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Issue 19 Editors

Genea Bailey Daisy Ware-Jarrett

Design

Daisy Ware-Jarrett

Writers

Joanna Sopyło-Firrisa Evan Merner Emily Valentine

cover artist Eva Penner


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14

Franco Sortini

Jenny Rafalson

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Inside this issue 18

Book Review Marion Kotlarski

Bradley Canfield

Danilo De Rossi

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52

60

Luca Ellena

Ruslan Isinev

Anne-Laure Etienne

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74

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on the cover Ilka & Franz

Katja StĂźckrath

Maksim Finogeev


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98

106

Karl Child

Nicolas THOMAS

Elise BOULARAN

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122

130

Laurent Henrion

alex agafonov

isabella sommati

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144

150

Feature Anna Tea

beyond digital

Luisa Nolasco

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166

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index Leticia Batty

Jui Kun Weng


A Neutral Place

Franco Sortini 6

I’m an Italian photographer, born in 1958. I produce colour photographs of landscape and architecture. My photographs are presented with a deadpan wit and always considering the tenuous balance between people and their surroundings. I work in series, photographing urban scenes. My use of color has been lauded for its capacity to express reality and the mediterranean light. How to conjure up a picture, for instance, of a town without pigeons, without any trees or gardens, where you never hear the beat of wings or the rustle of leaves, a thoroughly neutral place, in short?


Jenny Rafalson Russian Porcelain

I was born in the USSR in 1986 and immigrant to Israel in 1991. As an immigrant, I always find myself treading the line between two cultures: the first being the acquired Israeli culture in which I have learned to live, and the other being the Russian culture into which I was born and which I absorbed as a child, a culture in which I was ashamed for many years. The subjects of my photography are part of my life rather than emotionally detached objects, these are my immediate family, my present (Israeli) spouse, or baggage that they have brought with them. I have re-observed the personal belongings my mother and grandmother brought with them from USSR. The service sets of tea cups that ever since I can remember are kept locked like statues behind a vitrine. Those service sets have stopped being regular dishes and became sacred. A carrier of memories and stories as if it holds the family history. In order to take photos of them I broke their serenity. I moved them from their safe keeping but maintained the prestige as carriers of history. To me, this work has a sense of a public exposure about my hidden Russian identity, as kept by my mother and grandmother.

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Marion Kotlarski 18

SCHIZΩ


I’m a french photographer based in Paris. I work with portrait and fashion, and focus my work on the body, its abstract expressions and paradoxes. Schizo: fragment in ancient Greek. In this new series, I approach the issue of body fragmentation and, by extension, Schizophrenia. As a matter of fact, for some schizophrenics, the brain no longer considers the body in its entirety, and belonging to the same person. Body parts become independent from one another; True monsters that endanger the individual. I want to highlight the abyss they need to overcome in order to conform, the tension between the hostile, adipose, deformed perception of the body, and the structured, orthogonal, sharp outside world, where snatched limbs act as dams. I have favored a clinical approach, avoiding the spectacular and the emotionally excessive, without dissimilating the different stages of the creative process, as it seems vain and naive to represent madness through the eyes of those who suffer from it. Set design by Clement Ottenwaelter.


Bradley Canfield Penumbra

Eccentricity and oddity are two subjects I love to play with and try to identify in a variety of environments. Using a number of different approaches to capture scenarios or subjects that stray from the norm of day-to-day life grants me with an ability to share an alternate viewpoint. I try to offer provocation and avert clarity and resolution.

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Penumbra is an ongoing project that focuses on architecture’s interactions with light and how a building can present its self differently depending on thenlighting conditions. The careful framing of the structures in the viewfinder is a vital component in this project as it allows us to concentrate on the line, shape and form of a building.


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A Different Kind of City Photography Cityscape: The Dream of Modernity by Danilo De Rossi Written by Joanna Sopylo Firrisa Buy a copy on daniloderossi.com/shop

T

ypically, when I think of city photography I see perfect skylines and cliché street photos, but luckily that’s not the case in Danilo De Rossi’s tranquil new photobook “Cityscapes: The Dream of Modernity”. A collection of black and white images taken in Hong Kong and Shanghai, the emphasis here is on the architecture, angles, objects, lines, textures and atmosphere. As Danilo writes in the book foreword, “Spaces in-between buildings, narrow hallways, under flyovers (…) offer a real sensorial experience, where one’s mind eye is still able to caress materials and sink in textures. Here is where one can still find the beauty of the unexpected, almost an exotic experience in the modern globalised metropolis.” Indeed beauty is found in fishes displayed at the market, rain boots and a road cutting through a neighbourhood. Danilo loves the cities and you can clearly see it through his photographs. Even though modern cities can be lonely places and all look very similar, he loves every bit of it. Danilo makes some very timely observations by saying “While historical cities have the ruins of ancient civilisation at their centre, the world’s more modern ones seem to

converge in homogeneous collections of nameless buildings and interiors, offering visitors another angle making them feel different, he makes the most out of stainless steel, hidden roads and people.” As you open the first pages of the book you embark on a journey through mysterious modern city. It’s a city that never sleeps; a place that is dynamic and ever changing; a place that is majestic but so big that you can feel lost. Beginning journey you may feel as if you’ve been invited into Sin City or Gotham City but that’s only the first impression. Continuing through it feels as if you’re looking at an impressionist painting walking through it’s secret streets. Shot in Hong Kong and Shangai but I would’ve never guessed that without looking at the image index due to their timeless nature, they could have been taken anywhere at anytime. Every picture tells a story of its own while all of them show a full picture of the modern city playing on a contrast of black and white, light and dark with beautiful angles. You need a very detailed knowledge of the city and a good eye to notice those details and Danilo has both.


Flipping through the pages of the book I noticed a fascination with the city architecture and shapes. Something he’s been interested in since his childhood when he admired the silhouette of the gas cylinders trusses that dominated the landscape of an industrial area in Rome, where his grandfather was working.

There are times when you flip through a photobook and never get back to it again. That’s not the case with “Cityscapes”. Every picture is captivating and tells a separate story. You can find yourself going back to each picture again and again, finding something new every time.

“You need a very detailed knowledge of the city and a good eye to notice those details and Danilo has both” Later in life while traveling extensively, Danilo sparked an interested in documenting architecture, the sense of place and the relationship between the city and its inhabitants. Although photography is not his profession, it is a way to express his deep love for the cities, feeling for architecture and a great attraction for people and cultural diversity. Looking at his pictures you feel those deep feelings and you can see that he finds pleasure and fun in photographing modern cities…those feelings transfer to the viewer.

It’s certainly a great photobook to add to your bookshelf that will stand the test of time. Pick up a copy on www.daniloderossi.com/shop


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Luca Ellena

Human Leftovers

I am a young photographer living near a small town in Switzerland. With my photographs I try to document my surroundings, be it people, nature or urban environments. I shoot film as well as digital, depending on which project I am working on. The series Human Leftovers is a research about the question what we leave behind once we are gone. Do you know the answer?


Ruslan Isinev

In the light

I’m a 28 year old photographer living and working in Moscow, Russia. Primarily I shoot conceptual photographs but also enjoy shoot fashion editorials.

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Anne-Laure Etienne unspoken image Herbe Bleue

Stories of heavy shoulders and big heart, happiness at hand and unrestrained race, rebounds, fragility and unsaid (always).� The moving soul: the human being is the main subject of my photographs. This has naturally become a reality. A universe has settled. Sometimes it breaks away from the real situation and tells something else. I explore the territory of the image and its ability to transcribe a given state of reality as well as its symbolic and imaginary power. My work seeks to represent the perennial sensations: blooming, confinement and love. I thus sought to recreate metaphorical, imaginary and poetic scenes that are sometimes of the abstract order and sometimes closer to realism. This work is therefore the fruit of a photographic look through which I sought to account for the plurality and the convergence of being in general.

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Ilka & Franz Messy Eaters

We are a German/ Austrian photographer duo based in London (UK). We joined forces and started working as a duo in 2014. Our work blurs the lines between portraiture and still life as we discover a stillness in their living subjects and a human aspect in objects. We, who are partners in both work and personal life, are both largely self-taught. We art direct, shoot and retouch. “Most of our work begins with pen and paper when we sketch each shot. We often work with set, prop and wardrobe stylists to realise our vision.” - Franz Our work has been featured by Elle NL, Konbini, Trendland, Schön Magazine, Wallpaper Magazine and many more. We work on editorial and commercial commissions in the UK and abroad.

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The Messy Eaters series is a set of five portraits of people, who have just dug into some delicious and very messy food and have the remains smudged all over their mouths. Our aim was to create this situation that would normally be quite funny and embarrassing and still get each subject to sit down for a calm, considered and serious portrait. There is a hint of guilt in their eyes while they pose for quite a drawn out length of time. We are interested in how seriousness and humour can co-exist.


Katja StĂźckrath

On the cover

interview by Emily Valentine

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Hi Katja! You discovered photography at a young age could you tell us a bit about how this passion for image making developed? Hi there! Well, ever since I was a little girl, I’ve always wanted to be in the film industry. When I was 10 years old I told my parents that I wanted to be an actress but, later on I discovered that my place was on the visual side of the story and as a story teller.

I guess I enjoy putting a youth aesthetic on my pictures because this reminds me of how good it is to be a kid or a teenager. Everything seems so simple and as you grow older, some things change and become cooler but some things stay the same - it’s a melancholic feeling. I love photography with all my heart and soul, and I shoot with love, trying to reflect that passion within my photos and some of my themes.

I started taking pictures in my early teens when my Granny gave me her automatic digital Lumix camera. I used to grab it and take pictures randomly so she decided to give it to me as a gift for Christmas. When I was 15, I started making music videos so my parents gave me my first Canon (a t3i) which was able to use for both filming and photography. As the years went by, my passion for photography, film and fashion grew, and I started to do little photoshoots with girls from my town (Rada Tilly, Patagonia). They weren’t models but somehow they were special to me. Each person I photograph is special to me in an inexplicable way. I knew that when I finished high school I was going to study Cinematography in Buenos Aires and do fashion photography. And that’s what I do now! I imagine fashion stories and just do a photoshoot. They are my dolls for a few hours. Some of them are models and some are not - I just find people interesting. One of the things I love the most about photography is the people I get to know and their life stories. I also do street photography and landscapes but shooting people is what I enjoy the most. I mostly shoot fashion photography with a “cinematographic” look, and always try to express something through my images.

Youth and young love are some of the main themes within your work. How and why do you think these have emerged? I think that the youth theme is very present within my photos because I started photography as a teenager, and I’m not that far away yet from that girl so there’s still that sparkle on my photos. I try to tell what I know, what I’ve lived or what I would have liked to live (mixed with my imagination and thoughts, of course).

Your work focuses mainly on fashion and portraiture What is it about these mediums that you are drawn to? I love portraiture, there’s a connection when I look into the models eyes. I enjoy looking at the results and that’s what I think it attracted me at first. I try to capture the essence of the person and show it in a portrait. I want the viewer to feel what I feel when seeing the person I photographed. Fashion is a way of story-telling I’m still learning how to tell stories through photos, light and videos.

What or who inspires you when developing ideas for shoots? When it comes to inspiration, I find it mostly within movies and in photoshoots by photographers I really admire. Sometimes the inspiration comes from listening to music. I also love looking at online magazines, fashion films, Flickr, and Instagram accounts.

How do you develop such a close sense of intimacy between yourself and your models?


“I want the viewer to feel what I feel when seeing the person I photographed�


Probably England because it’s home and it’s my favourite place as well... I think it could be interesting to have Helena in the place I was born (Rada Tilly) too!

It makes me happy to see that my photos show a special bond of intimacy with my models. I always care for the person I’m shooting. I chat to them a lot before the shoot because I want to get to know them better. If the person feels comfortable with you, they’ll feel free in the photos and as a result will do their job better. In photography, trust plays a big part because not all people are the same or behave in the same way. I try to do personal photoshoots, and even thought the model/subject might be playing a photoshoot character, they will have something unique, such as an expression or pose.

What advice would you give to a young photographer just starting out?

If you could shoot anyone and anywhere, what would your dream photoshoot look like?

One piece of advice I would have to follow too is to trust in yourself, don’t let bad days get you down. We all have bad days because nobody is perfect (even if they appear to be!)

I have a huge list of “people I want to photograph”, so that’s a tricky question. Some of them seem far out of reach to me at the moment. But, if I had to choose one person from that list that I would really enjoy working with - it’s Helena Bonham Carter. She’s been my favourite actress (along with Dakota Fanning) ever since I was a little girl. She’s a chameleon and I think it would be an extraordinaire experience to work with her. And a place?

It might sound cliché but, always follow your instinct and what instil passion within you. Read, investigate, and be curious about everything because you can always learn something!

What can we expect from you for the year ahead? I have a lot of photoshoot ideas that are dancing around in my head with people I really want to work with. I also want to try and work for some magazines and do some film shooting to learn more technical stuff. Happily working!


Maksim Finogeev

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Unsoviet


Fashion photography for me is the language of modern beauty and esthetics. It helps me to define and formulate the stories that demonstrates glamour which hides true inner feelings of people and situations. That’s why I like to use collage technique to show of multilayered world.


With Daria Bondar (stylist), Oleksandra Trotsenko (model), Anna Naumenko (makeup & hair) I made a story about girl who was born in independent Ukraine but she is still under the influence of the Soviet past.


Shooting was in Kharkiv (first capital of Soviet Ukraine 1919-1934), in the art studio of Hamlet Zinkovsky, with a lot of artefacts from soviet period.


Karl Child Living with Sight Loss

I’m a British photographer currently living and working in the seaside resort of Blackpool, Lancashire. I received a Bachelor of Arts with honours Degree in Photography from the University of Central Lancashire in 2014. My work has taken me around the world documenting cultures and urban landscapes from Paris, Berlin, China and beyond. With works exhibited at the Louvre Museum in Paris, Venice Arts Gallery in California and published in printed format including Incandescent Magazine of Portland Oregon, I finds inspiration in artists including Eugene Atget & L.S Lowry. Evidently my work has progressed in recent years from urban observational material into a much more focused social form sharing stories of communities as seen in a new project, documenting Blindness in the North West. ‘Living with sight loss’ documents very personal and emotional journeys of several people within Lancashire who have experienced and are living with varying stages and severities of blindness. The work aims to challenge our perceptions of sight loss whilst informing and educating the viewer. At the age of 18 my mother lost her sight over night due to diabetes. A few years after her death I studied photography and wanted to use my camera to give something back to the Blind Society who had helped us during that time, and so the project began. I spent months contacting and visiting people, getting to know their stories and capturing them in their personal spaces. The project will never really be truly complete to me, I just hope it is able to raise awareness and crush stigmas attached to being blind. “It’s impressions about blindness that are far more threatening to blind people than the blindness itself” (Daniel Kish)

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Nicolas THOMAS No Vacancy

I was born in 1986 and started photography in 2010 by studying in Paris after having moved many times through France for my father’s work. I am attracted by the architecture since almost the beginning of my training but I “discovered� photography quite late and I consider myself lucky enough to have had the opportunity to get into this medium. I have been able to work with different types of photographers since and I traveled in several countries thanks to that. From now on I try not to avoid too much humans and rather to combine them with architecture. I am currently working on a series around the First World War.

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During the journeys I have been through in the past two years, I have compiled images of the many encounters I had and situations I have experienced. Whether it was in Norway or Cape Town, I was able to attend some special moments that attracted me and amused me for a moment. Here are some examples gathered in this series.


Elise BOULARAN

APACHE PALACE: fragments et projections I deliberately use a refined vocabulary and a language without any flourish, for images from the everyday life with a degree of abstraction, which erase all references points. This photographic work marked by ambiguity is in the form of fragments, strata, combinations. It takes place in research, experiment and questioning. I’m attracted by the non-formulated, which is of the unspeakable, the secret. How to make visible by the image what is hidden, how to put forward this invisible gesture? This reflection is always in my work. These representations are like some clues of an enigma, and they conjugate or oppose some meanings.

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Laurent Henrion Monolithe

My name is Laurent Henrion and I’m 24 years old. I’m a recent graduate of the school of arts of Saint Luc Liège (Belgium). I am an art lover in general. I love mixing my different references in order to create images that resemble me. I consider myself above all as a maker of images so as not to lock me in a precise style of photography. I dedicate my work to galleries and magazines. This is a series for which I continue to produce and which speaks of the feeling of desire in every sense of the word. I approach this series as a research / exploration of my relationship to this feeling. I puts in it sparingly the different cultures that have forged my vision of it.

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alex agafonov Black Ice

I started my creativity search in photography ten years ago when took my father’s analogue photo camera Zenit in my hands first time. For a few years I was taking photos only with analogue photo technique, later, I bought digital camera and attended short courses of digital photography. To my mind, digital technologies and blend of other forms of visual art created somehow new medium and perception of photography, made it more concept driven than contemplate. I’m mostly inspired by classic photographers, no matter if they worked in fashion industry or were war reporters. Maybe it also happened because I started practicing photography in Saint-Petersburg and visited lots of expositions, but now it is clear that my works have more retrospective, classic manner. This small photographic essay is about winter mood in general and winter 2016. Somehow, it combines composition and landscapes with city and rural area. Usually, during the summer time I do travel or participate volunteer projects abroad. But when my visa expires and my passport about to turns back into a “pumpkin”, I have to return - down into Russia.

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Winter is a time between depressive, post-travelling autumn and spring, full of planning and new hopes. Winter is for work, saving up and opportunities of not to get mad of monochromatic, cold reality around. From year to year situation is different but options are limited- or I’m in Saint-Petersburg or I’m in my small home town in Leningrad region. Only thing that constant- is my analogue camera loaded up with film. I spent last winter in Saint-Petersburg and paid short visits to my parent’s house. By that time used to work in quite a hippie place, so in the middle of frozen madness I managed to escape to Minsk, Belarus, for the week to “recharge” my mental batteries. Though Belarus was part of USSR, but environment and people are way open, simple and kind there. Catching up with friends and exploring the city turned out to be really revitalizing. One thing which I enjoy about winter is to look at the patterns on the ice. As my hometown is at the seaside and Saint-Petersburg has a great number of bridges over channels and rivers. Sometimes ice is like a landscape you see from the airplane; sometimes it is surrealistic mixture or just pure minimalism. As there’s nothing to see up in a plane-grey sky during the winter, sure thing it is fun just to have a glance on a thing, which used to be water. This state of mind, when everything seems to be trapped like a sheep somewhere on the way to the North Pole, firmly frozen in the ice; when all is simple: just black or just white. And waiting, waiting for the sun, expecting endless winter to be over one day.


isabella sommati BlackSea

I live in Milan, where I work as an art director for fashion and design firms. After 25 years of reviewing other people’s pictures, I decided to start taking photos by and of myself. Through photography I hope both to convey the world I live in, of which I am consciously a prisoner, and to find a way of communicating authentically, which is often difficult because of my strong sense of privacy.

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Summer heat, muggy weather, today is Sunday. The sea is far away, beaches are crowded, gasoline is too expensive, we can’t get away from the city. If we stay home, we will end up watching Formula One on TV, sleeping on the couch, sweating like pigs, empty beer cans on the floor, saliva dripping from the left side of the mouth. In summer we need to go out, have fun with friends, see some titties and get drunk. In summer we fall in love, messages sound louder in the empty streets, then we break up and the phone turns silent again. In summer we are in a good mood, the sky is clear, the sun is warm, it’s time to get tanned, even if the sun burns, we must escape to the nearest swimming pool, just thongs and cap, Sunday must begin! But in summer the sea is black despite the chlorine, the sky is black despite the sun, concrete is black, the sea gull is black, our skin is black, the bitterness in our throat is black, this ridiculous dream of escaping is black, the sunday we spent looking inside ourself is black, and slowly, the black sea is swallowing us.


Anna Tea Alien Princess

I would describe my works as a psychological research and exploration of nature of people and myself. Alien Princess is a project about the most beautiful, powerful, unique girl, who looks, thinks, behaves differently than everyone else around, however she is not always understandable by society.

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Model – Yana, MZM model agency Photography and stylist – Anna Tea


The rise of glitch art Written by Evan Merner The digital revolution is over, no longer an uprising but rather an integral part of the everyday. It is coasting alongside us, influencing our daily lives and slowly but surely making a new generation of digital natives dependent on just that. In 1994 (3 shorts years after the internet became public), the net.art movement was born and today it looks as if the art world is just as dependent on digital media as much as the next person.

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Net.art pioneers such as Jodi.Org and Olia Lialina have cemented Internet art as something that’s more than just a passing trend. Whilst New Media art is used as the umbrella term, net.art specifically uses the Internet as the best medium to experience the work.

© jodi.org

Jodi (or jodi.org), is a collective of Internet artists: Joan Heemskerk and Dirk Paesmans. Working primarily in video art and video game modification, they produce art designed specifically for the online world. Projects SOD or 404 are great examples of how they work with web pages that constantly randomise themselves or consist mainly of broken code and self-directing hyperlinks. They make it purposefully hard to distinguish between technical and human error. The video installation My%Desktop is an 8 minute long video of a desktop screen running amok, files continuously duplicate themselves, error messages pop up and new windows fill the screen. What the viewer seems to be watching is a computer glitching, something we can all relate to, but by the end of the video we realise that it was the work of the user rather than the machine. Olia Lialina is also a key pioneer of the net.art movement, working with experimental film and hypertext. Titled ‘My Boyfriend Came Back From

The War’ Olia’s project is considered iconic in the world of Internet art. Using HTML framework, Lialina creates a hypertext narrative, influenced by the viewer being able to choose which path the story takes. She also works a lot with gifs, ‘Summer’ being an incredible example of how new media artists such use the Internet to produce work beyond the expectations or intentions of the original programmers. Each frame of the gif is hosted on a different web page, which results in a browser that is constantly refreshing itself. It may come as not surprise that it’s often referred to as the frailest gif on the World Wide Web. These days, the digital frameworks of websites or software can be dressed up so much that it’s easy to forget that behind each page is a series of HTML coding. This has resulted in a new generation of Internet artists that have begun to use these particular aesthetics that a digital world produces, especially that of a digital glitch.

© Olia Lialina

We experience glitches on a daily basis, just think about times when you couldn’t get a good signal on your TV and the screen suddenly turns into a pixelated mess or when a YouTube video won’t play at anything above 240p. It might not always be so aesthetically pleasing (it’s annoying if anything when Photoshop decides to crash) but artists have begun to


embrace the glitch as an aesthetic of the digital age. The idea of something being less than perfect, has become it’s own art form. Artists are striving to recreate those moments that remind us that behind every screen is a complex database. Sabato Visconti is a new media artist who exploits algorithms, removes coding and compresses files, resulting in a body of work that reinterprets photography for the digital age. His incredible catalogue of work showcases how the glitch aesthetic has truly become an individual style for artists over the past few years. From humorous Snapchat filters to data bending videos of fashion week, Visconti presents a vivid library of just how much potential the glitch aesthetic has.

© Sabato

Visconti

Katya Koroscil is another artist whose work is a great example of how we can’t always control the technology we use. Whilst it’s possible to recreate glitch effects through post-production, a true glitch is one that happens without intention or explanation. Koroscil discovered this when her corrupted Canon 7D began to alter her photos and as a result, her Glitch Art photo series was born. A collection of simple but beautiful portraits trying to break through the vivid blocks of glitch unintentionally created by the camera. Whilst Glitch Art (even post-digital theory as a whole) points towards our relationship with digital technology, and man vs. machine and explores themes of nostalgia. We are prone to romanticising the past and aesthetically Glitch Art also alludes to nostalgia, a time when the trickiest tech task was remembering which way up the video tape goes into your VHS player. You only have to do a quick Google search for glitch art to see the influence of the classic tracking lines that would show up whenever the video was on pause, or turn your eyes for example to the recent spike in popularity of Kodak’s classic Super 8 film with it’s recognisable soft aesthetic. Katya Koroscil’s and Sabato Visconti’s glitched photographs may be easier to display on a traditional static page than that of the immersive webpages created by Jodi.org and Olia Lialina, they all showcase works born of a technological age. We live in a constantly changing world, updating, editing and re-working both our online and offline selves. Each day technology becomes more and more ingrained into our lives and it seems as if since the digital boom, we’ve been adapting to this new algorithm-ruled world. But, what happens now?


© Sabato

Visconti


© Katya Koroscil

© Katya Koroscil


The digital revolution is over (it won.) But what else is possible for artists whose work already comments on this, whose work is best suited for viewing through a browser. What is beyond digital?

Katya Koroscil: www.katyakoroscil.com Sabato Visconti: www.sabatobox.com Olia Lialina: www.teleportacia.org Jodi Collective: 404: http://404.jodi.org SOD: http://sod.jodi.org

Š Katya Koroscil


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Luisa Nolasco Same same, but different

Luisa Nolasco was born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Moved to the UK in 2014 in search of new opportunities in arts and photography. Having studied cinema, she began taking pictures at the age of 16. As a documentary photographer, Luisa develops images that speak borth to her and to others about what is happening out there in the world. She has a passion for getting to know different cultures and an obsession for photographing them. Part of her process before taking pictures is to observe people. Luisa wants to capture simple moments of the day to day life and traditions that sometimes seem to be forgotten or are not paid attention to. “Same same, but different� is a very common expression around Asia used by the locals. They use it for just about everything, to offer a service, giving a hint of what to eat or what places to visit. This project is the result of two months on the continent, traveling through Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. Despite being so close to each other, they are all unique with its own history, religion, culture and people. The similarity that I could find is: they are all incredibly alive.


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Leticia

Batty

Steel City

I’m originally from Worksop, Nottinghamshire and now reside in London. I’m is a photographic artist who specialises in medium format colour photography. The Nottinghamshire and South Yorkshire landscape are the biggest influences on my work. My practice explores themes of identity, landscape, British politics and the self. ‘A town like Sheffield assumes a kind of sinister magnificence’ - George Orwell Sheffield is a town with its identity forged from its industrial past. This project stands as a testimony to this; an account of the defining structural elements that shape a city. In this series the pragmatic yet intimate nature of the images project the effect of the grind of industry over the city of Sheffield.


Jui Kun Weng Migrate

I’m a 22-year-old student from Taipei, Taiwan. I like to capture some interesting moments from Taipei’s street, and also like to take portraits for my friends. Every things are changing every moments, even in this small island. Sometimes we feel lonely and realistic but warm, just like the birds migrate.

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photographers iNDEX Alex Agafonov

Ruslan Isinev

Leticia Batty

Marion Kotlarski

Elise BOULARAN

Luisa Nolasco

Bradley Canfield

Jenny Rafalson

Karl Child

isabella sommati

Luca Ellena

Franco SortinI

Anne-Laure Etienne

Katja StĂźckrath

Maksim Finogeev

Anna Tea

behance.net/alexagafonov

leticiabatty.co.uk

hanslucas.com/eboularan/photo

bradleycanfield.com

karlchild.com

lucaellena.ch

unspokenimage.com

facebook.com/Isinev.Ruslan

marionkotlarski.com

luisanolasco.com

jennyrafalson@gmail.com

isabellasommati.com

francosortini.eu

instagram.com/katjastuckrath

finomaks.com

cargocollective.com/anna-tea

Ilka & Franz

Nicolas THOMAS

Laurent Henrion

Jui Kun Weng

ilkafranz.com

laurent-henrion.tumblr.com

nicolasthomasmoreno.com

cargocollective.com/juikunweng


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#PHOTOGRAPHY - Issue 19  

#PHOTOGRAPHY is an online magazine run by two photography graduates with a passion for image making. www.hashtagphotographymagazine.co.uk Su...

#PHOTOGRAPHY - Issue 19  

#PHOTOGRAPHY is an online magazine run by two photography graduates with a passion for image making. www.hashtagphotographymagazine.co.uk Su...

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