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contents FEBRUARY 2013

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Stan Warunek

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Ignite for Your Heart

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Lackawanna County Heart Ball sparks heart health across Northeast PA.

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Revitalizing the Region

Successful Singles Meet local professionals who happen to be unhitched.

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Radius40 seeks to prompt positive change in Northeast PA.

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Romantic Getaways Stay close to home to enjoy a escape with your love.

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Leaders in Red Meet community leaders dedicated to spreading the message of heart health, and Going Red to prove it!

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104 Michael Straub

Fiery February Things to do, where to go, everything you need to know!

Home Showcase The Lackawanna Home Builders Association Home Showcase has everything under one roof.

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426 Mulberry Historic property takes shape!

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First Things First When it comes to dining, check out these palate-pleasing first bites!

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Sweetheart Shopping Get ideas for Valentine’s Day gifts!

February 2013

HappeningsMagazinePA.com

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MAILBAG Dear Happenings, Thank you so much for featuring Stephanie on the cover (January 2013)! People are amazed with it. Many complements received. When reading the story, it actually brought tears to my eyes. Happenings is truly first class. We can't pull off Russia without the support of individuals such as yourselves. –Deb Jallen, via email Dear Happenings, Our family has been reading and enjoying Happenings since 1969, and my mother has saved me every copy that has appeared since 1977 (when I left the region). Your current cover story on Stephanie Jallen (January 2013) is one of the very best I remember in my long readership. So, many congratulations, and thanks, on being one of the institutions that makes NEPA so great. – T. Corey Brennan, via email Dear Happenings, Many people have commented on our ad in Happenings and I received numerous calls from prospective brides who saw the ad. (January 2013) I'm sure you know the excellent reputation your magazine has, but it is always nice to hear feedback, especially from a new client. I hope you are as pleased as I am. –Tina Plink, Zacharelli’s Garden

Correction In the December 2012 Ties that Bind feature, the job title of Andrew Hailstone, representing United Neighborhood Centers of Northeast PA and SCOLA, should have been “Attorney, Kreder Brooks Hailstone LLP.” We regret the error. –ED

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Publisher Managing Editor Art Director Associate Art Director

Paula Rochon Mackarey Barbara Toolan Lisa M. Ragnacci Peter Salerno

Administrative Assistant

Katherine Kempa

Associate Editor

Erika A. Bruckner

Account Representatives

Contributors

Ken Chergosky Rosemary Nye Jane Preate Annette Profera Danielle DelPrete Kieran O’Brien Kern Shannon Lesniak Casey Phillips Julie Korponai

On the Cover: Local ladies Go Red to promote heart health at he Lands at Hillside Farms in Shavertown. Photo: Stan Warunek, Montage Photography Published Monthly. 350,000 copies annually. ©2013 HAPPENINGS MAGAZINE All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced by any process except with written permission.

Happenings Magazine published since 1969 P.O. Box 61 • Clarks Summit, PA 18411 Phone: (570) 587-3532 • Fax: (570) 586-7374 Email: info@happeningscommgroup.com

Read online at:

www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com

Drop Us a Line! We want to hear what’s on your mind; take a minute to send us a note!

• P.O. Box 61 Clarks Summit, PA 18411 • HappeningsMagazinePA.com • info@happeningscommgroup.com • Like “Happenings Magazine” on Facebook • Follow “HappeningsMag” and “ErAtHappenings” on Twitter

HappeningsMagazinePA.com

February 2013


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FROM THE PUBLISHER

Dear Readers, Red is a warm and positive color associated with our most physical needs and our will to survive. It exudes a strong and powerful energy, exciting our emotions and motivating us to take action. It signifies leadership, ambition and determination; it is associated with a strong will and can give confidence to those who are shy or lacking in will power. Red is a color most associated with passion, and is therefore representative of each of the incredibly passionate people included in this issue: our heart ambassadors who passionately teach us about better heart health {pages 10-18}; energized leaders like John and Tara Iona {pages 38-40} Charlie Jefferson {pages 58-62} and Charisse Kerrigan {page 36} who, although not originally from our area, have developed an unbelievable passion for Northeast Pennsylvania; and people like Gretchen Wintermantel, Kathleen Bell {page 32} Karl Pfeiffenberger {page 108} and Mary Ann LaPorta {page 50} who, among many others in this issue, passionately help children who are abused or treated unfairly find the love they need to grow into caring adults. Red is also a color used to stimulate our appetite, so you’ll likely find yourself making reservations this month at one of the many

incredibly distinctive restaurants that are unique to Northeast PA {pages 74-86} And, as Dr. David Weinberger recommends {page 56}, if you aren’t with a special someone, make plans to spend some time with someone special- a close friend or family member- and draw on their energy and positive feelings. We hope you find some inspirations to draw upon in this February 2013 issue, whether it’s the Norman Rockwell exhibit at Misericordia University {page 94} or the Clarks Summit Festival of Ice {page 96}. A big thank you to each Happenings’ staff member who passionately delivers to you each month, the best of Northeast Pennsylvania.

Fondly,

Paula

Paula Rochon Mackarey


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monday

tuesday

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February

wednesday

thursday

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friday

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saturday

A Hoopla Celebration, Mohegan Sun Arena, Wilkes-Barre. 562-9749, ext. 330.

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National Pancake Day

John Denver– A Rocky Mountain High Concert, State Theatre, Easton. 8 p.m. 800-999-STATE.

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Snowshoe Hike, Skytop Lodge, Skytop. 12:45 p.m. 629-3061.

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Norman Rockwell’s Saturday Evening Post Covers Exhibit, Friedman Art Gallery, Misericordia University.Through Feb. 28. 674-6400.

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17 Mrs. Thomas Jefferson, Lackawanna Historical Society, Scranton. 2 p.m. 344-3841.

Presidents Day

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2013 Lackawanna Home Builders Assoc. Home Showcase, Mall at Steamtown, Scranton. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 341-7496.

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Annual Winter Book Sale,Valley Community Library, Peckville. 11 a.m.-7 p.m.

February is... American Heart Month National Children’s Dental Health Month National African American History Month National Hot Breakfast Month

Ash Wednesday. Lent begins.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

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Love Your Pet Day Olivia Newton John, State Theatre, Easton. 8 p.m. 800-999-STATE.

National Tooth Fairy Day

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The Marvelous Wonderettes, Mellow Theatre, Lackawanna College, Scranton 8 p.m. 955-1455.

Clarks Summit Festival of Ice, downtown Clarks Summit.Through Mon. 587-9045.

Respect for Life Prayer Breakfast, St. Mary’s Center, Scranton. 9 a.m. 343-5099.

Marley’s Mission 3rd Annual Blue Ribbon Gala, Hilton Scranton & Conference Center, Scranton.6-11 p.m.

2013 Lackawanna County Heart Ball, Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel, Scranton.


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COVER STORY

for the Cause!

I

2013 Lackawanna County Heart Ball

gnite to help save lives from heart disease and stroke at the 2013 Lackawanna County Heart Ball! This hot event will spark some fun and help further the American Heart Association’s (AHA) mission. Reflecting the national Heart Ball theme,“Ignite,” the Lackawanna County event will feature local community leaders, including event chair James Yi, chief perfusionist at Regional Hospital of Scranton, and a presentation by Bishop James C. Timlin, Heart Ambassador Honoree.

The black-tie event will kick off Saturday, February 23 at 6 p.m. at the Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel in Scranton. Group D’Jour will provide live music. Julanne Hogan is social events director for the Northeast PA affiliate. “Guests can bid on some fabulous purses and ties at the Ball. These items were provided by women honored at a luncheon hosted by Commonwealth Health and Geisinger Community Medical Center, Scranton,”

notes Hogan. Live auction items include vacations, autographed memorabilia and the most-bid-on item, a “Wine Tasting Experience” donated and hosted by Dr. Lear Von Koch from his private wine collection! Guests will also have the opportunity to make a personal gift

to AHA’s restricted fund “Open Your Heart Campaign,” in honor of Heart Ambassador Honoree, Bishop James C. Timlin. Visit www.Heart.org/ NortheastPA or call 570-822-9438. –Erika Bruckner


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COVER STORY Ambassador Honoree: Bishop Emeritus of Scranton Most Rev. Timlin, a priest since 1951, underwent aortic valve replacement open-heart surgery in June 2012. He chose to have Dr. Lear Von Koch perform the procedure at Regional Hospital of Scranton. “I’m from here,” he explained.“We have very good surgeons and cardiology teams here, and I saw no need to leave this area for care. I’m very grateful for having such a successful outcome.” After going through cardiac rehab and doing plenty of exercise, the Most Reverend Timlin is recovering well. “He really is an inspiration to many at the spry age of nearly 86,” says Hogan.“We are very fortunate that he is willing to help inform and demonstrate to others that you can survive this disease and lead a healthy and happy life.” The Bishop Emeritus has been flying planes for over 30 years. Although he had a heart murmur, his heart was otherwise healthy. He opted to undergo surgery to put him in the best shape possible for the Federal Aviation Administration physical. After the mandatory six-month, post-surgery waiting period, he applied for his medical certificate to continue to fly. He didn’t hesitate when asked to be a part of the 2013 Lackawanna County Heart Ball. As ambassador, he hopes to say a few words of encouragement and ask people to be generous.“We all have a heart. And we probably know someone who has had heart trouble,” he explains. “Heart operations, like the one I had, are incredible. It’s only relatively recently that doctors have been able to do this, thanks to the American Heart Association’s help training doctors and supporting research.” He also praises AHA’s work in prevention, making people aware of risk factors and educating the public on signs of a heart attack.

The “Bear” Facts About Women & Heart Disease

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More women die of heart disease than the next causes of death combined, including all forms of cancer.

1 3

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in American women die of cardiovascular disease, compared to one in 30 women who die of breast cancer.

Currently, some million women in the U.S. are living with heart disease, yet only one in six American women believes that heart disease is her greatest health threat.

of women have one or more risk 90% factors for developing heart disease.

<1/3

of women in a recent survey reported any early warning signs such as chest pain or discomfort before a heart attack, compared with most men. Only slightly more than half of women are likely to call 911 if experiencing symptoms. And yet, 79% of women said that they would call 911 if someone else was having a heart attack.

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An estimated million women in the U.S. are affected by heart disease. Since 1984, more women than men have died each year from heart disease, and the gap between men’s and women’s survival continues to widen. Visit www.GoRedForWomen.org for more.


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COVER STORY

Advocates Unite for Heart Health Awareness Raise the Red Flag!

Community leaders dressed up to draw attention to matters of the heart. These advocates donned the color of passion, love and heart health and posed for photos at The Cottage at the Lands at Hillside Farms in Shavertown. They have each been touched by heart concerns, whether they have a loved one with heart disease, a per-

sonal experience with heart problems, a medical leader in the field or a hand in heart-health advocacy. Hair and makeup by Teresa Hagmaier, Brea Bidwell and Cady Brandt from Alexander's Salon and Spa in Scranton. Photography by Stan Warunek, Montage Photography

Donna Doherty Scranton High School Senior Age: 18; native of Scranton. Parents Christopher and Donna Doherty; siblings Christopher, Michael, Marie, Elizabeth and Hugh Community Involvement:“Last year, I was the Teen Ambassador for the American Heart Association. I think it is important to give back and to help the public understand that the money they donate to the AHA saves lives.”

When I was 5 days old I had transposition of the great vessels surgery to correct a life-threatening defect. I was what was once called a ‘blue baby.’ Thankfully, I don’t remember my surgery, but I am very grateful to my doctors, nurses and the AHA for the money they raised towards research that saved my life.


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Physician Assistant in Cardiology/Electrophysiology at the Richard and Marion Pearsall Heart Hospital, Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center

Age: 28; Husband, Joseph Worsnick; Resides in Scranton; Enjoys traveling, running, reading, shopping and spending time with family and friends; Educated at King’s College Career Notes: Started her career in women’s health/OBGYN before working in cardiology Community Involvement: Speaker on Women's Heart Health Awareness for the Luzerne County Women's Business Leaders

today are strong leaders, “Women whether it be in the home or work

field, and they need to be advocates for their health as well. Many women don't realize heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. among women. Also, this disease has modifiable risk factors, meaning there are active things we can do every day to reduce our risk or prevent future events.


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Teresa Pascucci Cordelli Kindergarten Teacher, Collier County Public Schools Age: 53; Husband, Mark Cordelli; Dog, Foxy; Native of Peckville; Resides in Naples, Florida; Enjoys baking, cooking, crafting and decorating; Educated at Marywood University. Career Notes: Owned and operated a private preschool, The Children’s Garden Nursery School, in Peckville for 23 years before selling the business and moving to Florida. Community Involvement: As a stylist with Jewel Kade, all of Cordelli’s proceeds during the month of February are donated to The American Heart Association.

Heart problems played a large part in my family. My dad was a pediatrician in Scranton for 52 years and underwent open-heart surgery in the latter part of his life. He died several years later from a fatal heart attack. My mom, who enjoyed 82 years of excellent health, died unexpectedly from a heart attack. A few years ago, I was diagnosed with Mitral Valve Prolapse.

” John D. McCarthy Chairman, McCarthy Tire Service Co., Inc. and McCarthy Realty, Inc. Age: 77; Wife, Cecilia M. Corgan; Children, Mary Ellen Horn, Kathleen Lambert and John D. McCarthy, Jr.; Seven grandchildren, one great grandchild; Native of Wilkes-Barre; Resides in Kingston; educated at King’s College Career Notes: McCarthy started working at age 13 and took over the family business after the death of his father. During his 26 years as chairman of the board for Wyoming Valley Health Care System, McCarthy hired the first cardiac surgeon in the Valley.

Community Involvement: Past Chairman of Board of Wyoming Valley Health Care System and Wilkes-Barre Housing Authority; past board member of Pennsylvania American Water Company, Blue Cross/Blue Shield and Continental Bank Board; Citizen of the Year by the Wilkes-Barre Lions Club and Small Businessman of the Year by the Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce; Knights of Columbus, 4th Degree

My father died suddenly of his second heart attack at age 69. I have had irregular heartbeats for many years, resulting in a stroke 11 years ago and open-heart surgeries for valve replacements and four bypasses this past year.


y

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Lisa Baker Pennsylvania State Senator Age: 51; Husband Gary S. Baker; Son, Carson W. Baker; Dog, Annie. Native of Dallas, PA; Resides in Lehman Twp.; Enjoys cooking, walking, mountain-bike riding, reading and watching her son play baseball. Educated at Shippensburg University. Career Notes: Served in state government for nearly 25 years, including executive director of The Blue Ribbon Foundation, established to support health and wellness initiatives in Northeast and North Central PA. She is currently in her second term representing the 20th Senatorial District, which includes parts of Luzerne, Monroe and Susquehanna Counties and all of Pike, Wayne and Wyoming Counties.

Community Involvement: Received the 2012 Legislator of the Year Award in Cardiac Policy from the American Heart Association for her work on the Good Samaritan Law. “I am proud to have a close relationship with the PA Chapter of the American Heart Association. Together we were successful in passing legislation to give added protections to bystanders who use CPR or first aid to assist victims during an emergency and to businesses who house AEDs. More than 300,000 sudden cardiac arrests happen in the U.S. each year outside the hospital setting. If CPR is performed immediately, a victim's chance of survival doubles and possibly triples.”

Diane Ljungquist Chief Nursing Officer and Chief Operating Officer; Tyler Memorial Hospital; Commonwealth Health

Age: 55; Husband, William Ljungquist; Sons Matthew and James Krolikowski; Stepson Billy Ljungquist and Stepdaughter Katherine Haney; Native of Ogdensburg, NJ; Resides in Hazleton; Enjoys photography and gardening; educated at Wilkes University and Kings College Career Notes: Over 30 years experience including positions at Berwick Hospital, Wilkes-Barre General Hospital and Tyler Memorial Hospital, which are all part of the Commonwealth Health System. Community Involvement: Heart Walk, Heart Ball and Purseonality Luncheon participant. Wilkes-Barre YMCA, Healthy Northeast and Berwick McBride Memorial Library Board of Directors; past board member of United Way and Berwick YMCA.

My father died 18 months ago after experiencing numerous heart conditions for years. My younger sister was diagnosed with Primary Pulmonary Hypertension after the birth of her youngest son 10 years ago. She was a tri-athlete and ran marathons prior to this rare heart condition. She has modified her lifestyle to accommodate and limit the progression of this disease. I also have a younger brother who has experienced essential hypertension since his teenage years


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Age: 53; Husband, Jim Brozena; Native of Berwick; Resides in West Pittston; enjoys traveling, learning new skills; Educated at Penn State and Wilkes University. Career Notes: Brozena started at Allied Services in geriatrics and has since worked in many areas of Allied Services from direct care to administration. Community Involvement: West Pittston Library, Northeast Regional Cancer Institute and Circle 200 Board of Directors

I think it’s most important to make people aware of the impact that personal choices have on their cardiac risk and quality of life. I keep reminding myself that small changes make a big difference.

Senior Vice-president/Chief Operating Officer, Allied Services


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Linda Thomas-Hemak, MD President and CEO, The Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education Age: 44; Husband, Mark Hemak; Children, Mason, Maya and Antoinette; Native of Archbald; Resides in Jermyn; Enjoys exploring the world through her children’s eyes including children’s museums, butterfly gardening and hillside landscaping; Educated at The University of Scranton, Baylor College of Medicine and Harvard’s Combined Internal Medicine & Pediatric Residency Training at Massachusetts General Hospital

Career Notes: Dr. Thomas-Hemak leads The Wright Center for Primary Care Mid-Valley, serves on the PA Department of Health's Chronic Care Initiative Steering Committee and is the Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency Program Director. She is also president of The Wright Center Medical Group faculty practice plan, chairman of Pediatrics and immediate past president of the medical staff at Regional Hospital of Scranton and clinical faculty and a founding member, secretary and member of the Executive and Strategic Planning Committees of the Board of Trustees for The Commonwealth Medical College. Community Involvement: Commonwealth Medical College, Boys and Girls Club of Northeast PA, Valley Community Library, Heart Walk

My maternal grandmother died prematurely of heart disease and congestive heart failure. Although my mom has cardiac risk factors, she shows no evidence of heart disease, now 10 years beyond my grandmother’s lifespan, because of her excellent primary care provided by my colleagues Dr. Richard Weinberger and Dr. Samir Pancholy. I see the amazing benefits of medical and surgical management through my dad, who was also cared for by these colleagues. He is doing great 10 years after life-saving cardiac bypass surgery by Dr. Von Koch. I am so grateful to these colleagues for their excellent care of my parents.

” Cornelia Conyngham Romanowski Nursery and Kindergarten Teacher Age: 55; Husband, Edward S. Romanowski; Children, Lindsay Palmer Romanowski and Andrew Edward Romanowski; Native of Shavertown; Resides in Shavertown; Enjoys gardening and traveling; Educated at Wheelock College Career Notes: Romanowski taught five years at Apple Tree Nursery School. While raising two children she was substitute teacher and volunteered. Community Involvement: American Heart Association, Wyoming Seminary Board of Trustees and President’s Council, Community Advisory Board for the Little Theater of Wilkes-Barre, Board of Home for Homeless Women and volunteer for Wyoming Valley Meals on Wheels

I have been affected by heart problems; I don’t take anything for granted. As women, we think heart disease happens to men, and we must be educated about women and heart disease.


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Jackie Lewandoski Host, WNEP-TV Age: 48; Husband, David; Son, John Joseph; Dog, Saunders; Native of Duryea; Resides in Moscow; Enjoys gardening, reading, traveling, kayaking, politics and spending time with family and friends; educated at King’s College and University of Scranton Career Notes: Lewandoski worked briefly at WVIA before being hired by WNEP-TV as the station’s Promotion and Community Programming Manager. She now hosts WNEP’s “Home and Backyard,” which she and her husband started more than 17 years ago.

Community involvement: Working at WNEP, I am fortunate to be able to work with many organizations that promote good health like the Heart Association. My father had heart surgery in 2012. He is doing wonderfully; however, it was very eye opening. It made me want to learn everything I could about the heart, how it works and how to take care of it so he could get the best care possible. Heart disease can affect everyone. You want to take care of your heart and set an example for your children so they too can take steps to prevent heart disease.

Jila Kaberi-Otarodi

MD, Internal Medicine/Physician, Geisinger Community Medical Center Age: 45; Husband, Masood Otarod; Children, Vhalla and Parsa; Dog, Tigger; Native of Waverly; Resides in Waverly; Enjoys gardening, painting and traveling; Educated at Iran University of Medical Sciences, Flushing Hospital Medical Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Career Notes: Kaberi-Otarodi held many positions at GCMC including Medical Director of the Preventative Medicine and Nutrition Clinic and Chair of the Nutrition Support Subcommittee. Her community health education includes working with Wilkes University, Misericordia University, The Commonwealth Medical College, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine and The Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education. Community Involvement: Lecturer for Geisinger Community Medical Center events including Ladies Night out and CATCH 10 & 11 (Convergence Around Technologies for Cardiovascular Health); American Heart Association Heart Ball and Heart Walk; American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, National Lipid Assoc., The Obesity Society, Iranian Medical Assoc.

My mom died at the young age of 55 from heart disease. She was not feeling well and was fatigued with heartburn. She attributed the pain to dinner and didn’t receive medical help. She also experienced coughing and shortness of breath. If she only knew that heart disease manifestation in women could have atypical presentation, she might have been here today, so I could tell her how much I love her.


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Scranton Office: 305 Linden Street Scranton, PA 18503 Ph: (570) 344-6323 Fx: (570) 344-6326 Mark Perry, Esq. • Paul Wylam, Esq. William Aquilino, Esq. • Amy Shwed, Esq. Elizabeth Giannotti, Esq. Dominick Georgetti, Esq. • Tim Holland, Esq.

Bethlehem Office: 87 S. Commerce Way, Suite 740 Bethlehem, PA 18017 Ph: (610) 694-1100 Fx: (610) 694-1120 John Hill, Esq. Neil E. Wenner, Esq.

w w w. T h e Pe r r y L a w Fi rm . c o m

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GO RED!

Perfusionist James Yi’s Passion for Heart Health

D

on’t take it personally, but Perfusionist James Yi does not want to meet you. Not on the operating table, anyway. He strives to teach people how to take care of their hearts, so he never has to see them in the operating room.

Yi, this year’s Lackawanna County Heart Ball Chair, is chief of perfusion at Regional Hospital of Scranton. While the surgeon performs an open-heart surgery, the heart is stopped. As perfusionist, Yi is responsible for maintaining heart and lung function, thereby keeping the patient alive through the surgery.“It 20

is exciting,” describes Yi. “Every time we stop the patient’s heart to repair it and then see the heart come back after a slow weaning off the heart-lung machine, it is an amazing thing.” At 8 a.m., he starts setting up the machine, spends about five hours on one case and follows with two to three hours of postoperative care.

A perfusionist since the 1970s, Yi is certified by the American Board of Cardiovascular Perfusion. He worked at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center as chief of perfusion. HappeningsMagazinePA.com

Heart surgeon Dr. Lear Von Koch of the Texas Medical Center recruited Yi to come to Scranton’s Mercy Hospital, now Regional Hospital of Scranton, over 33 years ago. Yi has perfused over 12,000 openheart procedures in his career, over 10,000 of them alongside Dr. Koch. Yi leads a team of perfusionists at Regional, including Anil Verma, Elise Troynacki, Mohamed Yousuf and Majdi Mojahed. As a leader in the blood-conservation technique, he also does heart surgery consultations with hospitals in various states. He offers evidence-based medical inforFebruary 2013


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mation, pulling from data in his thousands of surgeries. Although he loves his job, Yi is equally passionate about preventative medicine. He speaks at high schools and colleges about reducing risk for cardiovascular disease. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He says,â&#x20AC;&#x153;Know some numbers, such as blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol; eat right and exercise 30 minutes a day- brisk walking is all it takes. Most importantly, quit smoking. Those simple things may keep you away from needing heart surgery.â&#x20AC;?Yi, who starts each day with an hour-long workout, practices what he preaches. He encourages people to incorporate exercise into a daily routine. Instead of taking elevators, he walks the stairs at the hospital. His goal to reach younger generations with the message of cardiovascular disease prevention is one reason why he was drawn to the AHA.â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to keep spreading the news so heart disease and stroke donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even happen.â&#x20AC;?

GETTING PERSONAL WITH JAMES YI AHA Involvement: Board Member, 2013 Heart Ball Chair Wife: Christine Yi, award-wining designer of exclusive, custom jewelry Son: Christopher Yi, student Resides: Clarks Summit Interests: Golf, learning about wines (someday, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to write about wines)

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Erika A. Bruckner

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Save the Date!

Going Red for Heart Health (l-r): Teresa Cordelli, Linda Thomas-Hemak, Cornelia Conyngham Romanowski, Jackie Brozena, Diane Ljungquist, Lisa Baker. Photo: Stan Warunek, Montage Photography

ANNUAL EVENTS SUPPORT AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION Go Red! You don’t have to be a Happenings Magazine cover model to “Go Red!” Raise awareness through your attire during Go Red Day, February 1, 2013. Held the first Friday in February, National Go Red Day is aimed at making women aware that heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women in America. Since Go Red Day has been launched 10 years ago, 21 percent fewer women are dying from heart disease, 23 percent more women are aware that it’s their number one health threat, and gender-specific results have been published to highlight differences between men’s and women’s symptoms, responses, treatment and prevention. Donations can be made at www.GoRedForWomen.org

Heart Walks Northeast PA joins more than a million people in over 300 cities through the Heart Walks. Team and individual walkers raise support for the American Heart Association. The Luzerne County Walk will be April 20

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at Kirby Park in Wilkes-Barre. The Lackawanna County Walk will be May 18 at Nay Aug Park in Scranton. Registration for both is 9 a.m. with step off at 10 a.m.

Pursonality Luncheons At these invitation-only events, invitees are each asked to bring a purse which displays her own personality. These purses are presented by women in the community at the luncheon, and then they will be auctioned off at the Heart Ball. The Lackawanna County Luncheon will be held February 1, Go Red for Women Day, at Patsel’s in Clarks Summit. The event is hosted by Commonwealth Health and Geisinger Community Medical Center. The Luzerne County Luncheon will be February 6 in Hazleton, hosted by Geisinger Wyoming Valley. Both lunches will feature guest speakers about heart disease as the number one killer of women. For more about AHA events visit www.Heart.org/NortheastPA

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GO RED!

Getting to the Heart of the Matter

What Does American Heart Association Actually Do? ou’ve seen the logo; you can’t miss the red dresses worn to represent the American Heart Association (AHA). Julanne Hogan, social events director for the Northeast PA affiliate, says,“The work that the AHA does locally and nationally is vitally important; we are continuously informing and educating men, women and children about the devastating results of heart disease and stroke.” But what does the American Heart Association actually do?

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Donations fund research, public health education, professional education and training and community services; 75 cents of every dollar stays local. Here are a few things the AHA has accomplished that may have affected you.

reaching a 17 percent reduction after one year and about a 36 percent reduction after three years.

Eat Smart AHA advocates that food labels include appropriate nutrition information to promote healthy choices, since a healthy diet is a key weapon in the fight against heart disease. Eating habits are formed early, so AHA also helped to reduce the calories children consume at school.

Get Well Hospitals provide better treatment for cardiac and stroke patients through AHA’s Get with the Guidelines quality improvement program, which has impacted the lives of 2 million patients. The organization also funded research that led to breakthroughs like pacemakers, artificial heart valves and CPR.

Breathe Easy AHA led the fight for clean, indoor air in public areas such as workplaces, bowling alleys and restaurants. Research shows heart attack rates drop immediately following implementation of a smoke-free law, 24

Save Lives AHA established CPR guidelines and trains people of all ages through the CPR Anytime program, which teaches this lifesaving skill in just over 20 minutes. Effective bystander CPR, HappeningsMagazinePA.com

provided immediately after cardiac arrest, can double a victim's odds of survival. Congress mandated the public placement of AEDs (automated external defibrillators) in response to AHA lobbyists. When someone is in cardiac arrest, only an electric shock can restart a stopped heart. For each minute without defibrillation, a victim's odds of survival decrease by 7 to 10 percent. Recently, Hogan personally realized the importance of this. Her 15year-old son, a physically fit athlete, has experienced random moments of lightheadedness and a rapid heart beat. He was placed on a heart monitor for evaluation, and if the situation is severe enough, immediate medical attention will be needed.“When we go to public places, namely the schools where he plays basketball, you can bet that I am looking for their AED, in case we need one,” admits Hogan.“I never thought of this before, but until you walk in those shoes, it’s a different situation. Thank goodness we have made these medical advances in case the need should arise.” –Erika A. Bruckner

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ADVANCED CARDIOLOGY SPECIALISTS

A Division of PrimeMed, P.C.

David L. Lohin, D.O., F.A.C.C

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Chau Fe Huang, M.D., F.A.C.C S. Sree Hari Kesan, M.D.

Michael Kayal, D.O., F.A.C.O.I

Katharine Douaihy, PhD, CRNP Jennifer Rebar, CRNP

Tara Scarantino, CRNP

Clinical Cardiovascular Research:

Providing the opportunity for patients in NEPA to become involved in leading edge therapies

Currently recruiting patients for National/ International research studies. If interested, please call 570-961-2105 for information if you have:

• A history of heart problems & cholesterol levels not controlled by statin medications or you cannot tolerate statin medications

• A history of heart problems & chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD, Emphysema, chronic bronchitis) • A history of a heart attack 1-3 years ago & received a stent in a coronary artery.

Specializing in:

• Cardiac Catheterization • Peripheral/Carotid Angiography & Stenting • Coronary Angioplasty/Stent • Electrophysiology/Ablation/ Defibrillator/Pacemaker • Trans Esophageal Echocardiography • I.C.A.E.L. Accredited Echocardiography Laboratory • Nuclear and Non-Nuclear Stress Testing

2 locations

David L. Lohin, D.O.

Stephen J.Voyce, M.D.

Madhava S. Rao, M.D.

Chau Fe Huang, M.D.

S. Sree Hari Kesan, M.D

Michael Kayal, D.O.

475 Morgan Highway, Scranton, PA 18508 (570) 961-2105 141 Salem Avenue, 1st Floor, Carbondale, PA 18407 (570) 282-1605


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GO RED!

The Heart of A Runner

Fitness Pays Off for Heart Attack Victim reg Collins is a husband, father and Wells Fargo area president for Northeast PA. His family has a history of heart disease. His father passed in 1968 at age 45. In 2002, when Collins was 48, he was running 15 to 20 miles per week. During two of those runs, he became dizzy and fainted. He later reached out to childhood friend and cardiologist Dr. John Ellis.

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Collins was brought in for a Thallium Stress Test, but the experienced runner wasn’t challenged by the increasing treadmill incline. Months later, Collins was swimming with his then 8year-old daughter when the dizziness came back. He went in for a catheterization. At 48, Collins needed an aortic valve replacement. Because of his age, Collins chose a titanium valve over a pig valve because of its longer lifespan. He underwent valve replacement surgery September 24, 2002. The next day he had a seizure in the ICU; fortunately, it was an isolated event.

Rehabilitation specialists were amazed when he walked not only down the hall but also down the stairs and back. Not one to sit around, Collins walked as much as he could. Within five months, he felt like he did before the heart attack. Now over 10 years later, Collins consciously commits to healthy living. His wife cooks low-fat meats, fish and salads, and he drinks a lot of water. One of the best lessons Collins learned was to not sweat the small stuff, to step away from the fastpaced world and appreciate what is really important– things like family and fitness. He advises others

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not to ignore cardiac symptoms, but to see a cardiologist and follow his or her instructions.“It would have been easy to ignore my symptoms, but that would have been much more serious later,” he admits. Collins has cardiologist appointments for EKGs and Echocardiograms. His blood pressure is monitored. Maintaining this part of his lifestyle enables him to enjoy the rest of his life. In 2004, Collins participated in a St. Louis Cardinals fantasy camp. What better way to celebrate good health than to play with his sports heroes? The pride in seeing his daughter Emily attend Temple University is the ultimate reward for a decade devoted to good cardiac health. –Kieran O’Brien Kern February 2013


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GO RED!

Self Management Programs for Heart Failure Work Advice from Kathy Stella, Certified Rehabilitation Registered Nurse, Director of Case Management for Allied Services Integrated Health System ccording to the American Heart Association, the vast majority of heart failure care is done by the patients themselves and their caregivers. Successfully teaching people with heart failure how to manage their own condition is a low-risk, low-cost and effective treatment. Self-management requires that patients recognize a change, such as increased edema, evaluate the change and decide what action to take. They then need to implement treatment, e.g. take an extra diuretic, evaluate the results of that treatment and report to the physician as directed.

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Evidence-based heart failure self-management programs provide the patient basic education about heart failure, its causes and symptoms. From there, clinicians

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educate the patient on the various medications used to treat heart failure, and the tests used to diagnose and monitor the condition. The critical focus is on self-management activities that guide patient behaviors necessary to successfully manage their condition.

instantly and accurately track and transmit blood pressure, oxygen saturation levels and weight via a secure website on a daily basis, providing medical providers with information needed for early intervention and improved patient compliance with heart failure protocols.

Patients are taught about how to properly weigh themâ&#x20AC;Śself-management programs selves, manage their medicaprovide the patient basic tions, eat well, education about heart failure, limit fluid, watch for its causes and symptoms. swelling, exercise and manThe best approach to treatage oxygen. It is important ing congestive heart failure that patients are instructed is to enroll in a program on â&#x20AC;&#x153;red flagsâ&#x20AC;? that should approved by your physiprompt them to call their cian, educate yourself and physician immediately. your caregivers and be Telemonitoring and other proactive in taking care of new medical advances your heart health. allow patients and their caregivers to

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Healthy Hearts from the Start! iddle-schoolaged children who are taught CPR can not only save the life of someone else, but research shows that they will go home and teach the lifesaving technique to three additional people within their household. “This is vital for those who live in rural areas where EMS response time takes a little longer to get to the patient in need,” explains Julanne Hogan, social events director for the Northeast PA affiliate of the American Heart Association.“These children can help save the life of someone who is in cardiac distress until the EMS arrive.”The AHA is working on initiating these programs locally.

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Ending Childhood Obesity According to the AHA, about one of three American kids and teens are overweight or obese,

nearly triple the rate in 1963. This puts children at higher risk for heart disease and stroke. AHA instituted programs that aid in healthier eating, from teaching kids about choosing healthy foods and drinks to changing schools’ serving practices and replacing soda machines with healthier alternatives. AHA’s educational fundraising programs include Jump Rope For Heart for elementary students and Hoops For Heart for middle school students. Each teach athletic skills and heart health. The AHA has partnered with the National Football League for the NFL Play 60 Challenge, inspiring students to become more physically active. Around the country, AHA is helping Teaching Gardens sprout up at elementary schools. These hands-on learning laboratories teach how to plant, raise and harvest

produce along with the value of good eating habits. Complementary lessons teach nutrition, math and science. AHA hopes to institute this program locally. Advocacy Efforts Preventing childhood obesity is a critical focus for AHA’s 2020 impact goals. The organization advocates for physical activity, nutrition, diagnosis, treatment and childcare initiatives geared toward children. These include a “Safe Routes to Schools” program, creating safe walking and biking routes, limiting access to sugar-sweetened beverages and desserts and improving access to fruits and vegetables. AHA is also a partner in the Alliance for a Healthier Generation, founded to reduce the nationwide prevalence of childhood obesity by 2015 and to inspire young people to develop lifelong healthy habits. For more, visit Heart.org


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FEBRUARY IS NATIONAL CHILDREN’S DENTAL HEALTH MONTH

MICHAEL J. TERRERY, D.M.D ROUTE 611 • FOUNTAIN COURT, SUITE 14 • BARTONSVILLE, PA 570-629-1300 • WWW.TERRERYDENTAL.COM ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS

February 2013

Participating with most PPO insurances

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Marley’s Mission 3rd Annual Blue Ribbon Gala

Celebrates Hope

arley’s Mission will host its 3rd Annual Blue Ribbon Gala on February 16 at the Hilton Hotel and Conference Center in Scranton. The non-profit organization provides free, equine-based therapy to children who have experienced trauma.

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Growing Mission Marley’s Mission began in 2010 as a fund to aid a 5year-old victim of a brutal attack. It has grown into an award-winning organization that has provided therapy to more than 180 children from a seven-county region. In 2011, it was designated “Best New Charity” by StayClassy.org, a leader in the philanthropic and nonprofit industry. Gala co-chairs are Gretchen M. Wintermantel and Kathleen Bolling Bell. “$2,000 can provide Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy treatment for one child for one year,” Wintermantel explains.“Treatment is provided at no cost, and transportation is provided when needed. Every donation helps a child heal.” 6 percent or less of the organization’s budget is used for administrative costs, less than the industry standard; more than 94 percent of any donation goes directly to programs and treatment. 32

At the 2012 Blue Ribbon Gala (l-r): Rebecca Haggerty, Jen Macknosky, Gretchen Wintermantel, Kathy Bell & April Loposky

The Blue Ribbon “Blue is the color of the ribbon used for child abuse awareness. Marley’s Mission treats children who have suffered trauma, including trauma related to sexual or physical abuse as well as medical trauma, grief or bereavement and even secondary post-traumatic stress disorder,” Wintermantel says. WNEP’s Sophia Ojeda and Thom Welby will serve as masters of ceremony alongside honorary chair Sen. Bob Casey. The band “Into the Spin” will perform live. Guests will enjoy cocktail hour, dinner, dancing and the “Building Our Future” raffle. Prizes include an original painting by Angela Trotta Thomas, an elmwood headboard by Geg RocheSibio, a handcrafted cedar chest by Al Day, trips to Marco Island and Palm HappeningsMagazinePA.com

Harbor, Florida, two premium tickets to “Mamma Mia!” on Broadway with an exclusive backstage tour by Olyphant native and star of the show Judy McLane and a $250 Visa gift card. $20 raffle tickets can be purchased online; find a link at www.HappeningsMagazineP A.com. Art of Healing Art is a large part of the gala, and this year guests will have the opportunity to contribute to a piece of mixedmedia art. Artwork by local children will serve as centerpieces. Marley’s Mission found its “forever home” this year on more than 32 acres in Newton Township, and the children’s artwork will reflect the theme,“What Does a Forever Home Mean to You?” Tickets are $125 and may be purchased at www.MarleysMission.com. -Danielle Del Prete February 2013


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Gold Medal Grins February is Dental Health Month for Kids

uring National Children’s Dental Health Month this February, the American Dental Association hopes to keep the smiles going by teaching parents, kids and teens about dental hygiene.

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“Get a Gold Medal Smile” is the theme of this year’s campaign, which will be promoted by dentists, teachers and community group leaders across the country this February. The youth materials feature the McGrinn Twins, Flossy and Buck, along with their friends Den and Gen Smiley, going for the gold to get a winning smile. The pre-teens/teens materials feature kids going the distance for a gold medal smile.

5 Ways to Go for the Gold !

1. Brush twice daily with flu oride toothpaste (u se fluoride fo r kids over age 2) 2. Floss daily 3. Eat a balanc ed diet 4. See their de ntist regularly to address tooth decay in its ea rliest stages 5. Take a child to a dentist no later than their first birthday and then at intervals re commended by their dentist

"The ADA reminds parents and caregivers about the importance of good oral hygiene habits not only in February, but all year long," ADA President Dr. William R. Calnon said during the ADA’s 2012 campaign. "National Children’s Dental Health Month is an opportunity for the ADA to highlight the importance of optimum oral health while providing resources for advocates to spread this important message." Resources include posters, downloadable coloring and activity sheets and program guides filled with planning tips and easy-to-do activities. Visit ww.ada.org/ncdhm. –Erika A. Bruckner

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Instead of buying your kids more stuff, help protect their future with Life Insurance from New York Life. Call me about giving your children the most selfless gift theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never ask for.

John Mackarey*, LUTCF Agent, New York Life Insurance 220 Penn Ave. Suite 100 Scranton, PA 18503 570-969-3111 www.JohnMackarey.com *Registered Representative, offering securities through NYLIFE Securities LLC, member FINRA/SIPC.


NEPAVoices

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Charisse Kerrigan, Reflections on Community & Education in NEPA

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hen I was 10, I remember my father's big promotion resulting in my mother's plea to leave our Connecticut exburb of New York City and return to her hometown in NEPA. According to my mother, traipsing around New England and the tri-state area was one thing; moving halfway across the country to Des Moines was something else entirely. So when a business or two became available in Scranton, my father bid farewell to finance and returned to his family's entrepreneurial roots. I, on the other hand, was certain that I would be miserable without my friends and the beach. Little did I know that the community waiting for me would prove to be the richest part of my formative years. “The Andy Griffith Show's” setting of Mayberry fascinated me as a child not only because of how intimately the townspeople knew one another, but also because the town itself was cozy and compact. By contrast, most of my childhood in Connecticut was spent in the car with even the most basic necessities miles away. In Scranton, however, every neighborhood was its own little Mayberry with everything a community needed from a grocer to a doctor within a few square blocks! More astonishing to me than the layout of these communities scattered up and down the valley of NEPA were the intimate connections and generous spirits of the people 36

themselves. Nourished by this community support, my sister and I thrived.

uate courses and have served on state panels for educational reform. In every venue, whether affluent or impoverished, I have always noticed that one of the common factors of educational success is a nurturing community. Communities that promote honesty and hard work, that look out for one another, that value every member, and that stress the

After attending the University of Scranton, my sister and I furthered our educations in Philadelphia: she with an MD and I with a PhD. While completing my doctoral studies, I had the opportunity to administer educational programs to some of the most disadvantaged students from some of the most destitute neighborhoods I would ever know. During the summer of '92 while I was supervising the Temple Summer Reading Program, the Kensington Lewis Elkin Riots erupted in Elementary in Philadep my school's neigh- summer, 1992. hia, borhood already strained by the recent Rodney importance of giving King verdict. The violence of this back to the community have event shook me to the core and students who are happier and illustrated first hand how the more secure and who make stability and health of a commugreater gains in learning and nity affects almost every aspect critical thinking while using of the education of its children. fewer resources. It is this rich As a tutor and educational contradition of community in NEPA sultant for over 20 years for stuwhich supports the wonderful dents and districts from all parts opportunities for quality educaof Northeastern and Central tion available in our region. I am Pennsylvania, I have taught, fortunate to have been nurtutored, supervised or evaluated tured by such a community and every grade from K-12 in both am honored to be working private and public schools, from toward ensuring that our comaffluent suburbs to severely dismunities continue to nurture advantaged inner cities. I have our children. taught undergraduate and grad–Charisse Kerrigan, ASCD AATC

Bonner-Fallon and Co. HappeningsMagazinePA.com

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John Iona (Co-Founder & Chairman at Radius40 and “Serial Hired Gun CEO”)

Tara Iona

Photo: Guy Cali Associates

(Co-Founder & Program Director at Radius40 & Founder at Future411.com)

ike many kids growing up in Long Island in the ‘60s, John Iona’s family spent many summer vacations in the Poconos. “For as long as I can remember, Northeastern PA always held a special place in my heart.The natural, physical beauty of the area, the wildlife, the slower, less materialistic way of life, the easy access to outdoor recreation all translates to a wonderful place to live, work and raise a family. Ever since our children were toddlers, we vacationed frequently at Woodloch Pines. So, as Philadelphians, our friends would head east to spend their weekends and summers on the Jersey Shore while we headed north. After seven years of being guests, we acquired a very special piece of property and built our mountain retreat. It wasn’t long before we found ourselves spending far more time in NEPA than in Philly, so we opted to make the big move in the summer of 2009 to call the Lake Region our fulltime home. Within only a few months, it became exceedingly apparent to both my wife Tara and me that our new home area had long since been suffering from very real and significant degenerative problems. Among them were major issues that had been ignored and/or denied by the masses (residents, politicians, business owners, academics et al alike). I knew that the only way I could affect any kind of meaningful change was to create a highlydisruptive group like Radius40; a bold, yet apolitical unit of regional power brokers unbridled by restrictions of organizational policies and procedures, that could take swift and decisive action without being bound by convention, dogma or paradigms. So, I reached out, personally, to people I knew among NEPA’s foremost leaders who were also respected as risk takers and forward


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Affecting Real Change in

Northeast PA: “Radius40” thinkers. Radius40 is a vibrant, eclectic and highly-progressive assembly of leaders who truly care about NEPA’s future. We are CEOs, university presidents, technologists, executive administrators, PhDs, attorneys, entrepreneurs and business owners over a broad spectrum of industries.” John Iona: What’s the relevance of the name Radius40? “With the region’s shared challenges in mind, I wanted this upstart group to span from Wilkes-Barre to where my family now resides (a stone’s throw from the Delaware River in Lackawaxen Twp., PA). I wanted the name to define us and our region in some meaningful way. In the end, I drew a 40mile radius centered on the shores of Lake Wallenpaupack. It’s funny, people often ask me “why not Radius50?!” And, my answer is simple. A 50-mile radius would extend down into the Lehigh Valley where they don’t face the same challenges. Not long ago, however, they found themselves in a very similar economic situation. Allentown, Bethlehem and Easton were all synonymous with “dead cities.” So, with the power of true “regionalism” in mind, they reinvented themselves and joined hands across Lehigh and Northampton Counties to create a highly-successful, synergistic brand that is now the Greater Lehigh Valley. When I first joined the Executive Board

of the NEPA Boy Scouts I was told (jokingly) why the new headquarters was built in Moosic. My fellow Board Director (born and raised in NEPA) told me that Moosic was known to many as the demilitarized zone (akin to the DMZ once separating North and South Vietnam) serving as the invisible wall/dividing line between two “warring factions” (Wilkes-Barrians & Scrantonites) who historically didn’t agree on much, nor would they ever seek opportunities for collaboration or helping one another. And there it struck me… endocentrism colliding with the classic silo mentality. This is polar opposite to what NEPA now needs; a far-reaching regionalistic philosophy that transcends city boundaries and actually practiced versus being the favorite rhetoric of the “usual suspects” at cocktail parties. I envision Radius40 to be the cornerstone in the creation of NEPA's newly woven collaborative mindset, while leading the charge for positive change, economic growth, diversity and prosperity.” How will Radius40 drive economic change? “Radius40’s mission is to stem (then reverse) the tide of Northeast Pennsylvania’s sluggish economy and arrest the severe “brain drain” where many of our best and brightest young people have all too often found it necessary to take flight from NEPA in search of opportunity,

and to live and work elsewhere. As a region, we must embrace the core drivers of technology, talent and tolerance to harness, unleash and propel real, meaningful and sustainable economic growth in the region. Together, without being beholden to politics or special interests, we must endeavor to attract and retain the businesses, entrepreneurs and “creative class” of people who will bring the diversity, social scene and quality jobs. In parallel, Radius40 has begun powering our proprietary S2S Speed Mentoring Program throughout the region with terrific early success! We are in the midst of a moment of truth wherein our actions (or inactions) will forever either haunt us or serve us well. We must shift both public and private funds away from investing in physical assets toward investment in more meaningful, higher-impact areas. Without question, investments in human capital and technology are far more effective and will produce the highest returns. The time has come for NEPA's leadership to stop using our public funds for constructing stadiums and creating yet more empty business parks and commercial real estate with millions and millions of vacant square footage. Instead, the greatest payback of all will come when we support, in earnest, entrepreneurial, emerging growth and technology initiatives such as software, biotechnology, nanotechnology, continued on page 40


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IT and other emerging industries. Broadly investing in the arts and the creative economy will attract highly-talented people and active investors. We must ensure that the top scientific, technical, business and creative talent are generating spinoff companies, expanding and attracting firms to our region. Lastly, we must significantly improve the entrepreneurial climate in NEPA by engaging, encouraging, supporting and mentoring budding entrepreneurs… all to create and propel real, sustainable economic impact, growth and future prosperity for generations to come!” Tara Iona: How can we change the status quo? “If we don’t encourage, train and support both a skilled workforce and entrepreneurs, we won’t be able to start or attract businesses that will contribute to and drive a healthy tax base.”

Photo: James Ruane

Who are your ideal partners to drive momentum for change? “A local government that incentivizes companies to start in or move to NEPA, schools and educators that encourage the entrepreneurial spirit whether it’s a mechanic opening a garage or a tech wiz starting a new company, colleges and universities building research and technology programs that will spawn new companies and provide the support and incentive for those companies to stay in NEPA, and business owners willing to hire a recent local graduate or one who wants to return to NEPA and paying them a competitive wage on par with what they would

Getting Personal with John & Tara Iona Home: Lackawaxen Township, PA

dear friend & Misericordia University's President Dr.Michael John Iona - Chairman & Founder, MacDowell with the 2011 Eminent Radius40; President, i-Consilium, Eagle Award and in recognition of 108 of PA's finest young men for LLC; "Hired-Gun CEO"/industryattaining the coveted rank of Eagle agnostic turnaround & growth Scout strategist; Angel Investor; Chairman,Trustee, Director and Tara Iona - Director & Co-Founder Advisor to multiple corporate and of Radius40; Founder of non-profit boards Future411.com;Volunteer Coordinator for Marley's Mission Hometown: Commack, Long Island, NY

Hometown: Sewell, NJ

Favorite Quotes: "There are three kinds of lies:lies, damned lies,and statistics." Benjamin Disraeli (1804-1881) -and (2) "And in the end,the love you take is equal to the love you make." -Sir Paul McCartney (1942- )

Favorite Quote: "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give." -Sir Winston Churchill (18741965)

Recent NEPA Honor: Being recognized by Marley’s Mission at their 3rd Annual Blue Recent NEPA Honor: Being asked to deliver the keynote Ribbon Gala as the 2012 recipient address at an event honoring my of The Blue Ribbon Award

make in a similar or slightly larger city. In 2010, the average wage paid here was 28.12 percent lower than the national average, and far lower when compared to wages paid within less than two hours of NEPA.” What was the impetus for Radius40’s S2S (Student to Student) Speed Mentoring Program? “We were continuously hearing stories from high school kids about the lack of career guidance, seeing some of the local High School Guidance pages with little to no career information, realizing that kids in this region, especially in the more rural areas, are just not exposed to as many profes-

sional careers as kids in larger cities and suburbs. S2S pairs college and high school students in a speed mentoring, similar to a speed dating atmosphere whereby college students serve as mentors answering questions about things they themselves were concerned with and likely unaware of just a few years back while in high school. I also recently launched Future411.com (GoFindYourFuture on Facebook); an online educational tool focused on providing students and job-seekers alike a single website where they can access hundreds of college and career planning resources.


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Home

Building & Remodeling Professionals at the Mall at Steamtown

f it goes on, in or around your home, you can find out about it at the 2013 Home Showcase. The annual event, sponsored by the Lackawanna Home Builders Association (LHBA), has new digs. Exhibitors will welcome visitors at the Mall at Steamtown in Scranton from February 22 to 24.

I

LHBA Executive Director Dottie Gentile encourages attendees to bring their ideas and blueprints to talk to the experts gathered in the center of the Mall. A wide range of professionals in home building and remodeling will be present. Exhibits will feature home security systems, art glass

for kitchen cabinets, energy savings ideas and products, bathroom and kitchen displays, pools and spas, new concepts in windows and doors, plus advancements in gutter

applications, basement waterproofing and ideas for financing any building or remodeling project. Get hands-on advice during several consumer seminars planned throughout the weekend. Green Field Energy solutions will talk about whole house energy audits that can save homeowners money and increase property value. LHBAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bob the Builder will visit with youngsters on Saturday and Sunday with free gifts while supplies last. The popular, Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Snap LEGO Building contest, returns on Saturday at 1 p.m. Following the live

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building, all 40 LEGO homes constructed by the region’s next generation of builders, architects and engineers will be on display. The show begins on Friday night from 5-9 p.m. when WNEP will tape that week’s “Home and Backyard” episode at the show. A formal opening ceremony happens on Saturday morning with a Coffee Bar provided by Starbucks. Visitors can browse the Home Show on Saturday from 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Admission is free, and many great raffle prizes will be up for grabs. For more, call 570-341-7596 or visit www.lackawannahba.com

The show’s Presenting Sponsor– Perez Design. Build. Remodel will share new trends and ideas in kitchen remodeling during a seminar. Photo: Guy Cali Associates

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HOME

High and Dry…and Loving It! B-Dry Waterproofing Worked for Local Homeowner local homeowner, Sharon Gallo, sought out B-Dry® Basement Waterproofing services when she had to deal with water leakage in her home. Gallo chose BDry® because she continuously saw their advertisements, and the representative took time to explain everything to her.“I telephoned many times and asked many questions. Each time he took the time to explain every detail of the job with me,” says Gallo. She praises their speedy and thorough work, stating that her basement was spotless when the workers had finished.

A

“We installed the B-Dry® Drainage System below her inside basement floor to relieve the hydrostatic pressure under her foundation,” says Robert Clarke, presi-

dent and owner of B-Dry® System of Northeastern PA, Binghamton and New Jersey. ”We also installed BDry® Rigid Sealer, a white polymer which is pressed into waterproof sealer sheeting, on her basement walls.” A battery powered sump pump was also installed to guard the basement against power outages. Gallo says the true testament to their work came when she called unexpectedly to have the sump pump installed before a storm.“That very afternoon the pump was installed, and a few hours later the storm arrived and we lost electricity,”explains Gallo.“The new pump worked beautifully. Who provides service like that? My husband and I are most impressed.”

Established in 1980, Clarke’s operations have successfully waterproofed over 8,000 residential and commercial structures over the last 30 plus years. He has served as president of the National BDry Owner’s Association and remains a current director. Association members install the B-Dry® System Basement Waterproofing Process and also offer various crawl space services and foundation repair for homes, along with sump pump installation. They undergo continuous training and instruction. The BDry® Basement Waterproofing System, which comes with a lifetime warranty, has been installed in over 300,000 homes and commercial projects and has earned a material release from ICC-ES. Visit www.DryBasement.net or call 570-848-2454. –Casey Phillips


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HOME

Boost Energy Efficiency

AT YOUR HOUSE ou may be able to avoid getting hot under the collar when you see your energy bills if you heed a few hints that offer a good way to focus your home improvement efforts where they count.

Y

Upgrade Your Attic Insulation. Heat escaping through the attic may account for half your home’s heat loss. Make sure there’s at least 12 inches of insulation up there. Upgraded insulation can even help soundproof and weatherize your house for optimum living quality.

up to 10 percent of your heating and cooling costs. Check Your Furnace. Change filters frequently. Also clean air registers, baseboard heaters and radiators as needed. Change forced-air heating system air filters monthly as well. Take Advantage of Solar Energy. Simply opening the drapes on sunny winter days can let sunshine in to naturally warm your home. Similarly, closing them at night can reduce heat loss. Use a Humidifier. If your furnace doesn’t have a built-in humidifier, get one for frequently used areas. The additional moisture can make it feel as much as eight degrees warmer than the actual temperature.

Install Storm Windows and Doors. This can cut heat loss at those sites in half. If you can, replace single-pane windows with double- or triple-pane windows. Install an Automatic Setback or Programmable Thermostat that can adjust the house’s temperature around your schedule. When you’re away or asleep, program it to a cooler temperature. When you’re around, raise it, and you could save

Insulate the Concrete Slab That Supports Your House. It’s estimated that 10 percent or more of a home’s energy loss can come from an uninsulated foundation. By adding the EnergyEdge system from CertainTeed, you can cut back on bills and help save the environment.

Fritz Brothers Well Drilling Continuous Service Since 1930

Water Systems Pipe & Fittings Water Conditioning 100 Cliff Street, Honesdale, PA 18431 Located on Route 6 (570) 253-2660

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And the Winner is...

Gene Talerico

Photo by Guy Cali Associates

representing Marley’s Mission

Happenings Magazine’s 3rd Annual Ties that Bind Contest was launched in the December 2012 issue. Community leaders donned neck ties to represent non-profit organizations to which they’re “tied.” At HappeningsMagazinePa.com, hundreds of votes were cast and dollars were donated for these regional organizations through this contest! The 2012 Ties that Bind winner is Gene Talerico, 1st Assistant District Attorney, Lackawanna County District Attorney’s Office, representing Marley’s Mission. Marley’s Mission provides equine-assisted

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Ties

psycho-therapy free of charge to children and their families who have experienced trauma. Call 570-937-9399, or visit www.MarleysMission.com

HappeningsMagazinePA.com

that Bind.

February 2013


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Extraordinary Projects Begin with an Exceptional Builder Let Custom Building by Carriage Barn Make Your Dream Come True

Custom Building by Carriage Barn offers every service you need to take any renovation project from start to finish. Whatever style you’re looking for – from old-fashioned country to ultra modern – Carriage Barn’s experienced design experts will produce outstanding results, helping you achieve “the whole look” that you want.

Sam Mundrake

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A Homecoming Celebration

Matt McGloin

made a triumphant return to Scranton. After a long football season as the Penn State quarterback, his career came to a close, but not before a homecoming with his most loyal fans. McGloin was feted at not one, but two events in his honor on December 15 at St. Mary’s Center, Scranton. In the afternoon, he hosted a “tailgate” party for children where he signed nearly 500 autographs for children of all ages. In the evening, a meet-and-greet was held at the Center where over 550 fans, friends and family gathered along with eight of his PSU teammates and offensive line coach Mac McWhorter. Both events where held to benefit the Children’s Advocacy Center of Northeastern Pennsylvania (CAC). “This was a great team effort,” said Mary Ann LaPorta, executive director of CAC.“It was their team (PSU) supporting our team. I was glad to see Matt McGloin and his family help bring awareness to prevent child abuse.” “It’s been an honor to give back to Scranton and the community that has supported me throughout my career,” said McGloin. Both events had a combined total of 1,500 attendees raising more than $40,000 for CAC. –Tony Callaio 50

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Cultivating the Past

The Lands at Hillside Farms Continues the Tradition of Living Off the Land

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he Lands at Hillside Farms in Shavertown is a non-profit organization devoted to sustainable life choices. It is located on a 413-acre valley five minutes from Wilkes-Barre. In 1881, a wealthy coal magnate named William Conyngham from Wilkes-Barre purchased the valley, consolidating many small farms into a Victorian Gentleman's Estate. He owned more than 700 acres here and immediately added a Summer Cottage (34 rooms) which provided an escape from the hot Wilkes-Barre summers. The Cottage is a three-story, balloon-framed, elegant structure with a wrap-around porch. Outside, there is an Adirondack style pavilion. Conyngham developed an extensive farm system including greenhouses, Victorian Gardens, dairy barns, hog houses and horse facilities to breed Clydesdale Horses. The family managed the property until 2005 when the non-profit entered a lease-to-purchase agreement. The Lands at Hillside Farms was born and ultimately purchased the property in 2009.The purchase included thousands of original items within the buildings and across the farm including antique china, furniture and farm items. As a result, the property is a living history museum and a stunning representation of life in early rural America.

The goal of the Lands at Hillside Farms is to use the magnificent landscape as a backdrop for educating the public about healthy life choices. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to get to a point where people come to learn how to improve their lives while making it likely that people living here in a century or more have the same resources we have now,â&#x20AC;&#x153; explains Suzanne Kapral Kelly director of development and marketing. The Cottage may be rented for events such as weddings, business meetings, showers and farm-to-table dinners. The greenhouses grow plants sold in the adjacent Mercantile Store where American-made and Fair Trade products are also sold. The dairy store continues to produce and sell homemade milk in glass bottles, ice cream, butter and produce among many other wholesome products. Kelly says animals on the farm are treated humanely and are fed old fashioned diets while living as their ancestors did over a century ago. This spring, the Lands at Hillside Farms will serve food on-site with seating in one of the historic bank greenhouses. The Mercantile/ Greenhouse products will expand to allow for an extensive garden-like atmosphere where one may eat lunch after shopping, strolling the paths or touring the historic barns and outbuildings. For more, visit www.TheLandsAtHillsideFarms.org


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CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT

570-383-0291 www.shortenhomes.com

February 2013

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Bugaboo Young America Bloom 4moms Serena & Lily Naturepedic Aiden & Anais Bob Dwell Studio

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Major lines of furniture, executive furnishings & authentic oriental rugs, all at drastic reductions.

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Know Your Heart

How to Make Relationships Last

W

ith Valentine’s Day around the corner, Dr. David M. Weinberger, psychologist and author of “THINK SMART: Navigating Relationships,” discusses some thoughts on what makes a successful relationship. What made him want to write this book? “My philosophy comes from what I have learned through years of study and the privilege to work with individuals and couples in a career spanning almost four decades. It was my attempt to share with an audience I never met, the knowledge and insight gained from so many valuable human encounters.”

Dr.Weinberger offered these specific thoughts on building successful relationships: 1) Take your time, appreciate life in the moment, and get to know each other; 2) Stress the importance of trust and honesty; 3) Show mutual respect in valuing your partner; 4) Make communication a priority; 5) Learn to become a good listener; 6) Give each person a voice when making decisions; and 7) Have fun. At the end of your book you have a section called “Davidisms.”What are these, and can you give examples? Davidisms are relationship guidelines that help you to think smart. Here are examples that always seem to catch peoples’ attention.

What insights would you offer readers? First, I would say that what makes relationships succeed is not the same as what succeeds in making relationships.There is a difference between being in a relationship and building one. Relationships, like life, are about balance. Balancing thought with emotion can make the difference between decisions based on reason or those driven mainly by passion. Our emotions affect not only how we see things, but how we want to see them. 56

If you live in the present through past history, you trade off the future. If you are willing to play all the roles in a relationship where two people exist, you only need one person. People give what they need. Intrapersonal issues always supersede interpersonal ones. We are all cut out of the same fabric.What makes us different is how we wear our clothes. Many others can be found in the narrative. How can we become our own relationship expert? We are all architects of our own destiny. It’s about what you learn from your experiences. Take time to examine what drives your choices in people and decisions in relationships. Relationships start with yourself. Use your insight to make a difference in how you live. Do you have any final thoughts as Valentine’s Day approaches? If you are not with a special someone, be with someone who is special. Draw energy and positive feelings from being around other people. I suggest planning to spend time with a close friend or a family member. And remember, tomorrow is another day! Visit www.drdavidweinberger.com

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February 2013


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VINCE CAROLAN, LPC COUNSELOR

SERVING NEPA SINCE 1965

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see our Come in toction of large sele tings oil pain ! & prints

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Mulberry 426

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efferson-Werner recently celebrated the opening of Mulberry 426, the renovation of the former Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce building into 40 market-rate residential rental units and four streetlevel shops. With over 20 years of real estate development experience, Charlie Jefferson explains,

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

is new, it was in fact originally there in 1926. It was designed as a newspaper stand where one could enter from the street, purchase a paper and such, and then go through another set of doors to the lobby. The lobby is designed around the original configuration as well. Historic doors and trim were reused on floors two through four to mimic the locations of offices in 1926. We went to great lengths

Photo: Guy Cali Associates

All of the historically significant elements of

the building such as the facade, common areas and the fireplaces of the boardroom and library have been retained and incorporated into the apartments. The facade was restored with historically correct windows and trim. The lobby and entrances on both Mulberry and N. Washington streets were also restored to their original function. While some people may think the entrance on N. Washington

Charlie Jefferson, left, and Austin Burke review plans in Burkeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s former office. Jefferson is partner with Jefferson-Werner, which has over 20 years of experience in Pennsylvania and New Jersey; Burke has been President of the Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce since 1981.

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Photo: Guy Cali Associates

Board Room

to rescue the original 1926 elevator and modernize it.

Scranton is a great place to do business, and NEPA is an underestimated area. The people and the work ethic remind me a lot of the way things used to be. There is a real demand here for new, well-designed rentals in the downtown. People in general want to be around other people. There is only so much interaction you can have when you are stuck in a garden apartment where you need a car

February 2013

piece of land, but it takes a to buy a cup of coffee. special talent and commitYoung professionals and ment to search out an old retired people alike building and breathe new want to get out and life into it. There is a great walk around and be part feeling that comes from of a neighborhood. being able to walk around Nowhere in NEPA is this continued on page 60 more possible than in downtown Scranton. We are once My office on the second floor was literally again 100 percent leased before the wonderful corner office that we all completing the project. (Connell Lofts, aspire to, with a view of City Hall and The our other project, to Scranton Club. It is now a very attractive, this day remains consistently 100 perwell-lit kitchen. I am delighted that cent occupied.) We

have built many new buildings, but our passion and focus remains historic rehabs. Anyone can hire an architect to design a new building on a vacant

HappeningsMagazinePA.com

Charlie Jefferson was able to create an upscale project that people will be proud to live in and that the city will be proud to have on such a highly visible corner.

—Austin Burke

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Charlie Jefferson, left, with Jessica Kalinoski, property manager, and Dave Perrotta, construction manager.

and see people you know and sit in a local coffee shop or restaurant and watch the passersby. It’s why NYC is admired by so many people. We do urban projects in non-traditional places because no one else will. It is the ultimate in being green. While every-

one talks about LEED certified projects and sustainable materials, you can't get any more environmentally friendly than saving a 60,000-square-foot structure from the landfill. I believe it is incredibly important to preserve the past for the next generation. There is a

respect aspect for those who originally designed and constructed that landmark. There is a connection with the community that just can't be equaled with a new building. —Charlie Jefferson Mulberry 426 Developer

The Old Days ————————————————————— In 1923 “The Board of Trade” officially became The Scranton Chamber on November 21, 1923. At that time, the national slump in business, instead of discouraging the new Chamber, set them searching for larger quarters. The Mulberry and Washington site was purchased from the 60

Maloney Oil Company for $100,000. The construction of an impressive stone structure tested the courage of the newly organized Chamber of Commerce and became an act of faith, indicative of what would be needed in the future. A four-story building was HappeningsMagazinePA.com

drawn up with the price of $800,000. To finance this ambitious building, $400,000 in second mortgage bonds were sold to Scrantonians. Scranton banks advanced $300,000 through first mortgage bonds, and $100,000 was raised through office rentals. continued on page 62 February 2013


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Q THE

YEAR WA S

1906

Q

THE VICTROLA IS KING AND A NEW SCRANTON LAW FIRM FINDS ITS VOICE. For a long time, even the most important sounds could only be heard by a handful of people.The Victrola changed all that. By 1906, it was giving people a new voice. In the same year, a Scranton law firm called Powell Law opened its doors --and gave people a chance to have their voices heard in a different way. Every year since then, our team of experienced attorneys have been listening to our clients' voices, and using our skills and knowledge to make sure that our clients voices are heard loud and clear in any kind of legal situation. We know that a law firm can't make its reputation overnight. It takes years of trust, hard work and service -- in our case, 106 years, to be exact. When you, your family or your business needs legal advice, come to the law firm that's stood the test of time.

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STROUDSBURG 570-517-0403


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Continued from page 60 To meet interest payments and amortize this indebtedness, members of the Chamber included in their annual membership campaign the raising of a $25,000 sustaining fund. In this way, this imposing headquarters was paid for over the years. The Chamber moved into its spacious quarters, ready to expand its many fields of usefulness to the community and to the state. On this historic occasion, the members rose in the auditorium to sing,â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cym Rhonda,â&#x20AC;? with Hayden Evans accompanying on the $50,000 organ donated by Colonel Laurence A. Watres. The organ led to Sunday afternoon concerts in the Chamber auditorium. The promoters of these musicals later formed

Board Room

Charles M. Courboin, Designer of the Chamber of Commerce Organ

the Scranton Concert Association. The Chamber headquarters was the envy of every chamber nationwide. Chamber membership topped 4,000.

General Offices in The Chamber


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Win

a Woodloch Resort Two-Night Mountain Escape for a Family of Four! to ulations Congrat ’s winner, er Decemb osenberger R e Theres hanna, PA! y b o of T

here’s how... Visit HappeningsMagazinePA.com to request more information or mail your request to: Happenings Magazine P.O. Box 61 • Clarks Summit, PA Request Information from any Visitors Bureau or Attraction Listed Below: ❥ Endless Mountains Visitors Bureau ❥ Woodloch Pines Resort ❥ Clearfield County Tourism

Get away to Woodloch Pines Resort, TripAdvisor.com’s #6 Resort for Families in America, located in the Pocono Mountains Lake Region. Enjoy three delicious and abundant meals daily and have complete access to over 30 unique daily activities as well as world-class family-friendly, nightly entertainment. Blackout dates and certain restrictions will apply.

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PET TALES

Making Life Better for Older Pets

t’s never too early to take steps to make life easier for your pet for when he or she hits the golden years. Just as with people, proper diet, exercise and smart lifestyle decisions can delay some of the aging process and help your pet live a longer, healthier life.

I

That even holds true for one of the more common problems for aging pets– arthritis. Here are some steps you can take before your pet becomes a senior to help reduce the risk or lessen the severity of arthritis. Evaluate your pet’s body condition. Too much weight on your pet puts him or her at risk for diabetes, heart disease and arthritis. Excess weight puts too much strain on your pet’s joints, causing cartilage to degenerate. If you can’t feel your pet’s ribs, your pet needs to go on a diet. Also watch how your pet moves and plays for any issues that may be developing. Work with a veterinarian or holistic professional when you first spot problems. Read the label. Dogs and cats are carnivores and need a healthy dose of protein in their diet. Read the labels of

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their food and look for actual protein sources—chicken, beef and fish—instead of byproducts. Rice and other grains can also help your pet pack on extra pounds. Beware of too many preservatives as well. Get active. It’s very important to work on activities that keep your dog and cat moving. Walks, games of fetch and other activities keep your dog’s muscles toned and cut down on the risk of arthritis. It’s important to work play into your cat’s day as well to keep him or her moving, too. An ounce of prevention. Running, agility and other active games are a great way to keep your pet in shape. However, make sure you aren’t pushing your dog to work out too hard, and try to avoid activities that could put your dog at risk for bone or muscular injuries. These kinds of injuries make an animal more prone to certain types of

HappeningsMagazinePA.com

arthritis when aging. Start early on supplements. Nutritional supplements are a growing trend for pets these days. It helps to start your pets young on supplements that will help them rebuild cartilage before arthritis sets in. Look for products that provide glucosamine and chondroitin, such as Cosequin Joint Supplement and Cosequin Soft Chews for dogs and cats. Dasuquin Joint Supplements for dogs and cats provide a more advanced formula that helps rebuild your pet’s cartilage and lessen joint inflammation. Some of these products come in soft chews for dogs and a powder that can be sprinkled in food for cats.

February 2013


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Who’s the Cutest of them All? et at ruary pom b e ! F e t i ur favogsrMagazinePA.c o y r o f Vote w.Happenin ives ww

ner rece The win gs bandanna! nin a Happe

Marla Coury “Madiso n” Tzu/Laso p of Scranton adopted uppy. This th is S h ih cu to hide sho es under th rious cookie hunter loves e couch. atactivity is e ’s favorite d e st re C her Chinese tston. eerin says it Jennifer Sh ily resides in West P m fa e h .T g in

n” “Madaly

“King Ko ng”

“Joe”

over the d watches mn n u h sc a D old utu This 7-year- me he shares with A o h n to n a cr S Gramigna.

The votes are in... January’s Pet of the Month is.. Chausette McCarthy of Carbondale. Congratulations!

This Pit Bu ll home in Ca / Bull Mastiff mix live rbondale w s ith Aaron P large at hillips.


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Have Room in Your Heart?

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between exits 180 and 182B from I-81

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February 2013

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Give YourSweet ie exceptional handcrafted jewels & other such lovelies!

TREASURE HUNTING Bridge Street Marketplace– Over 7,000 square feet of shopping encompasses a consignment area as well as a multi-vendor co-op. Antique, vintage, gently used, new, hand-crafted and trash-to-treasure items. Credit cards accepted. Call for hours. Bridge St. (Rte. 29), Tunkhannock. 570-836-4456.

CLOE & Company- Peruse through many locally handcrafted & AMERICAN MADE wares. We are one of the only shoppes in the area dedicated to offering American made goodsantiques, vintage jewelry, handcrafted or manufactured items. We do Estate Sales. Hours: Tues.Sat. 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Wed. 10 a.m.-7:30 p.m. 410 S. State St., Clarks Summit. 570-587-2563.

Jukebox Classics and Vintage Slot Machines–

Winter Hours:Tues.- Sat.10:00-4:30 p.m. Every Wed.til 7:30 facebook.com/cloecompny 410 S. State St. • Clarks Summit • 587-2563

Specializing in Game Room Collectables, Pin Ball Machines, Juke Boxes (old & new), barber shop poles & chairs, Vintage Gas Pumps, Cookie Jars, Salt & Pepper Shakers, Paintings, Neon Signs, Jewelry, Rugs, Coca Cola items, Betty Boop items and more. 210 Main Ave, Hawley. Phone 570-2269411 or 570-241-6230, email: jukesslots@aol.com

Mary’s Home Furnishings– 10766 State Route 29, South Montrose PA. Antiques - Privately owned and operated. Oak and country furniture (1800’s-1900’s). Vintage accessories - lamps, linens, early prints & frames. Country kitchen cabinets, tables, & kitchenware. Original local Art. Postcards, much more. Call first. Mary B. Gere, Owner. 570-278-2187 www.antiquessusqco.com/marys

Olde Barn Centre/Antiques & SuchAn 1860s Quaker Barn filled with antique furniture of all periods. 12 antique dealers with treasures & collectibles for your home. Credit cards and layaway welcome. 1605 Rte. 220 Highway, Pennsdale. 1 mile east of exit 15 of I-180. Open daily 10-5. Info: 570-546-7493 or www.oldebarncentre.com 11 West Tioga Street Tunkhannock PA 570.836.2514

TUES-THURS & SAT:11-5 • FRI 11-6 • SUN 12-4

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CARRIAGE BARN ANTIQUES “If music be the food of love, play on.” —William Shakespeare

Valentine’s gifts that stand the test of time. Pool tables k Jukeboxes k Clocks k Furniture k Toys k Lighting k Conversation pieces

T

he Carriage Barn features two floors of room-like settings displaying authentic antiques & glassware. Carriage Barn boasts over 6,000 square feet of antiques. Custom refinishing, woodworking and delivery. Add a classic piece of the past to complement your life today!

1494 Fairview Road, Clarks Summit, PA From I-81: Take Waverly Exit 197

Going North: right at end of ramp, then the next two rights Going South: left at end of ramps, then the next two rights

www.carriagebarnantiques.com • (570) 587-5405


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WHERE TO DINE Alphonso's Restaurant- Italian/American cuisine. Serving breakfast, lunch & dinner Mon.-Sat. 6 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun. 6 a.m.-3 p.m. Formerly the Waffle Shop. Casual family dining. Entrees such as Pasta Alphonso, Frutti de Mari. Special discount on college students & senior citizens’ take out menu. Catering available. 917 Wyoming Ave. Scranton. 570-955-5450. Arcaro & Genell- On Main Street, Old Forge since 1962. Carrying on the family tradition of homemade Italian specialty entrees, seafood, steak, chicken, Veal & much more. Old Forge Red & White Pizza. Open Monday -Saturday, lunch at 11 a.m., dinner at 3 p.m.; takeout available. Private parties Sun. Catering services available on and off premise. www.arcarongenell. 570-457-5555.

Armetta’s- see ad page 77 Blue Shutters- see ad page 79 Cafe Trio- The newest addition to the Shops @ 400 Spruce in Scranton. Featuring modern Mediterranean cuisine. Serving breakfast sandwiches, paninis, wrapinis, delicious soups and salads. Relax on leather couches in our comfortable commons area. Enjoy an espresso or your favorite coffee drink. Dine in or take out. Mon.-Sat. 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. 570-207-3938.

Carl Von Luger Steak & Seafood- A family tradition since 1887. Casual fine dining in downtown Scranton. USDA prime steaks & fresh seafood. Lunches from $5.95; dinners starting at $10.95. Entertainment. Friday Night Jazz Lounge 7-11 p.m. Sunday brunch 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Dinner dress code. Outdoor dining available. Open daily. 301 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. 570-955-5290 www.carlvonluger.com

Carmen’s Restaurant & Wine Bar- see ad page 124

Coney Island Lunch- A Scranton tradition since 1923. Taste the Texas Wieners and Texas Hamburgers that made us famous. Serving homemade soups, old-fashioned rice pudding and chili-con-carne. Enjoy our legendary chili sauce, created from a closely-guarded family recipe, eat in or take it out. Open Mon.-Sat. 10:30 a.m.- 6 p.m., Sun. noon-6:30 p.m. 515 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. 570-961-9004. www.texas-wiener.com Ehrhardt’s Waterfront Restaurant- Overlooking beautiful Lake Wallenpaupack, Ehrhardt’s cozy atmosphere and delicious food will have you returning time and time again. We offer a variety of steaks, seafood, salads, burgers, sandwiches and more! Open 7 days a week 11:30 a.m. Pub open later. Route 507, Hawley. 570-226-2124. www.ehrhardts.com El Rincon Authentic Mexican Cuisine- Giving a homemade twist to the traditional Burritos, Tacos, Enchiladas and specialty platters that range from steaks, chicken and seafood. Full bar featuring classic Margarita, etc. Mon.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Sun. noon-10 p.m. Gift certificates available. Like us on Facebook. 69 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre. 570-822-3942. The French Manor- see ad page 84 Grassi’s- A new era of casual elegance! Enjoy a progressive menu of authentic Italian fare in a Tuscan-inspired ambiance. Family-owned & operated. Featuring traditional Italian entrees & American cuisine. Relax in the martini/wine bar. Wed.-Thurs. 5-9 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 5-10 p.m. , Sun. 5-8 p.m. 1092 Rte. 502, Spring Brook. 570-471-3016. www.grassis.net

Coccetti's A Restaurant & Bakery- Enjoy charming decor & unique breakfast & lunch creations including baked stuffed French Toast & funky chicken salad. Daily homemade baked goods including our popular chocolate fudge iced brownies! Daily breakfast and lunch specials. Tuesday-Friday 7 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m.-noon. Follow us on Facebook. 1124 Main St., Peckville. 570-489-4000.

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Gresham’s Chop House- Dine in our beautiful dining room, cozy bar or under the awning on our deck, and enjoy dazzling views of Lake Wallenpaupack while choosing from delicious steaks, seafood, Italian specialties and more. Visit us at www.greshamschophouse.com Rte. 6, Hawley. Open 7 days at 4 p.m. 570-226-1500. Jim’s Place- Back in a new location. Featuring a cozy & family friendly dining area, spacious outdoor deck & original menu of salads, grinders, burgers & the pizza that made us famous. BYOB and just like before....No Wings, No Karaoke....No Kidding. Lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Dinner 4-10 p.m. Open 7 days. 206 Grand Ave., Clarks Summit. 570-587-8686.

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WHERE TO DINE Katrina’s Pizza & Hoagies- Casual, comfortable dining. Try our popular 8-inch hoagie for $3 or our personal pizzas for $3.99. Breakfast daily 6 a.m.-noon. Lunch & dinner served Tues.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 11 a.m.-11p.m. Dine in/Take out. Delivery available. Credit Cards accepted. 813 Boulevard Ave. Dickson City. 570-489-8955.

Perkins Restaurant & Bakery- see ad page 122 Quaker Steak & Lube- see ad page 122 Sand Spring Modern Cuisine- Exciting food made from fresh, vibrant ingredients. Casual atmosphere with personalized service and a dynamic wine list. Awarded Open Table’s “Fit for Foodies,”“Best Service,” “Best Wine List,” and “Best Overall” in the Pocono Mountains and Philadelphia Suburbs. 570-595-3015. Reservations recommended. Dinner Wed.–Sun. Sand Spring Rd., Cresco www.sandspringdining.com

Settlers Inn-- see ad page 95 Shenanigans- see ad page 85 Six East Restaurant- see ad page 81 Sonic- See ad page 77 Stirna’s Restaurant & Bar- More than 100 years Kelly’s Pub & Eatery- Established in 1990 by the Cosgrove sisters. Family, friendly atmosphere. Serving, soups, appetizers, sandwiches, burgers, pizza, fries, cold beer and Award-Winning Hot Wings. Take out orders available and gift certificates. Credit cards accepted. Handicap accessible. 1802 Cedar Avenue, Scranton. 570-346-9758. www.kpehotwings.com

in service. Catering on & off premises seven days a week, for all your needs- large or small. Exclusive caterer for LaBuona Vita, formally the Parish Center, Dunmore. Visit our smoke-free bar & restaurant. Hours: Tues.-Sat. 4 p.m. Until closing. 120 W. Market St., N. Scranton, 570-961-9681 570-343-5742.

Krispy Kreme- See ad page 77 La Tonalteca- see ad page 81 Ledges- see ad page 95 Leggio’s Italian Ristorante- Affordable family dining in a Tuscan / Mediterranean decor. Breakfast. Tues.- Fri. 7-11 a.m. Sat. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Lunch & Dinner Sun. - Thurs.11a.m.-10 p.m. Fri. & Sat.11 a.m.-11 p.m. Full Bar. Happy Hour. Food prepared to order. Appetizers. Seafood, chicken, veal, pasta. Pizza, sandwiches/wraps. 64 East Center Hill Rd. Dallas. 570-675-4511.

Louie’s Prime- see ad page 85 Manhattan Manor- Carbondale's newest upscale restaurant/bar/lounge offering small plates (for sharing) of Italian, American and International cuisine. Meet friends for drinks or relax with family in the casual nonsmoking atmosphere. Owned and operated by the Wallis family. Enclosed outdoor patio open year around! Open Tues.-Sat. from 5 p.m. 8 Salem Ave. 570-282-2044.

Mecca’s Place - An Italian family tradition of great food & friends. Buffet-style catering for any party or gathering. Accommodating up to 145 people. Take-outs available. Reservations accepted. Open: Thursday, Friday & Saturday, Bar 3 p.m., Dining Room 5 p.m. Bar Open for Monday night football. 224 Erie Street, Dunmore, PA (Bunker Hill Section) 570-961-9498.

Nick’s Lake House- see ad page 85 Patsel's- see ad page 83

February 2013

Stone Bridge Inn & Restaurant- Quaint European village nestled on a hilltop, surrounded by rolling countryside – discover Northeast PA’s best-kept secret! Excellent cuisine in a casual atmosphere, multilevel tavern & patio with entertainment. Monthly Wine Tasting Dinners. Serving dinner Wed.-Sun. I-81, Exit 206, Rt. 374 East two miles past Elk Mountain, Union Dale. 570-679-9500. www.stone-bridge-inn.com Tiffany’s- see ad page 79 Tokyo Tea House- Authentic Japanese cuisine, sushi & vegetarian specials. The finest miso soup & traditional Japanese desserts including Mochi & green tea, ice cream, Kids favorites. Open for lunch & dinner, Saki, beer, cocktails. Easy to get to from anywhere in NEPA, 1/4 mile west of Interstate 380, Rte. 940 Pocono Summit. Closed Tuesdays. 570-839-8880. www.tokyoteahouse.us

Twigs- see ad page 83

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FOOD

AGING LIKE FINE WINE? milk shake. Aside from the grease, salt and excessive calories, we didn't overeat here. If the right combination sits there, it can literally ferment in our systems, causing gas, etc. However we are not meant to be distilleries. The problem with this pattern is that our preferred style of eating doesn't allow for the body to properly eat, digest and get rid of a meal before it gets loaded down again. This results in food adhering to the walls of our intestines in the form of garbage. This bogs our systems down over time resulting in lack of energy and a lesser state of overall health.

o many things in life seem to get better with age. Cheese, wine and our financial portfolios (hopefully). One thing that doesn't age so well is food in our digestive tracts. When we eat, it goes into our stomachs and awaits enzyme release that begins the process of breaking down and removing the vitamins and minerals for our body to use.

S

If we eat a meal composed of the average American diet loaded with proteins and processed carbohydrates, we have begun our own distillation process. Proteins are heavy and not quickly digested, nor is the butter-laden whipped potato. The petite salad and vegetable consumed are great but not adequate to make up for the overwhelming load of protein and starch. This may not seem like it is really that poor of a meal for us; maybe it isn't. However 12 hours later this meal still sits in our system awaiting breakdown, and it is followed up by a burger, fries and a 72

We should eat foods that are quick exiting– fresh fruits, vegetables, whole grains and modest amounts of protein. Not to oversimplify, but but we should strive for combinations that help each other digest.

Turkey Stew Osso Buco over Brown Rice 1 lb. turkey breast meat– cubed and dusted with seasoned flour 6 oz. medium mushrooms– quartered 1 small Vidalia onion– diced 6 leaves fresh basil– stacked and sliced into ribbons 6 plum tomatoes– cut in 1/6 wedges 1 T. olive oil 1 cup beef stock 1.5cups brown rice 1. Heat oil in sautee pan 2. Brown floured turkey; add onion, mushrooms and tomatoes 3. Add beef stock; cover; reduce to simmer 4. As liquid reduces to a thicker saucy state, add cut basil; adjust with salt and pepper 5. Cook brown rice according to instructions Serve Turkey Stew over Rice From the kitchen of Michael Davis, Executive Chef Susquehanna Health

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omance is on the menu every night at Grassi's. Enjoy an intimate evening in our elegant dining room or cozy martini and wine bar. Savor a wide array of homemade pasta, hand-cut steaks, fresh seafood and top quality meats. Delight in salads, soups and a variety of desserts elegantly prepared by our pastry chef.

Wed.-Thu. 5-9 p.m. Fri.-Sat. 5-10 p.m. â&#x20AC;˘ Sun. 5-8 p.m.

1092 STATE ROUTE 502 SPRING BROOK, PA 570-471-3016 WWW.GRASSIS.NET

Where you will eat well.


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FOOD&DRINK

Love at First Bite

Signature Appetizers from Local Restaurants –Erika A. Bruckner

wasabi cream and oyster cocktail featuring oysters harvested off the coast of Assateague Island. Pair it: Trout and Tuna – Dark beer

Head to Nick’s Lake House in Lake Harmony for the popular boneless wings, or be a bit more daring with the Tuna Taki (pictured above), sushi-grade Ahi tuna pan seared, sliced thin, encrusted with sesame seeds, served with seaweed salad and finished with teriyaki glaze. Pair it: Wings – Sam Adams beer (and football!) At Cooper’s Seafood House in Scranton and Cooper’s Seafood Waterfront in Pittston, rainbow trout is smoked inhouse for signature flavor. Appetizer favorites revolve with the seasons, such as pepperencrusted blackened Ahi tuna with salad and

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Appetizers at Jim’s Place in Clarks Summit are all about setting the stage for a great pizza. Italian favorites top the list, like homemade meatballs smothered in sauce and topped with mozzarella and provolone cheeses. Artichoke wraps showcase marinated artichoke hearts topped with roasted sweet red peppers and wrapped in prosciuttini, all drizzled with extra virgin olive oil and spices. Pair it: Red or white wine or cold beer (BYOB) Fresh lobster is mixed in a cream sauce made from five different cheeses and roasted red peppers and then topped with panko

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breading. If you’re already craving this appetizer, make a reservation at Grassi’s Restaurant in Spring Brook Township. Another unique dish is Arancini (pictured below center), featuring Arborio rice folded with roasted peppers, fresh herbs and cheeses and a balsamic drizzle. Pair it: Homemade wines by Grassi’s including Passion, Timeless and Mountain Goat Red Kick start your meal at Manhattan Manor in Carbondale with Boom Boom Shrimp, crispy, panko-fried shrimp tossed in a creamy spicy sauce with red pepper flakes and green onion. The Tuna Endive appetizer is a cool treat with sesame-seared Ahi tuna served on a leaf of endive with a teriyaki drizzle and cucumber wasabi dressing. Pair it: The old mentality of red wine with red meat and white wine with fish is traditional. If you like Pinot Evil Pinot Noir with your tuna endive appetizer, by all means have it! Or try a Blue Lagoon or Bikini Martini, both with flavored vodka and fresh squeezed juices.

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FOOD&DRINK

There’s an App for That! Whether guests eat them before or alongside their burgers and dogs, tots (pictured above) are the most popular starter at Sonic Drive-In in Wilkes-Barre. These crispy little potato pieces can stand alone or can be enjoyed with ketchup, with cheese or with cheese and chili! Pair it: Route 44 Cherry Limeade Sand Spring Modern Cuisine in Cresco serves up favorites like Fresh Papperdelle with Veal Ragu and Parmigiano Reggiano and Seared Hudson Valley Foie Gras with Apple Confit and Sherry Reduction. Pair it: Pinot Noir from Oregon Housemade Open Ravioli is a favorite at the Settlers Inn in Hawley. Ingredients for this dish change daily at this farm-to-table restaurant. Or, cozy up to Warm Crispy Phyllo Wrapped Goat Cheese with Apple Ginger Chutney. Want to try your hand at these dishes? All recipes are available at the front desk. Pair it: Goat Cheese - Blanche de Bruxelles Wit Beer continued on page 76

Hors D’oeuvres: Literally “outside the work”in French; food served before the main course or in place of a full meal Crudités: Pieces of raw vegetables, served often with dip Butlered Hors D’oeuvres: Passed by waiters before a meal Stationary Hors D’oeuvres: Served at the dinner table after guests are seated Appetizers: A small amount of food served before a meal to stimulate the appetite Antipasto: Literally “before food” in Italian; course of appetizers showcasing a variety of foods, such as olives, anchovies, meats or artichoke hearts Small Plates: Small servings of many foods; can be eaten before an entrée or combined into a full meal Maza: Arabic for “feast;” assortment of small portions of Middle Eastern foods served together, such as stuffed grape leaves, hummus and baba ghanuouj Amuse-bouche: Literally a “mouth amuser” in French; a complimentary piece of bite-size food served before a meal or between courses Tapas: Spanish-inspired small plates Canapé: Appetizer with bread or cracker base topped with a savory spread Apéritifs: Alcoholic drink served before a meal Dim Sum: Bite-sized, Chinese appetizers Zensai: Literally “before food” in Japanese, snacks and appetizers like edamame and steamed shellfish served with hot sake Zakuski: Russian buffet-style appetizers such as smoked meats, caviar and pickled vegetables

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FOOD&DRINK Continued from page 75

Unique items like French Onion Soup Bites are the centerpiece of a small plates menu at Glass Wine Bar and Bistro at Ledges Hotel in Hawley. Dips, cheese, charcuterie and small plates are designed for sharing and sampling, served alongside selections from the All-American Wine and Beer List. Pair it: Pine Ridge Chenin Blanc/Viognier 2011 Mild, Medium, Hot or Bee Sting (house honey-garlic BBQ) sauces can smother your wings at Ehrhardt’s Waterfront Restaurant in Hawley. On a chilly winter day, indulge in what the chef describes as “ooeygooey deliciousness” with Chili Dip (pictured above right), featuring Ehrhardt’s award-winning chili layered with cream cheese, Wisconsin cheddar jack cheese and red onions. Pair

it: Wings – Draft beers; Chili Dip – Grandma’s Sweet Tea (Bourbon, peach schnapps, triple sec, lemonade and iced tea) Pique your tastes at the French Manor in South Sterling with Foie Gras Torchon served with fig and ice wine gelee, asparagus chips, pear red wine reduction and prosciutto powder alongside a can-

died apple nest. A favorite on this menu is the Five Spice and Panko breaded Calamari with a Thai chili hollandaise. Pair it: Calamari - firestone Riesling (its light body and acidity will not overpower the panko breadcrumbs and counter the Thai chili hollandaise); Foie Gras Sauternes (a French sweet wine for the classic sweet and savory combination) Asian Pork Belly Buns (pictured below left) at Patsel’s Restaurant are served with home made steamed buns, house-made pickles and kimchi. Unique twists like Lobster Mac and Cheese are favorite starters at the Clarks Summit restaurant. Pair it: Pork – Prosecco or crisp champagne; Lobster – Sauvignon Blanc or light beer


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style

Represents the of cuisine of the restaurant, setting the mood for what is to come.”-Sand Spring Modern Cuisine, Chef/Owner Mark Reinhardt “Is something exciting for the palate that makes you want to continue on to the next course.You want to be intrigued, enticed and delighted.” -The Settlers Inn Beverage Director Tiffany Rogers

“Needs to pack a punch of flavor. It needs to be enticing and

truly something special,

otherwise a guest will just skip an appetizer and save room for dessert.This first impression needs to leave people excited for what is next.”-Glass Wine Bar & Bistro Ledges Hotel Director of Food & Beverage Marla Tremsky “Sets the stage for a warm, family dinner. Everyone together sharing and enjoying appetizers is a great way to start the meal.” -Ehrhardt’s Waterfront Restaurant Executive Chef Robert Williams “Is like the overture to a concert. It sets the stage for the next course or courses. Great ones the are items that diner and create excitement for some new taste.” Patsel’s Restaurant Executive Chef Michael J. Bodner (his lobster mac and cheese pictured above)

visually stimulate

“Something that can be shared.” - Nick’s Lake House Head Chef Christopher Santucci “Is not something I’m going to get at any other place. It should be interesting - just enough to pique taste buds but not to be overwhelming.An appe78

tizer quells initial hunger and allows you to relax and enjoy the experience instead of focusing on when the entree is coming.If you don’t order a starter, you’re missing out.It tends to start conversation and makes it

a memorable experience instead of an everyday meal.” -Cooper’s Seafood House Executive Chef Mark Cooper “Is the first thing people order and the first thing they’ll remember when they think of the restaurant. Presentation and taste are key; it has to be different than anything people usually see - an eyecatcher.To keep catching someone’s eye, we change them constantly and prepare items upon request.” -Grassi‘s Restaurant Cook Cody Soiker “Is part of a variety of great items to choose from including large portions to share with friends.You can never go wrong with any item that is dripping with chili and cheese!” -Sonic Drive-In Wilkes-Barre Shift Manager Josh Glasson “Is meant to give the diner a taste of something prior to the entree. Our Chef Jake Savage says that there is

nothing wrong with ordering appetizers for a meal! It can give the diner an array of different things to try if they are indecisive.” -Manhattan Manor Co-Owner Katlyn Wallis “Layers of flavors and textures that leave you craving more... Unless you serve an amuse bouche, appetizers are your first impression to wow the guest.”-The French Manor Executive Chef Jeff Huntzinger

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THE BLUE SHUTTERS

M ODERN A MERICAN C UISINE • O LD -FASHIONED C OCKTAILS

Unusual Dining • Banquets • Private Parties • Custom Events

Experience the New Blue Shutters Modern American Cuisine Served in a Timeless Setting Nationally Recognized Executive Chef Guy Ciccone RT. 435

February 2013

AT

BLUE SHUTTERS RD • ELMHURST • 570.842-9497 • theblueshutters.com

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weet endings are expected.Entrees have already been revealed on response cards.One chance to truly impress guests at an event is with an attention-getting cocktail hour with distinctive hors d’oeuvres.Professionals weigh in on how to make the celebration shine from the start.

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Woodloch Resort owner Robert Kiesendahl says cocktail-and-appetizer parties may work well as fundraising events.“Appetizer-only events have a ‘mix-and-mingle’ atmosphere,” he explains. “Creating space and an open layout of the room is desirable; the intent is to get people to be social while having a ‘small bite.’” Any combination of butler-style hors

Grand Openings Skytop Lodge’s Executive Chef Steve Sundberg and Sous Chef Bill Seitzinger agree; especially with the first course, presentation is important. They recommend serving six to eight choices of light bites. Use color, texture and unexpected elements and ingredients to make the food’s presentation stand out. To create a very interactive atmosphere at a special event, trade the sitdown dinner for hors d’oeuvres served alongside carving stations and other interactive stations. 80

d’oeuvres, stations and chaffing dishes could work well for this type of event. While four hot and four cold appetizers are recommended for appetizer-only events, Keisendahl says to take into account the type of appetizer and length of the event.“A chicken tender is much more filling than a tuna canapé, and for a lengthier event,

more food may be appropriate,” he notes. Weddings and special-event dinners at Woodloch typically feature three to four appetizers, with a combination of both hot and cold choices. Chef Ryne Spaudling notes, “At Woodloch, appetizers are endless, so everyone will have their fill.” Besides easing guests’ hunger while enjoy-

Capture Guests’ Attention with Impressive Hors D’oeuvres ing a cocktail,“hors d’oeuvres set a stage by making the first impression of the event,” explains Chef David Nordenhold.“If they are presented nicely and taste good, they set the tone for the evening by creating a ‘wow’ factor.” Chef Dan Corcoran says a great appetizer showcases,“A good balance of continued on page 82

Sample Starters Woodloch Resort, Hawley Most Popular: Lollipop lamb chops, mini cordon bleus and beef wellington– braised beef in a puff pastry Most Unique: Tuna Nacho with sushi grade tuna, wakame and tabiko caviar Hot Appetizer: Scallops wrapped in bacon and a Lemon Grass Pot Sticker Cold Appetizer: Shrimp cocktail squares Vegetarian: Antipasto Kabobs and mini quiche Pair It: Champagne HappeningsMagazinePA.com

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570.489.6414 or 570.489.8974 accentuatecaterers.com

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February 2013

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Continued from page 80 pleases the palate, eases guests’ hunger and gives an impression; it also encourages interaction.“Serving Mike Catalano, owner of Al passed hors d’oeuvres gets Mia Amore in Dickson City, people to mingle and talk says cocktail hour not only more. It creates an atmosphere Sample Starters and gives Skytop Lodge, Skytop guests something to do.” He Most Unique: Braised pork recommends cheeks serving six to Hot Appetizer: Crab cake, seven appetiztempura shrimp ers and says Cold Appetizer: Shrimp great hors cocktail d’oeuvres Vegetarian: Fresh mozshould be onezarella with plum tomatoes, bite finger fresh basil, caper berries, balfoods that guests can eat samic and Olive Oil without getting Pair it:White wine or Vodka messy. martini flavor and textures; small bites work best.”

–Erika A. Bruckner

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Sample Starters Al Mia Amore, Dickson City Most Popular: Stuffed mushrooms with sausage Most Unique: Pasta Station Cold Appetizer: Bruschetta; fresh mozzarella and toast with marinated tomatoes, onions and fresh basil Vegetarian: Spanakopita; puff pastry with spinach and cheese Pair it: Pino Grigio or Pino Noir

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570.836.0433 • twigscafe.com Rte. 6, Historic Downtown Tunkhannock

Valentine’s Day Thursday, Feb. 14 Lunch 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dinner 5 – 9 p.m.

Craft Beer & Food Tasting Friday, Feb. 22 6:30 p.m.

Breakfast with the Bunny Saturday, March 23 9:30 and 11:30 a.m.

Routes 6 & 11, Clarks Summit, PA 570.563.2000 • www.patsels.com February 2013

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First-Course Coupling Pairing Dinner Party Wines and Appetizers Light bites and wine make a classic dinner party opening course. Combinations as simple as fine wine, fruit and cheese set the stage for a grand event or hold their own as reception fare. Wine pairing experts at Chateau LaFayette Reneau in New York recommend serving one or two light-bodied, flavorful wines with an appetizer course. “The wine should not overpower the appetizer, yet at the same

time open the taste buds,” explains Betty Reno, office manager and culinary consultant. “A favorite appetizer of ours is rounds of toasted French baguette topped with mounds of warm, fried eggplant and shavings of Bel Ceillo cheese from Muranda Cheese Company in Waterloo, NY,” says Reno. To make, place the assembled appetizers in a 400-degree oven for about five minutes until the cheese melts. It pairs well with Chateau LaFayette

Reneau’s Cuvee Rouge or Roaring Red.“There’s nothing like it to ward off the chill of a winter blizzard,” admits Reno! Chateau LaFayette Reneau’s signature gold medal wincontinued on page 86

Where Sweet Endings Begin Wedding Shower Communion Anniversary Graduation Mother’s Day

Cathy Reppert • 570.283.CAKE (2253) 271 Wyoming Ave., Kingston, PA eatcakefirst.com 84

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Eventually Everyone Shows Up At

Steaks • Seafood • Chicken Burgers • Salads • Pasta Great Appetizers & Sandwiches

Karaoke Every Weekend POCONOS ALL NEW DANCE CLUB

Boomers Dance Club Spinning Today’s Hottest Hits Open 4 p.m. Mon-Fri • Open noon Sat & Sun

98 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony, PA 18624

570.722.1100 Reservations and Directions

Waterfront Dining at its Best

Open for Lunch and dinner 7 days a week

Happy Hour Mon-Friday 5 to 7 pm Tuesday, Pizza Night Wednesday, Wing Night At the Water’s Edge 110 South Lake Drive, Lake Harmony, PA 18624

570.722.2500

taste Reservations and Directions

great FEBRUARY 13 Women & Wine

Weddings • Rehearsal Dinners Showers and More! " LIFE ISN'T MEASURED IN MINUTES BUT IN MOMENTS"

280 Main St., Dickson City, PA • 383-0321 February 2013

THURSDAY TASTE OF ITALY

Traditional New York Steak House featuring Prime Aged Steaks, Terrific Seafood and Outstanding Service

570.722.3990 for reservations Open Sunday thru Thursday 4p.m.-9:30pm Friday & Saturday 4pm-10:30pm Closed Monday 134 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony, PA 18624

www.dinelakeharmonypa.com

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FOOD&DRINK Continued from page 84 ning Cabernet Sauvignon is an excellent example of a traditional Bordeaux style wine. All of the wineries’ cabernets are made from grapes grown at their vineyard on Seneca Lake from vines imported from Bordeaux region of France. Current vintages are 2009 and Owners Reserve 2005, seen here paired with smoky cheese, herbed cheese, traditional French baguette and fruit. Call 1-800-4-NY-WINE or visit www.clrwine.com. –Erika A. Bruckner

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Appet izers & Wine Pairing Recommendations from Chateau LaFayette Reneau:

Cheese and Crackers- Chateau LaFayette Reneau Cuvee Rouge or Seyval-Chardonnay, depending on the cheese Stuffed Mushrooms- Chateau LaFayette Reneau Cuvee Rouge Crab Dip- Chateau LaFayette Reneau Dry Riesling Bruschetta- Chateau LaFayette Reneau Seyval-Chardonnay Crudités- Chateau LaFayette Reneau Semi-Dry Riesling Fried Ravioli- Chateau LaFayette Reneau Roaring Red Antipasto- Chateau LaFayette Reneau Roaring Red Mini Egg Rolls- Chateau Lafayette Reneau Northern White Mini Quiche- Chateau LaFayette Reneau Seyval-Chardonnay

Find chef’s recipes for appetizers at www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com!

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Gifts from the

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Pretty in Pink 11/2 carat oval pink sapphire with half carat round diamonds set in 14K white gold. Available at: Nye Jewelers, Dickson C ity

Sweets for Your Sweetie! Everyone's favoriteâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;a heart shaped box full of Leopold's best. Retail: $7-$35 Available at: Chocolates by Leopold, Montrose

Bead the One! Pandora Jewelry. Retail: Bracelets starting at $45; beads start at $25 Available at: 3 Sisters, Kingston

To Your Romance! "Riesling Du Monde," voted Best New World White! Dry Riesling is perfectly structured for any meal. Dry, elegant melon and citrus character with a slight spritz! Retail: $14 Available at: Chateau Lafayatee Reneau 88

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Let Your Feelings Shine!

Dazzle Her! Pandora â&#x20AC;&#x153;Be My Valentineâ&#x20AC;? gift set featuring one pair of heart stud earrings and one heart pendant on a necklace chain presented in a special porcelain box. Limited edition. Good while supplies last. Retail: $125 Available at: Steve Pronko Jewelers, Clarks Summit & Dickson City

69 points of round, high-quality, brilliantcut diamonds surround this 18K white and rose gold masterpiece. A rose gold saucer center polished to a high mirror finish to further enhance the spectacular floralshaped diamond center. Available at: Glint of Gold, Scranton

Indulge! Bella's Bling Truffles available in flavors such as chocolate, amaretto, pina colada and raspberry. Sold individually and in packages of up to six. Retail: starting at $3.50 Available at Bella Faccias, Scranton

Spark a Passion

Be Charming Alex and Ani Bangle Charm Bracelets made in America from recycled materials. Retail: Starting at $21.98 Available at: Everything Natural, Clarks Summit

Henrietta glass diffusers, vases, ring holders, etc. Retail: starting at $20 Available at Wisnosky Jewelers, Tunkhannock

continued on page 90 February 2013

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Good Scents Crabtree & Evelyn Citron-honey & coriander bath and shower gel, body scrub, bar soap, hand therapy and recovery plus antibacterial moisturizing hand gel. Retail: $15-$23 Available at: Corky’s Garden Path, Justus

For a Classic Love Buy one pearl necklace, and get a pearl bracelet free. Retail: $150 Available at: Adams’s Jewelry, Stroudsburg

Share a Laugh! Comedian Bobby Collins in concert, Feb. 15. American Comedy Award winner & Grammy nominee. Tickets: $30 Available at: State Theatre, Easton HH_5x3.875Feb_Layout 1 1/2/2013 2:37 PM Page 1

The First. Still the Best.

State Theatre Center For The Arts Easy Access From RT 33 South!

Wed., Feb. 6

Smokey Joe’s Cafe

8 PM - $35/$25

7:30 PM - $50/$45

John Denver

A Rocky Mountain High Tribute

Fri., Feb. 8

Sponsored by The Morning Call Butz Broadway Performance Series

www.statetheatre.org

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Spamalot Monty Python’s

Sun., Feb. 10 2 PM & 7 PM - $60/$55 Sponsored by Easton Hospital Vintage Restaurant and 99.9 The Hawk Butz Broadway Performance Series

The Time Jumpers

Vince Gill,“Ranger Doug” Green, Paul Franklin, Jeff Taylor, Kenny Sears, Andy Reiss, Dennis Crouch, Dawn Sears, Joe Spivey, Larry Franklin and Billy Thomas

Sat., Feb. 16 8 PM - $50/$40

Visit www.statetheatre.org for full season schedule! 453 Northampton St., Easton, PA 610-252-3132  1-800-999-STATE

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With the largest number of covered bridges still standing, Pennsylvania can safely be called,â&#x20AC;&#x153;the covered bridge state.â&#x20AC;? That achievement is due to a proud population that maintains the scenic structures and tries to restore them to their former glory. Covered bridges come in at least seven different shapes.Winter is the perfect time to take in the architecture, unobstructed by leaves.The pure white snow hides imperfections and lends a certain quietness to the landscape. A covered bridge can be enjoyed any time of year, but I particularly like the sight on a blue-sky day with fresh fallen snow. -Photos and text by Dr. Melvin Wolk


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Sterling silver charms from $25

United Penn Plaza Kingston, PA 570.288.3147 www.3sisters.com Mon-Sat 10-5:30 Thurs 10-7

February 2013

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Norman Rockwell Works on Display American Artist

Works of “America’s favorite illustrator” will be on display at the Pauly Friedman Art Gallery at Misericordia University in Dallas until February 28. All of Norman Rockwell’s magazine covers, which spanned four decades, will be brought together for the free exhibition,“Norman Rockwell’s 323 Saturday Evening Post Covers,” including Saturday Evening Post cover of Sept. 20, 1958,“The Runaway,” pictured here. “Norman Rockwell has become an American icon for all generations – young and

old – and that is what makes this exhibit so popular,” says Thomas C. Daly, curator of education at the Rockwell Museum. “It gives everyone a chance to make their own personal connection with Rockwell’s work. Even if they weren’t alive when the cover appeared, they see themselves in a situation, remember a moment in time, or relate to the humor in everyday life that he conveyed … so no matter their age, there is something

in the collection that they can relate to.” Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, and Saturday and Sunday, 1-5 p.m. Visit www.misericordia.edu/art or call 570-674-6250. -Erika A. Bruckner

230 West Tioga St. • Tunkhannock • 570.836.5754 • www.wisnosky.com

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Festival of Ice Sub-Zero Superheroes Descend on Clarks Summit

Gotham City and Metropolis have nothing on Clarks Summit this winter! Super heroes will be seen throughout the town in the form of ice sculptures! On Presidents’ Day weekend, February 14 to 18, the “Sub-Zero Superhero” themed Clarks Summit Festival of Ice will be presented by the Abington Business & Professional Association. A parade through downtown Clarks Summit kicks off festivities February 14 at 7 p.m. followed by the Annual Family Fun Faire at the borough building. Sub-Zero Fun Mark Crouthamel and Sculpted Ice Works will coax the superheroes from ice during live ice carvings on Friday and Saturday. Live music, horse-and-carriage rides and giveaways are also part of the fun. Laura Ancherani, executive director of the Abington Business and Professional Organization, says Clarks Summit is the perfect setting for the icy affair. “It marries art, community and family, and I believe that is what the Abingtons are all about.” About 30,000 people are expected to visit the festival.“It’s is a great way for people to discover Clarks Summit and for Clarks Summit to give back to its local families and businesses,” Ancherani says. The Clarks Summit Festival of Ice was voted Best Seasonal Event by the Abington Journal’s Best of the Abingtons. The event is free. Extra Super Events A Superhero Luncheon featuring comic book artists will be held at the Ramada Hotel on Saturday. Families or groups must purchase a table which they get to decorate in any comic book theme. Prizes are awarded for the best decorations; tables are $150 and seat eight people. Visit www.TheAbingtons.org. To purchase a table at the Superhero Luncheon, call 570-587-9045. –Danielle Del Preate 96

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Escape to Romance Valentine’s Day Getaway Ideas

Hampton Inn, Jim Thorpe/Lehighton This Valentine’s Day, walk your special someone into a room covered with rose petals where together you can indulge in either a bottle of champagne or wine and chocolate-covered strawberries. Romance Package is $134 per couple plus tax and service charge, midweek, and $144 per couple plus tax and service charge, weekends. 610-377-3400

The Settlers Inn, Hawley (pictured above) Bring your love for a special midweek Valentine’s Day getaway on February 14, and savor romance at a savings. Enjoy a night in the best available room, dinner for two and breakfast the next morning, all for $275. Dinner in the main dining room will feature a special a la carte menu for this special day! Have a chocolate lovers’ bas-

ket from Mill Market and a bottle of wine in your room, awaiting your arrival for $49. 570-226-2993. Wyalusing Hotel, Wyalusing Indulge in a Land and Sea Buffet featuring Baked Chicken, Swiss Steak, Mashed Potatoes with Gravy, Bacon and Pepper Mac n’ Cheese, Green Beans Olé, Corn Casserole, Fried Shrimp, Peel n’ Eat Shrimp, Crab Legs, continued on page100

Bella’s signature, personalized TruffleGrams Chocolate Covered Gourmet Strawberries 23K Edible Gold-Dipped Chocolate Roses Personalized Chocolate Heart Boxes and Heart Lollipops with printed message/photo Bella's new Bling Truffles & Jeweled Chocolates

1.800.401.8990 • WE DELIVER • 343-8777 516 Lackawanna Avenue, Scranton, PA 18503

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Join Abington Travel & Norwegian Cruise Line aboard the Brand New Breakway.We have 2 exciting group departures to choose from in 2013: June -2-9 • NYC to Bermuda • starting at $1150* pp Oct. 20-27 • NYC to Bahamas & Florida • starting at $845* pp *Rates are based on availability and include RT bus to pier from Dickson City (if capacity is met.)

Walk-ins Welcome

317 Davis St. • Clarks Summit, PA 570.586.1666 • 800.242.8076 • www.abingtontravel.com

570.969.1705 • 1016 R iver Street, Scranton

February 2013

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Continued from page 98 Tomato-Basil Crab Bisque, Salad Bar and assorted desserts for $19.99. Enjoy live acoustic entertainment from 5 to 8 p.m. 570-746-1204. The French Manor, South Sterling (pictured above) Celebrate love with a customized gourmet dinner menu and piano serenade in The French Manor’s elegant dining room. During the month of love, the French Manor offers an Overnight Getaway Package including elegant lodging, chilled

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champagne, chocolates and roses in your room/suite upon arrival, a $120 gourmet dinner voucher and full gourmet breakfast. Rate is $375 per room plus tax and service charge or $425 per suite plus tax and service charge, available Sunday through Thursday throughout February. 1-877-720-6090. Woodloch Pines, Hawley Arrive Wednesday, February 13, and experience the delicious new Tuscan-style menu accompanied by the 2013 Broadway-Style Theme Show “Woodloch Celebrates Everything Italian.” Enjoy a full day of outdoor winter

HappeningsMagazinePA.com

activities on Thursday; then relax and unwind in the indoor pools and Jacuzzis or add a luxurious spa treatment to your package at our sister property, The Lodge at Woodloch. Can’t stay over? Enjoy Wednesday night’s dinner and show for the very special rate of only $29.95! One night, two-meal packages start at $119 per person, and two-night, four-meal packages start at just $198 per person. Ask for the Happenings’ Valentine Special. 1.800.WOODLOCH Skytop Lodge, Skytop Create a memory to last a lifetime with Skytop’s Valentine’s Package. It includes a complimentary upgrade to a mini-suite, Wine Tasting, a romantic table for two for dinner, turn-down service, delectable Skytop continued on page 102

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Continued from page 100 chocolates, fresh flowers in your room and a hearty breakfast. Rate is $299 per couple plus tax and service charge. Available Sunday, February 10 to Thursday, February 14. 800-345-7759. Holiday Inn Express, Gibson Transform the room of your choice into a romantic getaway! Rose petals and flameless candlelight adorn the room, while the complimentary champagne and chocolate set the tone for a lovely evening! Standard room packages start at $139. 570465-5544. (Must be booked three days in advance.) Ehrhardt's Waterfront Resort, Hawley On February 9, join skilled snowshoe guides on a magi-

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cal two-hour snowshoe adventure through a local state park. Then warm up at Ehrhardt’s Waterfront Restaurant with wine and a delectable meal for $73 per person. Or, make a weekend of it with two nights accommodations starting at $308 per room based on double occupancy. If relaxing with laughter is more your speed, stay lakeside this February 14 to 17, and enjoy a delicious four-course meal, followed by a performance of “I Take This Man” by the Ritz Co. Players and continental breakfast. Rates start at $306 per room based on double occupancy. 570-353-3444.

with the sweet sounds of John Curtin. Chef Ben and Chef Andy have put together a five-course, small-plate tasting menu for this special occasion. $55 Prix Fixe menu. To continue the romance, tell your Valentine you’re going for dinner, and surprise them with an overnight stay in a two-floor suite complete with dinner and breakfast the next morning. This all-inclusive package is $349 (or $259 for this package in one of our standard hotel rooms). Add a tray of handmade truffles and bottle of champagne in your room awaiting your arrival for only $35. 570-2261337. -Julie Korponai

Ledges Hotel, Hawley Have a romantic evening at Glass Wine Bar and Bistro

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successful sıngles

Unhitched Professionals in NEPA

These six individuals have made a name for themselves as successful professionals in Northeast PA … and they’re also unhitched!

Movie you can watch over and over:“Great Expectations.”The mystery surrounding Miss Havisham’s life sparked my interest initially, but now I just like the love story of childhood sweethearts finally getting together. Charity of choice: Anything to do with historic preservation in our area On nightstand: A lamp, clock and a glow in the dark figurine of a boy praying that I got when I was a child Biggest pet peeve: People who don’t appreciate the historic value of homes they have and either let them fall into disrepair or tear them down Friends describe you as: Sociable and outgoing Food you never eat: Beef Furthest traveled: Italy Typical weekend: Relax and spend time with family and friends and attend Sunday morning service Childhood dream job: Car designer for Mercedes-Benz, architect or doctor

Jaime Nye Age: 28, Owner, JTK Realty, LLC and JTK Marketing. Resides in Scranton. Educated at Scranton Prep and University of Scranton

Childhood hero: Jesus. I thought He was so brave for knowingly being led to His death for our eternal salvation Greatest influence: My aunts and uncles

Favorites part of Northeast PA: Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel lobby. I love to see historic preservation happening in our area, and I think it is one of our area’s only surviving symbols of the great wealth and success Scranton once had, and could have again.

Most daring thing you’ve done: Taking a chance with my savings and starting my own business

Favorite part of job: The freedom of being your own boss and in control of your own life.

I’d consider myself successful if... I was able to make a difference in someone’s life

Favorite food: Shrimp and wine

I’m addicted to... The beach and nice cars

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Goals: To be able to retire at 40 Hobby: Cars

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help themselves (i.e. children and animals) On nightstand: Lamp, cell phone charger and a candle Biggest pet peeve: Poor grammar! In both writing and speaking… drives me bananas. Friends describe you as: Very optimistic, friendly, out-going and a good listener. Food you never eat: Any food that is shown on those crazy TV shows. I could never bring myself to eat half of what they show. Furthest traveled: The Virgin Islands

Michael Straub Photography

Therese Maxfield

Age: 28, Graduate student, Marywood University, Mental Health Counseling. Resides in Kingston. Educated at Pennsylvania State University Accolades: Named in NEPA’s 40 under 40, 2009 graduate of Leadership Wilkes-Barre, Alpha Epsilon Lambda Honor Society Pets: Phia (cat) Community Involvement: Wilkes-Barre POWER! (Professionals Organized & Working to Enrich the Region) Favorites part of Northeast PA: The remarkable people. Friendships and relationships I have built are second to none. Favorite part of job: Currently, my job is to learn and grow as a counseling professional. I love everything about this. One should never stop learning. Favorite Book: “Man’s Search February 2013

for Meaning” by Viktor Frankl. The manner in which Dr. Frankl discusses how his view of life and the world aided him in overcoming hardships and challenging experiences that many unfortunately did not, is simply life-changing. Favorite movie genre: Old black-and-white movies, most of which fall under romance. There’s just something special that is added to a movie when color is removed. Favorite quote: "I shall pass through this world but once. Any good therefore that I can do, or any kindness that I can show to any fellow creature, let me do it now. Let me not defer or neglect it. For I shall not pass this way again." Favorite food: Mexican or Italian Movie you can watch over and over: Anything with Audrey Hepburn Charity of choice: Those who aid those who are unable to HappeningsMagazinePA.com

Typical weekend: School work. But on the rare occasion I am able to get out I make sure to spend it with my favorite people. Childhood dream job: Everything from a teacher, to a professional ballerina, to an archeologist. Greatest influence: My mentors, Ruth Corcoran and Lori Nocito. They have both taught me more than I am able to describe here. Goals: Complete my Master’s program and be accepted into a Doctoral program of my choice. Also, to never neglect the relationships that I hold dear. I’d consider myself successful if... I am living a happy and balanced life full of friendships, love and laughter. I’m addicted to... Pinterest. continued on page 106 105


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Thomas about Edward Bennett Williams Biggest pet peeve: Rude people Friends describe you as: Outgoing, probably pretty neurotic. Hardworking. Food you never eat: Mustard, it’s gross. Furthest traveled: Europe Where else you’ve lived: Washington DC, Madrid, Spain, Philadelphia Typical weekend: Relax and hang out with my friends and family.

Michael J. O’Brien

Childhood dream job: Once I realized professional sports were out of the question, I always wanted to be a lawyer.

Michael Straub Photography

Age: 28. Attorney, Oliver Price and Rhodes. Resides in Scranton. Educated at Georgetown University, Temple Law School Accolades: Army Achievement Medal Community Involvement: Army National Guard Judge Advocate General’s Corps, EOTC, Country Club of Scranton, Scranton Club, Friendly Sons of St. Patrick; American, Pennsylvania, Federal and Lackawanna Bar Association and Lackawanna County Young Democrats Favorites part of Northeast PA: Everything! The community, my job, my friends and family. It’s my home. Favorite part of job: It’s an exciting way to earn a living with new challenges every 106

day. I have the opportunity to work with my dad, my uncles and about 12 other great attorneys. As a lawyer you have the opportunity to help people at what can often be a very stressful time. Favorite book: “Brideshead Revisited,” I’m fascinated with the rise and fall of the British Empire. I love Evelyn Waugh, and Brideshead is a book that captures the twilight of an era that is gone forever. Favorite food: Pizza Movie you can watch over and over: “A Few Good Men.” It’s about military lawyers so I’m probably biased. Charity of Choice: EOTC. It’s a great organization designed to help people improve themselves and their chances for a better life. On nightstand: “The Man to See;” it’s a book by Evan HappeningsMagazinePA.com

Childhood hero: My parents Greatest influence: My parents, brother and sisters and uncles Most daring thing you’ve done: Go into the Army. I was 24 and in law school. In the middle of two wars, it wasn’t exactly what my classmates were doing. My father and grandfather had both served, and I’m grateful for the opportunity. Goals: Be the best attorney I can be and to someday have a family like the one I’m lucky enough to be a part of. Hobbies: Reading, golf, politics and sports Website most visited: RealClearPolitics. It’s an aggregate news site with a lot of good articles. I’d consider myself successful if... my goals were achieved. February 2013


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Mary Beth Murphy Age: 40. Customer Account Specialist, Springleaf Financial Services. Resides in Scott Twp. Educated at: Sacred Heart High School, Penn State University Favorite part of Northeast PA: Location. The beach and city are just a few hours away, so you can enjoy the quiet, laidback lifestyle here and still be in close proximity to anything you would want. Favorite part of job? Advising people to make smart decisions about their financial situations. Favorite Book: “Little Women,” it’s a timeless portrayal of the complex relationship among siblings. Movie you watch over and over: “Dirty Dancing,” it’s a fun, entertaining love story and a modern day classic! Patrick Swayze in his prime– need I say more? Charity of choice: Anything February 2013

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that aids ill or abused children. On nightstand: Alarm clock and a glass of water. Biggest pet peeve: Bad cell phone etiquette, i.e. taking a call while in the middle of a conversation. Friends describe you as: Always willing to help, caring and honest. Favorite quote:“I’m not crazy, my mother had me tested.” –Dr. Sheldon Cooper from TV’s “Big Bang Theory” Favorite food: Chicken fingers and cheesecake Food you never eat: Anything of the fish variety Furthest traveled: Ireland Typical weekend: Catch a movie, go to the gym, hang out with my nephew, attend whatever festival, fair or event is happening in the region. Childhood dream job: Ski instructor HappeningsMagazinePA.com

Childhood hero: AIDS activist Ryan White. His story still touches me. To have to fight to do something so normal as go to school! Greatest influence: My mom Most daring thing you’ve done: Ski the Back Bowls of Vail, CO Goals: Have a happy and peaceful life Hobbies: Skiing, attending concerts, travel, watching tennis on TV or better yet in person. You’re addicted to... Coke, French fries and Christmas ornaments Website most visited: ticketmaster.com so I don’t miss any of my favorites in concert You’d consider yourself successful if... I’m happy and able to do the things I enjoy. continued on page 108 107


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Favorite food: Thai and sushi Movie you can watch over and over: “The Sound of Music” and any Indiana Jones movie. Charity of Choice: My heart will always be pulled to helping children who are abused, treated unfairly and just don’t get the love that a child needs to grow into a caring adult. On nightstand: A light and a candle Biggest pet peeve: I am very particular in planning and packing for a trip… Friends describe you as: Funny, a good person, honest, a good sense of humor, a man of his word. Food you never eat: Peas and Indian food Furthest traveled: Orlando, Florida Michael Straub Photography

Karl F. Pfeiffenberger Jr

Age: 50. Project Manager, Scranton Lackawanna Industrial Building Company (SLIBCO), the economic development arm of the Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce. Resides in Jermyn. Educated at: Johnson College, Delaware University, Institute for Organizational Management Community Involvement: Chairman of Blind Association. My success is not about my materialistic riches but the amount of people who I can impact in a positive way. Favorite part of Northeast PA: The strong family values and traditions that are passed down and reinforced from one generation to the next. Favorite part of job: I love the interaction and impact we have on the communities who host our business parks and buildings. Knowing that we provide the means for businesses to locate to Northeast PA and that our family, friends and neighbors are employed at these businesses is very satisfying. Favorite quote: “Never test the depth of water with both feet.” 108 108

Typical weekend: Take my son to his bowling league. Create family time and activities with my children. Play time at night for me. Childhood dream job: Owner of a construction company with my name on the door of a pick-up truck. Childhood hero: Zorro and the Lone Ranger Greatest influence: My grandmother, Mary Buber and my parents, Lorna and Karl Sr. Most daring thing you’ve done: Climbed a 40-foot vertical rock cliff wall at the age of 12. Goals: To create/develop a business that is unique and that would lead to an everlasting impact on society. Hobbies: I like to work with my hands. I like to look at different and unusual ways to reuse or repurpose ordinary items that would otherwise be discarded. Website most visited: AOL and Facebook. I’d consider myself successful if... I can impact people’s lives in a positive way through service to them and to the community at large. I’m addicted to... my kids. I have four sons and a daughter. They are my first and foremost reason why I am here on earth.

HappeningsMagazinePA.com HappeningsMagazinePA.com

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Sherrie Holloway Age: 49. Professor, Baptist Bible College & Seminary. Resides in Clarks Summit. Educated at Baptist Bible College, East Stroudsburg University Accolades: Coaching awards; recognition of 25 years of service and 20 years of coaching; inductee BBC Athletic Hall of Fame (2013) Favorites part of Northeast PA: The beauty of the area; I love the colors in Autumn. The close vicinity to almost any activity. Favorite part of job: The opportunity to rub shoulders with young adults and hopefully make a difference as they make important decisions about their life’s direction Favorite Book: The Bible Favorite quote: “May He who is invisible, be all we ever see.” Favorite food: My mom’s Thanksgiving meal. 110

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Michael Straub Photography

Movie you can watch over and over: “Chariots of Fire,” or any “teacher” movie Charity of choice: Any number of my friends who are serving as missionaries here in the states and overseas On nightstand: My Bible, journal and alarm clock Biggest pet peeve: Lack of communication Friends describe you as: Intense, more serious than not, a good sense of humor, loyal Food you never eat: Shellfish Furthest traveled: South Africa Typical weekend: Shopping, cleaning, laundry, etc. and prepare for the week ahead; probably catch a basketball game; go to church and teach a ladies’ Bible study class on Sundays. Childhood dream job: A medical lab technologist HappeningsMagazinePA.com

Childhood hero: My mom Greatest influence: My mom—her consistent love and humility have made a lasting impression and have given me an example I hope to follow. Most daring thing you’ve done: Step away from coaching after 20 years; go to South Africa; tackling home improvement/renovation projects Goals: Write a book; continue to teach; see the Grand Canyon, travel to London Hobbies: Reading, enjoying good coffee and good conversation…especially together Most visited website: The Google search page I’d consider myself successful if... I continue to do what I believe God has called me to do.

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Share. More. Moments.

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| 800.WOODLOCH

Nestled in the picturesque Pocono Mountains lake region; Hawley Pennsylvania


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COUNTRY INNS / B&BS 1811 ADDISON HOUSE BED & BREAKFAST

A warm welcome awaits you at this fully restored historic home. Enjoy a full gourmet breakfast in our sumptuous dining room. Spend your day cross-country skiing, hiking, antiquing, or travel the wine trail. Relax in our library. Excellent nearby restaurants. Located in Susquehanna County– Choconut PA, Route 267 South. 570-553-2682. www.1811addison.com COLONIAL BRICK INN & SUITES–

Come and enjoy Pennsylvania hospitality at its finest. Call to reserve your special occasion package. Winter ski or summer golf packages, we will cater to guests all seasons of the year. New meeting room and free Internet in rooms. 25161 Route 11, Hallstead. 570-879-2162 or 1-800-290-3922. www.ColonialBrickInn.com CRESCENT LODGE–

Reserve our cabin in the woods in the heart of the Poconos. Stone fireplace, wood paneling, canopy bed with TV, Jacuzzi for two, covered deck and balcony. Nearby find a spa, casino, antiquing, outlet shopping, skiing & sleigh riding. Enjoy our pub and restaurant. Super Pasta Night every Wednesday! Paradise Valley. Cresco, PA 800-392-9400. www.CrescentLodge.com THE FRENCH MANOR– Romantic country inn modeled after a French chateau. Gourmet French cuisine, excellent wines. AAA 4Diamond Award Winner for lodging & dining. Luxurious suites with fireplace, Jacuzzis & balcony. New GREEN spa, Le Spa Foret. Includes indoor pool, hot tub, fitness room, couples’ massage suite, fireplace, pedicures & more. South Sterling, PA. 1-877-720-6090. www.TheFrenchManor.com. THE JAMES MANNING HOUSE– Enjoy a peaceful stay at this historic 1819 Federal-style house two miles north of Honesdale, PA.Three guest rooms, each with private baths, central AC,TV and WI-FI, feature handmade quilts and antiques. Hearty breakfasts include home-baked goodies served with genuine PA Dutch hospitality. Bethany, PA. 570-253-5573. www.JamesManningHouse.com

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COUNTRY INNS / B&BS

MOUNTAINTOP LODGE- Lake Naomi Club, Northeast’s only Five-Star Platinum Club Community has reopened the newly purchased, totally refurbished, 14room mountain-style Bed & Breakfast retreat. Full gourmet breakfast and temporary membership to the prestigious Lake Naomi Club included. Full Coffee/Pastry open to the public. Rte 940 Pocono Pines, PA. 570-646-6636 or 855LNLODGE. www.MountaintopLodge.com POCONO PINES MOTOR INN & COTTAGES– Tall pines shade this year-round family resort next to “The Big Lake” & winter ski slopes. Cottages, kitchenettes, motel rooms & a three-bedroom lodge with fireplace are available. Cable TV, DVD,VCR, outdoor pool, BBQ’s & private boat docks. Boating, fishing, shops & restaurants close by. 345 Rte. 507, Tafton. 570-226-2772. www.PoconoPinesMotorInn.com

STONE BRIDGE INN & RESTAURANT– European-style inn, restaurant & tavern in a spectacular country setting. 13 charming rooms, with private baths,TV, A/C, several with fireplaces, free WI-FI. Continental breakfast, indoor pool/hot tub, horseback riding. Excellent dinner cuisine. Exit 206, Rt. 374 East two miles past Elk Mountain, Union Dale. 570-679-9200. www.Stone-Bridge-Inn.com.

Lehighton, PA Jim Thorpe Area Ski Package - Starting at $160, includes all day/night lift ticket to Blue Mtn. per adult. Tubing Package - Starting at $146, includes all day/night tubing ticket to Blue Mtn. per adult. Romantic Package - Starting at $114, includes bottle of Champagne, chocolate covered strawberries. All packages include Hampton’s Hot on the House Breakfast, indoor Jacuzzi & Pool, WiFi, & business center. 100% Non-Smoking Rooms Link: www.lehighton.hamptoninn.com Valid until 4/2013 Blackout dates may apply. Not valid with any other discounts or promotions

610-377-3400 PA I-476/ EXIT 74 • 877 Interchange Rd. • Lehighton, PA From PA Turnpike I-476 - Take exit 74 for Mahoning Valley towards Lehighton. Follow Route.209 South 3/4 mile. Hotel is on the left.

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FEBRUARY HAPPENINGS Special Events

Feb. 1-28, Ghost Walk, 7:30 p.m., downtown Scranton. 383-1821. Feb. 2, Hometown Ice Harvest, 11 a.m., Hometown. 595-0452. Feb. 2-3, WinterFest, noon-4 p.m., The Lands at Hillside Farms, Shavertown. Feb. 10, AFBA Indoor Bluegrass Shindig, 12:30-5 p.m., ArtsQuest Center at Steelstacks, Bethlehem. 610-253-2800. Feb. 14-18, Clarks Summit Festival of Ice, downtown Clarks Summit. 587-9045. Feb. 16, Marley’s Mission 3rd Annual Blue Ribbon Gala, 6-11 p.m., Hilton Scranton & Conference Center, Scranton. Feb. 16, Paupack Plunge, Lighthouse Harbor Marina, Hawley. 857-0220. Feb. 16, Kiwanis Winterfest, 7 a.m.-dusk, Camp Brule, Forksville. 924-4224. Feb. 22-24, Lackawanna Home Builders Assoc. 2013 Home Showcase, Fri. 5-9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Mall at Steamtown, Scranton. 341-7496.

Community Events Feb. 3, Animal Welfare Society of Monroe Champagne Brunch & Jewelry Sale, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., The Big A Grillehouse, East Stroudsburg. 223-1700. Feb. 3, Safe Haven Pet Rescue Adoption Day, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Tractor Supply, Pocono Summit. www.safehavenpa.org Feb. 8, Abington Heights Civic 116

League Mardi Gras Celebration, 6 p.m., Glen Oak Country Club. 587-9033.

FEBRUARY SUN MON TUE

3 10 17 24

4 5 6 11 12 13 18 19 20 25 26 27

Feb. 8, Chicken & Biscuit Dinner, 5-8 p.m., Waverly United Methodist Church, Waverly. 586-8166.

Feb. 8, 2nd Annual Slumber Party for Valentine’s Day, 6 p.m., 411 Studio, Olyphant. 483-4883.

1 2 7 8 9 14 15 16 21 22 23 28

WED THUR

FRI

SAT

March 2, Faith & Family Day 2013, 6 p.m., Mohegan Sun Arena, Wilkes-Barre.

March 2, Dessin Animal Shelter FurrBall 2013, 6 p.m., Inn at Woodloch, Hawley. 647-0620.

Feb. 10, Camp Papillon Adoption Day, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Petco, Easton. 420-0450.

March 3, Bow Wow Bingo, 1 p.m., CLU Club, East Stroudsburg. 420-0450.

Feb. 16, Dance Your Heart Out, Frosty Valley Country Club, Danville. 784-8184.

March 3, Lackawanna Co. German American Society Spring Dance, 2-6:30 p.m., Genetti Manor, Dickson City. 346-9278.

Feb. 17, Safe Haven Pet Rescue Adoption Day, 11 a.m.3 p.m., Tractor Supply Brodheadsville. www.safehavenpa.org Feb. 20, Non-Profit Meet Up, 9 a.m.-noon, Weigh Station Café, Towanda. 268-2787. Feb. 22, Habitat for Humanity of Wayne Co. Hearts & Hammers for Habitat, 6-11 p.m., Ehrhardt’s Waterfront Resort, Tafton. Feb. 24, Camp Papillon Adoption Day, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Tractor Supply, Brodheadsville. 420-0450. Feb. 26-28, Annual Winter Book Sale,11 a.m.-7 p.m., Valley Community Library, Peckville. March 1, Annual Pre St. Patrick’s Day Cocktail Party, 5:30-8 p.m., Arcaro & Genell’s, Old Forge. 344-3931. HappeningsMagazinePA.com

Concerts Feb. 1, 17th Annual Elvis Birthday Bash, 7:30 p.m., State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE. Feb. 2, Gin Blossoms, The Sherman Theater, Stroudsburg. 420-2808. Feb. 6, John Denver A Rocky Mountain High Concert, 8 p.m., State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE. Feb. 7, The Dirty Dozen Band, 7:30 p.m., Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel, NY. 800-745-3000. Feb. 8, NEPA Philharmonic: I’ll Take Romance, 8 p.m., Scranton Cultural Center, Scranton. Feb. 9, NEPA Philharmonic: I’ll Take Romance, 8 p.m., F.M. Kirby February 2013


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FEBRUARY HAPPENINGS Center, Wilkes-Barre. Feb. 13, The Pink Floyd Experience, 7:30 p.m., State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE. Feb. 15, Comedian Bobby Collins, 8 p.m., State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE. Feb. 16, Gypsy Jazz Event, The Settlers Inn, Hawley. 226-2993. Feb. 16, The Time Jumpers, 8 p.m., State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE. Feb. 16, Up & Coming Comedy, 8 p.m., Scranton Cultural Center, Scranton. 344-1111. Feb. 17, Luciana Souza with Romero Lubambo, 7:30 p.m., Haas Center, Bloomsburg University. 389-4409. Feb. 21, Olivia Newton-John, 8 p.m., State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE. Feb. 21, Bowfire, 7:30 p.m., Hazleton Area H.S., Hazleton. 788-4864. Feb.23, Bruce Cockburn, 8 p.m., Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel, NY. 800-745-3000. Feb. 23, The Fab Faux, 8 p.m., The State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE.

Theatre Feb. 1-3,“Busybody– A Comedy,” 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m., Providence Playhouse, Scranton. 342-9707. Feb. 8, Monty Python’s “Spamalot,” 8 p.m., Haas Center, Bloomsburg University. 389-4409. Feb. 8,“Smokey Joe’s Café,” 7:30 p.m., State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE. February 2013

Feb. 9,“Valentease,” 8 p.m., Mauch Chunk Opera House, Jim Thorpe. Feb. 10,“Spamalot,” 2 & 7 p.m., State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE. Feb. 13-16,“V-Day Until the Violence Stops,” 7:30 p.m., The Moose Exchange, Bloomsburg. 389-4256. Feb. 14, State Ballet Theatre of Russia’s “Romeo & Juliet,” 7:30 p.m., State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE. Feb. 15,“Cabaret of Broken Dreams,” 8 p.m., Vintage Theatre, Scranton. 800-838-3006. Feb. 15-17,“The Addams Family,” Scranton Cultural Center, Scranton. 344-1111. Feb. 15-March 3,“Anything Goes,” Shawnee Playhouse, Shawnee-on-Delaware. 421-5093.

Art Exhibits Feb. 1-28, Norman Rockwell’s 323 Saturday Evening Post Covers, Friedman Art Gallery, Misericordia University. 674-6400. Feb. 1-28, Forwardian Cover Exhibition, Sarah Street Gallery, Stroudsburg. Feb. 2-28, Gary & Nancy Embich– Watercolor & Photography, Monroe Co. Environmental Ed Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061. Feb. 10-March 29, Photography: Perspectives & Perceptions by Theo Anderson, Stephen Perloff, Edward W. Nowak & David Sestak, State Theatre, Easton. HappeningsMagazinePA.com

Seminars & Lectures

Feb. 2, It’s Groundhog Day, 1011:30 a.m., Monroe Co. Environmental Ed Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061. Feb. 5, 12, 19 & 26, Intermediate Vegetable Gardening, 6-8 p.m., Penn State Extension, Honesdale. 253-5970, ext. 4110. Feb. 5, Monthly World Peace Meditation & Reiki Circle, 5-7 p.m., Self Discovery Wellness Arts Center, Montrose. 278-9256. Feb. 7, Navigating the Road map of Cancer, noon, Hospice of the Sacred Heart, Wilkes-Barre. 706-2400. Feb. 9, Glass Blowing Demonstrations, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Gillinder Glass Factory, Port Jervis, NY. 845-856-5375. Feb. 9 & 16, Intermediate Winter Fly Tying, 9 a.m.-noon, Monroe Co. Environmental Ed Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061. Feb. 12, Making Relationships Matter, 7 p.m., Brooks Theatre, Keystone College. 945-8000. Feb. 14, 22nd Annual Diversity Institute Dinner with Timothy Seibles, 5:30 p.m., Insalaco Hall, Misericordia University. 674-6217. Feb. 16, Tapping Trees, 10-11 a.m., Monroe Co. Environmental Ed Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061. Feb. 17, Mrs. Thomas Jefferson, 2 p.m., Lackawanna Historical Society, Scranton. 344-3841. Feb. 24, Garden Series: Staring Seeds Inside, 10 a.m.-noon, Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmas Ferry. 828-2319.

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FEBRUARY HAPPENINGS Nature

Feb. 1, 8 & 15 Eagle Watch, 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Monroe Co. Environmental Ed Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061. Feb. 2, Winterfest 2013, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Nescopeck State Park, Drums. 403-2006. Feb. 2-3, Eagle Watch, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmas Ferry. 828-2319. Feb. 2 & 9, Cross Country Skiing, 9-11 a.m., Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmas Ferry. 828-2319. Feb. 2 & 16, Eagle Tour with NEPA Audubon Society, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Delaware Highlands Conservancy, Lackawaxen. Feb. 3, Snowshoe Hike, 1-3 p.m., Skytop Lodge, Skytop. 629-3061. Feb. 3 & 10, Cross Country Skiing, 1-3 p.m. Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmas Ferry. 828-2319. Feb. 9, Eagle Tours, 9 a.m.-noon & 1-4 p.m., Delaware Highlands Conservancy, Lackawaxen. Feb. 9, Animal Tracking, 10 a.m.-noon, Pocono

Environmental Ed Center, Dingmas Ferry. 828-2319. Feb. 9-10, Winter Waterfalls, 13:30 p.m., Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmas Ferry. 828-2319. Feb. 10, Winter Bog Walk, 1 p.m., Cranberry Bog, Tannersville. 629-3061. Feb. 10, Family Ice Fishing, 9:30 a.m.-noon, Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmas Ferry. 828-2319. Feb. 10, Guided Snowshoe Hike, Varden Conservation Area. 676-3428, ext. 0. Feb. 23, Owling at Kettle Creek, 10 a.m.-noon, Monroe Co. Environmental Ed Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061. Feb. 23, Family Ice Fishing, 1:30-4 p.m., Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmas Ferry. 828-2319. Feb. 24, Introduction to Orienteering, 10 a.m.-noon, Pocono Environmental Ed Center, Dingmas Ferry. 828-2319. March 2, Maple Sugaring Open House, noon-4 p.m., PPL Montour Preserve, Danville. 437-3131

March 2, Annual Public Maple Sugaring Day, Monroe Co. Environmental Ed Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061.

Kids Corner Feb. 2,“Pinkalicious”The Musical, 11 a.m. & 2 p.m., State Theatre, Easton. 800-999-STATE. Feb. 7, Make it, Take it Craft Time, 3-5 p.m., Abington Community Library, Clarks Summit. Feb. 8, Boy Scouts Day, 10 a.m.4 p.m., Children’s Museum, Bloomsburg. 389-9206. Feb. 9, The Lorax, 10 a.m., Monroe Co. Environmental Ed Center, Stroudsburg. 629-3061.

Y

OU KNOW OUR NAME. GET TO KNOW OUR

Work.

Feb. 10, Royal Princess Tea, Appletree Terrace, Dallas. 455-4334. Feb. 16, Homemade Bird Feeders, 2-3 p.m., Abington Community Library, Clarks Summit. Feb. 17, Family Move-n-Groove Day, noon-4 p.m., YMCA, Bloomsburg.

Specializing in effective and attention getting: • Guide Books • Directories • Brochures • Maps • Website Design • Video Production/ Digital Marketing • Printing

March 2, KidDilly Expo, 10 a.m., Ice Box, Scranton. 561-6113.

Find more February events, at www.HappeningsMagazinePA.com

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For more information, call

(570) 587-3532, ext. 13 115 NORTH STATE STREET, CLARKS SUMMIT, PA

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Put the creative team behind Happenings Magazine to work for you. Let the talented art directors and experienced copywriters of Happenings Communications Group create your next printed piece or digital image.

February 2013


Y

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OU KNOW OUR NAME. GET TO KNOW OUR

Work.

Put the creative team behind Happenings Magazine to work for you. Let the talented art directors and experienced copywriters of Happenings Communications Group create your next printed piece or digital image.

Specializing in effective and attention getting: • Guide Books • Directories • Brochures • Maps • Website Design • Video Production/ Digital Marketing • Printing Pictured above: Happenings Magazine, Mount Pleasant Corporate Center Land Development Brochure, The Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce 2012 Business & Buyers’ Guide, Powell Law Firm Ad, Biondi-Franklin Insurance Campaign

For more information, call

(570) 587-3532, ext. 13 115 NORTH STATE STREET, CLARKS SUMMIT, PA


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Advertisers’ DIRECTORY 3 Sisters 93 Abington Travel 99 Accentuate Caterers 81 Adam’s Jewelry 109 Advanced Cardiology Specialists 25 Al Mia Amore 85 Allied Services 19 American Heart Association 7 Armetta’s Restaurant & Pizzeria 77 Awnings on the Side 53 B-Dry System 46 Bella Faccias 98 Blue Shutters 79 Boccardo Jewelers 67 Carriage Barn Antiques 69 Chateau LaFayette Reneau 85 Chocolates by Leopold 93 Citizens Bank 51 Clarks Summit Festival of Ice 100 Clearfield County 101 Cloe & Company 68 Cold Stone Creamery 93 Commonwealth Health 17 Community Concerts at Lackawanna College 96 Corky’s Garden Path Greenhouse 101 Country Inns/B&Bs 112 Custom Building by Carriage Barn 49 DeCoverly Kennels 65 Dr. Joyce A Perih Orthodontics 37 Ehrhardt’s 113 Endless Mountains Visitors Bureau 114 & 115 Erwine Home Health and Hospice 21 Everything Natural 27 Explore More 63 Fairfield Inn & Suites 102 Fern Hall Inn & Restaurant 82 Fidelity Bank 41 Fine Line Homes 51 French Manor Inn & Spa 84 Fritz Brothers Well Drilling 46 Geisinger 2 Glint of Gold 101 Grassi’s Restaurant 73 Guy Cali Associates 31 Hampton Inn 113 Happenings Communications Group 119 Hazzouri Dentistry 33 Hospice of the Sacred Heart 27 Inn at Pocono Manor 109 Jennifer L Gifts & Antiques 68 Jim Barna Log & Timber Homes 43 K. Nealon’s Visual Changes 118 Kathy Pope Hair Fashions 66 February 2013

Kelly McCool Salon Spa Electrolysis Krispy Kreme La Tonalteca Lackawanna Home Builders Association Lake Region Limo Ledges Hotel Louie’s Prime Steak House Mall at Steamtown Mariotti Building Products Marshall, Parker & Weber McCarthy Tier & Automotive Service Centers Minooka Subaru Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs New York Life Nick’s Lake House Nye Jewelers PA Cyber Charter School Patsel’s Restaurant Penn Furniture Perio Health & Dental Implants Perkins Restaurant Perry Law Firm Powell Law Practical Law & Life Quaker Steak & Lube R.G. Petty Construction Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel Scranton School for Deaf & Hard of Hearing Settlers Inn Shawnee Mountain Ski Area Shenanigans Shoppes at Montage Shorten Homes Six East Restaurant Skytop Lodge Sonic Drive-In State Theatre Center for the Arts Steve Pronko Terrery Dental Tiffany’s Tap & Grill Treasure Hunting Truly Scrumptious Twigs USA Discount Vince Carolan, Counselor Wayne Memorial Hospital Where to Dine Wilkes University Wisnosky Jewelers Woodloch Resort Wright Center for Primary Care WVIA

HappeningsMagazinePA.com

99 77 81 47 95 95 85 91 45 33 13 67 103 35 85 99 33 83 55 29 122 19 61 53 122 57 124 118 95 86 85 123 53 81 87 77 90 97 31 79 68 84 83 57 57 21 70 37 94 111 23 120

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DICKSON CITY Exit 191a off of I-81 4005 Commerce Boulevard 570.489.LUBE (5823) There's ALWAYS something happening at The Lube! From Tuesday's All-You-Can-Eat Wing Night, Everyday Happy Hour from 8-10 p.m. and Half Price Appetizers from 8 p.m.-close... and so much more! QUICK LUBE ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT LUNCH BUFFET Monday-Friday 11 a.m.-2 p.m. featuring our famous Wings, Hot EntrĂŠes, Full Salad Bar, Soup & More! $ 9.99 MONDAY - KIDS NITE 5-8 p.m., $1.99 kids meals (with adult purchase), free face painting, play Wii on the big screen, Crafts with Coop our mascot on select nites! EVERY NITE IS MOVIE NITE at THE LUBE! Stop by the Lube to Win FREE IMAX Movie Gift Cards daily on our prize wheel! $15 Movie Meal Deal - Lube Burger, Side & Fountain Beverage plus Movie Ticket.* Present your ticket stub for daily discounts and specials! *Regular Movie ticket not valid on IMAX or 3D GET READY FOR THE BIG GAME! All the games, All the Time on our 24 Flat Screens... Sunday Tailgate Buffet $11.99 11 a.m.-3 p.m. featuring our Award-Winning Wings, Ribs and much more! Tailgating at home? Feed the whole team - Pre-order for pickup at our Wingo Window!

570.387.0490 570.387.6702 Get 10% OFF Accommodations!

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DANVILLE

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Exit 305 off of I-80 570-421-6263

PITTSTON

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I-81 & Rte 315 570-883-5682

615 SR 6 East, Suite 1 570-996-0157

Exit 165 off of I-81 570-823-7264


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CARMEN’S 2.0 RESTAURANT & WINE BAR

VALENTINE’S DAY THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14

570.558.3929

HAPPIER HOUR daily 4-7 pm • TRAX Platform Featuring drink specials and our $5 Happier Hour Menu

RADISSON LACKAWANNA STATION HOTEL 700 LACKAWANNA AVE., SCRANTON 570.342.8300 www.radisson.com/scrantonpa


February 2013 - Happenings Magazine