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A Hatton-Brown Publication

Co-Publisher: David H. Ramsey Co-Publisher: David (DK) Knight Chief Operating Officer: Dianne C. Sullivan Publishing Office Street Address: 225 Hanrick Street Montgomery, AL 36104-3317 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 2268 Montgomery, AL 36102-2268 Telephone: 334.834.1170 FAX: 334.834.4525

Volume 42 • Number 10 • December 2017 Founded in 1976 • Our 439th Consecutive Issue

Renew or subscribe on the web: www.timberprocessing.com

Executive Editor David (DK) Knight Editor-in-Chief: Rich Donnell Managing Editor: Dan Shell Senior Associate Editor: David Abbott Associate Editor: Jessica Johnson Associate Editor: Jay Donnell Art Director/Prod. Manager: Cindy Segrest Ad Production Coordinator: Patti Campbell Circulation Director: Rhonda Thomas Marketing/Media: Jordan Anderson Classified Advertising: Bridget DeVane • 334.699.7837 800.669.5613 • bdevane7@hotmail.com Advertising Sales Representatives: Southern USA Randy Reagor P.O. Box 2268 Montgomery, AL 36102-2268 904.393.7968 • FAX: 334.834.4525 E-mail: reagor@bellsouth.net

Midwest USA, Eastern Canada

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ISSUES

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NEWSFEED

Make Yourselves Right At Home U.S. Still Winning On Softwood Lumber

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MACKEYS FERRY SAWMILL

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SECOND LOOK

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MILL ROOTS

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MURRAY TIMBER

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SAW TECHNOLOGY

The Jones Boys Finally Get It Right More Photos Of IdaPine Mills

New History Feature Spotlights Hancock Lumber Ireland Mill Has An Edge On Competition BGR, Simonds, Williams & White, Cut Tech, Burton

COVER: Mackeys Ferry Sawmill in Roper, NC has been a successful work in progress for (left to right) Stephen Jones, J. Wilson Jones, Jr. and Wilson Jones III. Story begins on PAGE 14. (Jessica Johnson photo)

John Simmons 32 Foster Cres. Whitby, Ontario, Canada L1R 1W1 905.666.0258 • FAX: 905.666.0778 E-mail: jsimmons@idirect.com

VISIT OUR WEBSITE: www.timberprocessing.com Western USA, Western Canada Tim Shaddick 4056 West 10th Avenue Vancouver BC Canada V6L 1Z1 604.910.1826 • FAX: 604.264.1367 E-mail: tootall1@shaw.ca

Member Verified Audit Circulation

Kevin Cook 604.619.1777 E-mail: lordkevincook@gmail.com

International Murray Brett Aldea de las Cuevas 66, Buzon 60 03759 Benidoleig (Alicante), Spain Tel: +34 96 640 4165 • +34 96 640 4331 E-mail: murray.brett@abasol.net

Timber Processing (ISSN 0885-906X, USPS 395-850) is published 10 times annually (January/February and July/August issues are combined) by Hatton-Brown Publishers, Inc., 225 Hanrick St., Montgomery, AL 36104. Subscription Information—TP is free to qualified owners, operators, managers, purchasing agents, supervisors, foremen and other key personnel at sawmills, pallet plants, chip mills, treating plants, specialty plants, lumber finishing operations, corporate industrial woodlands officials and machinery manufacturers and distributors in the U.S. All non-qualified U.S. Subscriptions are $55 annually: $65 in Canada; $95 (Airmail) in all other countries (U.S. Funds). Single copies, $5 each; special issues, $20 (U.S. funds). Subscription Inquiries— TOLL-FREE: 800-669-5613; Fax 888-611-4525. Go to www.timberprocessing.com and click on the subscribe button to subscribe/renew via the web. All advertisements for Timber Processing magazine are accepted and published by Hatton-Brown Publishers, Inc. with the understanding that the advertiser and/or advertising agency are authorized to publish the entire contents and subject matter thereof. The advertiser and/or advertising agency will defend, indemnify and hold any claims or lawsuits for libel violations or right of privacy or publicity, plagiarism, copyright or trademark infringement and any other claims or lawsuits that may arise out of publication of such advertisement. Hatton-Brown Publishers, Inc. neither endorse nor makes any representation or guarantee as to the quality of goods and services advertised in Timber Processing. Hatton-Brown Publishers, Inc. reserves the right to reject any advertisement which it deems inappropriate. Copyright ® 2017. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited. Periodicals postage paid at Montgomery, Ala. and at additional mailing offices. Printed in U.S.A.

Postmaster: Please send address changes to Timber Processing, P.O. Box 2419, Montgomery, Alabama 36102-2419 Other Hatton-Brown publications: Timber Harvesting • Southern Loggin’ Times Wood Bioenergy • Panel World • Power Equipment Trade

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THEISSUES

Rich Donnell Editor-in-Chief

THANKS FOR YOUR OPEN DOOR POLICY 14

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like to use this space at the end of the year to express my appreciation to all of the companies that opened their sawmills to our editors during the year. After all, nobody has to allow our editors to come in with their notepads and cameras, nor allow our editors to fire off dozens of questions at the managers, supervisors and mill floor operators, nor allow our editors to walk through the log yard and the sawmill and the planer mill while taking a hundred photos along the way. In fact, some companies don’t allow it, but we’ve always felt it’s their loss not to participate in the world of sawmill exchange. Numerous times companies that may have had some doubts about letting us in but ultimately acquiesced, have come back to us after the article appeared in print and told us it was a major morale booster for their employees and they wanted to order enough copies of the magazine to give to those employees. Frankly, many of the companies that don’t play ball have developed a bit of a reputation for a lack of, how can I put this, sawmill efficiency. You can’t blame them for not wanting the publicity if their latest capital expenditure isn’t delivering the returns they thought it would, and certainly they don’t want the limelight if safety issues have surfaced. Of course, some companies may not have any of these problems and just don’t want the publicity, and prefer to live in their own world. We’ll keep knocking on their doors. The following operations allowed our editors to play pitch and catch with them during 2017: l Associated Hardwoods, Gaffney, South Carolina l Fruit Growers Supply, Yreka, California l Battle Lumber, Wadley, Georgia l Maeder Bros., Weidman, Michigan l Oaks Unlimited, Waynesville, North Carolina l Biewer Lumber, Newton, Mississippi l Jordan Lumber & Supply, Mt. Gilead, North Carolina l Jordan Forest Products, Barnesville, Georgia l Södra Skogsägarna, Unnefors, Sweden l Empire Lumber, Weippe, Idaho l Wagner Companies, Owego, New York l Canton Sawmill, Canton, North Carolina l IdaPine Mills, Meridian, Idaho l Mackeys Ferry Sawmill, Roper, North Carolina Our editors are always l Diaz Forest Products, Kingsley, Pennsylvania dressed for the occasion. l Bennett Lumber Products, Princeton, Idaho I should also mention that Timber Processing has an exchange alliance with Canadian Forest Industries magazine to reprint each other’s articles as we see fit. Indeed TP reprinted three of them. So let me also acknowledge the following operations that opened up to the editors of CFI magazine: l Downie Timber, Revelstoke, British Columbia l Teal Jones, Surrey, British Columbia l Resolute Forest Products, Atikokan, Ontario We’re looking forward to getting on the road in 2018. TP Contact Rich Donnell, ph: 334-834-1170; fax 334-834-4525; e-mail: rich@hattonbrown.com TIMBER PROCESSING

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NEWSFEED ITC NEXT UP IN SOFTWOOD LUMBER DISPUTE U.S. Dept. of Commerce announced affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations of imports of softwood lumber from Canada. “While I am disappointed that a negotiated agreement could not be made between domestic and Canadian softwood producers, the United States is committed to free, fair and reciprocal trade with Canada,” said Secretary Wilbur Ross. “This decision is based on a full and unbiased review of the facts in an open and transparent process that defends American workers and businesses from unfair trade practices.” The Commerce Dept. determined that exporters from Canada have sold softwood

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lumber to the U.S. at 3.20% to 8.89% less than fair value. Commerce also determined that Canada is providing unfair subsidies to its producers of softwood lumber at rates from 3.34% to 18.19%. Commerce has instructed the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to prepare to collect cash deposits from importers of softwood lumber from Canada based on the final rates. The International Trade Commission must now make its final determination, scheduled in December. If ITC agrees with Commerce, the Commerce duties collection process will proceed; if ITC rules there is no injury, there will be no penalty or duties collection. In a preliminary ruling this summer ITC said it

found a reasonable indication that softwood lumber products from Canada materially injured American producers due to subsidies and dumping. In 2016, imports of softwood lumber from Canada were valued at an estimated $5.66 billion. Commerce calculated final subsidy rates for Canfor Corp., 13.24%; Resolute FP Canada, Ltd., 14.70%; Tolko Marketing and Sales Ltd. and Tolko Industries Ltd., 14.85%; West Fraser Mills, Ltd., 18.19%; J.D. Irving, Ltd., 3.34%. Commerce established a final subsidy rate of 14.25% for all other producers/exporters in Canada. Commerce found that Canfor, Resolute, Tolko and West Fraser were dumping at margins of 8.89, 3.20, 7.22 and

5.57%, respectively. Commerce established a final dumping margin of 6.58% for all other producers and exporters of softwood lumber from Canada. The petition was filed on behalf of the Committee Overseeing Action for Lumber International Trade Investigations or Negotiations (COALITION), whose members include: U.S. Lumber Coalition, Inc. (DC), Collum’s Lumber Products, L.L.C. (SC), Hankins, Inc. (MS), Potlatch Corp. (WA), Rex Lumber Co. (FL), Seneca Sawmill Co. (OR), Sierra Pacific Industries (CA), Stimson Lumber Co. (OR), Swanson Group (OR), Weyerhaeuser Co. (WA), Carpenters Industrial Council (OR), Giustina Land and Timber Co. (OR),

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NEWSFEED and Sullivan Forestry Consultants, Inc. (GA). “We are pleased the U.S. government is enforcing our trade laws so that the U.S. lumber industry can compete on a level playing field,” says U.S. Lumber Coalition Co-Chair and Co-President of Pleasant River Lumber Co., Jason Brochu. “The massive subsidies the Canadian government provides to their lumber industries have caused real harm to U.S. producers and their workers.” West Fraser released a statement: “Together with other Canadian forest product companies, the federal government and Canadian provincial governments, we categorically deny the U.S. allegations and disagree with the preliminary countervailing and antidumping determinations. Canadian interests continue to defend the Canadian industry in this U.S. trade dispute. Depending

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on the outcome of the final phase of the investigation, Canadian interests may appeal the decision. Shortly before the ruling, the U.S. Lumber Coalition appointed Jason Brochu and Joe Patton as Co-Chairs of the Coalition Board of Directors. Brochu is Co-President of Pleasant River Lumber Co., headquartered in Dover-Foxcroft, Maine; Patton is Vice President of Wood Products of The Westervelt Co., Tuscaloosa, Ala. They succeed Charles Thomas III of Shuqualak Lumber, Shuqualak, Miss.

CANADIAN FIRMS THINK GREENFIELD Two Canadian-based companies, both in recent years having purchased and now operating multiple sawmills in the U.S. South, are consider-

ing building greenfield sawmills in the South. Interfor reports it has completed a detailed feasibility study and business case for a greenfield sawmill capable of producing in excess of 200 MMBF annually and has identified a potential location in the Central Region of the U.S. South. Interfor estimates the total capital cost to be approximately US$115 million, including pre-startup costs and working capital. A decision on the project is expected in early 2018. Canfor reports it is conducting a detailed viability study of a greenfield opportunity at one of several locations in the U.S. South. The mill capacity currently being considered is 250MMBF annually. The study is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2018, with a final decision to follow.

In addition, Interfor has been working on a multi-year strategic capital plan that will involve a number of projects, both large scale projects that involve the rebuilding of a number of machine centers, plus a series of smaller debottlenecking and optimization projects with attractive paybacks. For 2018, discretionary spending is expected to be in the range of $100 million, and the company is proceeding with projects at two of its sawmills in the U.S. South that involve spending more than US$60 million, which are designed to increase production by 150MMBF annually. Those projects appear to be a $16.5 million investment at its Meldrim, Ga. sawmill, focusing on eliminating a bottleneck at the back end of the operation and includes the installation of a new continuous dry

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NEWSFEED kiln and upgrades to the planer mill. Lumber production is expected to increase by 50%, in addition to improving product quality and mill efficiency. Interfor also plans to invest $46 million to upgrade and modernize its sawmill in Monticello, Ark. The project includes the installation of new state-of-the-art machine centers in the sawmill as well as upgrades to the planer mill and a new continuous dry kiln. Annual lumber production is expected to double. Canfor said its board has also approved a US$125 million capital investment program focused on its U.S. South sawmill operations to increase production capacity by 350 MMBF by the end of 2019. The investments will target a number of sawmill and planer modernization opportunities along with increased drying capacity.

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CLEAN POWER PLAN IN DOUBT U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt has issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) for the repeal of the “Clean Power Plan (CPP).” After reviewing the CPP, EPA has determined that the Obama-era regulation exceeds the Agency’s statutory authority. “The Obama administration pushed the bounds of their authority so far with the CPP that the Supreme Court issued a historic stay of the rule, preventing its devastating effects to be imposed on the American people while the rule is being challenged in court,” Pruitt says. “Any replacement rule will be done carefully, properly, and with humility, by listening

to all those affected by the rule.”

POTLATCH, DELTIC COMING TOGETHER Potlatch Corp. and Deltic Timber Corp. announced they have entered into a definitive agreement to merge into a Timberland REIT with major wood products production capacity. The combined company will be named PotlatchDeltic Corp., with Potlatch stockholders owning 65% of the new company, and Deltic stockholders owning 35%. The combined company, which is expected to have a total enterprise value of more than $4 billion, will employ more than 1,500. It will have a timberland portfolio of approximately 2 million acres, with 1.1 million acres in the U.S. South, 600,000 acres in

Idaho, and 150,000 acres in Minnesota. The company will operate eight wood products manufacturing facilities, including six lumber manufacturing facilities, one medium density fiberboard facility and one industrial plywood mill. The company will have lumber capacity of 1.2 billion BF, with over half of the company’s capacity being produced at its three southern yellow pine sawmills. Deltic previously operated sawmills in Ola and Waldo, Ark. and a MDF plant (DelTin Fiber) near El Dorado, Ark. and owned 530,000 acres. Corporate headquarters will be maintained in Spokane, Wash., with the Southern operations based in El Dorado, Ark.. The transaction is expected to close in early 2018.

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NEWSFEED IFG PURCHASES TRICON TIMBER

Idaho Forest Group reports it is acquiring Tricon Timber’s stud mill operation in St. Regis, Mont. According to Erol Deren, Idaho Forest Group VP of Sales & Marketing,  “The St Regis sawmill acquisition supports our continued growth and will be an excellent strategic addition to our existing operations in northern Idaho.”

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Tricon Timber, which began sawmill operations in Wyoming in 1985 (a mill since sold), started up the St. Regis sawmill in 1992 and today it produces more than 100MMBF annually. Tricon Timber recently invested $5 million in its planer mill, including a new planer and sorter. The operation was featured in the December 2016 issue of Timber Processing. The mill becomes IFG’s sixth sawmill, the first one outside of Idaho, where IFG is headquartered in Coeur d’Alene. IFG was formed in 2008 upon the merger of Riley Creek Lumber and Bennett Forest Industries.

AUTOLOG BUILDS ON 30 YEARS Quebec-based sawmill equipment manufacturer Au-

tolog is celebrating 30 years in business. Autolog has been offering expertise and solutions to the wood processing industry for large corporations and entrepreneurs around the world since 1987. Autolog’s first commercial offerings were supplying industrial controls such as lumber and log sorters. Over the years, Autolog continued to add products to its lineup and rapidly gained worldwide recognition for offering solutions in optimization, automation and vision. “Today’s team of 100-plus professionals is made up of highly dedicated specialists who live up to the Autolog principles of Quality, Technology and Customer Experi-

ence,” the company states. “We plan to build on our reputation for innovative solutions, quality products and customer experience for many more years to come. “

TEMBEC MERGES INTO RAYONIER Rayonier Advanced Materials Inc. has completed the acquisition of Tembec Inc., combining two cellulose businesses and diversified product offerings in lumber, paper, paperboard and newsprint. The combined company will operate under the name Rayonier Advanced Materials. Tembec brings 3,000 workers spread out over 17 operations, including numerous sawmills, in Canada, the U.S. and France. Rayonier will continue to operate a Canadian headquarters in Montreal.

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AROUND

THEGLOBE By Jessica Johnson

North Carolina’s Mackeys Ferry Sawmill knows hardwood lumber on a world scale.

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ROPER, NC he Jones family has been sawing lumber in coastal eastern North Carolina since the 1930s, as J. W. Jones Lumber Co. in Elizabeth City. It was predominantly a hardwood mill at its inception, but ultimately evolved into a pine mill when the family through a series of auction purchases in 1987 acquired an antiquated hardwood/cypress mill in nearby Roper— Mackeys Ferry Sawmill.

The Mackeys Ferry mill was, in its heyday, a gem in the fiber rich coastal region. But when the Jones family purchased it, the mill was a wreck. “It was a nice mill in 1959, but in 1987 it wasn’t a very nice mill,” Wilson Jones, III, says of the purchase. “We spent the next year rebuilding some of it just to get it running.” Jones remembers that in the first few years, key pieces of machinery had to be updated, including spending a year on the log line putting in a debarker. But it

After 30 years of piecemeal capital improvements, the Jones family has finally designed Mackeys Ferry with the machinery they want.

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wasn’t just the machinery that needed to be updated; the sawmill itself was still a wooden based structure and needed to be converted to steel in areas to replace rotted wood. It’s been a somewhat slow process, Jones says, but the family has gotten every old piece of machinery and building structure out of Mackeys Ferry and made it their own—starting in 1990 when a boiler and dry kiln was installed and the old carriage was rebuilt. In 1995 and ’96, respectively, a linear positioning carriage and optimized trimmer and sorter were introduced to the production line. A second dry kiln was added in the late 1990s, followed by a third kiln in 2001, at the same time as a USNR edger. Two more kilns were added in 2015. “Last year we finally made the sawmill ours and took out the last old piece of machinery, a resaw system. Took us 30 years, but now its our mill from that standpoint,” Jones brother Stephen says. Previously, the resaw system in use

was installed in 1959, and had been rebuilt and rebuilt and rebuilt, the brothers say. After a while, it became obvious a change had to be made, Stephen says, after the old system gave everything it could. “We needed to do something more, and get more productive,” he says. After beginning a wide search, Mackeys Ferry was able to narrow down their choices for a new resaw system to two companies, before selecting USNR. Wilson Jones says previous purchases with USNR weighed heavily in the decision, as did the flexibility of the controls, but it was ultimately the availability of spare parts—an offer the Joneses could not refuse. “You have to realize we went from an older resaw system that had three guys working around it, which meant we had to keep five guys in order to have the three to run the system. We went from the Wright Brothers airplane to a 747,” Jones remarks. For the Jones family, it wasn’t just the machinery upgrades and ongoing (almost endless) project work around the mill that

had to be done. In order to combat the struggling economy of 2007, Jones had to think outside of its traditional sales box.

EXPORT SALES For Mackeys Ferry, the trouble with the Great Recession started appearing in 2007, and at about that time Jones (an Appalachian State graduate) received a letter from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Kenan-Flagler College of Business. “We were scrambling for something, looking at what we could do and what we need to be doing,” Jones recalls. “They have a program where a team of MBA students come and do a consulting project for you if you apply.” The STAR Program, something that Kenan-Flagler does each year, would select Mackeys Ferry for 2008—bringing a team of six MBA students and their faculty adviser to Roper to help Mackeys Ferry see itself not only through, but out, of the Recession. Wilson says originally the team was

PLC controls are one of the many reasons the Jones family took their time in choosing machinery.

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Stephen Jones

J. Wilson Jones, Jr.

Wilson Jones, III

tasked with helping to build some cost models, so Mackeys Ferry now has the ability to figure out profitability down to individual SKUs. The team also worked on a feasibility study for a dry kiln addition. “We didn’t get around to doing that until eight years later,” Jones says, laughing. But the biggest thing the project team helped Mackeys Ferry with was pushing the boundaries of export. In the 2007-08

time frame, Mackeys Ferry was exporting some lumber through U.S.-based wholesalers. The team’s faculty adviser, a former vice president of Asia Operations for Coca-Cola, Pat Garner, encouraged the Jones family to “build their brand,” in Asia and consider selling through more direct channels. It was a hard concept for the Joneses to consider. Jones remembers telling Garner the opposite, that he didn’t want to build the

brand and sell more directly in Asia. “In order to build the brand someone has to go over there and travel around. He told us, all you have to do is go over there and see. We had potential here because we’re an American product and they want American stuff,” Jones says. Garner reminded the Jones family that developing a brand is not so much the logo as it is the reputation. Wilson admits he and Stephen were originally bogged

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Jones likes USNR machinery, citing the amount of flexibility in the controls.

down by the idea that Asian customers often need very large amounts of material, something a sawmill doing 13-15MMBF annually can’t handle. But Garner pointed them to a parable: They didn’t want to find a big whale of a customer. As a little Eskimo when you kill a whale you’re only going to eat a little part of it. That whale is going to rot. Instead, they need to find six salmon so they’re always eating fresh food. Ultimately, the potential margin, thanks to not using a domestic wholesaler, proved too lucrative to ignore. Garner’s coaching didn’t hurt either. Wilson, 55, and Stephen, 51, had a cutthroat game of rock, paper, scissors (as brothers often do when they need to decide something important) to decide who would cross the oceans to attend an AHEC (American Hardwood Export Council) meeting in Saigon “to just see about it.” Wilson says his first trip to Saigon proved that Garner was right: He was the only American at the meeting no one knew, but that didn’t stop a Chinese man from asking questions. Fast forward three months of emailing and talking back and forth and Mackeys Ferry shipped a container to China to, as Stephen puts it, “Wilson’s buddy he bellied up to the bar with.” Wilson laughs, saying once the ship left everyone sat on pins and needles: “Next thing we know, we got paid! And we made more money.” From 2008 onward, Mackeys Ferry has used a combination of direct foreign agents as well as domestic wholesalers. “We are going to sell to whoever is going to pay us the best dollar and then get our receivables back,” Stephen says. The customer base, mainly in China and Vietnam, purchases most hardwood produced at Mackeys as well as selected grades of pine from the family’s mill in Elizabeth City. Wilson says it’s not been extremely easy selling to Asian markets, but he’s grateful he took the leap to go to Saigon initially. “We’ve got a good group of customers. We’ve done a lot of work to change what we’re doing to meet the customers’ need. It’s a two way street.”

MILL FLOW

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Changing how the mill produces lumber started with the needed improvements and upgrades to the mill. Things were done piecemeal, but now Stephen estimates annual capacity to be in the 1315MMBF mark, a change from the previous 7-9MMBF before the addition of

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the resaw system and new package kilns in the last two years. During the winter Mackeys Ferry will cut some pine, but predominantly remains a hardwood mill cutting cypress, ash, white oak, red oak, poplar and soft maple, keeping pace with 6-7,000 feet per hour. Logs are procured within a 120 mile radius, logged by Mackeys Ferry contract loggers. Stephen says the company purchases both standing timber and land and timber—preferring tracts that have a balance of pine and hardwood. “During the recession we phased out our logging crew; it was a bucket to throw money in,” he quips. In the eastern coast region of Carolina, before microchip-and-fuel-pellet big dog Enviva came on the scene, loggers in the area had a hard time finding markets for hardwood pulp thanks to mill closings. That hurt Mackeys Ferry’s log supply. Stephen explains, “Enviva can influence the loggers to the point that the logger will switch and concentrate more on pine. From a hardwoods perspective that sometimes will affect us.” Now, two hardwood pulpwood mills in the region have reopened, more loggers are able to harvest heavy hardwood tracts. In order to keep a stable invento-

The majority of lumber is shipped via container out of Norfolk, Va.

ry, Mackeys Ferry processes eight to 10 trucks per day of 10-16 ft. length logs. Product mix includes some metric sizes in times past, Wilson says, but stays standard with 4/4 through 12/4 varying thick-

nesses, with some pallet cants and industrial products sawn as well. Trucks pass scales, are unloaded and then logs are stick-scaled on the Doyle scale, then sorted for grade, length and

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Wilson, III, a self-proclaimed “green sawmill guy” enjoys talking with Stephen, based in Elizabeth City, about happenings on the floor of Mackeys Ferry.

species in rows on the log yard. Once enough wood of a certain species and grade has been accumulated, logs are loaded into the mill to a 38 in. Beloit/Alco ring debarker and MDI metal detector before being kicked to a McDonough 48 in. linear positioning carriage with USNR optimization, Lasar scanning system and a 6 ft. McDonough band headrig. Kerf across Mackeys Ferry is .170 in., with circles at .140 in. A Tyrone-Berry hydraulic shotgun with two 150 HP motors drives the carriage. When the hydraulic shotgun drive was installed in 2005, it was believed to be one of the last remaining steam powered drives in the state of North Carolina still in use. Cants are kicked to the new USNR resaw system with 6 ft. Letson & Burpee design bandmill, with as Wilson puts it, “the fancy” PLC controls from USNR. Sideboards flow to USNR/Schurman three-saw edger with a reman head and Applied Theory optimization. Green lumber travels across a USNR/HEMCO trim-sort-stack line with Applied Theory optimization. A stick placing stacker provided by Lunden/Moco/Bid Group handles lumber from the green and dry trim-sort optimized line that the family helped design alongside USNR in the mid-1990s. The line tracks both green and dry lumber, alternating lugs on demand. The system’s PLC keeps track of which lugs are green and which are dry, communicating with a Lucidyne GradeMark reader and USNR/Applied Theory scanner to determine decisions. Boards flow through the grademark into one of two trimmers, one 20

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designated for green lumber and one for dry. Saws in the green trimmer are at -1 ft., 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 ft. intervals up to 20 ft., while the dry trimmer only goes to 16 ft. (the maximum length Mackeys finishes). Thanks to real estate concerns, Jones explains, the sorter is installed below, having boards load from the top, move to the end and u-turn. Green boards are dipped with Lonza/Arch product before going to the air yard and the kilns. Lumber is dried in one of five kilns, depending on species—which includes two package kilns put in place in the last two years. In total, Mackeys uses three USNR/Irvington-Moore track kilns and two SII package kilns. AES wood gasifying furnaces with Industrial Boiler Co. pressure vessel provides steam for the kilns. Once dried, lumber is brought back across the USNR/HEMCO line to be reinspected and stacked for inventory. Dry packs of lumber go to a compression station for strapping and banding. Since most of Mackeys production is export for Asian flooring and furniture makers, the planer mill doesn’t stay too busy. A Yates-American A20-12 top and bottom profile planer does most of the work, supported by a McDonough resaw—mainly for cypress pattern work and some hardwood dressing.

PERSONNEL A great advantage the family has is being able to share key employees between Mackeys Ferry in Roper and J.W. Jones Lumber in Elizabeth City, 45 min-

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Two package kilns were installed in 2015.

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utes apart. Stephen mainly stays in Elizabeth City, but does travel over quite a bit; Wilson stays in Roper and moves over when needed. Stephen reports that many key employees live in Elizabeth City and will travel back and forth as well. “We have a good support group,” Stephen explains. “Our financials come out of Elizabeth City, provided by our bookkeeper, Thad Forehand, and our vice president of administration, Mark Delosreyes. Everything is in good hands between the staff in Elizabeth City and the staff in Roper.” Wilson and Patricia Mitzke handle most sales out of Mackeys Ferry in Roper. Veteran Cecil Richardson is Mackeys Ferry’s mill foreman and maintenance supervisor, supported by veteran production supervisor Willie Godfrey. Planer, yard and sorter departments are supervised by another industry veteran, Rick Smith. Hardwood log procurement is under the capable watch of John Mitzke. The Elizabeth City-based company electrician, Terry Morgan, handles electrical work on a needed basis. Millwrights are contracted out, and veteran Bob Gaston does all controls and programming work. The round saw shop in Elizabeth City handles all round saws; veteran filer James Downs files BGR and Oleson band saws using an Armstrong grinder and Iseli leveler, distributed by Oleson Saw. “We do a lot of experimenting on the best type of saw to run on the bandmills,” Wilson says. “Currently, we run a 14 ga. saw on the headrigs and either a 13 or 14 ga. on the resaw with differing gullet capacities. We’ve been able to really finetune how we saw. We don’t have a big fancy, formal maintenance system. But TP what we have works well.”

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IDAPINE

SECONDLOOK

Family-owned Idapine Mills’ new planer mill in Meridian, Id. graced the cover of Timber Processing’s November issue. Extra photos above show the level of automation in the new plant, and photos opposite page show the Krogh family’s Evergreen Forest Products sawmill in New Meadows that feeds the planing facility. The pine and fir mill, managed by Mark Krogh, right, has benefited from recent kiln and edger upgrades. (Dan Shell photos) 24

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Hancock Lumber Goes Way ‘Way’ Back Oxen and men of Hancock Lumber

By May Donnell

W

here the State of Maine whittles its way into a fine southern point, with Casco Bay to the east and the White Mountains to the west, sits the town of Casco in Cumberland County, population 3,700 not counting the moose. Portland is less than an hour up the road. Boston is two and a half hours south. It’s a scenic, woodsy place that nearly triples in population when the weather turns warm and summer camps and posh resorts ramp up.

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Before Maine became an official state (1820), it was ruled by neighboring Massachusetts. Because much of Maine was uninhabited by whites at that time, politicians in Massachusetts got in the habit of giving away large chunks of it to pay off debts, especially to soldiers who helped put down the Micmac, Wabanaki and other Algonquian-speaking tribes native to the region. Casco started out as a portion of one such payment. Casco is home to the Hancock family. They’re into lumber like Santa’s into gifts. American author Nathaniel Hawthorne, who moved to nearby Raymond in 1816, described one of the reasons this locale, known as the Sebago Lake Region, was a nice spot for starting up a lumber business: “That part of the country was wild then, with only scattered clearings, and nine tenths of it primeval woods.” Another asset was its abundance of fresh running water and plenty of it. Rivers, streams, lakes and ponds hydrated the terrain, making the region a Mecca in those days for water-powered mills. In 1832, the Cumberland and Oxford Canal was finished, linking Sebago Lake directly to Portland and the stage was set for Nathan Decker and his younger brother, Spencer, to begin building in 1848 a sawmill along the Crooked River. It cost $850 or about $24,000 in today’s prices, depending on which model you use. The Decker brothers had deep roots in Cumberland and adjacent York County. They were the fifth generation of the land rich, trade goods selling Decker clan. According to family records, the brothers’ great-grandfather, David Decker, helped dump the tea into Boston Harbor. Hancock Lumber maintains the original October 24, 1848 written agreement between the Decker brothers and Ambrose Wight, calling for Wight to build a dam and sawmill “upon the Meadow Brook” on Decker-owned land, “the mill in all respects to be built in as good style and the same as William Webb’s sawmill in Casco, and the whole to be done in a good workmanlike manner and the dam warranted to stand five years against all freshets.” The Deckers agreed to furnish Wight all of the necessary joists, timber and plank for six dollars per thousand, as well as roundwood for four dollars per thousand feet, and Wight could use the stones from the Decker land for the dam. The agreement said Wight would complete the mill by March 20, 1849. In Boston, two years after the Decker brothers commenced sawing logs, Sumner Hancock married Hannah Stuart. Hannah was a native of Harrison, about 10

Hard work in Hancock Sawmill, 1940

miles from Casco. Sumner, however, died in 1855 at age 31, just nine months after the birth of their first child, a son they named Sumner Orrin Hancock. Meanwhile, in 1859, the two Decker brothers started cutting their own timber from a 4,000 acre tract and floating it down the Crooked River to Sebago Lake where they sold it wholesale. They certainly made a go of it. In the 1860 U.S. Census, the two roommates reported that they had land worth $8,752 (at a time

when land could go for less than 50 cents an acre) and another $4,450 in cash ($133,000 in today’s dollars, again depending on method of calculating). Now-fatherless Sumner Hancock had a rocky start in life, but things picked up considerably when in 1870 his mother, Hannah, married Nathan Decker and Sumner’s Uncle Spencer left the woods to go into the grocery business. Sometime later, however, Sumner fell ill and was listed in the 1880 census count as in-

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Kenneth Hancock

David Hancock

firm and bedridden. At age 25, he was living with and dependent on his mother and stepfather. Then, apparently, he got over it. In 1881 he married Bertha Tukey and went back to work. Sumner and Nathan Decker were a good team. They took the business to a whole new level when they began using horses to haul portable sawmills to the logging sites. Sumner’s son, Milton, was born in 1887 and a dozen years later, Nathan Decker passed away at the age of 86, leaving the business to Sumner, whom he had raised as his own. By 1920, Milton Hancock was running the show and along the way changed the official name to M.S. Hancock Lumber. Milton built the company’s first stationery mill, powered with diesel fuel until electricity came. That site was adjacent to where Hancock Lumber’s current admin-

Early mill site in Casco

Granite pilings for the original water sawmill in Jugtown Forest 30

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Kevin Hancock

istration office building is in Casco, which was also the site of the company’s first retail store. The “original” mill site is a few miles away, located off a trail in Jugtown Forest. After Milton passed away at age 57, the reins of the company were handed to his oldest son, Kenneth. Under Kenneth’s watch, timberland management practices were put on the front burner and the Hancock family business ventured into retail. Kenneth died at age 67 while vacationing in Florida (oddly, his grandfather Sumner had died in 1934 while vacationing in Florida). Following Kenneth’s death in 1976, his son, David, took over and during the boom years of the mid to late 1980’s upgraded the Casco mill and built a new one in Pittsfield, all while growing the retail side of the business, expanding company-owned timberlands and venturing into real estate development. Asked about the company’s operating philosophies, David once said, “My dad was terribly strong on openness, honesty, fairness and saying what you truly believed, being loyal to your employees, community, industry, country. Those aren’t the operating philosophies of a company I guess; they’re more a way of life.” David Hancock was also known across the country as an activist for the industry and for spearheading the development in 1990 of the American Forest Resource Alliance to counter negative sentiment being pushed by well-funded preservationist groups. “A commodity that is very important to a large segment of the American society is an endangered species,” said David at the time. “We can’t sit this one out

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Owen Hancock

any longer.” David received Timber Processing magazine’s Man of the Year award in 1990. David passed away in 1997 at the age of 55 and today his son Kevin has taken over all facets of the company. In addition to completely changing the way Hancock sells lumber (We’re no longer about making products for the market,” he says. “We’re about making products for specific customers.”) and keeping tabs on an ever-changing array of technologies, Kevin has found time to author a book about his life-changing experiences among the Lakota Indians of South Dakota. The book, “Not for Sale, Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse,” relays the reasoning behind Kevin’s shift in business philosophy following a rare voice disorder and a “vision quest” out west and especially at the Indian reservation of Pine Ridge. He credits the changes he has made to Hancock Lumber’s strong performance in recent years and he credits his experiences out west among the influences that led to his making the changes. “For years prior to my first visit to Pine Ridge, Hancock Lumber had been pursuing ‘Lean’ and ‘Six Sigma’ efficiency initiatives, which were valuable

to our company. The problem with this traditional path, however, is that most companies simply use the extra capacity created to just do more work. This seemed mathematically powerful but spiritually empty to me.” Kevin goes on to explain what he calls the “Higher calling of Lean.” “Over a three-year period…we reduced the average work week at Hancock Lumber from 48 to 41 hours, while simultaneously increasing employee take home pay.” Today, the company that started with an $850 sawmill manages 12,000 acres of its own, employs 475, operates three modern sawmills, 10 retail lumberyards and a timberland management division. The company is a past recipient of the Maine Family Business of the Year Award, the Governor’s Award for Business Excellence, and was the Maine International Trade Center’s 2011 Exporter of the Year. The company was named the ProSales national Dealer of the Year in 2017. For the past four years, Hancock has been named in a statewide survey as one of the “Best Places to Work in Maine.” Family Business magazine lists Hancock Lumber as the 71st oldest family TP owned business in America.

Sawmill agreement, 1848 TIMBER PROCESSING

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COLLABORATION SOCIAL SCIENCE

including my family, didn’t get the big paydays that clearing it all would garner, but it was still more than enough. This may not work in all areas. I understand that. It does, however, work very well in our fire-prone forests of the intermountain west.

PUBLIC LANDS By Russ Vaagen

I

’ve been thinking about this for many years. As a teen I remember wondering why people were fighting about managing our forests. Of course, I understood the concern over heavy-handed clear-cutting, but I wondered why there was anger over the other types of logging that worked in concert with the needs of the forest. Where I grew up, many of the private forestland owners managed their land so that they could be proud of what it looked like after it was logged. This meant leaving many trees behind, so the forest looked natural. Managing forests is a social science rather than a purely physical science. I always called it uneven-age management. This referred to leaving trees in multiple age classes after harvest. Sure, it didn’t result in the same type of financial windfall that cutting every last tree would. What it did do was create happy or at least neutral neighbors. Over the long haul these landowners,

Much of what I am writing about here is most applicable on public lands. I am in favor of private property rights and landowners’ ability to manage their resources to the fullest extent of the law. That doesn’t, however, give landowners who manage aggressively to do so without public criticism. That criticism must be outweighed by the financial return. The public is never going to love clearcutting square edged, un-natural looking landscapes. Working to convince people of your position when they have no perceived benefit is foolish in my opinion. I always thought looking at a forest as a crop was a misguided approach. At least where I grew up. I always looked at it as constant management. In my mind it was pretty simple. You have a minimum stocking level and a maximum. Anytime the forest approached, reached or exceeded that maximum level it was time to manage it. Depending on the location and the sensitivity of the site you would manage it, but strive not to exceed the minimum stocking level. Fortunately, the forests recover with time, but if managed well there really wasn’t a recovery peri-

od. Just a shift from high levels to acceptable lower levels. It was about 10 or 15 years ago I started thinking about forest management as a social science rather than a physical science. Managing forests are as much about how people feel about the forest as it is about growing trees. Today I am convinced of this idea. I know there are those out there who will argue with me and say we need to let the “professionals” do the work. To that I would respectfully disagree and argue that we need a balancing act of professionals from many disciplines. Some of those have to do with managing people and relationships rather than just trees.

JERRY FRANKLIN Recently, a forester from New Jersey named Bob Williams sent a video to me. It was of the renowned forest scientist, Jerry Franklin, talking to a group of New Jersey foresters. I would suggest you look for it on YouTube if you’re interested. Jerry has been historically very hard on the forest industry; however, in this video he talks about this idea of forestry being a social science. His talk underscores the need to get to a place where the public is generally comfortable with where we manage as well as how we manage. We could benefit from a clearly defined system of the upper and lower stocking levels for each forest. When people are confident that the work is bal-

“I always thought looking at a forest as a crop was a misguided approach. At least where I grew up. I always looked at it as constant management.”

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COLLABORATION “Our public lands are so out of balance that we need to do far more management than we are currently capable.”

of everyone concerned to make our forests healthier, safer and more beneficial to our rural communities. The impact to log supply could be significant if we can figure this out. Managing our federal forestland for what’s needed, balanced with what the community wants will yield far more than the status quo. Over the long term, practicing this social science will result in managing more land and producing more

volume than the traditional alternatives. I don’t expect everyone to agree with me, but you should consider thinking about TP this issue differently. Russ Vaagen is a third generation sawmiller with his family’s company, Vaagen Bros. Lumber, in Colville, Wash. He is also the founder of www.theforestblog.com that specializes in topics focused on collaboration and the state of forests and industry. E-mail him at: rvaagen@vaagenbros.com.

ancing the needs of the people with ecological impacts we will be able to create a scalable solution.

SCALABLE SOLUTION Scale is a serious issue that needs to be addressed. Our public lands are so out of balance that we need to do far more management than we are currently capable. We are beyond the upper limits of stocking in most of our public forestland. It desperately needs to be brought back within the natural limits and quickly. This is one of the major factors in our out-of-control wildfire situation. It’s not just climate change, it’s too many trees and too much brush. Those things are all fuel for fires. If we can bring the forests closer to their lower acceptable limits, these fires will behave much differently. The forests will survive and thrive with the fire. Not only will this benefit our forests, it will drastically impact our state and federal budgets. Imagine if we could reduce our firefighting crews by half, create safer, more manageable conditions during fires. If we could do that, why wouldn’t we? I think people fail to believe the solution is so simple. We must reduce the fuels in ways that match up with the values of the public—balancing the needs

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EDGER SYSTEM BOOSTS MURRAY TIMBER New EWD line replaces two edger lines at Ireland mill. By Martina Nöstler

“W

e looked at several EWD optimizing edger systems in Germany. We really liked the solutions,” explains John Murray in regard to the decision to invest in a new EWD line at his firm’s sawmill in Ballon, Ireland. It represents the first time that EWD has delivered to Ireland. The schedule was very tight and the space was restricted. Murray opted for the high-performance OptiDrive TAE edger optimizer with skew and slew sawbox. Murray Timber operates two sawmills in Ireland with a total log intake of around 520,000 m³ per year. In Ballon, the focus is mainly on lumber for home building. A reducer quad band saw with secondary resaw and two optimized board edgers had been in use, but had reached capacity limits. The new OptiDrive edger from EWD replaces both edger systems, though the second machine remains in use for emergencies. Murray stopped the old edger on December 13, 2016. Production continued for the most part on the main machine and second edger optimizer to minimize losses. “We were able to maintain 60% of the production. We had a very ambitious, but feasible schedule. The planning and the execution were perfectly planned by EWD, meaning that we could start up again on January 24, exactly as planned,” Murray explains. The exchange was thus successfully completed within seven weeks, including a break over the Christmas period. Full performance was reached just one week after commissioning. The side boards reach the OptiDrive edger from the right side. The system can process boards with lengths ranging from 3.7 to 6.3 m. “The sawing height is between 16 and 55 mm, whereby Murray’s main size is 44 mm,” explains Thomas Lang from EWD. He managed the project at Murray Timber together with Project Manager Christopher Wolf. The unedged board width ranges from 120 to 550 mm. After separation, the boards can be turned on the manipulation table, cross-cut or rejected via a sorting flap, on demand. The boards are then transported laterally through the pre-scanning system. This system determines a preliminary board shape and open face, in order to position the board optimally at the infeed table. The OptiDrive is EWD’s high-performance optimizing edger. It has a feed speed of up to 420 m/min. To accelerate the boards to this speed, all centering rollers and every second pressure roller are driven. In linear mode, the boards then pass through the scanning system. Two cameras scan each board from top and bottom—800 scans per second result in perfect board data. Within split seconds, the Microtec optimization system calculates the best edging solution for the skew and slew EWD TAE edger. “This machine enables a skew and slew solution

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Pre-scanned alignment on EWD edger infeed table

Happy about the smooth process, left to right: EWS Project Manager Christopher Wolf, Joseph and John Murray, and Thomas Lang, EWD Sales

Singulation in front of Ireland’s first EWD optimizing edger system

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of up to 15 cm on a length of 6 m,” Lang says. This gives Murray a lot of options for optimization, enabling the company to increase the yield. “Along with improvements to the band saw and the sorting line, we expect an increase of around 20% in output, due to the new edger,” Murray says. For 4.8 m long boards, the output is around 50 boards per minute. Murray Timber uses the OptiDrive with a 3 saw edger to edge and rip boards. The edging separation takes place automatically: The boards are transported on a chain, which positions itself according to the edging solution. The edgings fall down on the left and right on the vibrating conveyor. John Murray is positive that the EWD edger is the best solution for the sawmill. “The performance of the edger is great. It provides us with better product quality and we have been able to increase efficiency at the same time. We process considerably greater quantities with just one system as we did a few months ago with two. It is a fantastic investment.” In addition to the Ballon mill, Murray Timber operates a sawmill at Ballygar. Founded in 1977, Murray Timber’s managing directors include Paddy Murray and his sons Joseph, John, Patrick and DenTP nis. The company employs 165 overall.

Behind this housing, or to be more precise, under the motors, the actual TAE circular saw is hidden.

This article was written by Martina Nöstler for Holzkurier and is printed here with permission. www.holzkurier.com.

COMING

IN JANUARY Who will be Timber Processing’s 30th Annual Person of the Year?

The OptiDrive edger system runs automatically; the operator’s role is mainly to monitor the process and only intervene when necessary.

All centering rollers and several pressure rollers are driven in order to accelerate the board to a feed speed of up to 420 m/min. 38

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SAWTECH BGR Saws, Simonds Offer Kirschner BGR Saws and Simonds International have introduced the range of Kirschner saw tipping machines engineered for the North American marketplace. The LK Pro provides fully automatic brazing of pretinned carbide and PM12 saw tips on a compact footprint. Kirschner tippers are solid machines, easy to set up and use and built to last. The machines have a patented sortKirschner LK Pro tipping machine ing bowl, enabling a quick changeover and no plug ups. The touch screen interface includes icons for each saw type specific to your sawmill: VDA, VSS, Quad, Board Edger, Trim Sawmill, Trim Planer etc. No need to re-enter data each time. The tip removal cycle has received rave reviews from customers. The LK Pro is engineered for high production filing rooms and can be a stand-alone unit or paired with robotic loaders. The LK 800M is a manual unit with many of the same design innovations of the LK Pro. Don’t settle for yesterday’s technology. BGR Saws and Simonds use Kirschner machines in their own factories. Visit simondsint.com.

First KB Side Dresser Installed Williams & White Equipment reports that Weyerhaeuser’s operation at Dodson, La. has installed the first Kohlbacher Baracuda 750 side dressing machine in North America. “Our team is extremely excited to have the opporKohlbacher Baracuda 750 at tunity to bring the latest Louisiana sawmill German technology to the professionals in the North-American market,” W&W states. Features of the machine include: l Central electrical blade height adjustment l Saw blade clamping system, clamps the blade automatically tight when grinding l Grinding wheel is direct driven, eliminates vibrations and deep pass (heavy removal) operation is possible l Grinding heads are guided by pre loaded ball rail systems to assure optimum accuracy l CNC control The company Siegfried Kohlbacher was founded in Berchtesgaden, Germany in 1992, and the company has built two production halls since 2007 in Bischofswiesen, Germany, expanding machine construction capabilities. The company is now named Kohlbacher GmbH. Visit williamsandwhiteequipment.com.

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SAWTECH

STA Performs For Saw Filers

The Saw Tension Analyzer (STA) from Cut Technologies/Burton Saw & Supply is an electronic Go/No Go gauge for evaluating tension in saw blades. Once a saw has been tensioned to the requested parameters, the STA captures the information, giving the anvil man a base line to repeat and check. “Craftsmen using the correct tools achieve quality custom tensioned saws,” the company states. Mindful the industry is after faster speeds in the constant Saw Tension Analyzer—custom tensioning to match cusdrive for better recovery and tom designs pushing the saws to the limit without increasing deviation, the question is asked: How can this be accomplished? Paramount considerations are: —A flat plate alone will not run; settling for a generic tension will create extra work for the filer —The saw blades must have the right amount of tension to match the saw design and cutting conditions —The correct tension must stay consistent from the first saw to the last saw —Repeatable tension in each filer’s saws is a must Using a saw tension analyzer, experienced anvil men using the basic tools (straight edge, tension gauge, dial indicators) now have an added piece of equipment to assist with the repeatability of tensioning a saw. Visit cuttech.com. 

Band Wheel Grinder Is Safe The WBG-01 grinder is designed to accurately and safely grind band wheels by giving the operator a user-friendly touch panel that can be used several feet from the grinding area. Accuracy is maintained through the use of a computer servo-driven precision lead WBG-01 band wheel grinder has screw on the X-axis and a strength built-in. computer servo-driven ball screw on the Y-axis.  The WBG-01 rail platform is CNC machined from billet materials for added strength and rigidity. Features include: l Grinder can be operated from a safe distance l Precision linear rail system l Servo motor control on two axis l Touch panel for easy operator control l Ball screw provides accurate infeeding l Advanced computer control l Four adjustable speed zones Visit burtonsaw.com.

More SawTech on page 51

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MACHINERYROW

Sennebogen Turns 65, Still Family Owned

German-based Sennebogen recently celebrated 65 years of operation. “This company milestone is truly so well earned by the generations of innovators who have strived to make Sennebogen a world leader in material handling equipment,” says Constantino Lannes, President, Sennebogen LLC, Stanley, NC. The focus, as it has been since 1952, is on providing productive and cost-efficient material handling solutions. “A lot has changed over the past 65 years,” says Managing Director Erich Sennebogen, who along with his brother Walter Sennebogen comprises the second generation of leadership in the family-owned company. “In today’s globalized markets, we supply products to customers in over 100 countries on all continents. In order to stay ahead of the competition, we invest in our model lineup and our sites every year, and undertake modernization and expansion work.” At Straubing, Germany Plant 2, an expansion over the past two years has seen

namic development of our company,” says Walter Sennebogen, “and we are confident that our continued investment in the plant expansion will have a very positive impact on the company’s ongoing success.”

BID Group Buys Idaho’s Vibra-Pro Sennebogen operations in Straubing, Germany

the addition of 375,000 sq. ft. (35,000 sq. m) of new production and warehouse space. At the same time, machine shipping has been restructured, storage areas extended and logistics processes optimized and modernized. Today Sennebgoen has 1,400 employees at production and support facilities around the world, including the North American headquarters just outside Charlotte, NC. With machines ranging up to 350 tons, Sennebogen has always focused both on special customer-specific solutions and on individually configurable series machines. “Our customers are amazed at the dy-

The BID Group, Vancouver, BC, has acquired Vibra-Pro of Boise, Idaho. Vibra-Pro’s staff has a combined experience of more than 200 years in the application, design and manufacture of vibrating equipment for material conveyance applications. It will continue to operate from the existing facility in Boise. Established in 1983, Vibra-Pro has been providing products, installation and service in the forest industry for more than two decades and is a strategic and complementary addition to the suite of products that BID offers. “The acquisition of Vibra-Pro allows us to further expand our worldwide product offerings and enhance the turnkey solutions we provide for customers in North America,” says BID CEO Alistair Cook.

Delta Names Linn Regional Sales Manager Phil Lin has joined motion control manufacturer, Delta Computer Systems Inc., as a Regional Sales Manager covering Asia Pacific, with an initial emphasis on China. Lin comes to Delta with a background in engineering, sales, marketing and business development with more than 22 years of domestic and international experience gained at Intel, IBM and Sharp. Delta continues to expand in the Asia Pacific region including China, India, South Korea, Japan and Australia driven by an industrial base seeking automation products and Delta’s best-in-class family of RMC motion controllers.

Kenworth Sales Remodels Lewiston Dealership Kenworth Sales Co. recently unveiled its $4.95 million remodeling and expansion of its Lewiston, Idaho, dealership at a grand re-opening celebration with more than 200 customers, company representatives and community leaders in attendance. Kenworth Sales C. operates at 21 locations in Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. 44

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2017 EDITORIAL INDEX JANUARY/FEBRUARY The Issues Hunting The Big One. Page 5. Focused Leader Tim Biewer of Midwestern sawmill company Biewer Lumber is Timber Processing’s 2017 Person of the Year. Page 18. Staying On Course Downie Timber matches log supply to diverse product offerings. Page 28. Collaboration Canadian Lumber: The Bigger Picture. Page 34. Going After High-End Quality control on drying plays a big part at Siskiyou Forest Products. Page 38. Going For Speed, Value New edger line provides security for Norra Timber. Page 40.

MARCH The Issues Two Companies Go The Greenfield Sawmill Route. Page 5. From Dry To Green Associated Hardwoods, long known for its dry lumber proficiency, builds a sawmill from scratch. Page 12. Small Logs Fruit box Innovative Fruit Growers Supply pallet stock mill blends high-speed, high technology. Page 22. Sorters & Stackers Pages 32-34.

APRIL

Automated Sort Line Battle Lumber follows up on its successful timbers mill project with new trimmer and sorter line. Page 12. Back On Track The U.S. softwood lumber industry has rebuilt itself since the recession hit home 10 years ago. Page 18. After The Fire Maeder Bros.’ green sawmill burned to the ground in 2014 and within one year was back sawing hardwood. Page 26. Collaboration Want To Be Involved? Here’s How You Can. Page 36.

JUNE The Issues Time To Invest. Page 5. Truly Greenfield Biewer Lumber comes South to manufacture a different kind of pine. Page 13. Optimism Abounds Softwood lumbermen in the U.S. seem to have implemented capital improvement projects at just the right time, and are enjoying the benefits. Page 24. Collaboration Just The Facts Please, NAHB. Page 46. SFPA Expo News Pages 54-90.

JULY/AUGUST The Issues A Little Bit Of Sunshine. Page 5. Building Output The Jordan family team is high on production and the future of its operations in North Carolina and Georgia. Page 14.

Collaboration We Fight Fires, But Don’t Manage. Page 46. 2017 Lumbermen’s Buying Guide Pages 49-84.

SEPTEMBER The Issues Strength In Numbers. Page 5. Swedish Knowhow Swedish landowners association has long history with wood production. Page 14. Opening Faces Trip To NYC Helps Me Remember. Page 22. Empire Strikes Back Empire Lumber has recovered and prospered following a major fire with a new large log mill. Page 24.

The Issues The Outdoors Were In Good Hands. Page 5.

The Issues The Past Is Present. Page 5. DECEMBER 2017

Ligna Preview Pages 30-56.

OCTOBER

MAY ■

Better Trimming Teal Jones sees returns with versatile trimmer optimizer. Page 22.

Okay For Now Survey says hardwood lumbermen in the U.S. are cautiously optimistic. Page 26.

The Issues Ehinger, Fery, Whelan Left Their Marks. Page 5.

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Built For Export Oaks Unlimited focuses on quality and valueadded dried Appalachian lumber. Page 10.

Ultimate Rebuild After a major fire in 2014 at Wagner’s hardwood sawmill in Owego, the company has built one of the most impressive hardwood mills in the U.S. Page 10. Smaller But Stronger Canton Sawmill in western North Carolina isn’t the newest, but it’s hard working. Page 22. New Saw Line Green end upgrade at Tropik Wood complements Fiji building boom. Page 26. Collaboration It Shouldn’t Be Political Football. Page 34. Second Look: Empire Lumber Pages 36-37.

NOVEMBER The Issues I Suppose He Invented The Chip-N-Saw, Too. Page 5. IdaPine Mills Big Step Idaho’s Krogh family moves operations closer to market and grows the company with new planer mill. Page 8. Building Returns Resolute’s newest sawmill is experiencing many successes and overcoming many challenges. Page 16. Dry Kiln Success In South Africa Viljoens team up at Timbersoft and bank on Wagner. Page 24. Kiln Drying Pages 26-34. A Smooth Life For Logs New electro-hydraulic motion controller gives Western FP a boost. Page 36. Second Look: Wagner Companies. Pages 42-43.

DECEMBER The Issues Thanks For Your Open Door Policy. Page 5. Around The Globe North Carolina’s Mackeys Ferry Sawmill knows hardwood lumber on a world scale. Page 14. Second Look: IdaPines Mills. Pages 24-25. Mill Roots: Hancock Lumber Hancock Lumber Goes Way ‘Way’ Back. Page 28. Collaboration Social Science. Page 34. Edger System Boosts Murray Timber Page 36. Saw Technology Pages 40-42.

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ATLARGE SFPA Communications VP Wallace Retires

products in national consumer magazines. Producing public service announcements, radio spots, and making Concluding a multi-faceted 38-year TV appearances promoting local marketcareer with the Southern Forest Products ing campaigns followed. Assn. (SFPA), Richard Wallace is retirAfter Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Waling in December. lace became vice president Wallace arrived at of communications. “I’ve SFPA headquarters in June experienced the industry 1979 following a cirthrough many market cycuitous career path. His cles. It’s an amazing incollegiate years led to a dustry, with a rich history film production degree of legendary leaders,” he from Southern Illinois Uninotes. “I want to thank all versity at Carbondale and a the SFPA board members stint in the Peace Corps I’ve had the pleasure of making agricultural trainserving, the many industry ing films in Morocco. and media friends I’ve Richard Wallace Back stateside in Atlanta, come to know, and the he responded to SFPA’s great team of coworkers newspaper ad seeking an audiovisual I’ve enjoyed collaborating with at the ofspecialist. fice all these years.” Wallace brought his film and photog“It has been a pleasure to work with raphy skills to SFPA, producing slide Richard during his 38 years of service to shows for the field staff and multi-image the southern pine industry and SFPA,” presentations for member meetings. Pro- comments SFPA Executive Director moted to media director, He coordinated Tami Kessler. “We appreciate Richard’s publicity projects featuring members’ dedication to SFPA and the industry and

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wish him the very best as he retires, and beyond.” SFPA Chairman Kerlin Drake of Canfor Southern Pine comments, “On behalf of all members, I want to recognize Richard for his many contributions to our industry and thank him for his dedication and the creative work he has provided SFPA throughout his career.” Erin Graham joined the staff in March as SFPA’s new Communications Director, and assumes Wallace’s responsibilities.

Brown, Jorgenson Step Up At Boise Boise Cascade Co. has promoted Mike Brown and Nate Jorgensen to senior vice presidents in the Wood Products Div. Brown has worked at Boise Cascade for 18 years, starting his career in Timberland Resources before moving into various operational management positions within Wood Products. He currently leads the manufacturing operations for the Division, which includes 22 mills across the U.S. and Canada.

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ATLARGE Brown earned a bachelor’s degree in forestry from Australian National University and an MBA at Cranfield University in the U.K. Jorgensen has more than 26 years of experience in the industry, with past positions in engineering, product development, sales and operations. He joined Boise Cascade in 2015 as a marketing manager, and currently leads the engineered wood products sales and marketing organization. Jorgensen received a bachelor’s degree in civil and environmental engineering

from the University of Wisconsin and an executive education through Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth University. “I’m really pleased to announce these promotions,” states Dan Hutchinson, Executive Vice President, Boise Cascade Wood Products. “Mike and Nate have earned this opportunity by driving important changes in the division, as well as showing strong commitment to our values, including leadership in significantly improving our safety performance.”

Italian Glulam Producer To Supply Stadiums Italian company and a leader in glulam timber production, Rubner Holzbau, is collaborating with Bear Stadiums, a consultancy and design company, to conceive and design the stadiums of the future: modular, made of glulam, low environmental impact, comfortable and totally green. Due to its mid-capacity, the stadium is cost effective and will be implemented in six to eight months rather than the 1824 months necessary for traditional sized stadiums. It will cost 1,500 euros per seat (2,000 euros per seat in smaller formats) versus the 2,500/3,000 euros per seat for traditional stadiums. The dramatic reduction makes this solution suitable for seismic areas or areas exposed to hurricanes and typhoons. "We see a huge demand in the world for medium-capacity stadiums, ranging from 5,000 to 20,000 seats, which actually represents 80% of the global market for this type of infrastructure," explains Jaime Manca Di Villahermosa, creator of this new format and co-founder of Bear Stadiums. The stadiums should replace existing structures made from reinforced concrete or metal that become dilapidated in just a few decades, resulting in high maintenance costs and low appeal to the public and fans. “Given the significant development of HD television technology which drives us to watch games comfortably seated on

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the sofa at home, it is necessary to build a new concept of beautiful, comfortable, safe and easy-to-assemble stadium, whose structures express well-being, serenity and are gaining more and more ground,” Di Villahermosa says. Claudio Rustioni, CEO of Rubner Holzbau, says the stadiums will be built with certified wood from sustainably managed forests. In particular, glulam enhances the structural capabilities and allows the development of innovative design solutions with efficient engineering qualities. “The production and installation of glulam wood structures result in low energy consumption that contribute to reducing CO2 emissions into the atmosphere and to respect the environment," Rustioni says. Rubner Holzbau was one of the first companies in Central Europe to specialize, more than 50 years ago, in the production of glulam. It has production facilities in Bressanone, Calitri and Ober-Grafendorf. It also produces roof panels and walls, crosslaminated wood panels and wood and glass facades. Bear Stadiums is a consultancy and design company based in Rome. Over the years Bear Stadiums has developed numerous patents for prefabricated glulam wood assembly systems.

Proposed Pellet Mill Receives Air Permits Bord na Móna, an Ireland power generation provider and renewable raw material resource supplier, has received an Air Quality Permit from the Environmental Protection Div. of the Georgia Dept. of Natural Resource for the construction and operation of an industrial wood pellet manufacturing facility in Washington (Wilkes County), Ga. The $80 million plant would include 10 pellet machines, two pellet coolers, three green hammermills, three dry hammermills, a natural gas fired double duct burner and natural gas fired rotary drum dryer, along with a regenerative thermal oxidizer for VOC air emissions control, according to the permit. Bord na Móna says the project could be operational within two years.

Vollmer Meeting Industry's Needs The last 12 months has seen some interesting developments in the sawmill sector. There remains strong concerns about the industry’s ability to attract new young workers while continuing to lose older skilled workers to retirement. Two factors are at play here: Automation in the filing room continues largely unabated while the introduction of new hightech machines has begun to attract the younger generation where previously filing jobs were considered old school, dirty and backbreaking work. Vollmer is ideally positioned to take advantage of both of these scenarios. The continuing basically strong economy, while some sectors still experience a troubling lag, is reflected in the number of new sawmills being constructed in the South. Vollmer is proud

Whitaker Is New Chairman Of SFPA

ATLARGE

Southern Forest Products Assn. (SFPA) elected its 2018 slate of officers during its annual meeting in Bonita Springs, Fla. The new officers are: Chairman, Donna Whitaker of Interfor U.S., Peachtree City, Ga; Vice Chairman, Steven Mason of Deltic Timber Corp., El Dorado, Ark; and Treasurer, Donny White of Ray White Lumber Co., Sparkman, Ark. The Board also reelected Tami Kessler as executive director and William Almond of Almond Brothers Lumber Co., Coushatta, La., to serve as immediate past chairman.. “I look forward to continuing the legacy of this association, working with the excellent staff at SFPA,” Whitaker says. “Our association is a strong voice in the industry, and I hope to build on that strength as we continue activities through the coming year.”

Biomass Power Plant Planned In Arizona Concord Blue Development (CBD) has contracted with Lockheed Martin to implement the design, engineering and construction of a biomass power plant in Eagar, Ariz. Lockheed Martin will serve as the engineering, procurement and construction contractor and provide supporting services for the $35 million project. Lockheed Martin has initiated a conceptual design and engineering process that is expected to produce a detailed procurement and construction timeline in early 2018. Requests for bids will follow once project specifications have been finalized. CBD’s power purchase agreement with Navopache Electric Cooperative (NEC) was amended in late September to adjust the commercial operations date of the plant to April 2020. NEC has an existing contract with CBD to purchase 1 MW of renewable electricity for the next 20 years.

SAWTECH to report it is involved in these plans either by supplying individual machines or complete filing rooms. To this end Vollmer’s RC110 automatic benching center has really come into its own with an expansion of its expert programming capabilities often resulting in drastically reduced processing times. In addition, this year has seen continuing acceptance of Vollmer’s GPA200 tipping technology, and particularly in large Canadian groups the strong introduction of Vollmer’s CA210 CNC wet grind band saw sharpeners, able to produce saws with unmatched sharpness. On the circular saw front, Vollmer’s new line of CHC/CHF 840 and 1300 line of top and face grinders and side grinders, all with 5-axis CNC control, Windows CE-based software, servo motors and now completely devoid of hydraulics, are taking the market by storm. They are quieter, faster, easier to operate and more accurate according to Vollmer customers. The machines with their accompanying services bring benefits to companies that process wood, plastic, aluminium or metal during production, such as sawmills, sharpening services, as well as small-batch manufacturers. Visit vollmer-group.com/us. TIMBER PROCESSING

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Contact Us Office 541.760.5086 Cell 541.760.7173 Fax 971.216.4994 www.acculine-rails.com george@acculine-rails.com

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• Rails straightened & ground in-place at a fraction of the cost of rail replacement • No down time for the mill • Restores carriage rails to optimum sawing efficiency •Precision Laser Alignment • Machining and Grinding • Carriage and Bandmill Alignment 489

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greenwoodimportsllc@gmail.com

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WOOD PRODUCTS marketplace NORTH AMERICA ■ United States

■ Kentucky HAROLD WHITE LUMBER, INC. MANUFACTURER OF FINE APPALACHIAN HARDWOODS

(606) 784-7573 • Fax: (606) 784-2624 www.haroldwhitelumber.com

■ Georgia Beasley Forest Products, Inc. P.O. Box 788 Hazlehurst, GA 31539 beasleyforestproducts.com Manufactures Kiln-Dried 4/4 Red and White Oak, Poplar, Ash and Cypress Contact: Linwood Truitt Phone (912) 253-9000 / Fax: (912) 375-9541 linwood.truitt@beasleyforestproducts.com

Pallet components, X-ties, Timbers and Crane Mats Contact: Ray Turner Phone (912) 253-9001 / Fax: (912) 375-9541 ray.turner@beasleyforestproducts.com

Ray White

Domestic & Export Sales rwhite@haroldwhitelumber.com

Green & Kiln Dried, On-Site Export Prep & Loading Complete millworks facility, molding, milling & fingerjoint line

■ Minnesota

Buyers & Wholesalers We produce quality 4/4 - 8/4 Appalachian hardwoods • Red Oak, White Oak, Poplar •

Green Lumber: Air Dried, Kiln Dried Timbers & Crossties • Hickory, Sycamore, Beech, Gum & Elm • Custom Cut Timbers: Long lengths and wide widths

Sales/Service: 336-746-5419

336-746-6177 (Fax) • www.kepleyfrank.com

■ Tennessee

STACKING STICKS

FOR SALE

AIR-O-FLOW profiled & FLAT sticks available Imported & Domestic DHM Company - Troy, TN 38260 731-538-2722 Fax: 707-982-7689 email: kelvin@kilnsticks.com www.KILNSTICKS.com

Next closing: January 5, 2018 ■ Indiana

■ North Carolina Cook Brothers Lumber Co., Inc.

Manufacturer of Appalachian Hardwood Lumber LEONARD COOK, Sales (828) 524-4857 • cell: (828) 342-0997 residential: (828) 369-7740 P.O. Box 699 • Frankin, NC 28744 NATIONAL HARDWOOD LUMBER ASSOCIATION

WANT TO GET YOUR AD IN OUR NEXT MARKETPLACE? Call or email Melissa McKenzie 334-834-1170 melissa@hattonbrown.com

08/17

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MAINEVENTS JANUARY

AUGUST

17-21—Appalachian Hardwood Manufacturers annual meeting, J W Marriott, Marco Island, Fla. Call 336-885-8315; visit www.appalachianwood.org.

22-25—International Woodworking Fair 2018, Georgia World Congress Center, Atlanta, Ga. Call 404-693-8333; visit iwfatlanta.com.

FEBRUARY

OCTOBER

6-8—Indiana Hardwood Lumbermen’s Assn. annual meeting, Indianapolis Marriott Downtown, Indianapolis, Ind. Call 317875-3660; visit ihla.org.

15-16—28th Annual WMI Workshop on Design, Operation and Maintenance of Saws and Knives, Holiday Inn Portland Airport, Portland, Ore. Call 925-943-5240; visit woodmachining.com.

6-9—Fimma-Maderalia 2016, Feria Valencia, Valencia, Spain. Visit fimma-maderalia.feriavalencia.com/en.

17-19—Timber Processing & Energy Expo, Portland Expo Center, Portland, Ore. Call 334-834-1170; visit timberprocessingandenergyexpo.com.

28-March 1—Ohio Forestry Assn. annual meeting, Embassy Suites, Dublin, Ohio. Call 614-497-9580; visit ohioforest.org.

MARCH 7-9—National Wooden Pallet & Container Assn. Annual Leadership Conference, Marriott Harbor Beach Hotel, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Call 703-519-6104; visit palletcentral.com. 8-12—IndiaWood 2018, Bangalore International Exhibition Centre, Bangalore, India. Call +91-80-4250 5000; visit indiawood.com. 22-24—Hardwood Manufacturers Assn. 2018 National Conference & Expo, Hyatt Regency Greenville, Greenville, SC. Call 412-244-0440; visit hardwoodinfo.com or hmamembers.org.

APRIL 11-12—Wood Bioenergy Conference & Expo, Omni Hotel at CNN Center, Atlanta, Ga. Call 334-834-1170; visit bioenergyshow.com. 13-14—Panel & Engineered Lumber International Conference & Expo (PELICE), Omni Hotel at CNN Center, Atlanta, Ga. Call 334-834-1170; visit pelice-expo.com. 22-24—American Wood Protection Assn. annual meeting, Seattle Marriott Waterfront, Seattle, Wash. Call 205-733-4077; visit awpa.com.

MAY 8-10—Western Wood Products Assn. annual meeting, Hyatt Regency Lost Pines Resort & Spa, Austin, Tex. Call 503-224-3930; visit wwpa.org. 8-12—Xylexpo 2016, Fiera Milano Rho Fairgrounds, Milan, Italy. Phone +39-02-89210200; Visit xylexpo.com/index.php/en. 18-19—Expo Richmond 2018, Richmond Raceway Complex, Richmond, Va. Call 804-737-5625; visit exporichmond.com.

JUNE 9-12—Assn. of Consulting Foresters of America annual meeting, Grove Park Inn, Asheville, NC. Visit acf-foresters.org. 54

DECEMBER 2017

Listings are submitted months in advance. Always verify dates and locations with contacts prior to making plans to attend.

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This issue of Timber Processing is brought to you in part by the following companies, which will gladly supply additional information about their products. ADVERTISER Andritz Iggesund Tools Burton Saw-Cut Technologies Colonial Saw Cone Omega Corley Manufacturing Eurobois 2018 Gilbert Products Grasche USA Hewsaw Machines HMT Machine Tools Holtec USA Hurdle Machine Works IndiaWood 2018 Industrial Autolube International Joescan Kanefusa USA Linck Linden Fabricating Longato Grinding Machines Lucidyne Technologies Mebor Metal Detectors Mid-South Engineering Muhlbock Holztrocknungsanlagen Nelson Bros Engineering Pipers Saw Shop Precision-Husky Premier Bandwheel Prinz GmbH Salem Equipment Sering Sawmill Machinery Simonds International South Carolina Forestry Commission Springer Maschinenfabrik GmbH Sweed Machinery Team Safe Trucking Telco Sensors Timber Automation Timber Machine Technologies Tradetec Computer Systems U S Blades Vollmer of America Wood-Mizer Woodtech Measurement Solutions

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TP 1217 Digimag  

The December 2017 issue of Timber Processing.

TP 1217 Digimag  

The December 2017 issue of Timber Processing.