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#PHOTOGRAPHY the online photography magazine

#11


#photography the online photography magazine

Issue 12

march

2015 curated by genea bailey & daisy ware-jarrett


inside this issue... luca tombolini

Camille Lévêque

Jelka von Langen

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30

52

Peter Byrne

Susan Swihart

Lewis Hadler

10

36

54

Sydney Sie

zine review

Tammy Mercure

16

thank you

40

58

Gina Nero

Angelica T Photography

MICHELE TASSINARI

20

46

62

Maggie Shannon

Parker Woods

Luca Sironi

26

50

64

111


Janne Parviainen 66

Lunakhods 86

Phoebe Kiely 104

william r. bullock

Cristina Coral

STEFANO BROLI

70

90

106

Jordi V. Pou

Fleur Alston

on the cover

74

94

110

Ryan

Saradjola

GABRIELE VIERTEL

index

80

96

interview

Duvan Carmona

thank you

100

112

82

111


luca tombolini ‘Landscape Studies’

I was born in Milan and completed classical studies at high school; then a degree in Sciences of Communication with a final assignment on visual rhetorics in Italian cinema. While studying at university I was introduced to photography and started experimenting with large format cameras. Since 2011, I’ve been making large scale prints; landscapes and real life scenes.

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My work stems from a pre-足photographic fascination with deserts, taking pictures became a self-足analysis of that early feeling. Notwithstanding our limited perceptional possibilities, these pictures are the mirror of this personal process of contemplation/suspension over time, space, existence, how should we consider ourselves in relation to the big entity we are part of?


Peter Byrne

‘Cowboys and the Landscape of the American West.’ 10


I studied at The Newport School of documentary photography in Wales. After graduating I worked with numerous national and international clients as an editorial photographer based in the North of England. More recently I have dedicated my time to travelling whilst exploring the art of medium format photography. I have exhibited various works in galleries across the UK.

Over the years the cowboys’ lifestyle has led to the creation of a mythical character, often stereotyped as a romantic hero or a hard drinking and brash troublemaker. My work looks at the role of the contemporary cowboy and his relationship with the land and examines how the land provides a perfect backdrop for individuals at one with nature, and how the peace and tranquility of the landscape mirrors the temperament of the cowboy.


Sydney Sie

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‘The Nothingness of Amelie’


I’m a photographer as well as a graphic designer, my artwork is often rife with gradient colour, optical illusion and everything about feminine. I wants my works to be bright but eerie, and include aspects of graphic such as colours that interest me particularly.

I like capturing surreal moments, all those moments or atmospheres I created through different analogue with or without a digital touch. I’m always searching an unique way to see the inside and the outside of things. Whether through multi-figured compositional complexity and suggestive narratives or with a straight forward and isolate human forms. There are autobiographical narratives at play very often.


Gina Nero ‘Leaving Hampton’

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I am an Australian Photographer living between Los Angeles, New York and Melbourne. My photography documents human intricacies and the social landscape. Since relocating to the US in 2013, I’ve used photography to find the calm amongst the chaos, which is very evident in my series ‘Leaving Hampton’. I’ve exhibited in solo and group shows in New York, Los Angeles, London, Melbourne and at the Australian Centre for Photography in Sydney. ‘Leaving Hampton’ - an ongoing introspective project documenting my adjustment to living in America. Simplicity paired with the abundance of light and colour express my need to find comfort and life in a place that is unknown to me.


Maggie

Shannon ‘West of the Sun’

I’m a photographer based out of Brooklyn, NY and Martha’s Vineyard, MA. In 2013, I graduated of the School of Visual Art’s MFA Photography, Video and Related Media program and received my BA in photography from Hampshire College in Amherst, MA in 2010. My work has been featured in Martha’s Vineyard Magazine, the Artist Catalogue, Alice Magazine, Musee and Nuvo among others. My work has also been shown internationally in Boston, New York, Birmingham, England and Harare, Zimbabwe. I’ve received an honorable mention in CCNY’s 2013 National Juried Competition by Juror Justine Kurland and was a winner of Magnum Photos 30 under 30 competition.

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In 2010 I traveled to Arizona and Southern California looking for a myth to photograph that would appease my childlike sense of wonder with the landscape that I had seen in movies and read in books. Though I knew that it could not exist, a small part of me refused to believe that as I searched for a specter of the past that was such a critical part of our American identity.


What I found instead was the transformation of a myth into kitsch, a history of harsh conquest and expansion that was transformed into a commodity. After this realization, my work became a reaction as an outsider to the landscape. I didn’t want to romanticize but to instead depict the unexpected landscape with the evidence and artifacts of a deteriorating myth.


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Camille Lévêque ‘DADS’ With DADS, I’ve ironically used photography to convey absence - a media often and almost automatically used to reframe memory. This project very much focuses on highlighting the loss of a relative, or their missing. As something physical and thus wishes to capture its essence.


Susan Swihart ‘About Face’

I’ve always been an observer and see images that tell stories even when my eyes are closed. I am a collector of memories and try to capture everything I can. I do this so that I cannot forget, but also to share it with others, so they will remember too. My family and our daily adventures are my greatest inspiration. My daughters are identical twins. With this work I explore the joys and struggles of growing up looking like someone else. The search for identity and place in the world, but the gift that this person has always been beside you. My images also reveal my challenges of being their parent - allowing for their individual growth while supporting their unique bond. As they become more comfortable being their own people and making their own choices, my photographs show their relationship relax and mature.

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Girls don’t

Volume One of Two | £4 | www.girlsdontzine.tumblr.com


Girls Don’t Do That is a non-profit zine making fun of societies expectations of women run by 22 year old London based photographer Joanna Kiely. In her words “when seen in a satirical light hopefully people see just how ridiculously we treat our women! A lifetime of living up to other people’s standards made me create this zine, one day I guess I saw it all in a different, very stupid light and didn’t want to withhold these standards anymore. I wanted to publish something that showed my point of view in a very light hearted but true light. I also wanted to do this in a way that involved young artists, I think it’s important to have spaces for young artists to be published.” Normally you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but in this case Joannas cover art is some of our favourite from the zine. Setting the tone for what follows, it combines aesthetically pleasing pastel tones with underlying commentary on issues surrounding female social stigma. Girls Don’t Do That Volume One is 38 pages of beautifully curated photography, illustration, anecdotes and poetry all with one thing in common, female empowerment. Not the feminist radicals of the past that fought

for civil rights but a new generation of equally intelligent young women that recognise modern day gender inequality and use satirical humour to express their dismay or celebrate a new feminine attitude. Notable work includes wonderfully vibrant images by Hungarian photo duo Iv & Candie challenging ideals of social female etiquette and taking a critical look at what it means to be a woman. They describe themselves as “charming, glamourous, trendy, loser, exaggerated, theatrical, banal, artificial, artistic, perversely-elvispresley, naive, middle-class-honest and martinparricide.” Private Tea Party by English artist Georgia Grace Gibson is a set depicting vintage china tea sets with gold ceramic flowers. These were traditionally owned by wealthy housewives and are symbolic of suppressed sexuality within middle aged women. This series was inspired by a conversation overheard between a group of boys discussing girls with pubic hair. After hearing one boy exclaim that he would never sleep with a girl that had pubic hair, Liv Thurley created


Weapon. With her use of pins for effect, this series reclaims feminine equality, girls need not be ashamed. Now we are a photography magazine but there are some other pieces in here that are deserving of a mention: Illustrations by Bridget Mayne Kate Ducker Daniela Kopeinig and Camilla Englund Anecdote by Milly Moreton-Cooper Poetry by Rut Guonadottir Girls Don’t zine is a great read and small enough to take with you wherever you go, what more could you want! Volume two has recently been published and we recommend grabbing yours fast before they sell out.

Volume One of Two | ÂŁ4 www.girlsdontzine.tumblr.com


Angelica T Photography ‘Touch’

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I am one of those artists who lives in a world apart. A friend once asked me if, when I walk around, I think all the time about what to photograph and that’s how my mind works. I’ve realised over the years that I have developed this inner strength that leads me to constantly live in a photographic world, almost unreal. I created this series to tell a story of two sisters that they have found themselves. The girls seem to live in a world apart, far from the moment of the shooting. There are a number of striking contrasts in the photos, which are united by the desire to be together.


Parker Woods

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My name is Parker Woods and I’m a 22 year old photographer living on the West Coast. My work consists primarily of portraits that I shoot all in film. I’ve never been a fan of digital photography and I feel film allows me to create my images rather than taking one to “perfect” in post production. These photographs were taken in Los Angeles in the style of a fashion editorial. The model, Britni Sumida, has a great edgy look that I thought would work well in contrast with the dark but soft aesthetic of the greenhouse.


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Jelka von Langen ‘Marianne’


Lewis Hadler ‘Tunisian Dream State’

Sometimes I take photos. Most of the time I don’t. I spent a month travelling Tunisia exactly one year after the Jasmine Revolution had ousted President Ben Ali and kick-started the Arab Spring. The photos were taken on a Kodak Retinette 1A with 12+ years out of date film and are intentionally void of human subjects; instead focusing on landscapes, scenery and history.

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Tammy Mercure ‘Cavaliers’

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I was named one of the “100 under 100: The New Superstars of Southern Art” by Oxford American magazine. I’ve been featured on CNN Photos, VICE, Daily Mail, NPR Big Picture Show, and more. I have a BA from Columbia College Chicago and an MFA from East Tennessee State University and am currently living in New Orleans, Louisiana. “The South is what we started out with in this bizarre, slightly troubling, basically wonderful country—fun, danger, friendliness, energy, enthusiasm, and brave, crazy, tough people.” —Bill Maxwell, “There’s no place like the South” Since 2008, I have been photographing some of the louder events in the Southeast United States. They have ranged from NASCAR races with 160,000 attendees to a group of 20 people recreating the stations of the cross. These events seem to show this area’s collective love of history and the land and their fierce independent spirit.


MICHELE TASSINARI

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‘ROCKS – OUT OF FOCUS’ My name is Michele Tassinari and I live in Modena, Italy. I love shooting analogue with my Holga, Olympus and Polaroid. My inspiration comes from movies, music and the art of nature. I prefer urban and landscape photography. The sun was high and the sky deep blue that day. I decided to go and see that beach with the rocks in Tuscany. The wind was blowing strong. The waves against the rocks. I took these pictures and finished the analogue film, I took the film and plunged into the sea for a few seconds. This is the result.


Luca Sironi ‘Cernusco, night and day’

I am a Milan based photographer. With my work I try to show that images can hide a lot, maybe memories, maybe a different point of view on something people usually find insignificant or not photographically relevant.

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These photographs are part of a larger project realised for the city of Cernusco sul Naviglio, a body of work composed by 30 pictures: 15 by Michele Ravasio during daytime, and 15 by me during the night. We were interested in the different faces that a single town can show, not only concerning the day and night diversification, natural vs. artificial light, but also as photography as a tool, photos of Ravasio are taken on black and white film. Mine are digital and colour.


Janne Parviainen ‘Light topography’

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I am an artist and a photographer and I love to push the boundaries between them. I use combination of forced perspective drawing and light painting in my photos very often and love the freedom of drawing in three dimensional space in my light art photos. In my photos I like to challenge myself as much as the viewer both in the technique used as well as the subjects I express in them. I started the light topography series out of curiosity to see what it would look like if I traced an entire room inch by inch with a single led light. After the first try I was immediately hooked to the technique and started to experiment how to take the technique even further. The exposure times in the photos vary from 15 to 55 minutes. All the photos are straight from the camera, no post processing of any kind has been used in them.


‘Alter’dEgo’

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I am a photo-media artist interested in aspects of abstraction, colour, 3D and sound. My works explore the separation, segmentation and fragmentation of modern life, including concepts of observation, perception, documentation and surveillance with a distortion of the quotidian. At a technical level I use multiple tools including cameras, paint, lighting and software manipulation. The Alter’dEgo series is part of an ongoing exploration of photographic abstraction. The original photos are of human models I painted with fluorescent paints and photographed under UV light. An exploration of identity, by giving the models a “second skin” they could express hidden aspects of themselves. My subsequent manipulation of the images continued that theme. These images were subsequently converted into a multi-channel installation and prints.


Jordi V. Pou ‘I-40’

The original project name was Graceland, which was a three part project. One of those was I40, a trip following the American highway I40. I was travelling along the I40 crossing all the USA heading Memphis starting from the west coast. It was a three month journey, alone, just taking pictures. Somehow it was an iniciatic journey as a photographer. The idea was to find “Graceland”, to find my own style and it worked. That way of taking pictures, subjects and everything was used for Kokovoko, which is a journey at home, finding oneself.

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Ryan Saradjola

I am 22, currently studying fashion photography at London College of Fashion. Within my work I like to develop a narrative and incorporate symbolism within my images. Although I study a fashion degree I am very interested in documentary and portraiture photography. I am intrigued with perception and representation of oneself.

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15 Questions with Aneta Ivanova By Ameena Rojee

‘Aneta Ivanova featured her enchanting series ‘Scars’ in #PHOTOGRAPHY issue 3, 2 years on, we catch up with her again to better explore her work, her inspirations and understand her practice.’ Ameena Rojee: Can you tell me a little bit about yourself? Where are you right now and what are you doing? Aneta Ivanova: My name is Aneta. I am a photographer by passion, a web developer by profession and twenty-two years old. I live in Varna, Bulgaria, but I am currently in Germany visiting my sister and working on some projects. AR: What made you want to become an artist? How did you get into photography?

AI: My mum mostly, I think. When I was a little kid I saw all her sketchbooks and was amazed by her drawing skills, then I wanted to be “like mummy” and started drawing and painting a lot. I got my first camera when I was 12 or 13 and fell in love with taking pictures and that was the beginning. It was a really cheap digital point-and-shoot camera, but it was like a whole new world to me! I am completely self-taught as I never got into art college. I just read and practised a lot!

AR: Your work ‘Scars’ was featured back in Issue 3; how did you come up for the concept for the work you produced? Is there a meaning behind the name? AI: I did a lot of experimental work before ‘Scars’. I was trying to combine two images, mostly two portraits and I was not sure if I liked the results or not. Then, influenced by the work of Dan Mountford, I combined photographs of my travels with self-portraits and portraits of my sister

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and that was the beginning of ‘Scars’. I gave it this name because I believe that each place we visit, everything that happens to us and everything we learn leaves a mark or a scar in our minds, deep inside. These images are my scars.

AR: Your double exposures are very beautiful. Why did you choose to work this way?

AI: I think I was bored of what I was doing before, which was a lot of conceptual work and portraits. I was searching for new techniques to express my ideas and I started playing with long and multiple exposures.

AR: What inspires you? AI: I would say that I find inspiration everywhere around me. I read, listen to music, look at art, go for long walks and dream a lot. One of my favourite photographers is Rodney Smith, but there are so many more! It is the simplicity of his work that I love; he is able to tell a whole story in such a simple and elegant way.

AR: So, you said that you are a web designer, do you find that graphic design inspires your photography?

AI: I think that my photography inspires my graphic design! In both cases, I am a fan of the total minimalism. Everything should be clean with a lot of white space. AR: Do you travel quite regularly?


“

I believe that each place we visit, everything that happens to us and everything we learn leaves a mark or a scar in our minds, deep inside. These images are my scars.

�


at least a few times a year. Right now it is pretty hard for me to stay in one place for longer than two months. I visited Venice this year; I was invited by Roman Tcherpak at Oi Va Voi studio. I was also lucky enough to do the Tour of Mont Blanc, which is a 10 day trekking tour in the Alps. I travelled a bit in Bulgaria, and now I am in Germany.

Technology gives us freedom if we know how to use it.

AR: Do you ever shoot film? Or are you mostly a digital user?

AI: I had a period of time where I was shooting film and it was probably the best way to learn the technical part of photography. Right now I am shooting mostly digital, but I do film from time to time because I enjoy it so much. I think that every photographer needs to shoot film only, for at least six months. In my opinion, that is the only way to start thinking before taking pictures. But I do not agree that film is better than digital; both have their pros and cons and I believe that every photographer should choose which one suits them best. Also, I think that technology gives us so many great opportunities, and we should not ignore it. Technology gives us freedom if we know how to use it.

AR: Which of your own works is your favourite and why? AI: I think that every time I create a new photo, it becomes my favourite one. Then I take a new one and new one… Of all my photography, I like ‘Under The Waves’ and ‘An Ode To The Sea’ the most because they are very personal, and took the most time and effort. They are dedicated to the sea, and I feel strongly attached to it.

AR: I also love your series ‘Under The Waves’, the colour is mesmerising. The decision to use colour in your double exposures, was it a recent one?

AI: There was no way to do ‘Under The Waves’ in black and white. I enjoy black and white more than colour, but this was an exception. So I had to experiment and shoot a lot until I got the results I wanted. But I think it was worth it.

AR: This [image right] is one of my favourite photographs of yours, can you give me a bit of behind-thescenes information about it? AI: The landscape for this image was taken in the Black Sea near my hometown, Varna. I used underwater housing for my camera and a lot of patience to get it. The model is my sister. I wanted to create a very personal project so I decided to do three photographs — one with me as a model, and two more with my two sisters. I’d had the idea for a long time. I was living in Germany, far away from the sea and I was missing it a lot. So when I got back home, I took the first chance to recreate what was in my head.

AR: I see you had work at a solo exhibition last year, was that a big event for you? How did it come about?

AI: It was very spontaneous but was also very special for me. It was in a gallery in my hometown and it was presented together with a poetry book for which I had created the photographs. It took me about a year to complete the project. It was quite a new experience to me, as I have never been the centre of attention until then. It was quite scary…

AR: What are you working on next? AI: Currently, I am working on a new series which are not double exposures! Other than that, I am preparing my next solo exhibition in Sofia, Bulgaria, which is going to be in July 2015. I will be showing my most famous photographs plus some new ones, which I have not shown yet. I wanted to take a lot of time to think about everything and make this one really special!


I am also working on doing final touches on a booklet that I am going to release soon.

advise to other photographers trying to get their work seen?

AR: If you could shadow one artist for a day, who would

AI: I would advise the other photographers to work hard, to use the social media and participate in competitions. If you think your work is good enough, then search for galleries, write proposals and do not give up — it will happen!

it be and why?

AI: I would really be interested to learn from the classical artists. It will probably not be a photographer, but a painter. I would really love to see the creative process of Gustav Klimt for example. I see photography only as a tool to express my ideas. I do not like to put limits on my imagination or work to fit in the description of photography or painting or whatever. If I need, I have the freedom to mix a few techniques until I get the result I want.

AR: You are very accomplished at a very young age — what would you

Thank you for answering our questions! I had great time, thank you!


Lunakhods We are two friends from Toronto, who decided to create this alter ego; Lunakhods. We try to make illustrations, music, and photos as much as possible. Recently we drove across North America making photos and collected field recordings. That was really amazing. Lots of colours, both film and digital, and a lot of computer editing. Editing photos is like editing sounds, it makes us appreciate the materials we already have to make something new.

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Cristina Coral ‘The other part of me’ “The other part of me’’ is a project that speaks about the hidden part of ourselves and about what we allow or don’t allow ourselves to be, show and reveal to the world. This project came from some reflections on the dichotomy between good and evil and about dichotomy realism-idealism, what you want to highlight in this context is the photo dualism of our time.

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Fleur Alston

‘Kit and Caboodle’

I believe strongly in the beauty of things and strive to reflect this in my images. I live in the South East of England with my husband and three children and I document them and the environment around me in my work. I suspect my images are strongly influenced by my self-conscious and the things that are happening to me, although I imagine this is how it is for everyone. “Only gradually did I discover what the mandala really is:...the self, the wholeness of the personality, which if all goes well is harmonious.” Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections. Jung spoke of the urge to produce mandalas at times of intense personal growth and as a way of rebalancing the psyche, the result is said to be a more complex and integrated personality.  I began producing these mandala like patterns and designs almost on a whim and an urge but I have ultimately stumbled upon the revelation that I am perhaps subconsciously rewiring myself, while ordering the world around me.


GABRIELE VIERTEL Originally from Germany I live and work currently in The Netherlands. Since 2011 I’ve been devoted to photography as a independent photographer, the main field of my activity belongs to fine art underwater photography. After introducing the first series to the public in 2013, I’m delighted that my work has been awarded in the category Fine Art followed by numerous international publications in art and photography magazines, a worldwide online coverage as well as features by

the Museum of Modern Art San Francisco. Meanwhile my works have been shown in exhibitions in New York, London, Amsterdam, Budapest and Malaga. Glancing into a life of something magical, into a realm of detachment where life is pure, full of pristine beauty. Emitting femininity and grace, there is a story of vulnerability and emotions of humanity behind each work. Time seems to stand still and the care of human world do not exist. The use of water creates a thought provoking mood, prompting the desire to know more.

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Duvan Carmona

Taking an intro to a film photography class at school may have been one of the most pivotal moments in my life thus far. Photography made me appreciate not only earth itself but also the moments I share with people. It motivates me to travel and adventure and encourage as many people to do so as well. These images were taken around May of 2014 in Argentina. My friend and I went on a 7 day road trip from Buenos Aires into the Patagonia on a mission to reach some glaciers and these are some of the moments I experienced on my way there.

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Phoebe Kiely

I didn’t come to university to learn how to be a photographer. I came to university to study. My story started at thirteen and I’ve not really stopped working since. My eyes have become more tuned and my vision of the world more refined. The series presented in this magazine is a small portion of a much larger edit. All the images happen to be from Manchester but in my final edit I have not constricted myself to one series. Every image selected was also taken at night. I am drawn to the aesthetic of images at night, but it is more about the process of working alone with very little human presence or distraction around me.

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STEFANO ‘Corse Corsica is a very ancient island, with prehistorical rocks, rumbling sea and a warm breeze. “Primordial Land” is a personal interpretation of witnessing the genesis of this land. When the sky was dark of dust, the light could just touch the rocks and the sea owned this land.

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BROLI Primordial Land’ I am a photographer, video maker and creative director of Phocus Collective LTD based in London. Born in Italy, I received a BA in Visual Arts and a Master degree in photography. Focusing my interests in travel and fine art photography I became an expert in getting lost in beautiful landscapes. Still looking for my way home, in the last years I have been awarded by National Geographic and Leica Camera Italy.


Wafaa Samir ON the cover

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I’m a photographer and artist based in Cairo, Egypt. My passion for photography started in 2010, after trying different photography types I found out that conceptual and mood are my favourites. My work is a reflection of subjects like identity, self-exploration and, city observation. I would prefer to use this statement to describe this series ‘Find what you fear the most. Drown yourself in it. Let it seep into your soul until it’s a part of your being. The more you embrace your fears, the more they turn into a blue serenity.’


Photographers index Fleur Alston Stefano Broli william r. Bullock Peter Byrne Duvan Carmona Cristina Coral Lewis Hadler Phoebe Kiely Camille Lévêque Tammy Mercure Gina Nero Janne Parviainen Jordi V. Pou Wafaa Samir  Ryan Saradjola Maggie Shannon Sydney Sie Luca Sironi Susan Swihart Angelica T Photography Michele Tassinari Luca Tombolini GabrieleViertel Jelka von Langen Parker Woods Lunakhods

www.cargocollective.com/fleuralstonphotography

www.stefanobroli.it www.yeeehah.com www.peterbyrne.co.uk www.cargocollective.com/duvancarmona www.cristinacoral.it www.lewishadler.tumblr.com N/A www.camilleleveque.com www.tammymercure.com www.ginanero.com www.jannepaint.com www.jordivpou.info www.be.net/wafaasamir www.ryansaradjola.com www.maggieshannon.net www.cargocollective.com/sydneysie www.lucasironi.net www.susanswihart.com www.facebook.com/AngelicaTPhotography www.micheletassinari.tumblr.com www.lucatombolini.net www.facebook.com/viertel.photomotion  www.jelkavonlangen.de www.parker-woods.com www.lunakhods.com


thank canada

USA 5

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U5K

germany

france taly i spain 6


We would like to say a BIG thanks to everyone who took part in this issue. A big part of this magazine is being able to bring creatives from all over the world together in one book. This map shows where all the photographers from this issue are based.

finland

you egypt

taiwan

Australia


www.hashtagphotographymagazine.co.uk hashtagphotography@hotmail.co.uk @Hashtagphotomag facebook.com/hashtagphotography


#PHOTOGRAPHY - Issue 12