H&H Classics | An Auction of Classic & Collector Motorcars

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An Auction of Classic & Collector Motorcars Sale 200 | 17th November 2021 | Imperial War Museum, Duxford


Europe’s oldest continuously trading classic and collector motorcar and motorcycle auction house offering a truly global reach for sellers and buyers alike

Trust your consignment to H&H Classics HandH.co.uk | info@HandH.co.uk | +44 (0)1925 210035 H&H Classics, The Motor House, Lyncastle Road, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4SN, United Kingdom


ON THE COVER

1962 Aston Martin DB4 ‘Series IV’

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Estimate: £280,000-320,000* Reg No: YSD 457

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: DB4/822/R

More details on page 38

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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Notes for intending purchasers Prospective purchasers are respectfully advised to read the Terms and Conditions of Sale carefully before bidding on any lot, as they form the terms of your contract with us, whether or not you are a successful bidder.

Insurance Hagerty Classic Car Insurance be pleased to advise buyers in this area. Please be reminded that the insurance is the buyer’s responsibility from the fall of the hammer.

Admission Admission H&H has the right at its sole discretion, without assigning any reason whatsoever, to refuse admission to any of its sales or indeed its premises to any person. The purchase of a catalogue does not constitute an entry ticket or guarantee entry.

Warranty H&H is acting as the agent of the Seller in offering his lot for sale by auction. We cannot and do not inspect each lot in detail to verify the Seller’s description - often we only see it shortly before the Sale. Therefore, we cannot and do not take responsibility for the condition of the lot or the accuracy of its description. This is the reason for our very specific terms as to roadworthiness (Condition 19.1) and absence of warranties (Condition 12.1), which intending purchasers should read carefully.

Bidder Registration All intending buyers are required to complete a Bidder’s Registration Form. This will enable you to bid at the sale by means of a number allocated to you. All prospective bidders must complete the form online giving full identification and bank card details to verify their identity. Lots sold will be invoiced to the registered bidder. References We reserve the right to request banker’s references from prospective purchasers and these should be supplied in time to allow them to be taken up prior to the sale. Failure to comply with this could result in the facility to bid being withdrawn. Currency Converter Solely for the convenience of bidders, a currency converter is provided at H&H sales. The rates quoted for conversion of other currencies to pounds sterling are indicative only and provided by our partner Argentex. We will not be responsible for any errors, inaccuracies or omissions in the currency converter. Bidding Increments In the case of Commission, Telephone and Online Internet bidding, the following increments will apply: Under £1,000 £1,000 - £2,000 £2,000 - £5,000 £5,000 - £10,000 £10,000 - £20,000 £20,000 - £50,000 £50,000 - £100,000 Over £100,000

At the Auctioneers discretion £100 £200/300 £500 £1,000 £2,000/3,000 £5,000 At the Auctioneers discretion

Premium Purchasers are reminded that a Buyers’ Premium is payable on all lots and is subject to VAT at the prevailing rate. The rates are as follows: Motor Cars Registrations Motorcycles Bicycles Automobilia

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12.5% (minimum of £150) 15% (minimum of £50) 15% (minimum of £50) 15% (minimum of £10) 15% (minimum of £5)

Commission / Telephone Bids We will make reasonable efforts to execute commission and telephone bids when instructed provided they are received by 5pm the day before the Sale. Lot(s) will be bought as cheaply as is allowed by other bids and reserves. Where more than one commission bid is submitted at the same winning amount, the commission bid submitted to the Auctioneer first will be the winning bid. We reserve the right to request a refundable deposit of approximately 10% of the intended bid amount. Payment For immediate clearance of Lot(s) full payment must be made to H&H Classics Limited by means of Visa Debit or Credit Card, Maestro, MasterCard, Cash up to the GBP equivalent of €10,000 or Interbank Transfer by 12.00 noon the day following the sale. In any event purchasers are reminded that clearance of Lot(s) may only be effected once we have received cleared funds in our account. For Purchaser’s wishing to pay by bank transfer our bank account details are as follows: NatWest, 23 Sankey Street, Warrington, Cheshire, WA1 1XH Account Name: H&H Classics Client Account Account No: 58868984 Sort Code: 01-09-17 BIC: NWBKGB2L IBAN: GB20NWBK01091758868984 Racing Cars & Documentation Buyers are reminded that the presence of an old HVIF (FIA papers) or other documentation does not constitute a ‘promise’ on behalf of the MSA or other issuing authority that they will be re-issued on demand. A car’s application for a Historic Technical Passport will be subject to the prevailing regulation in Appendix K and can be reviewed, much the same way Veteran Cars can be re-dated, as new information comes to light. The Issuing Authority can refuse to issue new papers. Any prospective purchaser should check the position of the Lot prior to bidding. Veteran Car Club of Great Britain Dating Plates and Certificates When mention is made of the Veteran Car Club of Great Britain Dating Plates and Certificates in this catalogue it should be borne in mind that the Veteran Car Club of Great Britain does from time to time review cars

already dated and, in some instances, where fresh evidence becomes available, alter the date. Whilst the Club makes every effort to ensure accuracy, the date shown on the Dating Plate or Dating Certificate cannot be guaranteed as correct and intending purchasers should make their own enquiries as to the date of the car. Export Licence / Dates Export licences may be required for any lot manufactured or produced 50 years or more prior to the date of export from the U.K. It is the responsibility of the buyer to obtain the licence and correct documentation prior to the exportation of the lot. Vehicle Identity and Competition History Any motor vehicle is sold as a collector’s item and not as a means of transport. Buyers are specifically warned that any vehicle sold as such may well have had parts replaced and paint renewed or be made up of parts from other vehicles the condition of which may be difficult to establish. The Auctioneer has to rely on information as to the date, condition and authenticity provided by the Seller and does not provide its own description, and does not and cannot undertake its own inspection of vehicles or other Lot and it is the responsibility of the Buyer to ensure that the Lot conforms to the description in the catalogue. The Auctioneer cannot check or verify the authenticity of the chassis or VIN number under which a vehicle is offered, but relies on the Seller’s description. Buyers should take particular care to verify in advance the authenticity of a vehicle that is claimed to have important racing, rallying or ‘exworks’ history as it was common in period for a competition vehicle of a single identity to have more than one chassis, body or other mechanical components. This may have happened several times, both in a vehicle’s ‘works’ career and thereafter in private owner hands. Sometimes ‘works’ vehicles were fitted with different registration plates, so that a vehicle could meet a particular event’s start date deadline. These historical factors may lead to there being in existence multiple and competing claimants to the same vehicle identity. Removal of Lots A representative of our preferred transport provider E.M. Rogers will be present at the sale to assist with any transport requirements. All lots are held at the purchaser’s risk at the fall of the hammer and must be removed not later than 1pm on the day following the sale. Please note, if lot(s) are not removed by then the standard charges as stated in our Terms and Conditions will apply.


Auction Information Auction Venue

Imperial War Museum Duxford, Cambridgeshire, CB22 4QR

Schedule

Tuesday 16th November 2021 Viewing: 12:00pm to 6:00pm

Wednesday 17th November 2021 Viewing: 9:00am onwards Auction: 1:00pm start Bidding

Bidding will be available live at the venue Online at www.HandH.co.uk | Telephone | Commission

Buyer’s Premium

Motorcars 12.5% plus VAT

Buyer Enquiries

+44 (0)1925 210035 | info@HandH.co.uk

Safety Guidance

• If you have Covid-19 symptoms, please do not attend

• Face masks are recommended where possible

• Observe social distancing at all times

• Wash hands regularly or use hand sanitiser if that is all you have access to

More information and full terms & conditions are available via our website www.HandH.co.uk


1939 Standard Flying 12

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No Reserve Reg No: FKH 824

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Estimate: £12,000-15,000* Chassis No: DC3958DL

MOT: Exempt

The Flying 12 was introduced at the Motor Show in October 1935 with a 1609cc (12hp) four-cylinder side-valve engine producing 44bhp and driving through a 4-speed box. The car was sophisticated, quiet and well-mannered but it soon became clear that the performance was lacklustre thanks to a heavy body on a weighty chassis. Within a year the factory had designed a much lighter chassis for what is today known as the Light 12, but it was to take rather longer to develop a suitably lightweight body that would offer the space and the comforts that Standard desired. Manufactured in 1939, this Flying 12 was first registered in the UK on the 24th of March 1939. Fitted with the 1609cc four-cylinder side-value engine mated to a four-speed manual transmission and is finished in the complementary colour scheme of Black with Green interior trim. The Standard has a recorded mileage of 86,682 (atoc) miles and has been in current family ownership since 2017. Having a cameo appearance in the 2002 film ‘A is for Acid’, ‘FKH 824’ is now offered from a deceased estate and may require some recommissioning following a short period of storage although is said to ‘run well’. The Flying 12 was in previous long-term ownership and is accompanied by a history file that comprises previous logbooks, collection of past MOTs and tax discs and V5C document.

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1971 Alfa Romeo GT Junior ‘1600’

Reg No: PGC 68K

Chassis No: 1295951

MOT: Exempt

Though one of his first major projects, the Bertone-penned Alfa Romeo 105 Series Coupe has a simple grace that is as admired today as when it first appeared in 1963. When coupled with the 1.6-litre Super version of the company’s ubiquitous all-alloy, DOHC, four-cylinder engine, the result was a performance car capable of shaming many sporting two-seaters of the period. Manufactured in 1971 and presented in red with contrasting black interior, PGC 68K features a 1600cc engine tuned by Bob Dove, 5-speed gearbox, suspension by Alfaholics and a stainlesssteel exhaust. Acquired by the owner in March 2008, the car is now offered for restoration. The vendor describes the condition of the bodywork and paintwork as “poor”, the electrical equipment and interior trim as “average” and the engine, transmission and gearbox as “good”. PGC 68K is offered with a small number of invoices and expired MoTs, as well as a V5 document which records eight former keepers. Although exempt, the owner put the car through an MoT on 4 October 2021 and the resulting failure document indicates some of the work now required to prospective buyers.


1971 Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow

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Estimate: £11,000-13,000* Reg No: IOM-Reg

Chassis No: SRH10991

1974 Rover P6 3500S

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Estimate: £12,000-14,000* MOT: Exempt

Launched in 1965, the Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow was a bold departure for the Crewe-based company. Their first monocoque design, it also benefited from olio-pneumatic rear suspension, power disc brakes and, from 1968, GM’s silken 400 series automatic gearbox. Such ‘new technology’ did not encroach on the luxurious interior with its sumptuous leather hides, rich wood veneers and deep lambswool carpets. Though smaller than the Silver Cloud III, it possessed greater space and boasted far more contemporary looks. At launch it was powered by a 172bhp V8 engine of 6,230cc, though this was enlarged to 6,750cc during 1970. Performance from the smooth V8 engine was assured, the car wafting forward on a seemingly unstoppable wave of torque. Supplied new by Rossleigh Ltd to Cambridge Electrics Ltd of Glasgow this example pleasingly retains its original book pack and factory guarantee letter etc. The car is believed to have had just two owners (unfortunately this is not document supported) and to have covered just 41,000 miles from new based on the condition of its original interior and its residency on the Isle of Man since 1979. Recently recommissioned and serviced following a period of dry storage, the vendor currently rates the bodywork, engine and interior trim as “very good,” the electrics and gearbox as “excellent” and the paintwork as “average.”

Reg No: GAH 312N

Chassis No: 48110401D

MOT: Exempt

Introduced in 1963, the Rover P6 was a truly innovative design. Based around an unusual ‘pontoon’ chassis equipped with bolt-on panels, coil-sprung suspension (inboard at the front a la contemporary F1 cars) and servo-assisted disc brakes, it won the inaugural ‘Car of the Year’ award. Launched in 1971, the flagship 3500S model was powered by a 3528cc OHV V8 engine mated to four-speed manual transmission. Quoted as developing some 150bhp and 201lbft of torque, it was capable of 0-60mph in 9.2 seconds and 123mph. Sporting the same matt black grille and improved interior as its lesser post-1970 facelift siblings, it came with a vinyl roof and Rostyle type wheels as standard. This striking example has covered just 54,560 miles from new and has been in the current ownership since 2011. Benefiting from a major service in 2018 which included changing all fluids and only 500 miles covered since a new water pump was also fitted in 2019, it shows just 5 former keepers shown on V5c. The specification includes Sundym glass, box pleat leather seats, rear mounted spare and PAS whilst the car is offered with the original service book, owner’s handbook, collection of invoices and old MOT certificates back to 1995. Finished in Red with black leather, the vendor currently rates the bodywork, paintwork, interior, engine and transmission as “very good”.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1958 MGA Roadster

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Estimate: £15,000-18,000* Reg No: 876 XVG

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: HDA4354254 The Syd Enever-designed MGA was a breath of fresh air for the Abingdon marque, replacing as it did the last of the venerable T Series cars, whose origins dated all the way back to the TA of 1936. Launched at the 1955 Frankfurt Motor Show, it featured a separate chassis penned by Roy Brocklehurst and was powered by the 1489cc straight-four BMC B Series engine. The suspension was independent with coil springs at the front and by live axle hung on semi-elliptic leaf springs at the rear. Braking was by Lockheed drums allround, and steering was by rack and pinion. Manufactured in 1958 for the North American market, 876 XVG was first registered in the UK in 2019 and is presented in red with contrasting black interior. Sitting on chrome wire wheels with luggage rack, spare wheel and tonneau cover, the odometer currently displays 26,835 miles and the vendor rates the condition of the bodywork, engine, electrical equipment, paintwork and transmission as “good”, with the interior trim being described as “very good”. 876 XVG is accompanied by a V5 document together with a number of invoices, as well as a copy of the Florida title.

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1937 Austin Seven Nippy

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Estimate: £15,000-17,000* Reg No: JC 4435

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: A/EB263186 Brainchild of Herbert Austin and Stanley Edge, the Austin Seven was launched in 1922. A highly versatile design, derivatives included everything from tractors to single-seater racing cars! An evolution of the Type EB ‘65’ which itself had been inspired by the legendary Type EA ‘Ulster’, the Type AEB ‘Nippy’ arrived during 1934. Visually near identical to its immediate predecessor with the same low-slung stance and distinctive rounded tail, the newcomer was predominantly bodied in steel over an ash frame (though, early cars utilised the same aluminium panelling as the Type EB ‘65’). Powered by a tuned 747cc engine allied to four-speed manual transmission and benefiting from a lowered centre of gravity, the Type AEB ‘Nippy’ proved an amusingly brisk and chuckable sports car. Phased out in 1937, total ‘Nippy’ production is thought to have amounted to just c.800 cars. The stampings on the accompanying continuation logbook are a little indistinct but it appears that the current registered keeper acquired this delightful Nippy in 1966. A true Seven enthusiast, he fitted a bench seat for three-up motoring but the past fifty-five years have only seen 10,000 miles or so added to the odometer! First registered in Caernarvonshire on 12th March 1937 (or so its ‘JC 4435’ number plate would imply), the Austin had migrated to Yorkshire by the 1960s. Fitted with a replacement engine that same decade, it is nicely detailed throughout with a badge bar, wooden dashboard, carpeted boot and rear-mounted spare wheel. The snug hood is complimented by sidescreens and wind deflectors. A rare survivor coming from long-term ownership, this wonderful Nippy is described by the vendor as being in ‘good overall’ condition with regards to its engine, gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork. Offered for sale with continuation logbook, V5C Registration Document and bucket seats.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1990 Bentley Mulsanne S

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Estimate: £12,000-14,000* Reg No: B10 DGH

MOT: July 2022

Chassis No: SCBZS00A3LCH32688 This lovely looking example is finished in Royal Blue with Parchment hide complemented by blue piping with a sheepskin over rugs and has covered just c.56,000 miles in the hands of three former keepers. In the previous ownership for some twenty years, B10 DGH has clearly been well maintained, with 18 stamps (mostly main dealers) shown in the service record up to 53,000 miles. Offered with its book pack, handbooks and service book and a current MoT to 22nd July 2022, this comfortable and capable Mulsanne S rides on correct specification Avon Turbospeed tyres and is said to be “a superb example of this model”. Styled in-house by Austrian born Fritz Feller, the Bentley Mulsanne had somewhat less fussy lines than its T2 predecessor. Introduced in 1980, its greater road presence masked a larger glass area. While it looked suitably imposing from the outside, internally it proved pleasantly airy. Although, based on the Shadow/T2 floor plan, the Mulsanne offered considerable improvements in both ride and handling thanks to its new Girling automatic ride-height control and gas shock absorbers. Copious amounts of sound deadening combined with the finest quality upholstery kept intrusion from the 6.75-litre V8 engine and three-speed automatic transmission to a muted hush unless the model’s full 120mph potential was explored. Driver inputs were minimised with power-assisted steering and disc brakes. Launched in October 1987, the Mulsanne ‘S’ benefited from firmer, more sporting suspension and a new centre console design (the latter feature donated by the Turbo R). Fitted with alloy wheels as standard, the new model gained quad headlamps in September 1988. Only in production for five years, a mere 909 standard wheelbase cars are thought to have been made.

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1966 Reliant Scimitar GT SE4

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Estimate: £11,000-13,000* Reg No: KYN 150D

MOT: October 2022

Chassis No: SC400226 The Reliant Scimitar series were manufactured between 1964 and 1986, Reliant’s first Scimitar being a coupé based upon the styling of a Daimler SP250 prototype (renamed the SX250) and the chassis of a Reliant Sabre. First displayed in 1964, it was powered by a 2.6-litre Ford straight-six from the Ford Zephyr/Zodiac and to keep costs down, many components in addition to the engine were off-the-shelf items. The engine was mated to a four-speed manual gearbox with optional Laycock overdrive. Suspension was by wishbones and coil springs at the front with live axle, coil springs and a modified Watts linkage at the rear. Steering was by rack and pinion and braking by Girling discs/drums. Manufactured in 1966, this SE4 utilises the 2553cc straight-six engine mated to a 4-speed Ford transmission with overdrive. Finished in Porsche Guards Red with Black vinyl interior upholstery and wood trim, ‘KYN 150D’ entered the current ownership in 2006 and has a recorded mileage of 95,263 miles (at time of consignment). It was comprehensively restored between 1992 and 1997 comprising body removal; chassis blasting and repairs; repaint; suspension restoration and renewal; steering and brake reconditioning; engine and gearbox overhaul and much further work. Featured in Practical Classics (June 1998) following the completion of the restoration, the car subsequently gained a TV cameo appearance in the 2002 Heartbeat Christmas special with set pictures, newspaper clippings and VHS tapes included in the sale. ‘KYN 150D’ has since benefited from a new stainless-steel exhaust in 2015 at a cost of c.£1,600, a gearbox and axle overhaul together with much further mechanical remediation in 2016. Offered with a sizeable history file which comprises a vast selection of invoices, large collection of MOTs, copy of the featuring Practical Classics magazine, a photograph album of the restoration work and current V5C.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1963 Alfa Romeo Giulia Spider

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Estimate: £12,000-15,000* Reg No: XWV 967A

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: AR383180 Launched at the Monza Autodrome on 27th June 1962, the Giulia range was the work of a design team headed by one of the greatest of Italian automobile engineers, Dr Orazio Satta Puliga. The capacity increase boosted maximum power of Alfa’s classic twin-cam four from 80 to 92bhp and the car’s top speed to 109mph. Reliability was likewise enhanced and the larger engine was noticeably smoother. A five-speed gearbox was standard on the Giulia Spider, which remained in production until 1966. The Giulia Spider is certainly one of the most attractive Alfa Romeos of its day and remains highly regarded now. This UK Supplied right-hand drive example originally left the Milanese factory in 1963. Subject to a ‘bare metal’ restoration for circuit racing in 1999 by its previous owner, Jim Avis, the side windows and winder mechanisms were removed, the interior stripped out and the open bodywork sprayed in Ferrari Giallo Fly. Veloce specification included twin Webers, tubular exhaust manifold, front disc brakes and aluminium fuel tank. In 2001, the car was subject to an engine overhaul with forged pistons, reground crank, ported and polished head, and Jim Evans race/rally cams. XWV 967A was purchased by its current owner in February 2004 from H&H Classics’ Stoneleigh Park auction, and has been enjoyed on several road trips, including to Switzerland and the Isle of Man. However, it has seen little use in recent years and is offered as somewhat of a ‘rolling restoration project’ since the owner finds himself with nine points on his license! This pretty Alfa is accompanied by technical manuals, invoices totalling just under £10,000, a number of previous MoTs dating back to 2000 and a mileage log detailing previous journeys, mileage covered and even the amount of fuel used.

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1993 Bentley Continental R

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Estimate: £34,000-38,000* Reg No: K79 FYO

MOT: October 2022

Chassis No: SCBZB03A0PCH42550 The Continental R (code-named ‘Nepal’ by the engineering department) was designed and built entirely at Crewe. This was a significant change from previous Continentals that were offered out to coachbuilders to complete, although Mulliner Park Ward was involved in developing the body shape. The sleek shape had more than a nod to a more modern Bentley, and benefited from work in the wind tunnel, raising the model’s top speed. It is said that when the model was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show, the assembled audience broke out into spontaneous applause. Manufactured in 1993, ‘K79 FYO’ was supplied new via Silverlane of Bristol, being delivered on 1st January 1993 and initially registered ‘3 CYD’. Finished in Diamond Graphite with Light Grey hide and powered by the company’s revered 6750cc V8 engine, the 325bhp turbocharged power unit would offer a near 150mph top speed and somehow heave Bentley’s 2.4-tonne bulk to 60mph in just over six seconds. ‘K79 FYO’ has covered just 52,544 miles (at time of consignment) and has had just six former keepers, having been with the vendor since 2016. The beneficiary of approximately c.£2,500 worth of expenditure with Origin Motorwork (Rolls-Royce Specialists) during the current ownership including servicing, new drive belt and suspension remediation work. The history file also illustrates approximately £2,800 worth of expense with specialists Stewart Walker Ltd which comprised power steering fettling and remedy to a central locking issue in 2015. The accompanying history file includes further invoices for work completed and services as well as the original book pack (with service records) presented in the leather Bentley wallet, a current V5C, a selection of previous MOTs and other sundry paperwork. The aforementioned service history shows eighteen service records, four main dealer records, twelve from Rolls-Royce/Bentley specialists and two further from Aston Martin specialists, with the most recent completed at 49,971 miles by Brooklands Motorworks. Offered with an MOT certificate until October 2022.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1955 AC Aceca

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Estimate: £45,000-55,000* Reg No: UBP 650

MOT: None

Chassis No: AE528 Introduced in 1954, the AC Aceca fastback was conceived as a more refined alternative to the company’s seminal Ace roadster. Developed by Alan Turner and Desmond Stratton, the new model augmented its open-topped sibling’s ladderframed chassis with an elegant square-tube superstructure. Boasting a generous glasshouse, sensuous roofline and practical side-hinged rear hatchback, the Aceca’s Grand Touring credentials were more than skin deep as proven by its all-round independent transverse-leaf suspension and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Initially powered by the John Weller designed 1991cc OHC straight-six which had been a staple part of AC production since 1919, the twoseater could later be had with a choice of Bristol 2-litre or Ford 2.6 litre engines (all three variants boasting a 100mph plus top speed). Handbuilt, just 328 Acecas were produced of which 151 were AC-engined. According to its accompanying original buff logbook, chassis AE528 was initially road registered as ‘UBP 650’ on November 4th 1955 to K.N. Rudd Ltd; the company owned by renowned racing driver, tuner and AC concessionaire Ken Rudd. The second keeper is listed as A.C. Cars Ltd, while the first private individual to take possession was J. Orr Esq of Avon House, Keynsham on February 13th 1956. Thereafter, the Aceca passed to Aubin Long Esq, Jas Harrison & Sons Ltd, Geoffrey Hewitt Esq, Anthony Strange Esq, Wilfred Bell Esq and Raymond Harding Esq before being bought by William Charlton Esq in December 1967 who kept it for the next forty-nine years. Last taxed for road use during 1977, the two-seater was dismantled by Mr Charlton pending a restoration that has yet to be completed.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT


Acquiring the project in 2016, the vendor had the chassis and bodywork professionally restored with the latter being finished in Grey Primer. Factory finished in Blue with matching Blue leather upholstery, the AC has also had its speedometer and rev counter refurbished plus numerous new parts bought for it. Sundry chromework has been replated and the four-speed manual gearbox not only rejuvenated but augmented by a Laycock de Normanville overdrive. The original AC 2-litre straight-six engine (number CL2206W) is present but in need of a complete overhaul. The fibreglass mouldings for the front footwells, gearbox cover and rear bulkhead appear basically sound and there are numerous hand drawn paper templates to help reconstruct the interior. An appropriate kit is among the spares should a new owner wish to convert the car to rack and pinion steering. The finned brake drums look to have been rejuvenated and a wiring loom should act as a guide when it comes to reinstating the electrics. The front windscreen and side windows are present as is the plexiglass rear windscreen. The radiator has been reconditioned and the original brass chassis plate retained. It is somewhat indistinct but we thought we could see the number ‘528’ stamped into a bonnet hinge which suggests the component itself is original. We are not aware of any major parts being missing. However, the AC is being sold strictly as seen and as such potential purchasers are urged to carry out their own inspections. Offered for sale with original buff logbook, continuation logbooks, V5C Registration Document and sundry paperwork.

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1975 Mercedes-Benz 450 SL

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Estimate: £14,000-16,000* Reg No: TEG 723N

Chassis No: 10704422014824

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Estimate: £11,000-13,000* MOT: Exempt

Following a period of long-term dry storage this 450 SL was subject to much recommissioning work in 2016/17 including: brake callipers, brake discs, brake pads, brake pipes, fuel pump, fuel filter, engine/gearbox/rear axle oils, ignition leads, four new tyres, new rear metal (copper) fuel pipes, new rear rubber fuel hoses (highest specification), some professional welding (front inner arch and small area in driver side rear footwell), replacement of the rear exhaust/silencer section, a brake fluid change and two coolant flushes. All cavities, sills, chassis, spaces between inner and outer panels etc. have been injected with waxoyl whilst the steel bonnet has been replaced with a lighter aluminium unit. In long term ownership from 1989 to 2016 when acquired by the vendor, it is offered with Swansea V5C together with a collection of invoices. TEG 723N currently registers some 60,500 miles and is described as having “very good” bodywork, white paintwork, engine, automatic transmission and black interior. Powered by a 4520cc SOHC V8 engine, the 450SL model was quoted as developing some 225bhp and 278lbft of torque. A strong 120mph-plus performer, it remained in production until 1980.

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1970 Austin 6 CWT Van

Reg No: PCE 846J

Chassis No: AAVC.299317

MOT: August 2022

After much production success with the Morris Minor, closed van and open flat-bed (“pick-up”) versions launched in 1953 were offered until the end of production. They were designed for commercial use with small businesses, although many were also used by larger corporations. Both the van and the pickup differed from the monocoque construction of the Saloon and Traveller variants by having a separate chassis. Austin-badged variants of the Minor van and pick-up were sold following the end of Austin A35 production in 1968. These featured Austin badging and the corporate Austin ‘crinkle-cut’ radiator grille but were otherwise identical to the standard Minor commercials, and were sold as the Austin 6cwt and Austin 8cwt. PCE 846J was purchased new by Professor Barrie Rickards, the distinguished paleontologist and writer as well as respected angler. Used during many an angling trip throughout his ownership, the Austin van remained in his care until his passing in 2009, upon which it entered the ownership of his partner (the sole other keeper). Finished in Green, it is fitted with an Ivor Seale engine mated to a four-speed manual gearbox. Showing one erroneous keeper change during Professor Rickard’s ownership due to a change of address, it is accompanied by past logbooks illustrating the address change adding said keeper. The history file further includes a selection of past work and service invoices; a current MOT certificate until August 2022 as well as previous certificates.


1976 Land Rover Series III 88

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Estimate: £11,000-13,000* Reg No: MOU 211R

Chassis No: SARRAWBMBMG002012

1997 MG RV8

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Estimate: £14,000-18,000* MOT: Exempt

The World-famous Land Rover was launched in 1948 and developed from a single offering to a family of long and short wheelbase derivatives with an ever-increasing choice of engines. The Series III of 1971-1985 was the most numerous, with some 440,000 being produced. Outwardly it was almost identical the IIA, but the gearbox now benefited from synchromesh on all ratios, while the cab featured a more modern, moulded plastic facia. Restored in 2019 by a Land Rover specialist based in Lancashire, this fine-looking Series III 88 is finished in Blue with a Black interior and currently registers some 92,600 miles. In the current ownership since the restoration was completed, MOU 211R has been enjoyed by five former keepers and is powered by the 2.25-litre petrol engine. Offered with a Swansea V5C registration document it should provide faithful service for many years to come.

Reg No: P872 POW

Chassis No: SARRAWBMBMG002012

MOT: July 2022

Finished in Woodcote Green with Beige leather interior, this low-mileage RV8 registers just c.36,000 miles having covered less than 3,000 of these since 2011. Being enjoyed by four keepers whilst resident in the UK since 1997 (the last three being from the same family), it is accompanied by assorted expired MoTs back to 2003 when the mileage was 9,246 miles together with a number of invoices. These detail recent expenditure including replacement fan/air-con belts in September 2020, a new battery in 2020 (with 4-year Halford’s guarantee) and a service in May 2018 by Peaslake Garage which included changing of the brake fluid. Said to be in “very good” condition throughout it is offered with Swansea V5C and a current MoT to June 2022. When production of MG B finished and the doors of the Abingdon plant closed the outcry was such that the state-owned company (by then known as the Rover Group), hatched plans to revive the brand. As the MGF launch would take some time, Rover created the RV8 as an interim model. Based on a re-sculptured B bodyshell benefiting from modern production methods and corrosion protection and powered by a 3.9-litre version of Rover’s alloy V8 mated to a five-speed manual gearbox, output was 190 bhp - sufficient for 0- 60 mph in under six seconds and a top speed of 135 mph.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

15


1969 Mercedes-Benz 300 SEL 6.3 Crayford Estate

16

Estimate: £20,000-30,000* Reg No: TBA

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 10901822003081 Dr Eric Waxenberger, Head of Passenger Car Research at Mercedes-Benz Stuttgart, was a keen and able competition driver and, inevitably working were he did, a lover of very fast cars. He had the idea of employing the 6329cc V8, with its single overhead camshaft per bank of cylinders, along with its enormously strong transmission from the huge 600 limousine and trying to squeeze them under the bonnet of the 300SEL. With 200bhp, massive torque and 137mph top speed, the model also boasted self-levelling air suspension, four wheel disc brakes and power assisted steering. By any standards this was an amazing car with unexpectedly excellent handling. Making its debut at the Geneva Salon in March 1968, the new 300SEL 6.3 stunned the world’s motoring press. Indeed, when Road and Track got their hands on it, the US market leader headed their feature “Merely the Greatest Sedan in the World!”. This extremely rare Crayford Estate was first owned by Kenneth McAlpine, ex-Works Connaught Formula 1 driver and member of the McAlpine civil engineering dynasty. It is believed to be 1 of just 12 such Crayford conversions and possibly the only one to have survived. In the current ownership since 1989, the car registers a credible 71,000 recorded miles and benefited from new air suspension units in 2010. Finished in Olive Green with cream trim and green carpet, it is offered with V5 document, owners wallet, handbooks, 1970 letter from Mercedes, Crayford brochure copy, original 300 SEL sales brochure, collection of old MoTs and service invoices plus service manual. One of just 702 300 SEL 6.3 cars built to right-hand drive specification, it is perhaps the ultimate 1960s estate car.

16


1998 Aston Martin DB7 Volante

17

Estimate: £20,000-24,000* Reg No: M1 VTG

MOT: Feb 2022

Chassis No: SCFAAWK202090 Although Victor Gauntlett had long mooted the idea, it took the arrival of Ford money and TWR Group know-how for a new generation, ‘small’ Aston Martin to become a reality. Introduced at the March 1993 Geneva Salon albeit deliveries did not start until late the following year - the newcomer had been subjected to more testing and development work than any of the marque’s previous models. Indeed under the watchful eye of Engineering Director Rod Mansfield Project NPX (as the nascent DB7 was labelled) got through some thirty prototypes. Based around a steel semimonocoque chassis the production version was equipped with all-round independent suspension, four-wheel disc brakes and power assisted rack and pinion steering. Derived from a proven Jaguar unit, the DB7’s 3239cc DOHC straightsix engine boasted four valves per cylinder, Zytec multi-point fuel injection and an Eaton supercharger. Credited with developing 335bhp and 360lbft, it was allied to five-speed manual transmission as standard and reputedly enabled the Aston Martin to sprint from 0-60mph in 5.8 seconds and reach 161mph. Styled by Ian Callum just 879 straight-six powered DB7 Volantes were reputedly made like the sale car including several limited edition models. Finished in Mendip Blue matched to a Cream leather interior with Blue piping, ‘M1 VTG’ has covered just 66,000 miles from new. Offered with copies of service history plus a collection of invoices the Aston HAS recently been shod with new front tyres. The cherished registration number ‘M1 VTG’ is included in the sale. Said to have been maintained very well in the last 10 years, it is no surprise the vendor currently grades the DB7’s engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘Very Good’. Offered with an MOT certificate into February 2022.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

17


1938 Brough Superior 3.5-Litre Dual Purpose

18

Estimate: £55,000-65,000* Reg No: ETV 795

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 812692593 One of just circa eighty examples produced, ETV 795 with its Big Six engine wears attractive drophead coupe coachwork by W C Atcherley of Birmingham and has been in the current ownership since 1979. Currently displaying a credible 104,600 miles on its odometer, the first owner is believed to have been a Mrs Minnie Sheriff, a lady friend of Brough’s. Originally acquired by the vendor in an Alexandra Palace auction, the car has been enjoyed on numerous events including Continental tours to most European countries. Repainted some thirty years ago it has also benefited from a gearbox overhaul by Jeff Moor, carburettor overhaul in 2007, engine overhaul in 2005 and a complete rewire. A stainless-steel exhaust, Kenlowe fan and backup electric fuel pump are fitted and we understand a quantity of spares are available by separate negotiation. Offered with an original sales brochure, VSCC eligibility document, collection of old MOTs back to 1980, V5C, assorted invoices plus brown logbook this finely engineered drophead coupe represents a rare and exciting opportunity for lovers of pre-war performance cars. The Brough name is better known in relation to motorcycles than cars, as the company produced over 3,000 two-wheelers between 1919 and 1940. Dubbed the `Rolls-Royce of Motorcycles’, they were prestige machines that attracted a discerning clientele, and among the many famous Brough owners were George Bernard Shaw and T E Lawrence (`Lawrence of Arabia’) who had no less than eight and, of course, famously lost his life on one. The firm’s car production was miniscule by comparison and limited to circa eighty-five examples, but they echoed their two-wheeled cousins in terms of quality. Three models were designed but only two made it into series production - the 4-Litre straight-eight manufactured in 1935/36 and the ensuing 3.5-Litre straight six. Most Broughs sported striking Drophead Coupe bodies, which were produced by W C Atcherley of Birmingham.

18


1954 Bentley R-Type Saloon Single family ownership from new

19

Estimate: £18,000-22,000* Reg No: OVU 200

MOT: November 2022

Chassis No: B73WG An obvious evolution of its MKVI predecessor, the Bentley R-Type was introduced at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show. Subtly reworked from the previous model by in-house stylist John Blatchley, it boasted a notably larger boot and reprofiled rear wings. Switching from riveted to welded frame construction at chassis B349TO, the newcomer featured independent coil-and-wishbone front suspension, a leafsprung ‘live’ rear axle and servo-assisted four-wheel drum brakes (hydraulic front / rod rear). Powered by a ‘big bore’ 4566cc straight-six inlet-over-exhaust engine allied to either four-speed manual or automatic transmission, the R-type was a surprisingly strong performer, able to reach more than 100mph. Praised by the contemporary motoring press for its high-speed handling and well-appointed interior, the model remained in production until 1955 by which time some 2,017 Standard Steel Saloons are thought to have been made. First issued with the Manchester registration number ‘OVU 200’ on April 22nd 1954, chassis B73WG has been in single family custodianship from new. Literally bought for buttons, the first owner was a large-scale manufacturer of clothing fasteners, the Bentley is highly original with a particularly delightful interior. The rich Red leather and polished wood veneers still reek of quality. The gloss Black paintwork has a deep shine but there are some imperfections to the bodywork which are to be expected of an unmolested but still sixty-seven year old car. Recently recommissioned following almost a decade of dry storage, the R-Type started readily upon inspection and is said to ‘drive very well’. A decidedly rare opportunity to acquire a one family owned from new Bentley. Offered for sale with V5C Registration Document, sundry paperwork and fresh MOT certificate.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

19


1943 Ford GPW Jeep

20

Estimate: £20,000-24,000* Reg No: VSV 698

MOT: April 2022

Chassis No: GPW101445 Arguably even more iconic as a piece of WW2 Americana than a Sherman Tank or P-51 Mustang, the Jeep is for many the definitive WW2 vehicle. Equipped with a torquey L-headed 2.2-litre engine driving all four wheels via a threespeed manual box and two-speed transfer case, the tough, go-anywhere four-seater did its job exceptionally well. Cheap to produce and simple to fix in the field, its contribution to the Allied victory cannot be understated. By the end of hostilities in 1945, 647,870 Jeeps had been produced - 281,448 of which were manufactured by Ford. Manufactured in 1943, this Ford Jeep is finished in green with painted wartime style decals and is fitted with a 2.2-litre engine and three-speed manual gearbox. Imported into the United Kingdom in 1987 from America, the Jeep remained with its first keeper until 1998 when it was purchased by the late vendor. Understood to still be fitted with the original body-tub, the Jeep benefited from a new fuel tank from Dallas Auto Parts in 2017 at a cost of approximately £350. Nicknamed ‘Auntie Millie’ in memory of a relation of the late owner, the name appears in vinyl underneath the windscreen. Offered with a Swansea V5C document together with a few past MOT certificates, ‘VSV 698’ comes with a current no advisory MOT certificate until April 2022.

20


1967 Fiat 850 Sports Spider

21

Estimate: £11,000-13,000* Reg No: Un-reg

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 100GS 010193 Fiat’s perennially pretty 850 Spider emanated from the prolific pen of Giorgetto Giugiaro, was built by Bertone and unveiled at the 1965 Geneva Salon. It was notable for the free-flowing elegance of its lines and the fact the hood could be completely hidden from view below a panel ahead of the rear-mounted engine. Early examples were powered by the same 843cc engine as the Saloon, but in 1968 the Spider’s unit was enlarged to 903cc - this version was known as the Sport. Manufactured in 1967 in left-hand drive specification, this Fiat 850 Spider is fitted with the 843cc straight-four engine mated to the four-speed manual transmission. The charming Bertone coachwork is finished in red with a black vinyl interior upholstery and a black hood, the 850 is accompanied by a scarce body-coloured hard-top. With a recorded mileage of c.60,100 km, the Fiat was formerly part of the Petitjean collection based in Strasbourg, of Marcel Petitjean, a former French racing driver who invested his returns from a business empire into rare cars. Sourced for the collection from a French owner who is said to have used the Fiat for many local events, the 850 entered into the collection in 2009 where it remained until 2020. The car was purchased by the vendor directly from the collection and imported into the United Kingdom in 2020. A rarity on British shores, this 850 Spider is an appealing sports car to those searching for something a little different.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

21


1954 Sunbeam Alpine MKIII Roadster

22

Estimate: £10,000-12,000* Reg No: Un-reg

Chassis No: EF 1472

23

Estimate: £10,000-12,000* MOT: None

Though developed from the Sunbeam-Talbot 90, the Alpine was the first Rootes Group product to wear just the Sunbeam badge. Inspired by Bournemouth-based Sunbeam-Talbot dealer George Hartwell, the design was finalised by Raymond Loewy. The newcomer found fame at the hands of Works drivers Stirling Moss and Sheila Van Damm and starred in ‘To Catch A Thief’ with Cary Grant and Grace Kelly. The Alpine bodies were hand-made by Mulliners Ltd of Birmingham and the cars were powered by a mildly-tuned version of the 2267cc four-cylinder engine from the SunbeamTalbot 90, which gave around 80bhp at 4200rpm. The Alpine was manufactured from 1953 to 1955, during which time some 1,282 MKIs and 300 MKIIIs were produced (there was no MKII version), of which relatively few remain - possibly no more than 200. Originally finished in Ivory with Bright Red upholstery, this left-hand drive example spent most of its life in America before being imported into the EU. Off the road since the 1970s, it is understood to have been untouched apart from replacement front floors. The seller believes that the 21,000 miles shown by the odometer could well represent the total covered from new given the car’s lengthy inactivity. Thought to be essentially complete apart from missing top bows, the Alpine is said to pleasingly retains its factory-fitted engine and transmission.

22

1992 Porsche 944 S2 Cabriolet

Reg No: J442 SPP

Chassis No: WP0ZZZ94ZMN430736

MOT: December 2021

This rare and desirable UK-supplied S2 was manufactured in 1992 and was first delivered on the 6th of May 1992 by Chariots Porsche Centre of St. Albans. Fitted with the 2969cc straight-four engine with the five-speed manual transmission, the Porsche is finished in Light Blue with Blue leather interior upholstery and a Blue hood. ‘J442 SPP’ is offered with just 71,898 miles (at time of consignment) and only three owners from new, the 944 was retained by the first owner until 2017. Subject to a ‘Category C’ insurance claim in 2010 but has since been AutoLign inspected in 2019 which concluded with the 944 being provided with a ‘Certificate of Investigation and Pass’ (a copy of which is provided in the history file), reclassifying the Porsche. Subject to £4,200 worth of expenditure in 2017, the Porsche received a service, new cam belts, further engine fettling and a brake overhaul provided by Porsche specialists. ‘J442 SPP’ is offered with a history file which comprises the book pack including stamped service book displaying ten service stamps as well as five brake fluid and coolant changes. Further accompanied by a selection of invoices, numerous MOT certificates and a current V5C.


1992 Mercedes 190E 2.0

24

No Reserve Reg No: J987 JGU

1995 Mercedes-Benz SL 500

25

Estimate: £12,000-14,000* Chassis No: WDB2010242F919056

MOT: December 2021

The W201 was a revolutionary model for Mercedes-Benz featuring, as it did, a patented rear fivelink suspension subsequently used in E and C class models, front and rear anti-roll bars, anti-dive and anti-squat geometry as well as airbags, ABS brakes and seatbelt pre-tensioners. MercedesBenz spent over £600 million researching and developing the 190 and was subsequently quoted as describing it as ‘massively over-engineered’. Fortunately, it proved to be a huge commercial success, becoming one of the brand’s best-selling vehicles with over 1.8 million sold over its eleven-year production run. Today they are increasingly sought-after modern classics, harking back to a golden era of timeless Mercedes design and bulletproof build quality. Presented in grey with black cloth interior, J987 JGU was manufactured in 1992. A Japanese market car, it was imported to the UK in 2015 and road registered in September of 2016. Displaying just 40,867 miles on the odometer, it is offered with a number of documents including the V5 which displays one former keeper, export certificate, a number of previous MoT certificates dating back to 2016 and a collection of invoices for previous works carried out.

Reg No: M189 WHJ

Chassis No: WDB1290672F115228

MOT: October 2022

Following the resounding success of the R107, the R129 Mercedes-Benz SL had a rather tough act to follow, as it still had to carry on the tradition of a fast and reliable grand touring convertible. The SL500 featured a 5.0 V8 that produced 326bhp and offered great performance, delivering a 0-62mph time of 6.2 seconds and a top speed of 155mph. The R129 featured much in the way of innovation, including controlled electronic damping, automatically expanding roll-over bar and a more modern multi-link rear axle. In addition to this was a fully operating electric roof, windows, door mirrors and seats, which made this model easy and comfortable to operate. As one might expect, the SL luxury sports cars were leaders in their class and lavishly equipped in the best Mercedes-Benz tradition. Offered in two-tone silver with matching grey leather interior and factory hard-top, M189 WHJ has been in the current ownership for the last seven years and is offered displaying just 88,004 miles on its odometer. This particular example comes with its all-important factory hard-top and an MOT Certificate valid until 27 October 2022. M189 WHJ is rated by the vendor as ‘’very good’’ all round.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

23


1973 Jaguar E-Type V12 Roadster

26

Estimate: £55,000-65,000* Reg No: MCY 446L

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 1S 22625 By 1971, Jaguar’s jaw-dropping E-Type had been in production for a decade. Despite continual improvements, new emissions legislation in the all-important American market threatened to strangle the big cat’s performance. Jaguar responded by giving its revered sportscar fresh claws in the shape of a 5343cc V12 developed from the stillborn XJ13 Le Mans project car. The new engine was both effortlessly powerful and eerily refined. “The turbinelike smoothness with which the engine provides a sustained shove in the back is almost uncanny, the more so when one accelerates hard in top gear without even a gearchange to interrupt one’s headlong dash into the distance” (Autocar 5th July 1973). With some 272bhp and 304lbft of torque on tap, the Series III E-Type once again had 150mph in its sights. A revised wheelbase yielded better cabin space and in conjunction with wider front / rear tracks, new anti-dive front suspension geometry and fatter tyres gave improved road holding. Imbued with a more muscular stance thanks to its flared wheelarches, re-profiled wings and larger grille, the model also boasted vented disc brakes and a restyled interior. Finished in Metallic Silver with Black leather upholstery, this handsome left-hand drive V12 Roadster is understood to have had just two owners from new. The first residing Stateside and the second here in the UK. Reportedly ‘a matching numbers example which is completely unmolested and retains the factory shut lines’, the vendor is also confident that the 66,000 miles shown to its odometer represents the total covered from new. Riding on chrome wire wheels shod with whitewall tyres, the two-seater features the preferred four-speed manual gearbox. Offered for sale with V5C Registration Document and sundry paperwork.

24


1912 Ford Model T Tourer

27

Estimate: £24,000-28,000* Reg No: SV 6617

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 123692 This notably early UK registered Tin Lizzie has been the subject of a chassis up restoration which included a full engine overhaul and features a Clam Shell back axle plus is fitted with a water pump, spare wheel carrier and new hood. Offered with a V5c document, its unsurprisingly that the vendor now describes the bodywork, black paintwork, engine, transmission and black interior as all being in “very good” condition. The world long since ran out of new things to say about the Model T (or `Tin Lizzie’ as it was affectionately known). Ford was already progressing impressively before the launch of the T in the autumn of 1908, but it was the model which really set the company, and the world, on the move. The statistics are staggering: it was the first car to be mass produced and the first to be manufactured in several countries simultaneously. Production ran for nineteen years, during which time some 16.5 million examples were built. The timing of the T was perfect. It came to market just as motorcars were gaining in interest and acceptance and sold for less than a wagon and team of horses. It mobilised people the world over and for the first sixteen years of production accounted for no less than 40 percent of all car sales in America - small wonder that it was voted `The World’s Most Influential Car Of The 20th Century’. At launch the T was powered by a sidevalve 2.9-litre fourcylinder engine producing some 20hp. It was among the first to have its cylinders cast in one block and the first of all to have a detachable cylinder head. The epicyclic transmission had two forward speeds and a reverse and was controlled by a combination of three foot pedals and lever - a real test for drivers who cut their teeth on modern cars!

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

25


1953 Bentley R-Type Special

28

Estimate: £50,000-60,000* Reg No: NOH 757

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: B291SP Based around a 1953 R-Type, the build of NOH 757 including stripping the donor vehicle back to the bare chassis which was blasted and painted having been found to require no welding. All suspension parts and the braking system were then checked, cleaned and refitted whilst the brakes were converted to hydraulics front and rear and a remote servo fitted. The FB60 Rolls-Royce engine was stripped and checked over by a specialist, its alloy construction allowing not only for weight saving but also far more pleasant steering characteristics over the cast iron unit. The bodywork was constructed in the traditional manner using a hard wood frame, aluminium and ply covered with quality Everflex. The wheels were custom made by Torrino Wheels of Peterborough and shod with Blockley tyres. The interior, seats and doors have been trimmed in quality leather whilst the hood is of Mohair. Attention to detail is evidenced by the presence of the correct Bentley jack and wheel brace being present in the toolbox. Offered with V5c and a collection of photographs from the build NOH 757 is now described as having “very good” body, paint, interior, engine and transmission, this recently completed special is only being offered for sale to allow the vendor to concentrate on other projects. Introduced in 1946, the MKVI was Bentley’s first post-WW2 model. Aimed at the emerging ‘owner-driver’ luxury car market, it was fitted with a freshly developed 4257cc engine mated to four-speed manual transmission. Suspension was independent by coil springs at the front and by leaf springs at the rear. Unfortunately, the variable quality of steel available in the post-WW2 period meant that the MKVI’s Standard Steel Saloon coachwork rarely lasted as long as Crewe had intended, and by the mid-1960s there were plenty of mechanically strong but cosmetically untidy cars running around. From that time onwards, the tradition of building Bentley MKVI-based Specials has been long and proud.

26


1974 Volkswagen SP2

29

Estimate: £20,000-30,000* Reg No: OPC 389W

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: BL006207 Described as being “one of the most beautiful sports cars VW ever designed” by the German publication Hobby Magazine, it is perhaps a shame the SP2 was never officially offered to the European market. The model, based on the VW Variant, was developed by Volkswagen Brazil and offered between 1972 and 1976. Powered by a 1700cc engine and known as ‘Project X’ the prototype debuted in 1971. Sadly, its relative lack of performance against local opposition resulted in production ending in February 1976 after c.10,000 units had been built of which just 670 were exported with just one of these making it to Europe via Portugal. This left-hand drive example has been with the vendor since 2010 having been imported to the UK from Kuwait. It is understood to be one of just four examples in the UK currently. Retaining its original floor plan, the bodywork is said to have avoided the rust problems suffered by most. The SP2 is powered by a replacement VW Heritage SP2 1641cc engine (fitted in 2018) that breathes through twin Dellorto DRLA carburettors. These were installed and tuned by Rawspeed of Plymouth. We have been advised that all of the original engine parts not incorporated into the replacement engine can be collected from the vendor and that a stainlesssteel exhaust created by Turbo Thomas is fitted. The gearbox has been overhauled by Bears Motorsport and the car is offered with a comprehensive history file which includes Arabic service invoices, import documentation, old MoTs, old blue logbook and a rare original handbook.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

27


2001 Ferrari 360 Spider

30

Estimate: £58,000-65,000* Reg No: Y957 CDS

Chassis No: ZFFYT53C00125022

MOT: June 2022

‘The 360 is a devastating road car. It does everything you’d hope a Ferrari would but with such polish, precision and ease that you don’t have to think twice about unleashing all its performance. There is perhaps no other car yet made that combines so much raw emotion with so much technical finesse.’ Evo magazine, June 1999 Introduced in 1999 as a replacement for the F355, the 360 was an entirely new design featuring an aluminium spaceframe chassis which was 40% stiffer and 28% lighter than the tubular steel arrangement of its predecessor. The revised bodywork resulted in downforce improving by a factor of four over the F355. Powered by a 3.6-litre V8 coupled to either a six-speed manual or F1 electrohydraulic manual transmission, the 360’s lighter weight improved the 0-60 mph dash to just 4.2 seconds with a nominal top speed of over 180mph. In 2001, the spider version was introduced, the stiffness of the spaceframe being ideally suited to handle an open top. This was followed in 2003 by the ultimate incarnation - the 360 racing series inspired Challenge Stradale - featuring a number of weight saving and tuning modifications by the factory. First registered in July 2001, this manual ‘Spider’ was acquired by the vendor from his father-in-law earlier this year; a prolific figure in the classic car world and no stranger to the Ferrari marque. With significant documented service history, ‘Y957CDS’ is offered with the original Ferrari Certificate of Conformity and numerous receipts and bills for maintenance. Details show that the front suspension was overhauled in 2013 and that the cambelts and tensioners were most recently changed at 32,346 miles. There is a near continuous MOT history with thirteen old certificates within the documents file. The paint presents in very good condition with no significant blemishes or scuffs reported by the vendor - the wings are also embellished with the optional ‘Scuderia Ferrari’ shields. Weather protection is provided in the form of a black fabric convertible hood, which is in great shape, with no rips or tears, and the mechanism worked perfectly during our recent photography session. It rides on a set of factory-option OZ ‘Challenge Stradale’ alloy wheels, which were fitted recently and present in superb order with no damage or marks. The interior is finished in dark blue leather with contrasting stitching. The condition of the cabin reflects the low mileage, with minimal wear. There is slight rubbing to the steering wheel, but otherwise the buttons and controls all present very well and work as they should. The original Ferrari-branded stereo head unit has been replaced with a far more user-friendly contemporary Pioneer system.

28

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT


The most recent service work was carried out in July of this year at 35,700 miles and included air, oil and pollen filters, spark plugs and an oil change (using the recommended Shell Helix Ultra 5W-40). Accompanying the car is the original book pack, including the H.R. Owen stamped ‘Servizi Ferrari Direct Line’ booklet, and even the Ferrari Maglite torch. The leather-bound tool kit is also present and the vendor notes that numerous invoices detailing servicing and maintenance prior to his ownership are included in the comprehensive history file. This Ferrari 360 Spider is a thrilling open-top supercar, which benefits from a timeless factory specification. Even more aurally exciting than the Modena coupe thanks to being able to drop the roof to listen to the glorious V8 behind you; this is a well-maintained car that presents in superb condition throughout. It is now ready to be cherished and enjoyed on the road by a new owner, and would make a fine addition to any collection of Maranello’s finest.

29


2007 Maserati Granturismo V8

31

Estimate: £28,000-32,000* Reg No: SN57 FCG

MOT: TBA

Chassis No: ZAMGH45C000036406 Unveiled at the 2007 Geneva Salon, the Maserati GranTurismo set a new record for the automotive industry progressing from design to production in just nine months! Based on a modified version of the M139 platform that underpinned the Quattroporte V saloon, the newcomer was equipped with all-round independent, double-wishbone suspension and powered by a Ferrari-derived 4.2 litre V8 engine (399bhp/339lbft) allied to ZF six-speed automatic transmission. Conceived as more of a luxurious grand tourer than an out and out sportscar, the Maserati was reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 5.2 seconds and 177mph. However, the GranTurismo’s stand out feature was its stunning Pininfarina styling. The work of Jason Castriota, it remains one of the twenty-first century’s most elegant GTs. A sales success for Maserati, the GranTurismo evolved through various guises with some 28,805 being produced in total. Finished in the striking combination of Black with Red leather upholstery, this handsome Gran Turismo dates from 2007. Supplied new by Graypaul of Edinburgh, its 4.2 litre V8 engine is allied to six-speed ZF automatic transmission. Fitted with upgraded 20-inch Birdcage alloy wheels which have recently been refurbished and shod with new Pirelli P Zero tyres, ‘SN57 FCG’ has had just 2 former keepers and covered a mere 39,500 miles from new. Offered with bookpack, handbooks and service book and just subject to an oil and filter change, the vendor currently considers the engine, transmission, bodywork, paintwork and interior trim all to be in `excellent’ order. He also tells us that the 2+2-seater will possess a fresh MOT by the time of sale.

30


1957 Chevrolet Bel-Air Townsman Wagon

32

Estimate: £30,000-35,000* Reg No: 932 XUD

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: VB57L187517 In 1955 Chevrolet began production of the second generation of the Bel Air with Chevrolets produced from 1955 to 1957 commonly being referred to as “Tri-Five” Chevrolets. Interestingly enough, each year of the “Tri-Five” Chevrolets can be differentiated by their unique front end. For the 1957 model year, Chevrolet once again chose to restyle the looks, this time it was in an effort to compete with the all-new 1957 Ford. The redesigned Chevrolets featured cues borrowed from Cadillac. The car was very well received, and today the 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air has gained the reputation as one of the most iconic cars of the ‘50s. Presented in Larkspur Blue with ivory accents and chrome brightwork with matching interior, 932 XUD represents perhaps the only Bel-Air Townsman to ever be offered at auction in the UK. Acquired by its current custodian some 9 years ago to form part of a private collection, this particular example features chrome-wire wheels, chrome roof rack, cooler box in the boot and was subject to interior re-trimming by Ecklers of Hampshire. Mated to a 5.5-litre Chevrolet V8, a TH350 three-speed transmission now replaces the original two-speed Powerglide fitted as standard. Other upgrades include a full front disc kit with a dual servo brake conversion, power steering conversion and the addition of gas shock absorbers front and back. 932 XUD was subject to full service, replacement plug lead ends, rear brake overhaul and engine tuning in December 2020 and comes accompanied with a V5 document, a number of previous MOTs and invoices, as well as a 1957 owner’s guide, accessories booklet, wiring diagram manual and yes, the fan and guitar on the dashboard are also included!

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

31


2003 Volkswagen Golf VR5

33

No Reserve Reg No: YB03 EDX

34

Estimate: £12,000-14,000* Chassis No: WVWZZZ1JZ3W623236

MOT: TBA

The successor to the MK3, the MK4 Golf was Launched in October 1997 for the 1998 model year. With many variants offered, perhaps less known but rather interesting is the V5 model. The V5 is mostly remembered for producing some intoxicating sounds and is an incredibly important car in automotive history, making use of the only V5 automobile engine to reach production. This 2.3-litre (140 cu in) “VR5” engine manufactured by Volkswagen from 1997 to 2006 was based on Volkswagen’s VR6 engine, the VR5 being a narrow-angle engine with staggered cylinders (three cylinders on one bank and two on the other) sharing a single cylinder head. As per the VR6 engine, the angle between the banks was 15 degrees. Manufactured in the model’s final year of production, YB03 EDX is presented in silver with contrasting black leather interior and features sports seats and sports steering wheel. An extremely rare survivor, it is an even more attractive proposition as the vehicle’s mileage registers just 16,737 and only two former keepers are shown on the V5 document. YB03 EDX is accompanied by its service booklet containing nine stamps, the last in 2019 at 13,967 miles.

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1970 Porsche 911 E

Reg No: RTP 234S

Chassis No: 9110220345

MOT: None

Porsche’s 911 is an automotive phenomenon like no other. Its tail-heavy configuration has been described as a ‘triumph of engineering over design’ and its maker sought to pension it off as much as 40 years ago. Yet it is still with us, still being developed and refined, and still frequently trouncing the opposition on road and track. In 1968, the model’s wheelbase was increased by 57mm and the rear overhang reduced by the same amount. The following year the engine capacity was enlarged to 2.2-litres and then to 2.4-litres in 1971. The latter examples were offered in three levels of tune, namely: T (130bhp), E (165bhp) and S (190bhp). Offered as a stalled restoration which has been dismantled and dry stored for over twenty years, this 911E is 1 of just 1,304 E Coupes made for the 1970 model year (C Series). The car is understood to have been supplied new to Belgium (or so its secondary chassis plate would imply) and was subsequently imported and UK road registered during 1978 (hence the ‘S’ registration). Sold strictly ‘as seen’ but as a potentially rewarding project, there are no front wings and doubtless missing other parts. The engine is a later 911/81 2.7-litre unit.


1939 Ford 91C V8 Ambulance

35

Estimate: £12,000-14,000* Reg No: BFN 329

Chassis No: 4851230

1971 Mercedes-Benz 280SE 3.5 V8 LHD

36

Estimate: £12,000-15,000* MOT: Exempt

Reg No: FHH 451K

Chassis No: 10805712004753

MOT: Exempt

This rare surviving Ford 91C ambulance had the distinction of serving in the Western Desert campaign during World War Two before returning to these shores via Canterbury (hence the BFN registration). It subsequently continued to serve patients in the UK until its retirement and has been the current family ownership since the mid-1960s. Finished in Stateside Yellow with Green vinyl interior, it is powered by a replacement French-sourced 3.6-litre flathead V8 driving through a three-speed gearbox. BFN 329 was treated to a restoration in 2016/2017 and is now described as being in “very good” condition as regards its bodywork, paintwork and transmission with “excellent” engine and electrics. Offered with Green logbook and a collection of old MOT’s it is sure to be welcome at shows and events and could even provide the next owner with an entry to the world of film hire.

Among the fastest, most luxurious saloons of its generation, the four-door Mercedes-Benz 280SE 3.5 was introduced at the 1970 Amsterdam Motor Show. The work of Paul Bracq, its elegant, understated lines were shared with the rest of the W108 range but gave little clue as to the newcomer’s reputed 125mph potential. Based around a beautifully engineered monocoque bodyshell equipped with all-round independent suspension (double-wishbone front / swingaxle rear), power-assisted recirculating ball steering and four-wheel disc brakes, the model was powered by a freshly developed 3499cc SOHC V8 engine allied to four-speed automatic transmission. Credited with developing some 200bhp and 211lbft, the all-alloy powerplant was feted for its flexibility, refinement and punch. Only in production between July 1970 and September 1972, the 280SE 3.5 is notable as one of the last Mercedes’ saloons to be handbuilt.

The 91C was produced by Ford UK in 1939 and was the last of the V8 models they built following their introduction in 1932. For the British market it was available as a two-door convertible, fiveseat estate and four-door saloon. It was powered by a 3622 cc Ford sidevalve V8 and retained the transverse leaf suspension pioneered on the Model T. Some 1878 were built.

Finished in Mittelblau with Light Grey upholstery, chassis 004753 was reportedly supplied new to the Netherlands and retained by its first keeper for some forty-five years. Imported to the UK in 2018, ‘FHH 451K’ is said to have benefited from approximately £15,000 worth of recommissioning and maintenance work during the current (only third) ownership. A handsome and usable 1970s sports saloon with undeniable style.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

33


1988 Lancia Delta HF Integrale 8V

37

Estimate: £18,000-22,000* Reg No: E730 DAP

MOT: October 2022

Chassis No: ZLA831AB00420763 The iconic Lancia Delta Integrale requires little introduction. A formidable and enormously successful rally weapon, it also made a very capable and comfortable road car. With manners suitable for family outings, nights to the opera, spirited weekend drives, or high-speed laps or a legendary racing circuit, the Delta Integrale was an extraordinary machine that could take all these in its stride (in all its evolutions), and it can still hold its head high today. The eight-valve variant utilised a two-litre turbocharged engine producing 185bhp and the world’s most sophisticated 4WD system that rocketed the car to 60mph in just 6.6 seconds, on virtually any surface, on its way to a top speed of 133mph. Manufactured in 1988 in lefthand drive, this 8V Integrale was supplied new to the United Kingdom being first registered on the 14th of January that year. Fitted with the aforementioned 1995cc turbocharged straight-four engine mated to the five-speed manual transmission, ‘E730 DAP’ is finished in Red with Grey cloth interior upholstery. With a recorded mileage of approximately 146,000 kilometers (equating to c.90,000 miles), the Lancia is understood to have been supplied new to the Pentti Airikkala Driving School and has had a total of eight registered keepers, entering current ownership in 2015. The beneficiary of a comprehensive engine overhaul by Tanc Barratt Italian Car Specialists shortly before the purchase by the vendor, this comprised a new Tanc Barratt cylinder block with forged pistons and steel con-rods along with overhauled cylinder head. A reconditioned turbocharger was supplied by Auto Integrale along with a new steering rack gaiter and brake fettling including rear callipers. Offered from a private collection, the Lancia is accompanied for sale by a large history file comprising many previous MOT certificates dating back to the early-1990s, the book pack, a large selection of invoices including many from Tanc Barratt and V5C document.

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2002 Maserati 3200 GT

38

Estimate: £13,000-15,000* Reg No: YF02 VNM

MOT: TBA

Chassis No: ZAMAA38C000004076 The Maserati 3200GT was styled by Italdesign whose founder and head, Giorgetto Giugiaro, previously designed, amongst others, the Ghibli, Bora and Merak and so it certainly had an impressive pedigree. Sold mainly in Europe, the 3200GT shared the twin-turbo, 3.2-litre, V8 featured in the Quattroporte IV and Shamal, now revised and tuned to 365bhp.The tail-light design consisted of LEDs arranged in the shape of a boomerang with the outer layer of the ‘boomerang’ providing the brake lights and the inner layer the directional indicators. Manufactured in 2002, this 3200 GT was first registered in the United Kingdom on 30th of April that year and is powered by the aforementioned 3217cc V8 engine mated to the desirable and rare six-speed manual transmission. Finished in the attractive colour scheme of Sebring Blue with cream leather interior, the car has covered only c.42,500 miles from new. Entering into the vendor’s private collection in 2016, ‘YF02 VNM’ has been enjoyed by just five former keepers. The beneficiary of a new clutch, clutch slave cylinder, replacement starter motor and attention to areas of paintwork amongst other additional works while in the vendor’s custodianship at a cost of approximately £3,200, it was last serviced at 41,913 miles. Previous to that, ‘YF02 VNM’ was subject to a cam belt service at 39,445 miles with further work carried out at this time including new lower front suspension arms, front anti-roll bar drop links and rear track rod-ends at a cost of approximately £5,000. This was carried out by respected specialists McGrath Maserati. Offered with a history file including the owner’s handbook, a collection of previous invoices, a selection of MoT certificates and V5C document.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

35


c.1931 Ford Model A Roadster Pick-Up

39

Estimate: £15,000-18,000* Reg No: Un-reg

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: A45I4072 Amid rumours that several States were preparing to ban his Model T due to its ‘unsafe’ hand-operated braking system, Henry Ford begrudgingly succumbed to pressure and authorised the development of a successor. Introduced in December 1927, the Model A was greeted with unprecedented demand. Longer and lower-slung than the Model T, it retained transverse-leaf suspension but proved significantly more refined. Designed by Howard Hicks, its 3285cc, L-Head four-cylinder engine developed 40bhp (twice the Model T’s output) boasting niceties like coil ignition and integral water pump. Mated to a three-speed manual gearbox, it gave a top speed of 65mph necessitating the fitment of four-wheel brakes. This charming Model A was recently imported into the United Kingdom from Iowa, America and is supplied with a NOVA in preparation for registration with the first UK keeper. Fitted with the Roadster Pick-Up body, four-cylinder engine and a three-speed manual transmission, this example was the beneficiary of a self-evident older restoration. Finished in the complementary colour scheme of Blue and Black with a Black interior and hood, the Ford features a well-finished wooden-stake pick-up bed and driver’s side-mounted spare tyre. The vendor rates the engine, electrical equipment, gearbox and interior trim as ‘very good’ and bodywork as ‘good’.

36


1967 Hillman Hunter

40

Estimate: £12,000-14,000* Reg No: MKV 15F

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: B011033198H5HS0 Blessed with a strong bodyshell, tough suspension and ‘bomb-proof’ mechanicals, the Hillman Hunter always had the potential to be a successful rally car. Nevertheless, there was surprise when Andrew Cowan, Brian Coyle and Colin Malkin took the sole Works Hillman Hunter (‘MKV15G’) to outright victory on the 1968 London-Sydney Marathon (vanquishing factory BMC, Ford and Citroen opposition in the process). MKV 15F is a faithful replica of that car built by the late Gordon Jarvis. Under the bonnet is a Holbay Engineering tuned 1725cc OHV engine, fed by twin Weber 45 DCOE carburettors, coupled to a four-speed manual gearbox with overdrive. Gordon was working for Rootes in 1967 and it appears he had access to factory records to make this as faithful as possible to the winning car. It was also undertaken with Andrew Cowan’s full support and approval. Given its registration plate of MKV 15F, this wonderful recreation has been asked to ‘stand in’ for the genuine article at various shows and events. The exterior is a faithful homage to the original, with Capri blue paintwork, white roof and white stripe accents down the flanks, along with period stickers and decals including the ‘75’ London to Sydney rally number. The car has genuine Minilite alloy wheels, with three spares on the roof plus a lockable spares box. As per MKV 15G, there are Lucas roof, bonnet, and bumper mounted spotlights at the front, plus a Lucas 576 reversing light at the rear. The bodywork inside the boot was stiffened, and a larger 15-gallon Rapier fuel tank installed behind the rear seat. There is a Rootes bulkhead suspension top reinforcer fitted and an aircraft clock, stopwatch and Brantz Retrotrip. The car has been used on a number of events at home and overseas, proving to be very reliable over the years. The full specification is too detailed to list here so we advise prospective bidders to check the history file and view the car in person – we are certain it will not disappoint.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

37


1962 Aston Martin DB4 ‘Series IV’

41

Estimate: £280,000-320,000* Reg No: YSD 457

Chassis No: DB4/822/R

MOT: Exempt

Arguably the zenith of DB4 evolution, the so-called ‘Series 4’ variant was introduced in September 1961. Some three-and-a-half inches shorter, one-and-a-half inches lower and several hundred pounds lighter than its ‘Series 5’ successor (or indeed the DB5), the ‘Series 4’ sported a revised radiator grille design with seven vertical bars and a sleeker, reprofiled bonnet scoop (both features which endured up until the end of DB6 production). An oil cooler became standard on the DB4’s Tadek Merak designed DOHC straight-six engine which could also be had in ‘Special Series’ tune for the first time. As well as an extra (third) SU carburettor and boxed plenum chamber, the 3670cc unit benefited from an improved inlet manifold, higher compression ratio (9:1), revised distributor advance curve, special pistons, larger inlet / exhaust valves and hotter plugs. Utilising the same ‘big sump’ bottom-end as its lesser siblings, the enhanced powerplant was credited with developing some 266bhp and 255lbft of torque (an increase of 26bhp and 15lbft respectively). Bringing a welcome extra dose of performance, it was allied to four-speed all-synchromesh manual transmission with optional overdrive. Short-lived, just 185 ‘Series 4’ cars are understood to have been made between September 1961 and October 1962 plus a number of Special Series-equipped Vantage models. According to its accompanying copy build record, chassis DB4/822/R was supplied new via Callanders Garages Ltd of Glasgow to Andrew Whyte Esq. of Tudor House, Skelmorlie. A member of the Whyte & MacKay whisky dynasty and a petrolhead to boot who had previously owned WO and Derby Bentleys, Mr Whyte specified the Aston Martin in the handsome combination of Snow Shadow Grey with Red leather upholstery. Fitted with a replacement gearbox, overdrive and 3.77:1 rear axle under warranty when it was six months’ old, the DB4 is understood to have remained in Scotland until the mid-1970s. Reportedly treated to major engine and gearbox overhauls during May 1988 at circa 80,000 miles, the four-seater was purchased from Hexagon of Highgate by Merrick Edwardes the following year. Benefiting from a rear axle rejuvenation and DB5 brake calliper upgrade at an indicated 94,000 and 95,000 miles respectively, the Aston Martin then passed to collector David Duffy in 1998. A keen historic racer not to mention a former Connaught Grand Prix car and Jaguar D-Type custodian, Mr Duffy was keen to enhance the DB4’s performance and roadholding. To this end, he had marque specialist Excalibur Engineering refresh the steering, uprate and lower the suspension all-round (including the fitment of a Harvey Bailey handling kit and Koni shock absorbers) and upgrade the engine to ‘Special Series’ / 4 Litre specification.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT


39


A friend of Mr Duffy’s since their university days, the vendor became the Series 4’s sixth registered keeper in 2001. As well as enjoying ‘YSD 457’ on the 2003 Scottish Malts and 2004 Irish Trial events organised by HERO, he took it on various Continental sorties including trips to Le Mans and Scandinavia. Progressively improved, the Aston Martin gained a stainless steel exhaust system, full flow oil filter, stainless steel brake calliper pistons and new Turrino 16inch wire wheels. With Mr Duffy continuing to oversee the DB4’s maintenance, it was again entrusted to Excalibur Engineering for a photographically documented chassis restoration in 2012 (£31,073.72). The same year seeing its headlining renewed and fresh tyres fitted (£3,614.08). Returning to Excalibur Engineering during 2017 for a thorough engine overhaul, the four-seater also benefited from a Borg & Beck clutch conversion, engine bay refurbishment and replacement brake servo (£36,723.36). Having covered a scant 500 miles since this work was completed (the odometer currently shows some (1)18,100 miles), ‘YSD 457’ started readily and sounded decidedly healthy during our recent photography session. Pleasingly retaining its original Red leather upholstery and engine (number 370/847), the still Snow Shadow Grey-hued Aston Martin remains highly presentable. Indeed, when asked to value chassis DB4/822/R in 2018, Alec Slade of Excalibur Engineering commented as follows: ‘Due to the exceptional condition of the vehicle including a complete chassis restoration which encompassed the engine compartment; I consider its value to be £350,000’. A true driver’s car, this subtly enhanced Series 4 has some claim to being - revered GT models aside – the ultimate DB4. Offered for sale with V5C Registration Document, copy build record and large history file.

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41


1959 Jaguar XK 150 3.8 Fixed Head Coupe

42

Estimate: £40,000-50,000* Reg No: MVS 379

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: S836583BW By the time the XK150 was launched in May 1957, Jaguar was weeks away from securing a fifth Le Mans 24-hours victory. Though the newcomer was a logical progression of the XK140, subtle changes to the bodywork gave this final iteration of the XK a distinctly more modern air. The split windscreen was replaced with a single sweep of toughened glass and the scuttle height was raised, along with the waistline. Inside, the walnut dashboard of the XK140 was replaced by one trimmed in leather. Thinner doors gave more interior space. The standard engine was a 3.4-litre DOHC straight six inherited from the XK140, but a larger 3.8 litre version became available in 1959 with buyers able to opt for a triple carburettor ‘S’ version of either powerplant. The XK150 could be had in Fixed Head Coupe, Drophead Coupe and (later) Roadster guises. Total Fixed Head Coupe production – in both LHD and RHD – is believed to have amounted to just 4,445 cars. One of the later, more desirable 3.8-litre engined cars, chassis S836583BW was supplied new to America complete with the ‘Special Equipment’ package and automatic transmission. Repatriated to the UK during 1992, the Jaguar was the subject of a ‘body off, chassis up’ restoration with further works continuing up until 2010. As well as being repainted, retrimmed and treated to an engine overhaul, the 2+2-seater was uprated with a five-speed manual gearbox for a more immersive driving experience and better highspeed cruising plus an alloy radiator for improved cooling. Acquired by the current registered keeper in 2011, the XK150 has been used for runs to the Goodwood Revival etc. Summed-up by the seller as ‘a very good-looking car ready for further adventures’, ‘MVS 379’ is offered for sale with V5C Registration Document and history file.

42


2007 Audi RS4 Saloon

43

Estimate: £20,000-25,000* Reg No: FT07 NYN

MOT: August 2022

Chassis No: WUAZZZ8E17N907471 The B7 RS4 was a dramatic departure from previous Audi RS models being available initially as a four-door saloon with the Avant Estate and the Cabriolet arriving later, unlike the previous RS4 and RS2 which were available exclusively as Avants. Produced between 2006-2008, the B7 was constructed from fully galvanised steel in a monocoque design with the RS4 benefiting from lightweight Aluminium front wings and bonnet. Despite the wide flared arches, large air intakes and low and purposeful stance, the RS4 had a classleading drag coefficient. The engine of the B7 RS4 is based on the existing all-alloy 4163cc V8 from the B6 S4 and shared many parts with the 4.2 FSI V8 in the Q7. Producing 414bhp at 7,800rpm, the power is fed through a Getrag 6-speed manual gearbox and out to all four wheels with the aid of Audi’s trademark ‘Quattro’ permanent four-wheel-drive system. Manufactured in 2007, ‘FT07 NYN’ was supplied new by Grimsby Audi on the 4th of August 2007 to its first and sole keeper. Finished in Light Silver metallic with the classic RS cockpit trimmed in black RS4 leather. Having covered just 60,053 miles (at time of consignment), the RS4 was wellspecified from new with CD changer; powered and heated mirrors; rear and side windows tint; ultrasonic parking sensors amongst many others. Rated as ‘excellent’ condition throughout by the vendor, the Audi is in unmolested condition. Benefiting from some cosmetic restoration in 2021 to the cost of approximately £1900, the car is accompanied by invoices for work completed including two equating to c.£9,200 worth of expenditure at Grimsby Audi in 2018 encompassing four suspension shock absorber regulators, air conditioning regassing, new front and rear brake discs and pads etc. Accompanied by a history file that comprises the original book pack with a stamped service book (displaying eight services all from Grimsby Audi), a vast collection of service and work invoices, previous MOT certificates and tax discs and a V5C document. A rare, one-owner example of an undoubtable modern classic.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

43


1976 Daimler Sovereign 4.2 Series II Coupe

44

Estimate: £28,000-32,000* Reg No: RNM 978R

MOT: TBA

Chassis No: 2H-1873BW The Daimler Sovereign was a name applied to a sequence of luxury cars built by Jaguar but carrying the Daimler badge between 1966 and 1983 and were based on contemporary Jaguar body shells, chassis and engines. The launch of the Jaguar XJ6 in 1968 and its Daimler sister in 1969 redefined expectations in the luxury car sector. The new model truly ‘moved the goalposts’, setting new standards in comfort, refinement and handling. A waiting list was quick to form and enthusiasm remained strong upon the introduction of the Series II cars in 1973. The standard or long wheelbase saloon models were joined later that year by a striking new variant; an elegant pillarless coupé, all being built on the short-wheelbase chassis and available with either the 4.2 litre straight-six XK unit or the 5.3-litre V12. Performance was predictably strong with both variants reputedly able to exceed 120mph. Rarer than its Jaguar brother, just 1,677 Daimler Sovereign 4.2 Coupes are thought to have been produced by the time production ended in 1978 with 613 built in 1977 and only six in the final year. Presented in red with cream contrasting leather interior, this Daimler Sovereign 4.2 Coupe underwent photographically documented restoration in 1992 including; replacement floor, inner and outer sills, bulkhead, lower quarter panel, wheel arches, a full respray and interior refurbishment at a cost of approximately £6,000. In 2019, RNM 978R was subject to a full engine overhaul and more recently a reconditioned gearbox and torque converter, as well as replacement petrol tanks, brake lines, fuel lines and engine tuning. Currently showing just 48,266 miles on the odometer, this handsome coupe is accompanied by a large amount of paperwork including photographic history of the restoration, a number of previous invoices and V5 document.

44


1988 Lotus Esprit Turbo

45

Estimate: £18,000-22,000* Reg No: F227 JYJ

MOT: TBA

Chassis No: SCC082910JHD13367 In 1987, the Esprit was restyled by British designer Peter Stevens. Stevens, who would later go on to design the McLaren F1, produced a less angular, more rounded Esprit. Giugiaro is said to have liked the new shape, claiming it was perhaps too close to his original design. The exterior changes were accompanied by a redesign of the interior that gave more space to the occupants. The revised Esprit was not given a new “Series” number but is often called by its project code of X180. Panels for the body were produced using a new process called VARI (Vacuum Assisted Resin Injection). This method, which was patented by Lotus, offered advantages over the previous hand lay-up process. Kevlar reinforcement was added to the roof and sides for roll-over protection. This also increased the Esprit’s torsional rigidity by 22%. Manufactured in 1988 and presented in blue with contrasting gold wheels and cream interior, F227 JYJ is powered by a Lotus 2.2-litre ‘Chargecooler’ engine and features power windows, central locking, electric heated mirrors, removable glass roof panel, glass engine cover, factory air conditioning and more. Subject to a front brake upgrade and OZ Route wheels, the car was recently subject to a top end overhaul including replacement head and head gasket. Currently displaying 71,541 miles, it is accompanied by a service book including 8 stamps, a number of previous invoices totalling approximately £15,000 and a V5 document. The vendor now rates the condition of the interior trim as “good”, with the bodywork, engine, electrical equipment, paintwork and transmission being described as “very good”. Please note: F227 JYJ was subject to a replacement speedometer on 15 November 1990 at 12,528 miles.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

45


1996 Ford Escort RS2000 4x4

46

Estimate: £12,000-14,000* Reg No: N359 CNC

Chassis No: WF0BXXGCABTG38634

47

Estimate: £12,000-14,000* MOT: TBA

The Escort RS2000 appeared in the autumn of 1991 with a 16-valve version of the Sierra’s 2.0 litre engine providing improved performance, ride and handling. The example offered here is the rare 4x4 version; reputedly only 500 were built, with only 350 designated for road use and the rest being allocated for competition. N359 CNC was purchased and registered in the UK but spent most of its early life in the south of France. Returning to the UK in 2002, the car was used sparingly for a year before being parked in a residential garage in London at 72,000 miles. N359 CNC remained in the London garage until the present owner was lucky enough to purchase it as part of a deceased estate in 2019. Subsequently, the car was resprayed in its original Ash Black. An unmolested car with no known modifications, it benefits from factory Recaro seats, sunroof, air conditioning, electric windows and mirrors and has recently been treated to new Pirelli tyres. Now showing 72,698 miles on its odometer, this sporting Escort comes with the original stamped service book, a number of previous MOT certificates, invoices and original handbooks.

46

1975 Triumph Stag

Reg No: KLY 732P

Chassis No: LD35856

MOT: July 2022

Stylish, fast, and practical, the Stag began life as a Triumph 2000-based styling exercise by Italian carrossier Giovanni Michelotti. A 2+2 convertible, Michelotti’s design featured a quad-lamp grille and sculpted front and rear ends, the latter destined to appear on many future Triumphs. By the time production commenced in 1970, the 2000’s six-cylinder engine had been replaced by a 3-liter V8 based on an overhead-camshaft four. A padded, ‘T’-shaped roll bar bracing the door pillars and windscreen was one of the Stag’s most distinctive features, and the model could be had in softtop, hardtop, or soft-with-hardtop forms. An older restoration presented in attractive Carmine red with contrasting cream leather interior with red piping, KLY 732P was first registered on 1 June 1975 and features a 3-speed automatic gearbox, wire wheels and rare accompanying hardtop. Showing approximately 12,000 miles on the odometer (believed to be 112,000), the car comes with a number of previous invoices and expired MoTs, as well as a V5 document. KLY 732P is offered with a current MoT valid until 29 July 2022.


1967 Morris Mini Traveller

48

Estimate: £13,000-15,000* Reg No: HJE 904F

Chassis No: 967829

c.1970 Citroën D Super

49

No Reserve MOT: Exempt

This Traveller is powered by an uprated 998cc engine and is understood to have been restored whilst in the care of a previous owner to an extremely high standard. We are advised the car has covered just 7,000 miles since completion and that it remains in “fabulous condition”. Finished in Old English White with red interior it is currently described as having “excellent” bodywork, paintwork, engine, transmission and interior. MoT exempt, this charming example has had thousands of pounds lavished on it in order to bring it to the current condition and is well worthy of close inspection. With the reverberations of the 1956-1957 Suez Crisis being felt worldwide, Leonard Lord commissioned Alec Issigonis to work on a radical small car project. His response was the now legendary Mini. Featuring an ingenious transverse-mounted powertrain (with engine sat atop the gearbox), all-round independent ‘rubber cone’ suspension, front-wheel drive and compact rack and pinion steering, the newcomer was a packaging masterpiece; not to mention one of the most influential automotive designs ever conceived. Available with saloon, pick-up, estate and traveller body styles, the ubiquitous mini proved to be an extremely successful and long-lived motoring icon.

Reg No: Un-reg

Chassis No: 3842396

MOT: Exempt

Intended as a more affordable and less complicated version of the iconic DS, the ID19 was launched in 1956 and initially lacked its sibling’s hydraulically operated clutch, gearchange and unique power steering and braking systems. However, the ID range was subsequently developed in parallel and by the 1970s, ID specifications had greatly improved, the latter being equipped with powered steering and braking and a five-speed manual gearbox. It was offered in three versions the 1985cc D Special, D Super and 115bhp 2175cc D Super 5. This righthand drive D Super is fitted with the aforementioned 1985cc straight-four engine and finished in the colour scheme of white with cream interior upholstery. Thought to have resided in the righthand drive market of Cyprus for much of its life, the Citroën had been in the hands of an ex-Citroën employee for approximately 10-15 years, for much of this time being kept in storage. Purchased by the vendor in c.2015, the car was imported to the UK and placed back into dry storage. Now offered in ‘barn-find’ condition, this worthwhile and rewarding project is offered without reserve.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

47


1925 Bentley 3 Litre Dual Cowl Tourer Original J. Gurney Nutting coachwork

50

Estimate: £180,000-220,000* Reg No: CR 9914

Chassis No: 930

MOT: Exempt

“It was not the means whereby the 3-Litre Bentley performed, but the manner in which it did it, that endeared the car to sportsmen who took pride in their driving. The engine was remarkably flexible, strong and reliable, the gear ratios admirably chosen, the handling excellent and the quality unremittingly high. So, also, was the price, but an ever-growing reputation, augmented by striking racing victories - including the Le Mans 24 hours of 1924 and 1927 - ensured its success” (‘Classic Sports Cars’ by Cyril Posthumus and David Hodges). A railway engineering apprentice turned aero engine designer, Walter Owen Bentley previewed his first creation, the immortal 3-Litre, at the October 1919 London Motor Show (though, he would not deem it production ready for another two years). Inspired by a 1914 Humber TT racer, the newcomer’s ladder-frame chassis was equipped with all-round semi-elliptic leaf-sprung suspension and rear-wheel drum brakes (four-wheel brakes becoming the norm from 1924 onwards). The car’s heart and most advanced feature was its 2996cc engine. A long-stroke fourcylinder (80mm x 149mm) that prioritized torque over top-end power, it boasted a five-bearing crankshaft, shaft-driven overhead camshaft, monobloc construction, twin ignition, four valves per cylinder and aluminium pistons. Developing between 65bhp and 88bhp, the unit was allied to a separate four-speed gate-change gearbox. Supplied in bare chassis guise only, albeit with a choice of wheelbase lengths and engine tune, the 3-Litre remained in production until 1929 by which time some 1,621 are thought to have been made. As well as its two Le Mans victories, the Bentley enjoyed considerable success at Brooklands and even broke the 24-hour world record around Montlhery setting a 95mph average speed. According to the motoring historian and author Tom Clarke, chassis 930 is one of just twentyfour Bentley 3 Litres that are known to have survived to the present day with their original Gurney Nutting coachwork. The car also pleasingly retains its factory-fitted front crossmember (930), engine (914), steering box (926), bonnet (930), gearbox (1498) and rear axle (930 on banjo casing and nose piece). We presume that the front axle is original too but were loath to scrape away the paint. For a WO Bentley to have retained such an unusually high proportion of original components indicates that it has led something of a charmed existence. The floorboards are held in place with nicely crafted, T-headed brass bolts and we suspect the door furniture to have come from Gurney Nutting’s Chelsea workshops too.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT


49


First registered in Southampton during February 1925 as ‘CR 9914’, the Bentley was built on the Standard (10ft 10in) wheelbase and supplied new to local resident J.B.M. McMeikin Esq. who is the only owner listed on its accompanying copy factory service record. The same document suggests the Open Four-Seater had (a) covered a mere 9,000 miles by the time that its five-year guarantee expired on 28th February 1930 and (b) that it dropped off Cricklewood’s radar some four years later. Surviving World War Two, the 3 Litre belonged to Captain Ivan Forshaw by the late 1940s. Former secretary of the Lagonda Club and proprietor of Aston Service Dorset, Capt Forshaw had a real love of British engineering and indeed there are photographs on file of him tinkering under the bonnet and leaning against one of the twin-mounted spare wheels. It is unknown whether he was responsible for installing the twin SUs which provide more power than the initial Smiths five-jet carburettor. Imported to America by the Rolls-Royce and Bentley dealer Neil McDade of Chattanooga, Tennessee in 1956, chassis 930 passed to famed collector Bernie Goldflies of Dayton, Ohio and near neighbour Richard Fisher before being sold to George Evenson during 1968 who kept it for nigh on thirty years. Enthusiastically evented by Mr Evenson but otherwise stabled in a heated garage, the Open Four-Seater was awarded a series of third, second and first place Certificates of Merit at various RROC regional and national meetings from the 1970s through to the 1990s. Recrossing the Atlantic in 2014, the 3 Litre then spent time in Austria prior to entering the current ownership during 2018. A true Rolls-Royce and Bentley enthusiast, the seller has commissioned renowned marque specialist Ewen Getley’s Kingsbury Racing Shop Ltd to fit a new cone clutch, improve the wiring, restore the bezel switch and overhaul the engine via a rebore, re-magnetised magnetos, new +40 thou pistons, valves and valve guides etc. Interestingly, Mr Getley is understood to have been surprised to find the previous pistons were of the factory ‘hourglass’ type and that the propshaft had both its pot joints. Corresponding invoices total circa £23,000 and also show that the brake linings have been renewed and the carburettors attended to. Blue Label cars may be less fashionable than their Red Label counterparts but it is hard not to be charmed by this one’s originality. Featured in the Johnnie Green book ‘BENTLEY: Fifty Years of the Marque’ and starting readily upon inspection, ‘CR 9914’ is only being offered for sale to free up garage space for another Bentley project. A handsome, well-proportioned WO which could be upgraded to 4½ power or simply enjoyed ‘as is’. Accompanied by a bound ‘Technical Facts of the Vintage Bentley’ manual, the aforementioned Kingsbury Racing Shop Ltd bills, sundry other paperwork and period photographs (including a hand tinted image taken by an Egyptian photographer).

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51


1943 Ford GPW Jeep

51

Estimate: £24,000-28,000* Reg No: XBV 227

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: GPW138179 By the end of the war, 647,870 Jeeps had been produced - 281,448 of which were manufactured by Ford. This 1943 example of the Ford GPW is thought to have served with the 6th Armoured Division during the Second World War before residing in Italy after the end of hostilities, being registered ‘GE 62652’. The Jeep is subsequently understood to have been painted in green over the original paintwork, this having been carefully removed in areas to reveal the original wartime painted decals. Formerly it was the property of Rex Harrison, the Oscar-winning film star who played Professor Henry Higgins in ‘My Fair Lady’ and Dr John Dolittle in ‘Doctor Do Little’. Retaining many of its genuine WW2 features including body-tub, front bumper, early bonnet, combat wheels shod with Firestone Bargrip tyres, very scarce lubrication bags and rare USA shovel, the canvas and frame are thought to be original too. Fitted with a period Willys MB unit it has been subject to a 12-volt conversion. Incorrectly declared as being manufactured in 1947 by the DVLA, ‘XBV 227’ will be supplied with a letter from the IMPS (Invicta Military Preservation Society) and MVT (Military Vehicle Trust) stating the correct date of manufacture as 1943. Imported into the UK in 2015, it was subject to much mechanical fettling in July 2021 including an engine and ignition system service, new master cylinder, fuel system flush, new points, plugs and condenser. It is accompanied by UK registration plates which will be fitted in time for the sale, copies of Italian paperwork relating to Rex Harrison’s ownership, two images with him in the Jeep including one with Rita Hayworth and a Swansea V5C.

52


1972 Jaguar E-Type V12 Coupe

52

Estimate: £45,000-55,000* Reg No: MYH 470L

MOT: August 2022

Chassis No: 1S51518BW ‘MYH 470L’ is one of just 2,116 RHD examples and is finished in the attractive combination of British Racing Green with Beige leather upholstery piped in green complemented by green carpets. This handsome ‘home market’ Series 3 E-Type was the subject of a c.£20,000 restoration around seven years ago that included: a bare metal respray; re-trimmed seats, headlining and carpets; rechromed wire wheels and bumpers; new exhaust and brakes; and a full service. Owned by the vendor since 2016, the car’s paintwork, bodywork, interior, 5.3-litre V12 engine and three-speed automatic transmission are currently rated as being “very good”. The odometer currently displays c.77,562 credible miles. Benefiting from the fitment of a Kenlowe fan and electronic ignition, the car was treated to a carburettor overhaul to the tune of £769.20 in August this year. Offered with photographs of the restoration, a collection of old MoTs back to 1984, assorted invoices, reproduction handbook and custom indoor car cover, this delightful E-Type also comes with a current MoT to August 2022. By 1971, Jaguar’s jaw-dropping E-Type had been in production for a decade. Despite continual improvements, new emissions legislation in the all-important American market threatened to strangle the big cat’s performance. Jaguar responded by giving its revered sportscar fresh claws in the shape of a 5343cc V12 developed from the stillborn XJ13 Le Mans project. The new engine was both effortlessly powerful and eerily refined. With some 272bhp and 304 lb ft of torque on tap, the Series III version once again had 150mph in its sights. A revised wheelbase yielded better cabin space which, together with wider tracks front and rear, new antidive front suspension and fatter tyres, gave improved road holding. Imbued with a more muscular stance thanks to its flared wheel arches, re-profiled wings and larger grille, it also benefited from vented disc brakes and a restyled interior.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

53


1989 Bentley Turbo R LWB

53

Estimate: £12,000-16,000* Reg No: TBA

MOT: July 2022

Chassis No: SCBZR04AXKCH27640 Launched at the 1985 Geneva Motor Show, Bentley’s Turbo R was based on the chassis of the Mulsanne and powered by a modified version of the engine from the Mulsanne Turbo. However, the newcomer proved to be rather more than the sum of its parts, causing the respected American magazine Motor Trend to describe it as `the first Bentley in decades deserving of the famous name’. The chassis changes were especially key to the model’s success. This was to be an unashamedly sporting model, requiring tauter suspension than the Mulsanne. The Turbo R had wider tyres than the Mulsanne, which were mounted on alloy wheels - a first for the marque. The model was available with short (3,061 mm) or long (3,161 mm) wheelbase - 4,653 short and 1,211 long-wheelbase Turbo R’s were produced between 1985 and 1997. Supplied new in 1989 by Dutton-Forshaw RollsRoyce in Preston costing a total of £82,111.52, this Turbo R was initially registered as ‘BS 45’. Finished in Balmoral Green with Parchment leather and Green piping, the 6750cc turbo-charged Bentley V8 engine is mated to a three-speed automatic gearbox. One of just 1,211 long-wheelbase examples manufactured, the Bentley has covered just 60,478 miles (atoc) from new, with only four former keepers, two of which being a father and son. Accompanied by an extensive history file that comprises the original book pack (with stamped service book) in its leather Bentley wallet; full factory build sheets; past logbooks and tax discs; a large selection of previous MOTs and a vast quantity of invoices. The aforementioned service book illustrates fourteen stamps, all of which are from either Bentley and Rolls-Royce main dealers or specialists. Benefiting from approximately £18,800 worth of expenditure between 2017 and 2019, with much of the spend being with either Corbrook Rolls-Royce and Bentley specialists or Flying Spares, it is offered with a no advisory MOT until July 2022.

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1934 Wolseley Hornet Shelsey Special

54

Estimate: £42,000-50,000* Reg No: AOG 462

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 155462 According to its original buff logbook, chassis 155462 was first registered as ‘AOG 462’ by Birmingham C.B.C. on 12th September 1934. The same document lists it as a ‘Shelsey Special’ which was a designation typically given to Wolseley Hornets that had been bodied by Samuel Holbrook Ltd of Wolverhampton. Understood to have had just six keepers from new, the fifth of these - Libby Mason Fenwick – treated it to much restoration work during her forty-seven year tenure. From 1992-1998, attention was paid to the car’s floor, seats, scuttle, bonnet, valance, exhaust, dashboard, windscreen frame, wiring harness, ignition parts, kingpins, wheels, tyres, bearings, hubs, headlamps, brakes, radiator, dampers, rear axle, chomework, body, paint and trim. A cylinder head overhaul in 2004-2005 encompassed welding and machining, valves, valve guides, studs, camshaft, springs, timing chain and gaskets but also saw the carburettors, distributor, petrol pump and water pump overhauled. Entrusted to the Chairman of the Wolseley Hornet Special Club, Barry Baxter, during 2008, ‘AOG 462’ benefited from a new clutch, reconditioned oil pump, gearbox overhaul and engine refurbishment (rebored / honed block, reground crankshaft, new white metal bearings, fresh pistons, composite head gasket etc). Further improved since entering the current ownership in 2014, the Shelsey Special has gained: new wings, wing stays, rear valance, exhaust, Blockley tyres, Brooklands steering wheel, aero screens, dashboard, chromework, restored seats, new upholstery and a respray. Plus fettling of its distributor, steering box, gearbox, differential, gauges, radiator, carburettors, brakes and linings etc. The water pump was overhauled in 2017, the fuel pump replaced during 2018 and 2020-2021 has seen the original distributor rejuvenated and the battery, coil and HT leads renewed not to mention oil changes for the engine, gearbox, differential and steering box plus a grease service. Surely Wolseley Hornet Specials do not come much better! Offered for sale with hood, tonneau, original buff logbook and copy instruction manual and factory parts book.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

55


1932 Rolls-Royce 20/25 Saloon

55

Estimate: £10,000-12,000* Reg No: Un-reg

Chassis No: GBT 47

56

Estimate: £11,000-13,000* MOT: Exempt

Rolls-Royce introduced the 20/25 in 1929 as a successor to the outgoing 20. Though the newcomer was primarily aimed at owner drivers, many examples were nevertheless sold to customers with chauffeurs. Power came from an enlarged version of the straight-six unit used in the 20hp. Now of 3,699cc, it made for swifter acceleration and a higher top speed of up to 75mph. Bodywork for the 20/25, was to the taste of each individual customer, and Freestone & Webb, Gurney Nutting, Park Ward, Thrupp & Maberly, Mulliner and Hooper were among the many coachbuilders selected to clothe these fine motorcars. Nearly 4,000 20/25 chassis were ultimately produced, making it the company’s best-selling model between the wars. Supplied new to a Mr E B Harvey and understood to have been fitted with electric clock and spring steering wheel from the factory, this 20/25 carries Park Ward coachwork and was first registered as ‘GX 8868’. Said to be “very’ original”, GBT 47 has been in the current family ownership since c.1968 and registers c.70,000 miles. Purchased in driveable condition with a cracked cylinder head from a scrapyard near Barking by the vendor’s father, the car has not been driven since he collected it. A true garage find that has been in dry storage for over 50 years it is accompanied by a brown logbook. The vendor advises a spare engine, gearbox, and axles are available by separate negotiation.

56

1988 Range Rover Vogue EFi

Reg No: E323 GRD

Chassis No: SALLHAML3EA327673

MOT: November 2022

There was always scope to produce a vehicle that combined the no-nonsense Land Rover’s off-road prowess with a greater degree of on-road chic and comfort. Though various plans were mooted in the 1950s, it was the emergence of the American SUV a decade later that finally convinced Rover to create such a model. Spen King famously oversaw the ‘100-inch Station Wagon’ project that was finally revealed as the Range Rover in 1970. The David Bache-penned newcomer was powered by the ubiquitous Rover V8 which was connected to a permanent fourwheel-drive system for optimum traction. Manufactured in 1988 and supplied new to the United Kingdom, this example was first registered on the 17th of March that year. Fitted with the 3528cc Rover V8 engine mated to the automatic gearbox. Finished in White with Grey cloth interior upholstery and headlining, the Range Rover has covered approximately 83,000 miles from new. Understood to have been retained by one keeper between 1991 and 2013, the Vogue EFi has had just six former UK keepers. Said to be a pleasingly unrestored example, ‘E323 GRD’ is offered with the owner’s manual and a no advisory MOT certificate until November 2022.


1973 Lotus Elan + 2S 130/5 Coupe

57

Estimate: £14,000-16,000* Reg No: TGC 484M

Chassis No: 73051390L

2003 Chevrolet Corvette C5

58

Estimate: £12,000-14,000* MOT: Exempt

TGC 484M was extensively restored in 2019 with further electrical work in October 2021. Benefiting from 5-speed manual transmission, the odometer displays 41,135 unwarranted miles. During restoration the bodywork was finished in blue and silver and the chassis cleaned and painted. We are advised the work was completed to a high standard with even shut lines and glossy finish. The door and window seals were replaced and period correct 13-inch Dunlop alloy wheels fitted whilst the interior has been retrimmed in beige vinyl. The walnut veneer dashboard has faded slightly with minor chips and cracks and the white lettering on the controls is missing, as are the black plastic knobs on the heater sliders. A modern retro-styled radio, with Bluetooth/USB, has been installed. The 1.6-litre Lotus-Ford Twin Cam engine was fully overhauled including a carburettor refurbishment and installation of electronic ignition. The braking and suspension components have been overhauled and Toyo 350 175/70 R13 tyres fitted. Recent maintenance includes replacement of the oil, filter, spark plugs, brake fluid and auxiliary belt, as well as servicing of the electrical components. Offered with invoices for over £10,000 relating to the restoration and a further £1500 for recent recommissioning work, there is also a GT category FIA Historic Regularity Run car pass for classic car events.

Reg No: VF53 RVJ

Chassis No: 1G1YY32G345114289

MOT: TBA

A discernible improvement on its predecessor, the fifth generation or C5 Corvette was introduced in 1996. Commendably light and stiff, its hydroformed box frame chassis played host to composite transverse-leaf independent suspension, rack and pinion steering and four-wheel disc brakes. Powered by a new alloy 5.7-litre LS1 V8 engine, initially rated at 345hp/350lbft, the powerplant was increased to 350hp/365lbft for the 2001 model year. The C5 Corvette Convertible was reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 4.8 seconds and 164mph. Proof of the design’s fundamental soundness, the racing C5-R versions were regular class winners at the Le Mans 24-hours. One of the later C5 cars, VF53 RVJ was manufactured in 2003 and imported to the UK in April of 2018. Presented in red with contrasting grey interior, this particular example features sought after BOSE premium audio and Z06 alloy wheels. It currently displays some 72,551 miles on its odometer. The vendor rates the condition of the paintwork as “good”, the interior trim as “good to very good” and the bodywork, engine, electrical equipment and transmission all as “very good”. VF53 RVJ is accompanied by a V5 document showing two former UK keepers.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

57


2006 BMW Z4 M Coupe

59

Estimate: £20,000-25,000* Reg No: TBA

MOT: June 2022

Chassis No: WBSDU92030LF78062 The BMW Z4 M Coupe is a striking and well-engineered sports car with an immersive driving experience by virtue of its powerful 3.2-litre S54 straight-six engine, manual transmission and rear drive layout which was launched in 2006. Specified from new they featured a multi-function M steering wheel, hydraulic power steering, headlamp washer system, xenon headlamps, air-conditioning and sports seats. With 338 bhp on tap (as per the M3) performance was impressive with 262lb/ft or torque at 4,500 RPM and 0-60mph achievable in just 4.8 seconds. An undoubtable modern classic, good examples make an excellent addition to any collection. Manufactured on 3rd of June 2006, this Z4 M was first registered in the UK on the 29th of that month. Fitted with the 3246cc straight-six engine mated to a six-speed manual transmission, this example is finished in the complementary colour scheme of Black with Black Nappa leather interior. Having covered a total of just c.62,346 miles from new, the car has been in the current ownership since 2014 with seven former registered keepers and has covered just c.4,500 miles in the vendor’s hands. Well-specified from new with numerous additional options, it features electric folding mirrors, auto-dim interior mirror, front heated seats, cruise control, park distance control, Bluetooth, and a HiFi speaker system amongst many others. Offered with a history file which includes the original BMW book pack with stamped service history recording thirteen stamps which are almost entirely from main dealers or specialists. The aforementioned history file further includes the MOT history with many certificates, a large selection of invoices, options list, original sales literature and two keys.

58


1965 MG B Roadster

60

Estimate: £18,000-22,000* Reg No: DYS 88C

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: GHN346704 The MGA had really been the first ‘BMC corporate’ MG, and the MGB which replaced it was intended to be even more popular. Although the engineering of the new car was evolutionary - the B-Series engine, transmission, rear axle and independent front suspension were all improved versions of those used in the previous MGA. The first incarnation of the MGB built from 1962 to April 1965 featured distinctive pull-type door handles and a 95bhp/1798cc engine with three-main-bearing crankshaft and while overdrive was an optional extra, the model’s top speed was more than 100mph. Today, it enjoys a very strong following and with its GT sister has spawned a dedicated support industry. For many, the early chrome-bumper MGB roadster is the epitome of the classic British sports car. This ‘pull-handle’ roadster was manufactured in 1965 and is finished in the classic combination of Green matched to a Black interior. Bought as a ‘garage find’ by the vendor in 2016 on the understanding it had been a one owner example, ‘DYS 88C’ has recently been restored to a high standard including a bodywork renovation and repaint plus brake, rear axle and suspension overhauls. The gearbox and overdrive have also been refurbished and a new clutch fitted. The engine has been refreshed too and converted to run on unleaded. Retaining many original features and offered with soft top, hood frame, tonneau cover, refurbished instruments, V5 and a collection of invoices the vendor currently considers the engine, transmission, bodywork, paintwork and interior trim all to be in `excellent’ order.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

59


1998 Ferrari 550 Maranello (Manual)

61

Estimate: £78,000-88,000* Reg No: C12 SCA

Chassis No: ZFFZR49C000112188

MOT: March 2022

Ferrari’s 550 Maranello was introduced as a replacement for the F512 M in 1996 and found much acclaim during its five years of production. It featured a 484bhp front-mounted naturally-aspirated 5.5 litre V12 engine driving the rear wheels through a transaxle - the six-speed manual gearbox being located at the rear for optimum weight distribution. Suspension was by double wishbone, coil springs and anti-roll bars all-round and the braking by ventilated discs front and rear. The Pininfarina designed all-alloy body was mounted on a tubular steel chassis. A pukka GT car out of the Daytona mould, it offered speeds of up to 199 mph coupled with the ability to accelerate from 0-60mph in just 4.3 seconds - the sort of performance figures that wouldn’t have disgraced an F1 car once upon a time. With a luxurious and roomy interior and a boot that accommodated at least a set of overnight bags (or a full set of golf clubs), this was the perfect car for dashing through Europe - Monte Carlo one weekend, Rome the next. It was replaced in 2001 by the 575M Maranello. Though not intended for use in motorsport, the 550 Maranello was nevertheless adopted for racing by a number of privateer teams, to good effect. 2003 was arguably the year of best results, with Prodrive winning the GTS class in the Le Mans 24-hour race and finishing second in the GTS class of the American Le Mans Series, and Scuderia Italia winning the FIA GT championship. Supplied new by Maranello Concessionaires of Egham to Peter Hookham Miller Esq on 11th May 1998 and first registered as ‘SHY 1’, chassis 112188 was finished in Nero Daytona Metallic and specified with such desirable options as: a quilted leather rear parcel shelf, Fiorano Handling Pack and Daytona seats (the latter trimmed in Nero with Bordeaux inserts). Serviced at 857, 5,996, 13,056, 13,809, 14,571, 14,941, 16,314, 18,688, 20,297, 20,568, 21,803, 22,246, 22,714, 22,875, 22,946, 23,024, 23,028, 23,052 and 23,070 miles by the likes of Maranello, Rardley Motors, Autofficina, SGM Performance, Dick Lovett, QV Motors and Ferrari Birmingham, the 550 was last treated to a cambelt change a few hundred miles ago in 2019. Previously upgraded with a Becker Grand Prix stereo system which allows Bluetooth connectivity, the Ferrari comes with its original unit should a new owner wish to reinstate it. A former cover car for Classic & Sports Car magazine (June 2001 issue), this pampered, low mileage 550 is due to be serviced again by Ferrari Birmingham ahead of the sale. Worthy of close inspection, ‘C12 SCA’ is accompanied by its original book pack and a comprehensive history file.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT


61


1969 MG C GT

62

Estimate: £17,000-20,000* Reg No: ENP 597J

MOT: TBA

Chassis No: GCD17040G Intended as a flagship sportscar to replace the Austin-Healey 3000, the MGC was introduced in autumn 1967. Based around the same two-door monocoque bodyshell as the humble MGB (albeit with a substantially altered engine bay and floorpan), the newcomer was powered by a 2912cc OHV straight-six engine and promised a 120mph top speed. Too readily confused with its four-cylinder sibling to be a sales success, the MGC was dropped in 1969 after just 4544 Roadsters and 4458 GTs had allegedly been made. According to its accompanying Heritage Certificate, chassis GCD17040G was originally finished in Snowberry White with Black upholstery and despatched from the Abingdon works to dealer Lex Tillotson of Kidderminster in October 1969. Not road registered as ‘ENP 597J’ for another twelve months, the C GT was sold to third owner Alan Davies as a restoration project by Bromsgrove MG Spares on 16th January 1990. The associated invoice for £3,400 remains on file and clearly states: ‘Please Note: Stored 15 years. Mileage: 16,572 from new’. A trained engineer and MG Club member, Mr Davies proceeded to renovate the Coupe over the next seven years. The project was photographically documented and reportedly consumed some 600 hours. Sold on by Mr Davies’ estate in 2012, ‘ENP 597J’ was further improved by its next keeper who fitted a new core plug, fuel pump, brake servo, electronic distributor and front wheel bearings not to mention renewing the foam in the front seats and replacing the front wings. Other works are understood to have seen the engine benefit from a top-end overhaul and the installation of a new exhaust system complete with tubular Maniflow manifold. Converted from twin 6-volt batteries to a single 12-volt item, the MG also boasts an auxiliary power socket for a phone charger or sat-nav etc. Currently displaying 22,000 miles to its odometer, this appealing C GT is offered for sale with V5C Registration Document, fresh MOT certificate and history file.

62


1977 Lynx Jaguar D-Type

63

No Reserve Reg No: OKV 421

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 1E50175 Founded by Guy Black and Roger Ludgate in 1968, Lynx soon became renowned for their Jaguar C-Type, D-Type and XKSS expertise (even working on the Coventry manufacturer’s own heritage fleet). Launched at the London Racing Car Show in 1974, the Lynx D-Type was a highly convincing Evocation. Typically employing a Jaguar E-Type donor, it featured an authentic alloy monocoque and aluminium bodywork by Williams & Pritchard. According to an accompanying dossier from The Lynx Register, ‘OKV 421’ was the third Lynx D-Type completed. Commissioned by Blair Hamilton of Classic & Thoroughbred Motors Ltd in Vancouver, who was a friend of Guy Black, it was built to 1955 specification complete with a long nose, high tailfin and single screen. Raced at Club level and the subject of an article in the Vancouver Sun newspaper on 25th January 1978, the D-Type was repatriated some two years later. Reportedly passing through the hands of Victor Gauntlet, Casper McDonald Hall and John Baynes thereafter, the latter had a slight off at Brands Hatch which saw the two-seater returned to Lynx for minor repairs. Bought by Barry Eastick during 1983, not long after it had graced the front cover of Sporting Cars magazine, ‘OKV 421’ resumed its competition career the following decade at the Nurburgring, Silverstone and Spa-Francorchamps etc (having been the first Lynx D-Type converted to dry-sump lubrication). Looked after by John Pearson and Martin Greaves from 1989 onwards, the two-seater entered the current ownership in May 1997 for £69,000. Preferring to enjoy ‘OKV 421’ as a fast road car, the vendor tasked Lynx with reconfiguring it to Works 1956 specification (hence the addition of a passenger door and full-width wraparound windscreen). Taken off the road with an electrical issue some ten years ago, the two-seater has remained garaged ever since. Still registered under its Jaguar E-Type donor identity, this fabulous Lynx D-Type has the makings of a very worthwhile project. Offered for sale with a large history file dating back to 1976.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

63


1959 Jaguar XK 150 Fixed Head Coupe

64

Estimate: £50,000-60,000* Reg No: WLM 725

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: S824751DN By the time the XK150 was launched in May 1957, Jaguar had won Le Mans four times and was about to do so once again. A logical progression of the XK140, subtle changes to the bodywork gave this final iteration of the XK a distinctly more modern air. The split windscreen was replaced with a single sweep of toughened glass and the scuttle height was raised, along with the waistline. The bonnet was widened and the walnut dashboard of the XK140 was replaced by one trimmed in leather. Thinner doors gave more interior space. The standard engine was the 3.4-litre DOHC straight six unit of the XK140, which was later increased to 3.8-litres. Still more power became available from 1958 in the form of the ‘S’ engine. The XK150 was the first production Jaguar to be equipped with disc brakes and was initially offered in Fixed Head Coupe (FHC) and Drophead Coupe guise, the Roadster following in 1958. By the time production ended in October 1960 to make way for the E-Type, some 4,445 FHCs had been produced. Manufactured on 13th January 1959, this home market Manual overdrive example was supplied new via Henlys Ltd to a J W Bradstreet of Goring-On Sea and registered ‘WLM 725’ – a mark it pleasingly retains. Originally painted in cream with red interior, it is 1 of just 1,368 RHD examples built and benefits from the factory-fitted Special Equipment (SE) pack which comprised: front fog lamps, wire wheels and twin exhausts. Having spent some 20 years in South Africa (where it was restored c.2010), the car is now finished in Black with Red interior and is fitted with a MKIX 3.8 engine. The extensive restoration included a new interior and the fitment of A/C. Treated to a new clutch and front calliper overhaul in 2020, this handsome XK comes with a heritage certificate and a collection of old MOT’s and invoices.

64


1968 Morris Mini MKII Cooper

65

Estimate: £18,000-22,000* Reg No: XGK 480G

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: K-A256-117545A The first Mini Cooper appeared in 1961, following a tie-up with champion F1 constructor John Cooper. The stroke of the standard 848cc engine was lengthened to 997cc which, together with other improvements, raised power output from 34 to 55bhp - a close-ratio gearbox and front wheel disc brakes completed the package. That engine was replaced by a shorter stroke 998cc unit in 1964, while the Mark II version launched in 1967 featured a redesigned grille, a larger rear window and numerous cosmetic changes. Manufactured in 1968, this Mk2 Cooper was first registered on 23rd September that year and is fitted with the 998cc straight-four A-series engine mated to a four-speed manual gearbox. Finished in its original colour scheme of white with a black roof, the car was previously blue and white but was returned to the original colours during a bodywork restoration completed 18 months ago. Further benefiting from a brake and suspension overhaul (utilising a dry suspension set-up) since entering into current ownership in 2018, ‘XGK 480G’ has a recorded mileage of c.68,951 miles. Understood to retain the majority of its original interior, this Cooper also has notably good panel gaps. Offered with a history file which includes a photographic record of the bodywork restoration and repaint; logbook history; a large collection of invoices; a selection of previous MOTs and a current V5C document.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1972 Aston Martin V8

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Estimate: £110,000-130,000* Reg No: DDG 999L

Chassis No: V810559RCA

MOT: Exempt

Introduced in April 1972 shortly after Aston Martin had been acquired by Company Developments, the new V8 was visually distinguished from its DBS V8 predecessor by a black mesh grille and twin (rather than quad) headlights. Under the skin, the two shared the same platform chassis, DeDion rear axle, independent front suspension, power steering and disc brakes. Another carry over was the ‘quad-cam’ 5340cc V8 engine allied to either five-speed manual or three-speed automatic transmission. Credited with developing well over 300bhp - thanks in part to its Bosch mechanical fuel-injection system - the model was reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 6 seconds and almost 160mph (figures which would not be properly eclipsed until the arrival of the fearsome Vantage). Only in production for fifteen months, just 288 of the first generation `twin headlight’ V8s are thought to have been made. This Aston Martin V8 was built in July 1972 with fuel injected engine and automatic transmission and delivered to Plough Motors Ltd, Stroud Valley in August that year for delivery to its first owner. This is therefore an original RHD UK market car and one of just 288 Series 2 cars produced. Little is known about the car’s early history despite attempts to track this down via the Owners Club and Works Service. However, the DVLA have confirmed that ‘DDG 999L’ is the original registration number of the car. The car was exported at some point, most likely in 1987 when it was last taxed prior to the vendor purchasing it. It is believed to have remained in Europe (as evidenced by a Norwegian registration document dated March 2003) before returning to the UK from Germany in 2015. During its time abroad, the car was converted to LHD. Purchased by the vendor as a bare body shell, with fully overhauled engine and everything else in boxes, this 1972 Aston Martin V8 was treated to a comprehensive restoration between 2015 and 2020 and has been placed in dry storage since completion. Work to the body comprised the eradication of all rust and included the fitment of new sills, rear radius arm mounting points and boot floor. At some point the car had been styled like a later Oscar India V8 with Kamm tail rear bodywork, this being removed to return the car to original specification. It was also converted back to RHD and painted in Aston Martin Olive Green. Many new parts were incorporated into the build including a complete new wiring loom and full stainless-steel exhaust. The GKN wheels were refurbished and new 225/70x15 Michelin XWX tyres with tubes were fitted. This tyre size being correct for a manual V8.

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Prior to fitting, the engine was run on the dyno and achieved an extremely healthy 330bhp without any tuning. The car is said to “run and drive extremely well and is a showcase for how good a properly set up mechanically fuel injected car should feel. The fully overhauled ZF dog-leg gear box now fitted complements the engine as, unlike later carburettor V8’s, the mechanical fuel injection delivers it’s power further up the rev range.” The engine also benefits from a recent inspection with compression test by marque specialist Rikki Cann. The interior was completely retrimmed in Conolly Vaumol Luxan Stone leather. The carpets are Boyriven Wilton and the headliner is Boyriven Union Cloth in fawn. In addition, all the black vinyl dash panels were re-covered and the steering wheel restored. On completion, ‘DDG 999L’ was entered into the Aston Martin Owner’s Club Concours in February 2021. Due to Covid restrictions, this was a virtual concours and the judges used photographs to assess the cars. Despite strong competition, this car was declared the winner of the “Newport Pagnell V8” class. A commemorative plaque is included with the history. A decidedly handsome machine, this recently restored Series 2 is offered with a folder of invoices for parts and work carried out during the restoration as well as a substantial ring bound document comprising details of all the work carried out along with accompanying photographs.

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1990 Jaguar XJ-S V12 Convertible

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Estimate: £14,000-16,000* Reg No: Un-reg

Chassis No: SAJJNADW4DM16600

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Estimate: £12,000-14,000* MOT: TBA

Arguably the most complete grand tourer of its generation, the XJ-S’s ride / handling balance remains impressive to this day and elements of its design were bequeathed to both the Jaguar XK8 and Aston Martin DB7. Though, sadly neither inherited its legendary 5343cc V12 engine. Rated at 295bhp and 320lbft of torque in its later guises, this superlative unit was said to be capable of 150mph and 0-60mph in less than eight seconds, for many the ultimate XJS variant remains the first series V12 Coupe. Presented in blue with matching blue leather interior, this European specification Jaguar XJS was supplied new by Jaguar France and registered new in 1990 in Japan. The vehicle benefits from just 24,037km being displayed on the odometer (14,936 miles) and it is believed to have had just one private owner from new. Brought over to the UK in 2021 with VAT and Duty paid, this XJ-S is accompanied by its owner’s manual, supplement manual and service booklet. The vendor rates the condition of bodywork, engine, electrical equipment, paintwork, transmission and gearbox and interior trim all as “very good” and informs us he is happy to assist with registration if necessary.

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1971 Land Rover Series II A

Reg No: ABD 182J

Chassis No: 24142125H

MOT: Exempt

A sympathetic update of its much-loved predecessor, the Land Rover Series II was introduced in April 1958. Available with a choice of 2.25-litre petrol or 2-litre diesel engines, the Series II accounted for some 62,000 sales in its first two years of production. In 1961, the subtly upgraded Series IIA benefited from an improved cooling system and is thought to have been the most successful variant, with sales around 1969/70 believed to have reached 60,000 units a year. Supplied new via Groves of Northampton to local resident Mr D. E. Braybrook, ‘ABD 182J’ was acquired from the latter by the vendor in 1981. Displaying just 38,300 miles from new, a figure the vendor confirms to be correct, the Landie is equipped with the more desirable petrol engine. Offered with original owner’s instruction manual, V5 document, old MOTs, tool roll plus jack and said to be ‘very original’, the vendor currently considers the engine, transmission, bodywork, paintwork and interior trim all to be in `good’ order.


1977 Leyland Mini Pick-Up

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Estimate: £14,000-16,000* Reg No: VVF 962S

Chassis No: XLU1-435025A

1972 MG B GT V8 Conversion

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Estimate: £11,000-13,000* MOT: Exempt

Though now a rarity on our roads, a total of 58,179 Mini Pick-ups were manufactured between 1961 and 1982. The design was basic although the factory brochure described a “fully equipped Mini Pick-Up is also available which includes a recirculatory heater.” A passenger-side sun visor, seat belts, laminated windscreen, tilt tubes and rear cover were also available at extra cost. In common with the related Van, the model was re-christened the Mini 95 in 1978 - the number referring to the gross weight of 0.95 tons. This Leyland Cars variant of the Mini Pick-Up was manufactured in 1977. Originally fitted with the 998cc engine, it has been uprated with a 1275cc Cooper engine and four-speed manual transmission. Purchased by the vendor in 2014 as a project, it was subsequently restored before returning to the road in 2015 following an engine and gearbox overhaul and reconditioning completed by Revivals of Royston, Herts. A letter from them dated February 2018 confirms general details of the work carried out and the mechanical specification stating the Mini “ran very well with good smooth performance”. This practical and collectible Pick-Up is supplied with a current V5C.

Reg No: ATO 140K

Chassis No: GHD5267412G

MOT: Exempt

A more powerful alternative to the MG B came in 1973 with the introduction of the B V8 - a GT-only variant powered by the ubiquitous 3528cc Rover V8 unit. Though inspired by the conversions carried out by independent tuner Ken Costello, the factory V8 cars were somewhat less tuned, producing 137bhp rather than 150bhp. Manufactured in 1972 and supplied new to the United Kingdom, the BGT was first registered on the 13th of January that year. Originally fitted with the 1798cc straight-four B-series engine mated to a four-speed manual transmission, ‘ATO 140K’ has been retro-fitted with a 3.5-litre Rover V8 engine. Finished in Red with Black interior upholstery and Black Webasto roof, the MG was originally presented in Orange with the colour change occurring in 1990, around the time ‘ATO 140K’ is understood to have been restored. Showing five former UK keepers, the MG is thought to have been exported during the 1990s before forming part of the Petitjean collection in Strasbourg of Marcel Petitjean (a former French racing driver who invested his returns from a business empire into rare cars). Entering into the collection in 2007, it remained there until 2020 when it was purchased by the vendor and repatriated into the United Kingdom.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1957 Mercedes-Benz 190SL

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Estimate: £150,000-200,000* Reg No: 813 CYE

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 1210427503213 The 190SL was introduced in 1955 – the year Mercedes swept all before it on the Mille Miglia with the 300SLR. Indeed, the graceful, new two-door, convertible grand tourer was sold alongside the road-going version of the SLR – the 300SL - whose styling it strongly resembled. In fact, the underpinnings of the two cars were quite different and, while the 300SL had a purpose-built tubular spaceframe (W198), its smaller sibling was built on a shortened version of the ‘Ponton’ saloon (W121) platform, which was of monocoque construction. The 190SL also boasted an all-new engine - an over-square SOHC straight-four unit of 1897cc that produced some 120bhp, which was sufficient to propel the car to a maximum speed of 112mph. The engine was coupled to a manual four-speed gearbox. The suspension comprised double wishbones and coil springs at the front and a coil-sprung swing axle at the rear. Steering was by recirculating ball and braking by powerassisted drums all round. Built to the highest standards and among the quickest comparable cars of the time, the 190SL featured a well-appointed cockpit, notable comfort for its occupants and relatively generous luggage space. Under the circumstances, even the steep asking price of £2,693 did nothing to deter purchasers. Options included a third seat placed transversely behind the front ones which was big enough to carry an adult. The 190SL continued in production until 1963, when both it and the 300SL were replaced by the 230SL (W113). By this time 25,881 190SLs had been produced (just over two percent of which – some 562 cars - were to right-hand drive specification). Completed during the 1957 model year, this particular example – chassis 121.042-7503213 – was first road registered in London as ‘813 CYE’ on April 14th 1958. Migrating to Oxford and the care of Dr Keith Hawton thereafter, the two-seater was granted a MOT certificate by Alcester Rd Service Station of Kings Heath, Birmingham on September 22nd 1977 at an indicated 63,601 miles. Resident in Yorkshire the following decade, it received a new short block, cylinder head and camshaft plus numerous other parts via Mercedes-Benz main dealer, Derwent Vehicles of Leeds. Returning to London in the early 2000s, the Roadster then relocated to Norfolk for thirteen years before being bought by the vendor for £93,000 during April 2017.

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Fortunate enough to have his own bodyshop, the seller is the first to admit that he got carried away with the subsequent restoration. Indeed, he tells us that he has dared not add up the number of hours his team spent on the project! Familiar with refurbishing classic Mercedes-Benz models, they stripped the 190SL down to ‘the last nut and bolt’, carrying out any remedial metalwork repairs as necessary. Hundreds of accompanying photographs document the extent and thoroughness of the renovation with the seller putting the cost at £104,000 (despite heavily discounted ‘in-house’ labour rates). Refinished in its original Anthracite Grey Metallic (DB172) colour scheme matched to Cream leather upholstery and a matching soft-top, ‘813 CYE’ does not want for visual drama. The previous keeper commissioned a professional engine overhaul within the last few thousand miles but new motor and gearbox mounts have been fitted and the suspension, brakes and electrics fettled. Countless zinc-plated fixings were used in the reassembly, while Classic Mercedes Parts of Belgium supplied many of the replacement components. Among the jewels of his collection, the vendor has chosen to offer someone else the chance to enjoy the Roadster on the show circuit or events such as the Mille Miglia Storica rather than modifying it to accommodate his tall frame. Worthy of close inspection, this exceptional right-hand drive 190SL is accompanied by a V5C Registration Document, owner’s manual and large history file.

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1931 Ford Model A Deluxe Phaeton

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Estimate: £20,000-24,000* Reg No: BF 7219

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: A4201822 The Ford Model A was produced between 1928 and 1931 and was the second huge success for Ford after its predecessor, the Model T. It was also the first Ford to incorporate a standard set of driver controls with conventional clutch, brake pedal, accelerator and gearshift. Manufactured in the final two years of the Model A’s production, the Deluxe Phaeton represented the top of the line and offered the pinnacle in sporting design with its lower roofline. Perhaps one of the most desirable Model A variants, out of the 4,858,644 Model A’s manufactured, only 2,229 were manufactured in the final year. To put into perspective, these cars are one in 2180, or as a percentage, 0.00046% of model A production. Nowadays, it is believed just a handful remain worldwide. Presented in Washington Blue with Riviera Blue beltline and Tacoma Cream strip and wheels, BF 7219 was restored to a very high standard some 45 years ago. As the story goes, the car was transported from concours event to event over a 30-year period covering a mere 200 miles (presumably just positioning the car). It was then sold to the next enthusiastic owner in River Falls, Wisconsin and he covered around 700 miles before it headed to the UK in 2015 for the princely sum of $65,000. Here it spent that summer winning numerous awards on the show circuit before being purchased by the current owner, who has kept the car as part of a private collection. In June last year, BF 7219 was subject to an engine overhaul at the cost of £2,037. This rare sporting Model A is offered with a history file which includes the V5 document, previous receipts and import paperwork.

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1963 Ford Cortina MK1 Limousine

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Estimate: £12,000-15,000* Reg No: ANV 165A

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 284C074350 The Cortina, aimed at buyers of the Morris Oxford Farina and Vauxhall Victor, was launched on 20 September 1962. The car was designed to fill a gap between the smaller Anglia and executive Zephyr/Zodiac models, with the aim being that it should be economical to buy, cheap to run, and easy and inexpensive to produce. The front-wheel drive configuration used by Ford of Germany for the new Ford Taunus P4, a similar-sized model, was rejected in favour of traditional rear-wheel drive layout. With its lightweight shell and nimble handling, it was a great success, being produced in five generations over a period of twenty years until 1982. Commissioned in 2009 and created by Mario Tripicchio, ANV 165A is a unique Cortina Mk1 limousine. Benefiting from a 2ft addition to the wheelbase, the Interior makes use of MK2 1600E Cortina seating featuring bespoke door panels. Power comes from a Ford 2.8 V6 Cologne engine paired with an automatic gearbox whilst the car rides on American Chrome wire wheels with Knock-on spinners and features disc brakes with front vented discs, coilovers and a bespoke twin pipe Powerflow exhaust. Following completion, it was shown at the 2010 MK1 Cortina National Show winning the ‘Best Modified’ Class, before being displayed at the NEC Classic Car Show shortly afterwards. In 2018, the car benefited from works at Classic Workshop Ltd including replacement fuel lines, bespoke uprated heater matrix pipes and adjustments to the propshaft, as well as four new tyres. Subject to a gearbox overhaul in October 2019 at a cost of £2154, ANV 165A is accompanied by a folder including its V5 document, a number of previous MoTs and invoices and, of course, a bottle of champagne and two glasses!

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1926 Rolls-Royce 20hp Landaulette by Park Ward

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Estimate: £50,000-70,000* Reg No: RA 333

MOT: May 2022

Chassis No: GUK-71 Unveiled in 1922, the 20HP was a second string to the RollsRoyce bow - a shorter, more economical sibling to the Silver Ghost which broadened the marque’s reach to span both the very rich and seriously wealthy. Instantly distinguished by its horizontal radiator shutters, the newcomer was constructed around a ladder-frame chassis with a 129-inch wheelbase. Power came from a 3,127cc straight-six, OHV monobloc engine mated to a three-speed manual gearbox. Suspension was by semi-elliptic leaf springs all-round. Braking was initially on the rear wheels alone, while steering was by worm and nut. Progressively updated to feature a four-speed gearbox and servo-assisted all-wheel braking, the ‘baby’ Rolls remained in production until 1929, by when some 2,885 examples had vacated the company’s Derby factory. Lighter and more responsive than the Silver Ghost, the 20HP was capable of exceeding 60mph. Supplied new on 20th August 1926 via Huskinson & Ashwell Ltd of Nottingham to F.R Claye Esq, chassis GUK-71 featured Landaulette coachwork by Park Ward and was finished high-varnished in Purple Blue with fine white coachline and matching blue upholstery. Importantly, this particular example featured the much improved four-speed gearbox, which it retains to this day. GUK-71 remained in F.R Claye’s ownership for 10 years, before being passed on to a Mrs Hannah Claye for a further 19 years. In 1955, the car was sold to a Richard Edward Derington-Fenning of the Royal Hotel, Ashby-de-la-Zouch who owned the car for 38 years, during which time, this Rolls-Royce 20hp Landaulette would gain the admiration it has to this day.

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The car retains its registration ‘RA 333’ and is arguably the most famous 20hp in existence; being the car used throughout ITV’s adaptation of H.E Bates’ ‘Darling Buds of May’, starring David Jason as Pop Larkin. Pop’s beloved Rolls-Royce instantly became an icon of the show, with diecast models of the car widely available. RA 333 was purchased by its current keeper in 2019 for the sum of £100,000. Currently stored in a Carcoon within a dehumidified unit it has been lovingly maintained, even being offered for sale with a current MoT valid until 5 May 2022. Offered with this famous 20hp is a comprehensive folder featuring rarely seen documents, including the original order confirmation letter, bill of sale and specification sheet from 1926. In addition, copies of pre-delivery inspections are included, as well as the original logbook, a copy of the original guarantee and an instruction manual. Additional documentation includes previous MoT certificates and invoices including a printed summary of maintenance post1992, and of course, photographs and press information relating to the Darling Buds of May series.

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1972 Jaguar E-Type V12

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Estimate: £50,000-60,000* Reg No: BJA 325K

MOT: July 2022

Chassis No: 1S51021 This desirable manual transmission V12 is understood to have been restored and converted from a coupe in the early 1990s at which time the odometer was reset. Although no invoices are present for the conversion it was clearly carried out to a high standard and the car looks resplendent with its red coachwork, black interior, and chrome wire wheels. Indeed, it has since won numerous prizes including the Bugatti Owner’s Club ‘Scuderia Prize’ and ‘Best in Show’ at a Jaguar Enthusiasts Club Isle Of Man Tour. Whilst in the hands of previous owners it was treated to engine works by Chequered Flag in 2011 and a gearbox overhaul at a cost of £4500 in 2014. Acquired by the vendor in 2015, more recent attention has included the fitment of a new electronic distributor cap and rotor arm in July this year. Offered with a collection of invoices, old MoTs dating back to 1993, original operating manual and sales and service book. ‘BJA325K’ is, in our opinion, sensibly priced when compared to the values of restored original examples with the vendor currently rating the paintwork, bodywork and interior as “Good” with “Very Good” engine plus transmission and is offered with an MOT certificate into July 2022. By 1971, Jaguar’s jaw-dropping E-Type had been in production for a decade. Despite continual improvements, new emissions legislation in the all-important American market threatened to strangle the big cat’s performance. Jaguar responded by giving its revered sportscar fresh claws in the shape of a 5343cc V12. The new engine was both effortlessly powerful and eerily refined. “The turbine-like smoothness with which the engine provides a sustained shove in the back is almost uncanny, the more so when one accelerates hard in top gear without even a gearchange to interrupt one’s headlong dash into the distance” (Autocar 5th July 1973).

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1909 Ford Model T Town Car

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Estimate: £30,000-40,000* Reg No: Un-reg

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: Not stated Known affectionately as ‘Lady’ this RHD-converted and notably early Model T features coachwork in the style of the 1909 Town Car built by Craftsman of San Diego. We are advised that no expense was spared in its restoration and the impressive specification includes; fully overhauled 1914 engine with re-white metalled valves and rebored pistons, electric starter, detachable wheels, spare wheel carrier, Rocky Mountain brakes, Ruckstell rear axle, modern ignition system, Hasler front shock absorbers, new radiator, new battery and a new old stock petrol tank. In the current ownership for some twenty years, the vendor currently rates its cosmetic and mechanical condition as “very good”. Launched in 1908, the T’s chassis and mechanical components were made from exceptionally durable, highgrade vanadium steel. The Ford also featured a compact 2890cc, sidevalve, four-cylinder engine that pioneered the use of a detachable cylinder head. Mounted in unit with the clutch and two-speed epicyclic gearbox assembly, it developed some 23hp at a leisurely 1,600rpm and 80lbft of torque. Top speed was limited to around 45mph depending upon bodywork, whilst brakes operated on both the transmission and rear wheels. With the introduction of a moving assembly line in 1913, Henry Ford famously turned his Model T into the world’s first mass made car. A year later, Model Ts represented 56% of all automobile manufacture in the USA. However, it was not just the sheer volume of Model Ts rolling off the production line that motorised America, it was the inherent quality of the design.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1971 Ferrari Dino 246 GT

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Estimate: £220,000-250,000* Reg No: FPK 28J

Chassis No: 01950

MOT: Exempt

According to Tony Willis of The Maranello Concessionaires Archive, chassis 01950 was one of just forty-eight, ‘Series M’ Dino 246 GT cars produced by Ferrari SpA for the UK market. Specified in Argento Auteil 106-E-1 with Black 161 Plastica upholstery, Black carpets and electric windows, Order D/41 cost first owner – F. Tydeman Esq of Greystone Garage, Swanage – some £5,210.75. Copy correspondence on file between Mr Tydeman and Mike Salmon of Maranello Concessionaires reveals that the former initially planned to collect the two-seater from the factory and asked (unsuccessfully) if it could be fitted with a wood-rimmed Daytona steering wheel. In the end he took delivery of the newly registered ‘FPK 28J’ from Maranello Concessionaires’ Egham premises on 27th May 1971. The Dino 246 GT changed hands twice more before being bought by the vendor’s late husband and his brother on 3rd June 1975. Both fully apprenticed toolmakers, the siblings became enthusiastic members of the Ferrari Owners’ Club of Great Britain but restricted usage of their treasured Dino to select social trips and FOC outings. Despite being kept garaged, time caught up with the 246 GT and what the brothers thought would be a cosmetic refresh when they embarked up on it in 1991 soon turned into an extensive, ‘ground up’ restoration. The body was stripped out and all surface rust removed from the chassis. Corroded bodywork was replaced at Moto Technique of Chertsey. The front valance and sections around the rear wings were replaced. The car was painted by Spray Tech of Cirencester. All the suspension was checked and stove enamelled. The shock absorbers were refurbished by Koni. The engine was found to be in very good condition. However, as a precautionary measure the valves and seats were replaced (Nimonic) as it was alleged at the time that high mileage engines could suffer valve breakage. All the ancillary parts were renovated, some made in stainless steel. The exhaust was replaced by a new one in stainless steel. The car has been kept as original as possible with the exception of the red paint finish, leather interior and the paint finish on the camshaft covers. Even the headlights were dismantled, re-silvered and refitted. Completed during 1995, the restoration was met with much acclaim. Sadly, the vendor’s husband died thereafter prompting the 246 GT to be laid-up. Having taken the decision to return the twoseater to the road, the family entrusted it to Peter Chambers Automotive of Tewkesbury in early 2019. Recommissioned at a cost of £7,719.55, ‘FPK 28J’ remains highly presentable some two years later. Showing just 50,400 miles to its odometer and coming to market for the first time in forty-six years, this decidedly rare UK-supplied Series M Dino is worthy of close inspection.

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2003 Mercedes SL55 AMG

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Estimate: £15,000-18,000* Reg No: GU03 PBX

MOT: TBA

Chassis No: WDB2304742F038502 Notable as the most powerful production car ever fielded by Mercedes-Benz upon its launch in 2002, the SL55 AMG received rave reviews from the contemporary motoring press. Boasting one of the greatest engines of the 2000s, its supercharged 5.5-litre V8 produced some 476bhp and 700Nm of torque (the latter at just 2,650rpm). Allied to a fivespeed automatic transmission, it enabled the two-seater to sprint from 0-60mph in 4.5 seconds and on to a limited top speed of 155mph. Though, AMG ‘let slip’ that a de-limited yet otherwise standard example has been clocked at 205mph! Surprisingly civilized given the performance on tap, the SL55 boasted a full suite of ‘creature comforts’. Visually enhanced via re-profiled bumpers, quad exhaust tips and 18-inch alloy wheels, demand for the newcomer soon outstripped supply. An undoubted modern classic and one of those cars which is more than a sum of its parts, the SL55 AMG enjoys something of a cult following. Presented in Brilliant Silver Metallic with contrasting Black/ Anthracite leather interior, GU03 PBX was registered in 2003 and boasts a fantastic specification including panoramic roof, AMG styling package, Keyless Go, heated massage seats, BOSE premium audio and more. Currently displaying 87,251 miles, the car was subject to replacement discs and pads in December of 2020 at a cost of £1,074, as well as replacement water pump, belts, engine mounts and gearbox mounts in July of 2020 at a cost of £1,310.14. GU03 PBX is offered with its original book pack, which includes the service booklet containing 10 stamps (the most recent being in May of this year and some 300 miles ago), invoices totalling nearly £16,000, a number of previous MOTs and V5 document.

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1924 Albion Type 24 30CWT Delivery Van

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Estimate: £24,000-28,000* Reg No: SR 4310

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 4032J The Albion Motor Car Company, founded in 1899, was one of the famous Scottish three ‘A’s in motor vehicle manufacture – the other two being Argyll and Arrol-Johnston. With the motto ‘As sure as the sunrise’ Albion produced no frills vehicles, both private cars and commercials, capable of providing guaranteed reliability in the most difficult terrain. Although the post Great War years witnessed a slump in demand, Albion’s chief, T. Blackwood Murray, forged ahead with new models including the Type 24 which in its various guises proved the mainstay of production, finding much favour in the export market and remaining in production until 1931. Albion products were the preferred choice of many grocery suppliers including Nestles, Huntley & Palmer and Lyons Teas amongst others, and a particularly valued customer was Edinburgh based McVitie & Price, manufacturers of digestive biscuits and Royal Warrant holders, in whose livery this vehicle is hand finished. The Type 24 Albion was powered by a sturdy 3.9-litre four-cylinder, side-valve engine. With an unladen weight slightly over two tons this sufficed to propel the Albion van comfortably at the then legal limit for Heavy Motor Cars of just 20mph. This extremely rare Type 24 was first registered with Angus County Council licencing authority in 1924 and was restored in the early 1990s by a highly respected historic commercial vehicle and Albion enthusiast. It is well known in commercial vehicle circles and has participated in the HCVS London to Brighton Run and the Trans Pennine Run to Harrogate, as well as many other events, winning many premier awards along the way. In current ownership for the last 7 years as part of a private collection, it is offered with a V5 document but no other paperwork.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1982 Frazer-Tickford Metro

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Estimate: £35,000-45,000* Reg No: YKO 585X

MOT: TBA

Chassis No: XBHND2AD851462 Manufactured in 1982, this Metro was ordered from Dutton-Forshaw Maidstone as a 1.3 S in left-hand drive by Wendal ‘Rick’ Mc Bride, the successful photographer who was the official photographer for Ferrari and said to have been associated with the naming of the De Tomaso Pantera. Supplied to the Aston Martin Tickford department for production to a Frazer-Tickford example which was completed in time for it to be shipped and displayed at the Los Angeles Motor Show in 1982. One of just 26 FrazerTickford examples produced, this is one of just three manufactured for the American market. Finished in Cairngorm Brown with complementing Saddle leather, piped Chocolate, with Beige Alcantara headlining and Wilton carpets with leather edging with extensive sound-deadening throughout the interior. The rest of the specification includes Uher stack stereo with a graphic equaliser, a full bodykit, four Marchal fog lights, enamel name badges, tinted glass, sunroof, 51/2 J alloy wheels, electric windows and mirrors and cruise control. The engine was performance-tuned by Aston Martin with a Weber twin-choke carburettor, a hotter camshaft and bigger valves with a gasflowed cylinder head, producing 80bhp, with an Aston Martin handling pack fitted as well. Costing significantly more than a Porsche 944 when new with a list price of £11,600, ‘YKO 585X’ stayed in Beverly Hills after the Auto Expo 82, residing at Mr. McBride’s home and he is understood to have often been seen in the car and many notable events. Remaining with Rick McBride until his passing in 2013, the Tickford subsequently entered into a large private classic car collection where it has remained since.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT


With only two owners from new (although still registered to the first owner), the Tickford has covered a mere c.15,000 kilometers from new (equating to under 10,000 miles). Supplied with the retention document for registration number ‘FTM 1T’ which is said to stand for ‘Frazer-Tickford Metro, 1 Tickford’. The Tickford was re-commissioned in c.2015 following a short period of storage after Mr. McBride’s passing with a full service, brake overhaul, alloy wheel refurbishment and fitment with new tyres. The Frazer-Tickford has benefitted in 2018 from a new windscreen; an interior refresh including leather re-trim of the steering wheel, gearknob and handbrake gaiter and new alacantara headlining, along with a new rear exhaust system to the cost of approximately £3,000. The aforementioned history file further includes shipping documents relating to the motor show and subsequent freight trips back and forth from McBrides Kent and Los Angeles homes; Aston Martin Tickford sales invoices and correspondence; build photographs; an Auto Expo 82 official show magazine; original sales literature; book pack; past tax discs and previous MOT certificates. A surely unique opportunity to acquire a scarce example of Aston Martin’s first foray into compact cars with both interesting history and low mileage and ownership. Surely a worthy addition to any collection!

87


1988 Marcos Mantula Spyder

81

Estimate: £12,000-14,000* Reg No: F673 TRU

MOT: November 2022

Chassis No: 8266S This low-mileage Spyder has covered just c.29,640 miles from new having been in the current ownership since 2010. Powered by a Rover V8 engine mated to a 5-Speed manual gearbox ‘F673TRU’ is finished in dark blue with blue interior, the specification includes electric windows and a stainlesssteel exhaust. Offered with a collection of invoices, assorted old MOT’s back to 1993, current MoT to November 2022 and a Marcos build manual, the Spyder benefits from an oil and filter change carried out in January this year whilst the vendor currently rates it as having “good” bodywork, engine, transmission and interior with “average” paintwork. Founded by Jem Marsh and Frank Costin in 1959, Marcos was to become synonymous with British sports car building for road and track use during the 1960s before difficulties with the American market and the expense of new premises caused the firm to close in the early 1970s. The Marcos name was resurrected by Jem Marsh in 1981 with the premise of offering the previous GT models as kits. Power options were mainly Ford, Rover and Triumph units ranging from humble four-cylinders to larger V6s and V8s. Making its debut in 1993, the Mantula was similar to the old GT but was powered by Rover’s 3.5-litre V8 coupled to a five-speed transmission. The light alloy engine gave the car an all-up weight of around 900kg making performance on a par with rival models from TVR and Morgan. In 1989 the convertible or Spyder version was introduced which went on to become the most popular variant. A total of 170 coupes and 119 Spyders were built before Marcos retired from the kit car business in 1992 to concentrate on factory offerings.

88


1986 Mercedes-Benz 500 SL

82

Estimate: £40,000-50,000* Reg No: C554 CTR

MOT: August 2022

Chassis No: WDB1070462A021658 Originally built in November 1984 to a UK order this 500 SL was re-imported to the UK from Japan in 2015. Finished in Smoke Silver with Anthracite leather interior and black soft top, this extremely low mileage example registers just 12,540 miles from new. The car’s build record lists a number of options including limited-slip differential, Tempomat cruise control and anti-lock braking system. In 2020 it underwent a workshop inspection which included an engine compression test and full service. Offered with matching hard top, a collection of invoices and old MoTs, Japanese service records, original sales brochure and a book on the SL 107 series cars, this highly collectible example boasting a fantastic colour scheme is worthy of close inspection. The landmark 300SL was unveiled in 1954 and the similarly styled, but mechanically unrelated 190 followed in 1955, completing the first generation of cars. The second series of SLs (Pagoda Top) began with the 230 of 1963. The larger, third generation model (R107) was launched in 1971, initially with just a 3.5-litre engine (350 SL) mated to a four-speed automatic transmission. The car featured a two-door monocoque bodyshell with independent suspension all round - double wishbones/coil springs at the front and semi-trailing arms/coil springs at the rear. Braking was by discs all round - ventilated on the front. Over its phenomenal 18-year reign, the R107 range was powered by no less than eight different engines. The 500 SL variant was manufactured from 1980 to 1989, and with 240bhp on tap this model, with its all-alloy fuel-injected V8, was made for Europe only (though a few slipped into North America as grey imports) and, with 60mph available in 7.4 secs and a top speed of around 140mph, was faster even than the US, Japan and Australian-market 560SL.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

89


1967 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray

83

Estimate: £60,000-70,000* Reg No: 67 CC

Chassis No: 194377S109249

MOT: Exempt

Growing up from its first foray as an anaemic six-cylinder roadster in 1953, the Corvette matured fast, gaining V8 power in 1955 and packing more muscle (such as a fuel-injected 283 cu in V8 in 1957), options and ornate styling cues with every year. In 1963, the second generation debuted with clean, sharp-edged styling by Larry Shinoda that introduced coupe bodywork to the Corvette for the first time. This C2 style lasted until 1967 after which it was replaced by the C3 Stingray; these ‘mid-year’ cars are some of the most collectible Corvettes today. Four-wheel disc brakes arrived in 1966, along with the option of the big-block 396 cu in engine, but even the base 327 cu in powerplant gave 300bhp. The 1967-year models benefited from five years of development and are acknowledged as being the best of the C2 line. Indeed, the solid lifter L88 427/430 would become most sought-after Corvette ever; with only 20 examples being produced. Model year improvements for the 1967 line included; five smaller front fender vents replacing the previous three larger ones, flat-finish rockers without ribbing creating a lower, less chunky appearance, a single reversing light mounted above the licence plate whilst the previous model’s wheel covers gave way to slotted six-inch Rally wheels with chrome beauty rings and wheelnuts concealed behind chrome caps. Interior alterations were modest and included revised upholstery, whilst the handbrake was moved from beneath the dash to between the seats. With potential buyers anticipating the car’s overdue redesign, sales for the Sting Ray’s final year totalled 22,940, down by over 5,000 units from the results for 1966. Meanwhile, Chevrolet readied its thirdgeneration Corvette for launch in the 1968 model year. Offered in its original shade of Marina Blue with matching bright blue interior, this particular example was subject to a ‘frame off’ restoration in the US prior to its import to the UK in 2007. It has had just two owners since, forming a part of the vendor’s private collection for the past five years. The extremely appropriate registration mark ‘67 CC’ (1967 Chevrolet Corvette) is included in the sale. In addition, the car boasts an impressive factory specification, including four-speed manual transmission, side-mount exhaust system and cast aluminium bolt on wheels. Currency displaying 29,291 miles on its odometer, 67 CC was subject to a full service in February of this year at a cost of £1073. Accompanying the car is a comprehensive history file which includes an owner’s manual, a number of previous MoTs, authorisation papers and shipping documentation together with a number of invoices.

90

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT


91


1970 Jensen Interceptor II

84

Estimate: £30,000-35,000* Reg No: YYO 13H

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 1233645 Finished in a lustrous eye-catching shade of dark blue complimented by a black interior, this UK market Interceptor II was first registered on 27 February 1970. The subject of bodywork restoration and a repaint plus an engine overhaul carried out c.2009, YYO 13H registers some 76,300 recorded miles and benefits from a substantial history file including a collection of invoices, old MOT’s, tax discs and Cropredy Jensen specialist inspection report. In addition, the original Interceptor handbook and a large amount of service history are included, along with the original purchase documents from December 1969 – January 1970. The vendor advises the last service was carried out in April 2019 at 74,885 miles. This entailed replacement of the V8’s spark plugs, as well as the engine oil and filter. In March 2018, the spark plugs, distributor, coil pack, alternator and regulator had been replaced at 74,883 miles along with a mechanical service. Prior to this, the spark plugs, engine oil and filters were previously replaced in May 2017 at 74,836 miles. Jensen’s C-V8 replacement debuted in 1966 reviving a name first employed in the 1950s. However, several of the firm’s traditions were broken in that the design was outsourced to Carrozzeria Touring and the bodies made of steel not glass fibre. Early shells were built in Italy, by Vignale, prior to production being established at Jensen’s Kelvin Way plant in West Bromwich. Power came from a 6276cc (383ci) Chrysler V8, driving through either a four-speed manual or three-speed TorqueFlite automatic transmission to an LSD Salisbury rear axle. Specification included electric windows, reclining seats, wood-rim steering wheel, radio with twin speakers, electric clock and reversing lights. MKI production ran for three years before being supplanted by the MKII. The MKIII followed two years later and was still in manufacture when Jensen entered receivership during 1976, by which time some 6,408 Interceptors had been built.

92


1929 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Sedanca

85

Estimate: £45,000-55,000* Reg No: UV 1377

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 116KR Chassis 116 KR pleasingly retains its original registration ‘UV 1377’ having been first registered on 3 July 1929 as a long wheelbase model and delivered to an S Harris Esq of 80 Wardour St, London. However, by 1930, the car is described on the logbook as being a coupe finished in black with red wheels, in the ownership of Peter Edward Mazzina. Mazzina was the companion and associate of Maundry Gregory and manager of the Ambassador Club in London, which was infamous for entertaining the likes of the Prince of Wales (codenamed ‘Number 1’) and for various illicit activities. The car remained in his ownership until 1935. 1935 saw UV 1377 enter the ownership of Thomas Ireland & Sons Ltd of Lancaster, bus company and funeral directors. During this custodianship, the car would be rebodied as ‘Saloon Hearse’, finished in blue and black. It would remain with the company until 1965 when it was transferred to the ownership of Hillcrest Coaches of Settle, Yorkshire. A year later it was sold to an M.J Hollinshead. Purchased as a restoration project to be completed by the current owner, UV 1377 retains its original engine numbered ‘KU 95’ and is now in finished form, having had a significant amount of work completed including overhauls to the cylinder head, magneto, dynamo, crankshaft damper, carburettor and autovac. As well as this, the bottom end and camshaft followers were inspected, radiator flushed, interior reupholstered and a sedanca top made and fitted. UV 1377 is accompanied by a host of paperwork, including copies of the chassis bill of sale, inspection reports, delivery papers, previous logbooks, photographic history and a significant number of invoices for works carried out.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

93


2005 Porsche 911 Carrera S

86

The property of Jennifer Saunders No Reserve Reg No: LS55 MYK

87

Estimate: £14,000-16,000* Chassis No: WP0ZZZ99Z6S732476

MOT: October 2022

Introduced in 2004, the 997-series of Porsche’s iconic 911 allied all the technological improvements of its 996-series predecessor – a lighter / stiffer bodyshell, better suspension / brakes, four-valve cylinder heads and a superior HVAC system – to more classical styling. Available in Carrera or Carrera S guises when launched, the latter boasted a more powerful 3.8 litre engine (rated at 350bhp/295lbft), sports exhaust, Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) and 19-inch wheels as standard. Reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 4.6 seconds and 182mph, it soon became a driver’s favourite. Better built and better looking than a 996 and smaller and more agile than a 991 (or current 992), great examples of 997 manual gearbox cars are becoming increasingly collectible. Although, the multi award-winning actress, comedian and screenwriter Jennifer Saunders is perhaps best known for Absolutely Fabulous and French & Saunders, her current, fifteen-year long ownership of ‘LS55 MYK’ suggests that she is a petrolhead too! Certainly, few enthusiasts would argue with her choice of a rear-wheel drive, manual transmission 911 Coupe. Finished in Arctic Silver with Black leather upholstery, the 2+2-seater was less than twelve months old when Ms Saunders bought it. Since used as an everyday car, the Porsche now displays some 153,500 miles to its odometer. Predominantly maintained by Porsche Centre Exeter and Porchetech of North London, the former fitted a new battery and alternator in August 2020 at a cost of £1,074.23, while the latter carried out a major service plus the installation of a new gearbox undertray, outside temperature gauge, top mounts and stabilizer bushes etc in July 2021 the bill for which totalled £2,719.10. Passing its last MOT test on 26th October 2021 with ‘no advisories’, this ‘Ab Fab’ 997-series Carrera 2S is offered for sale with V5C Registration Document, book pack and sundry invoices.

94

1972 Ford Mustang Fastback

Reg No: DMT 612V

Chassis No: 2F05H144008

MOT: Exempt

The last year in which Ford’s iconic pony car would escape being saddled with mandatory federal ‘5mph impact’ bumpers and the year in which the Boss 351 and 429 Big Block were dropped due to emissions regulations, 1972 also represented the penultimate season of first-generation Mustang production. It was the final fling of Ford’s muscle car performance engine era. This impressive Mustang was imported into the United Kingdom in 1980 hence its ‘V’ registration plate. Thought to have arrived via the US Military personal import arrangement, it has a 351 cubic-inch V8 Windsor motor coupled to a 4-speed manual gearbox. Finished in Canary Yellow and riding on Torque-Thrust wheels, the original steering wheel has been replaced by a vintage leather Motolita item, and the gear lever is a ‘white ball’ Hurst shifter. A new Holley carburettor and fuel pump have recently been fitted and new spark plugs. The carpets were replaced and a major brake service carried out (including a new master cylinder and rear wheel cylinders) before the car was stored around six years ago. Fitted with desirable disc brakes at the front, the history file shows that in 2009 clutch and prop shaft work amounted to £3,150. Although the chassis number decodes as 1972 for the year of manufacture the body style is c.1969/70. Possibly the result of being back dated at some stage.


1969 MG C Roadster

88

No Reserve Reg No: KJH 10G

2007 Jaguar XKR 4.2

89

Estimate: £12,000-14,000* Chassis No: GCN1-2328G

MOT: Exempt

Intended as a flagship sportscar to replace the Austin-Healey 3000, the MG C was introduced in autumn 1967 and powered by a 2912 cc OHV straight-six engine. A strong performer, it was reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 10 seconds and 120mph. However, the newcomer’s striking resemblance to its smaller-engined B sibling hampered sales. Thus, MG chose to axe the model in 1969 after just 4,544 Roadsters and 4,458 GTs are understood to have been made. Entering the current ownership in December 1997, ‘KJH 10G’ was extensively restored and upgraded over the next twelve years. As well as chassis / sill work, the MG was treated to a new radiator, gearlever-mounted competition overdrive switch, stainless steel fuel tank, Quaife limited slip differential, rejuvenated suspension (Bilstein dampers, parabolic rear springs, sundry polyurethane bushes) and a set of Heuer clocks. The engine was overhauled too gaining an alloy cylinder head, Kent camshaft, Maniflo stainless exhaust system, Dural sump and machined flywheel etc. Finished in Green with what may well be its original Black leather upholstery, the Roadster was last on the road during 2018. Dry stored since then, it will require recommissioning prior to use. Offered for sale with V5C Registration Document and history file – a great winter project.

Reg No: TBA

Chassis No: TBA

MOT: June 2022

Introduced at the 2005 Frankfurt Motor Show, the second-generation Jaguar XK range (codenamed X150) was styled by Ian Callum. Deliberately evoking the E-Type via its oval grille, speeding teardrop glasshouse and muscular haunches, the newcomer featured bonded / riveted aluminium construction, all-round independent suspension, power steering and four-wheel disc brakes. Powered by a supercharged 4.2-litre V8 engine developing some 420bhp and 413lbft of torque, the range topping XKR variant was reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 4.9 seconds and was limited to 155mph. Presented in Grey Blue with Charcoal leather and featuring Aluminium trim, HX07 WJG registers some 78,294 miles on its odometer. The impressive specification includes cruise control. Showing five previous owners on the V5 certificate, the car is accompanied by its service book which evidences a comprehensive service history. HX07 WJC is offered with a current MoT certificate valid until 8 June 2022 (no advisories) whilst the vendor currently rates the condition of the paintwork as “very good” and the bodywork, engine, electrical equipment, transmission and interior trim as “excellent”.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

95



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Terms & Conditions of Auction Sale These conditions apply to all sales held by H&H Classics Limited in England and Wales to the exclusion of all other Terms and Conditions and no alteration or modification to these Conditions will be binding on H&H Classics Limited unless accepted in writing by them. Your attention is specifically drawn to the “Notes for Intending Purchasers” published in the catalogue.

Auctioneer means H&H Classics Limited whose Registered Office is at 8 Eastway, Sale, Cheshire UK M33 4DX; company number 02852199 and Auctioneer means its representative who actually conducts the sale.

Automobilia/Motobilia Charges for these items are determined by size and weight: ‘A’ - the standard charge and will not be marked in the sales catalogue £8 uplift and £1 per day storage (subject to change without notice). ‘B’ - larger items and marked * in the sales catalogue - £20 uplift, £2 per day storage (subject to change without notice). ‘C’ - the largest items marked ** in the sales catalogue - £50 uplift, £5 per day storage (subject to change without notice). ‘R’ - items needing to be ‘Referred’ for individual quotations marked ‘R’ in the sales catalogue (subject to change without notice).

Bidders Registration Form means the form to be completed by each bidder pursuant to Condition 12.5.

Hammer Price means the price in £ sterling at which a Lot is knocked down by the Auctioneer to the Buyer at the fall of the hammer.

The Buyer is the only person whose bid is accepted by the Auctioneer to conclude the contract for the purchase of a Lot.

Lot means any item or items consigned with a view to its or their sale at auction.

Buyer’s Commission shall have the meaning given in Condition 14.

Premises means the place at which the Auctioneer are conducting that particular sale.

Definitions In these Terms and Conditions the following words and expressions shall unless the context otherwise requires have the following meanings:

Catalogue includes any advertisement, brochure, estimate, price list and other publication generated or published by or on behalf of the Auctioneer in relation to a sale.

Reserve means the minimum Hammer Price (if any) agreed between the Auctioneer and the Seller at which the Lot may be sold.

Contract means the contract formed pursuant to these Conditions between any of the Seller, the Buyer and the Auctioneer.

The Sale means the auction sale in respect of which the Lot is consigned for sale.

Entry Form means the form to be completed by the Seller as to each separate Lot pursuant to Condition 1.1.

Sale Proceeds means the net amount payable by the Auctioneer to the Seller being the Hammer Price less the sum of the commission, the expenses, the entry fee (if not already paid) and the VAT chargeable on any of them.

Estimated Value means the value given by the Seller in the Entry Form as the Estimated Value of the vehicle and if more than one value is given, the higher of those values. Expenses in relation to a Lot means the Auctioneer’s charges and expenses for illustrations, special advertising, packing, freight, transport, storage and any other charges and expenses of that Lot (other than the commission) plus VAT on any of them. Purchasers are reminded that a Buyers’ Premium is payable on all lots and is subject to VAT at the prevailing rate. The rates are as follows: Motorcars Uplift from £175 Storage - £10 per day for the first fourteen days or part thereof and £30 per week or part thereof thereafter (subject to change without notice). Motorcycles Uplift from £60 Storage - £5 per day for the first fourteen days or part thereof and £12 per week or part thereof thereafter (subject to change without notice).

100

Bicycles Uplift £20 Storage - £3 per day for the first fourteen days or part thereof and £8 per week of part thereof thereafter (subject to change without notice).

Entry Fee: £50 for a standard catalogue entry £100 for a premium catalogue entry £150 for a deluxe catalogue entry Registration Numbers 15% to the Buyer, 10% to the Seller (minimum £50 to both parties). Entry Fee: £50 Bicycles 15% to the Buyer (minimum of £10). Seller’s charges available on application. Automobilia/Motobilia 15% to the Buyer (minimum of £5). Seller’s charges available on application. Total amount due means the Hammer Price in respect of the Lot sold plus the Buyer’s commission and additional charges and expenses due from a defaulting Buyer under these Conditions plus VAT chargeable on any of them expressed in £ sterling. Usual Charges means the total of the Commissions, Entry Fees and any other reasonable costs and expenses plus VAT payable thereon. VAT means UK Value Added Tax at the prevailing rate from time to time.

Seller means the person who offers the Lot for sale whether or not he is the true owner. Seller’s Commission means commission payable by the Seller pursuant to Condition 6. Stated rates means the usual rates of Commission, Entry Fees and any other charges for the time being plus the VAT chargeable on any of them. The current rates are as follows: Motorcars 12.5% to the Buyer, 5% to the Seller (minimum £150 to both parties). Entry Fee: £100 for a standard catalogue entry £200 for a premium catalogue entry £400 for a deluxe catalogue entry Motorcycles 15% to the Buyer, 10% to the Seller (minimum £50 to both parties).

Vehicles includes, where appropriate, incomplete vehicles. Conditions Mainly Concerning Sellers and Consignors 1.1  An Entry Form in respect of each Lot must be completed fully and accurately, with an honest description of the Lot, signed and dated by the Seller and accompanied by the Entry Fee, when the Lot is entered. The Auctioneer may at any time ratify an incomplete form. 1.2  Any documentation pertaining to the Lot must be sent with the Entry Form to the Auctioneer’s office, or in any event delivered with the Lot to the Premises. The Contract between the Seller and the Auctioneer will be formed when the Auctioneer receives a signed Entry Form for the Lot, whether by hand, post, fax, email or by any other means, and whether or not the Entry Fee for that Lot has been paid, and whether or not the Form has been signed by the Auctioneer. 1.3  All relevant matters pertaining to the Lot such as a financial encumbrance, serious accident damage or other factors affecting value which are known to the Seller must be stated on the Entry Form. If a sale is lost because of the failure of the Seller to disclose to the Auctioneer all information which may reasonably be expected to affect the provenance, title, value or any other aspect of the Lot, the Auctioneer will charge and the Seller must pay the stated rates (both to Seller and Buyer) plus VAT. 1.4  If the Seller wishes to retain the registration number of a Lot, it is the Seller’s responsibility to notify the Auctioneer in writing on the Entry Form. It is the Seller’s responsibility to take all necessary steps


to ensure that the current registration number is retained and a new number allocated prior to the Lot being sold. If the Seller does not do so, the Auctioneer shall not be responsible for any loss or damage whatsoever and howsoever arising out of the Seller’s loss of the right to the registration number following the sale of the Lot. 2.1  The Auctioneer shall have absolute discretion whether or not to accept any Lot for sale and shall be entitled to select the auction place, date, catalogue placement and photographs for the Lot. 2.2  The Seller gives the Auctioneer full and absolute right to photograph and illustrate any Lot placed in its hands for sale, and to use such photographs and illustrations as are provided by the Seller at any time at its absolute discretion (whether or not in connection with the Sale), with indemnity against copyright infringement. 2.3  The Seller is wholly responsible for the factual accuracy of, and for any judgments or opinions expressed in, the catalogue description of each Lot entered by him, and for any error, misstatement or omission of information in that description. Whether the description has been prepared by the Auctioneer or the Seller, a copy of the typed text will be provided to the Seller within a reasonable time prior to the Auction, and unless the Seller reacts with comments or changes prior to the Auction, the Auctioneer may treat that description as accepted by the Seller. 3.1  The Seller warrants to the Auctioneer and to the Buyer either that he is the true owner of the Lot or that he is duly authorised to sell the Lot by the true owner, and is able to transfer or procure transfer of good and marketable title to the Lot free from a third party claims or encumbrances.

once placed by the Seller shall not be changed without the consent of the Auctioneer. 4.2  The Auctioneer may, at its option, sell the Lot at a Hammer Price below the Reserve but in any such case the Sale Proceeds to which the Seller is entitled shall be the same as if the sale had been at Reserve. 4.3  Where no Reserve has been placed on the Lot the Auctioneer shall in no way be liable should the Lot be purchased for a price below the lowest estimated selling price. In any event, any written or oral estimate of likely selling price given by the Auctioneer is an expression of opinion only and may not be relied upon by the Seller nor give rise to any claim. 4.4  If a Reserve is placed by the Seller in a currency other than Pounds Sterling, such a Reserve shall be calculated and converted into Sterling at the spot rate of exchange quoted to the Auctioneer by the National Westminster Bank Plc at close of business on the last banking day prior to the date of the Sale. The certificate in writing of the Auctioneer as to such rate shall be conclusive. 4.5  Where a Reserve has been placed, only the Auctioneer may bid on that Lot on behalf of the Seller. Should the Seller buy in his own Lot, the Seller must pay to the Auctioneer its stated rates (both Seller and Buyer) before the Lot is removed.

3.2  In the event of an unsettled hire purchase, finance agreement or any other charge or lien affecting the Lot, the Auctioneer reserves the right to settle the amount due of such charges not exceeding the Sale Proceeds and if the Sale Proceeds are less than the charges outstanding the Seller will be responsible for the settlement of the balance forthwith. There will be a charge of £75 plus VAT for this service.

5.1  The Seller may by notice to the Auctioneer withdraw the Lot from the Auction. If the Seller does so he shall be liable to pay the Auctioneer the stated rate of the Seller’s and Buyer’s commission calculated on the estimated value of the Lot that the Auctioneer would have received had the Lot been sold for the estimated value. For the purposes of this clause the estimated value shall be the higher of: (a) the Seller’s estimate of value as previously notified to the Auctioneer or if more than one figure the highest figure or if none; (b) the value estimated in the catalogue or if more than one figure is given the highest figure, or if none, (c) the Auctioneer’s reasonable estimate of its value; (d) plus VAT on such fee in either case and expenses;

3.3  Each Lot, in the condition as described on the Entry Form, and with all keys, spare or extra items and documents shall be delivered to the Premises at the expense of the Seller. The Seller of a Lot not held by the Auctioneer at the Premises or under its control warrants and undertakes to the Auctioneer that the Lot will be made available and in a deliverable state at the time stated by the Auctioneer.

5.2  In the event that the Seller withdraws the Lot from the Auction the Seller shall arrange for the collection/removal of the Lot at his own expense within 2 working days after the date of withdrawal provided that the Seller may not collect the Lot unless or until any withdrawal fee payable under Conditions 5.1 shall have been paid in full and any storage charges have been met by the Seller.

3.4  The Seller shall indemnify both the Auctioneer, its Employees and Agents, and the Buyer separately, against all payments, costs, expenses, demands, or any loss or damage whatsoever and wheresoever incurred or suffered by any of them in respect of any breach of these Conditions on the part of the Seller.

6.  The Seller authorises the Auctioneer to deduct from the Hammer Price commission at the Stated Rate subject to the relevant minimum commission for each Lot, plus Expenses and VAT on both. The Seller acknowledges the Auctioneer’s right to charge and retain the Buyer’s Premium also in accordance with Condition 14.

4.1  The Seller shall be entitled, prior to the sale to place a Reserve on any Lot, this being the minimum Hammer Price at which the Auctioneer is authorised to sell that Lot and to make its usual charges. A Reserve

7.  The Seller of a Lot which is a road going means of transport warrants and undertakes to the Auctioneer that, as at the date of the Sale, either: (a) the Lot will be VAT paid in the EU and registered in the UK, will

be lawfully usable on the public road, complying with the provisions of current Road Traffic Legislation and all relevant regulations made thereunder and any statutory modifications thereof, and there is or will be in force an MOT Certificate required in relation to such use; or (alternatively) (b) the Seller has notified the Auctioneer that the Lot does not or will not meet these requirements, and cannot legally be used on the road. 8.  The Seller hereby agrees to indemnify the Auctioneer, its Agents and Employees against any and all claims, liability or damage and all related costs and expenses arising out of the proper execution by the Auctioneer of their obligations to the Seller under these Conditions, and in particular against any liability or claim which may be incurred by the Auctioneer as a result of any defect in the Lot, whether proving dangerous to human life or health or otherwise giving rise to a claim against the Auctioneer, or as a result of any default by the Seller or any breach of any of the warranties or undertakings herein by the Seller. 9.1  Where any Lot fails to sell, the Auctioneer shall notify the Seller accordingly. The Seller shall make arrangements either for the Auctioneer to re-offer that Lot for sale, or forthwith to collect the Lot and to pay the Expenses. If such arrangements are not made: (a) by 1pm on the day following the date of the Sale, the Seller shall be responsible for the costs of any removal, storage and other expenses related to that Lot; (b) within 3 months after formal notification by the Auctioneer to the Seller, the Auctioneer shall have the right (pursuant to the Torts (Interference with Goods) Act 1977 or any legislation that re-enacts or replaces it) to sell the Lot by private treaty or at public auction without reserve and to deduct from the Hammer Price or price received any sum owing to the Auctioneer including (without limitation) removal, storage and insurance expenses, the Expenses of both auctions, Commission at the Stated Rate on the sale and all other reasonable expenses, before remitting the balance to the Seller; or if he cannot be traced, placing it in a bank account in the name of the Auctioneer on behalf of the Seller. 9.2  If the Seller later sells the Lot as a result of its exposure at the auction the Auctioneer will be entitled to their normal commission. In any event the Auctioneer will be entitled to try and effect a sale as the Seller’s agent within 14 days after the date of the auction (that time limit does not apply to a sale by the Seller). If the Auctioneer does so sell the Lot, they will also be entitled to their normal commission. 10.1  Where a Lot is sold, the Auctioneer shall initiate payment, by bank transfer, of the Sale Proceeds to the Seller 14 days after the Auctioneers have received in cleared funds the Total Amount Due from the Buyer. Should no bank details be provided by the seller, the Auctioneer will effect payment by sending its cheque, drawn in favour of the Seller, 14 days after receipt of cleared funds, by first class mail at the Seller’s risk. 10.2  If before the Total Amount Due is paid by the Buyer (whether or not because the Auctioneer has given credit terms to the Buyer) the Auctioneer pays to the Seller an amount equal to the net Sale Proceeds, title in the Lot shall pass from the Seller to the Auctioneer.

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10.3 In the case of overseas Sellers, the Sale Proceeds will be paid to the Seller either in Sterling or in such other currency available to the Auctioneer as may have been agreed in writing between the Seller and the Auctioneer before the date of the Sale. The Auctioneer shall calculate the rate of exchange for the Sale Proceeds by reference to the spot rate of exchange quoted by the National Westminster Bank Plc at close of business on the date of the Sale, whichever is more favourable to the auctioneer. 10.4  If the Auctioneer receives notice of any dispute related to a sold Lot before the Sale Proceeds have been remitted to the Seller, the Auctioneer may withhold payment from the Seller until it thinks fit or until the Dispute is resolved, whichever is earlier. 10.5 The Auctioneer retains the right to withhold partial or total payment for any Lot if items committed to the Sale by the Seller and sold as part of the Lot, including any relevant documents, have not been delivered by the Seller. 10.6 The Seller shall maintain their insurance of the Lot until they are in receipt of the Sale Proceeds. 11.1 If the Buyer fails to pay the Auctioneer the total Amount due within 21 days after the Sale, the Auctioneer will notify the Seller and take the Seller’s instructions as to the appropriate course of action. So far as in the Auctioneer’s opinion it is practicable, the Auctioneer will at the Seller’s expense assist the Seller to recover the Total Amount Due from the Buyer, but the Auctioneer shall be under no obligation to institute proceedings in its own name. 11.2  If circumstances outside the Auctioneer’s control do not permit the Auctioneer to take instructions from the Seller, the Seller hereby authorises the Auctioneer, at the Seller’s expense, to agree special terms for payment of the total Amount Due; to remove, store and insure the Lot sold; to settle claims made against the Buyer or the Seller on such terms as the Auctioneer shall in its absolute discretion think fit; to take such steps as are necessary to collect the monies due by the Buyer to the Seller; and if necessary to rescind the sale and refund money to the Buyer. Conditions Mainly Concerning the Buyer 12.1  Any motor vehicle is sold as a collector’s item and not as a means of transport. Buyers are specifically warned that any vehicle sold as such may well have had parts replaced and paint renewed or be made up of parts from other vehicles the condition of which may be difficult to establish. The Auctioneer has to rely on information as to the date, condition and authenticity provided by the Seller and does not provide its own description, and does not and cannot undertake its own inspection of vehicles or other Lot and it is the responsibility of the Buyer to ensure that the Lot conforms to the description in the catalogue. The Auctioneer cannot check or verify the authenticity of the chassis or VIN number under which a vehicle is offered, but relies on the Seller’s description. Buyers should take particular care to verify in advance the authenticity of a vehicle that is claimed to have important racing, rallying or ‘ex-works’ history as it was common in period for a competition vehicle of a single identity to have more than one chassis, body or other

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mechanical components. This may have happened several times, both in a vehicle’s ‘works’ career and thereafter in private owner hands. Sometimes ‘works’ vehicles were fitted with different registration plates, so that a vehicle could meet a particular event’s start date deadline. These historical factors may lead to there being in existence multiple and competing claimants to the same vehicle identity. 12.2  The Buyer shall be the person making the highest bid at or over Reserve (if any) that is accepted by the Auctioneer, and the Contract shall be concluded at the fall of the hammer. The Auctioneer shall have the absolute discretion to settle any dispute related to bidding at the Sale. All sales are deemed not to be sales in the course of a business, unless notified to the contrary. 12.3  Every bidder shall be deemed to act as a principal unless the Auctioneer has, prior to the auction date, acknowledged (either by acceptance of the Bidder’s Registration Form which discloses the true principal, or otherwise in writing) that the bidder is acting as agent on behalf of a disclosed principal. 12.4  The Auctioneer may in its absolute discretion refuse to accept any bid, advance the bidding as it may decide, withdraw or divide any Lot, combine any two or more Lots, and in the case of dispute may put up any Lot for auction again. 12.5  A prospective bidder should register his intention to bid for a Lot by completing fully and signing a Bidder’s Registration Form prior to executing his bid. If this has not been completed before the fall of the hammer, the Buyer shall forthwith complete the Bidder’s Registration Form. The Bidder shall also provide photographic identification. Failure to do so shall not invalidate the sale, unless the Auctioneer, in its absolute discretion, so decides. 12.6  Any bid which fails to reach the Reserve may be submitted by the Auctioneer to the Seller and if the Seller accepts that bid, the Lot will be deemed to have been sold to the Buyer at the sum bid at the fall of the hammer and the normal Terms and Conditions will apply to that sale. 13.1  Where a Lot is illustrated by a photograph, in the case of a vehicle with a registration number visible, that number will not be transferred with the vehicle to the Buyer unless the registration particulars appear in the written part of the description and the transfer has been authorised by the Seller. If the vehicle is sold to the Buyer before the formalities of the allocation of a different registration number to that vehicle are completed with the DVLA, the Buyer accepts that he will take all steps necessary to co-operate with either the Seller or the Auctioneer to have the number re-transferred to the Seller or as may be, and will take no steps to register the vehicle with the number in his name. 13.2  Whilst the interests of prospective Buyers are best served by personal attendance at the Sale, the Auctioneers will if so instructed execute bids on their behalf. Neither the Auctioneer nor its Employees or Agents will be responsible for any error or default in doing so or in failing altogether to do so. Where the Auctioneer executes bids on behalf of an absent bidder, each Lot will be bought as cheaply as is allowed by other bids and any relevant Reserve. 14.  The Buyer shall pay to the Auctioneer in respect of each Lot the

Buyer’s Commission calculated on the Hammer Price at the stated rates as set out above. 15.  Where a Lot is described in the Catalogue or announced at the time of Sale as being subject to VAT on import, VAT will be payable in addition to the Hammer Price (which VAT may or may not be refundable by HM Customs & Excise on proof of export). 16.1  Upon the sale of a Lot, the Buyer shall: 16.2  Unless he has already done so, complete a Bidder’s Registration Form as in Condition 12.5 above; 16.3  Pay to the Auctioneer the total amount due, at latest by midday on the day after the Sale, notwithstanding that where the Buyer wishes to export the Lot, an export licence may be required which must be obtained by the Buyer at his own cost; 16.4  Accept that any payments received by the Auctioneer from a Buyer may be applied by the Auctioneer towards any sums owing from that Buyer to the Auctioneer on any account whatsoever, without regard to any directions of the Buyer or his agent, whether express or implied. 17.1  Until the total amount due has been received by the Auctioneer: (a) title in a Lot shall not pass to the Buyer but the risk shall; (b) no Lot may be taken away by or on behalf of the Buyer. 17.2  The Buyer shall be responsible for any removal, storage and insurance charges and any other Expenses on any Lot not paid for and taken away by 1pm on the day following the day of the sale. 18.1  If a Buyer fails either to pay for or to take away any Lot, the Auctioneer may without further notice to the Buyer, at its discretion and without prejudice to any other rights or remedies it may have, exercise one or more of the following rights or remedies, as may be relevant, in relation to any and all remedies for non-payment that the Auctioneer may choose to exercise. The Buyer will pay to the Auctioneer all legal and other costs borne by it on a full indemnity basis. 18.2 To charge interest at a rate not exceeding 3% per month over NatWest Bank’s base rate on so much of the total amount due as remains unpaid after the date and time referred to in condition 16.3 for the first two months. After that period of time to charge interest at a rate not exceeding 1.75% per month over Natwest Bank’s base rate on so much of the total amount due as remains unpaid after the date and time referred to in condition 16.3. 18.3  To issue proceedings against the Buyer for payment of the total amount due and/or for damages for breach of contract. If the Seller decides to sell the Lot elsewhere, the Auctioneer may proceed against the Buyer for the Commission which it would have earned both from the Seller and the Buyer together with VAT on both had the Buyer paid for the Lot in accordance with these Conditions. 18.4  To rescind the sale of that or any other Lots sold to the same Buyer at this or any other Sale, in respect of which title has not passed. 18.5  To resell the Lot or cause it to be resold by public or private sale,


such that any deficiency in the total amount due resulting from such resale (after giving credit for any payment) together with the full costs incurred in connection with the Lots shall be paid to the Auctioneer by the Buyer; any surplus in excess of the Sale Proceeds of that resale shall belong to the Seller. 18.6  To store the Lot at the sole expense of the Buyer and to release the Lot only after payment in full of the total amount due, together with the accrued cost of the removal, storage and insurance and all other expenses incurred in connection with the Lot. 18.7  To retain that or any other Lot sold to the Buyer at the same or any other auction and to release the same only after payment of the total amount due. 18.8  To apply by way of set-off any Sale Proceeds of any Lot then due or at any time thereafter becoming due to the Buyer towards settlement of the total amount due and expenses and the Auctioneer shall be entitled to a lien on any property of the Buyer which is in the Auctioneer’s possession for any purpose. 18.9  To reject or ignore any bids made by or on behalf of the defaulting Buyer at any future sales or insist upon a cash deposit before accepting any bids in future.

23. The Auctioneer shall have the right, at its sole discretion, without assigning any reason, to refuse any person admission to its Premises or attendance at any of its Sales, or to view any Lot. 24. The Auctioneer shall keep and use any data relating to the Buyer and the Seller in accordance with the provisions of all relevant data protection legislation. The Buyer and the Seller consent to such data being kept and used for appropriate purposes, including informing the Buyer and the Seller of any offers or other matters of interest from time to time. 25. The copyright in all written matter and illustrations relating to Lots shall remain at all times the absolute property of the Auctioneer, and any person wishing to use such materials, or any part of them, shall require the prior written consent of the Auctioneer. 26. If any Condition or part of a condition in these Terms shall be held to be invalid or unenforceable, the validity or enforceability of the remaining Conditions will not thereby be affected. 27. These Conditions shall be governed by and construed in accordance with English Law. All transactions to which these Conditions apply and all matters connected therewith shall also be governed by English Law. Each of the Auctioneer, the Seller, the Buyer and any bidder hereby submits to non-exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of England and Wales.

19.1  All Lots are offered as seen with all faults and defects without any guarantee or warranty attaching thereto as to condition, roadworthiness or otherwise and with all faults and defects whether apparent upon examination or not. 19.2  In any event, neither the Seller nor the Auctioneer shall be liable for any indirect or consequential loss whatsoever, and the maximum liability of the Auctioneer together with its Employees and Agents, in the event of any claim against them arising from the sale of any Lot shall be limited to the Hammer Price plus Buyer’s Premium in respect of that Lot. General Conditions 20. The Auctioneer in all respects acts and will be treated as agent for the Seller (except where the Auctioneer is expressly stated to be selling as principal), and is not responsible for any default by the Seller or the Buyer to the other party. 21. The Auctioneer will not accept any liability for damage sustained to a Lot that is attributable to members of the public or non-Auctioneer operatives during the Sale or any removable items left within lots during the same period. Any claims for damage and / or lost items must be submitted to the Auctioneer in writing no later than 3 working days after the date of the Sale and include a valid quote for repair or replacement and digital photographs where applicable. 22. The Auctioneer shall be under no liability for any injury, damage or loss sustained by any person while on the Auctioneers premises (including any premises where a sale may be conducted or where a Lot, or a part of a Lot, may be on view from time to time) except for death or personal injury caused by the negligence of the Auctioneers or its employees and agents in the course of their duties to the Auctioneers.

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Motorcars in today’s auction Lot No.

Lot No.

11 79 9 2 41 17 66 43 6 13

1955 AC Aceca 1924 Albion Type 24 30CWT Delivery Van 1963 Alfa Romeo Giulia Spider 1971 Alfa Romeo GT Junior ‘1600’ 1962 Aston Martin DB4 ‘Series IV’ 1998 Aston Martin DB7 Volante 1972 Aston Martin V8 2007 Audi RS4 Saloon 1937 Austin Seven Nippy 1970 Austin 6 CWT Van

37 68 14 69 57 45 63

1988 Lancia Delta HF Integrale 8V 1971 Land Rover Series II A 1976 Land Rover Series III 88 1977 Leyland Mini Pick-Up 1973 Lotus Elan + 2S 130/5 Coupe 1988 Lotus Esprit Turbo 1977 Lynx Jaguar D-Type

10 50 7 19 28 53 59 18

1993 Bentley Continental R 1925 Bentley 3 Litre Dual Cowl Tourer 1990 Bentley Mulsanne S 1954 Bentley R-Type Saloon 1953 Bentley R-Type Special 1989 Bentley Turbo R LWB 2006 BMW Z4 M Coupe 1938 Brough Superior 3.5-Litre Dual Purpose

32 58 83 49

1957 Chevrolet Bel-Air Townsman Wagon 2003 Chevrolet Corvette C5 1967 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray c.1970 Citroën D Super

44

1976 Daimler Sovereign 4.2 Series II Coupe

81 38 31 24 71 36 16 12 82 25 78 5 70 60 62 88 15 65 48

1988 Marcos Mantula Spyder 2002 Maserati 3200 GT 2007 Maserati Granturismo V8 1992 Mercedes 190E 2.0 1957 Mercedes-Benz 190SL 1971 Mercedes-Benz 280SE 3.5 V8 LHD 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300 SEL 6.3 Crayford Estate 1975 Mercedes-Benz 450 SL 1986 Mercedes-Benz 500 SL 1995 Mercedes-Benz SL 500 2003 Mercedes SL55 AMG 1958 MGA Roadster 1972 MG B GT V8 Conversion 1965 MG B Roadster 1969 MG C GT 1969 MG C Roadster 1997 MG RV8 1968 Morris Mini MKII Cooper 1967 Morris Mini Traveller

30 61 21 77 35 73 46 20 51 39 72 27 76 87 80

2001 Ferrari 360 Spider 1998 Ferrari 550 Maranello (Manual) 1967 Fiat 850 Sports Spider 1971 Ferrari Dino 246 GT 1939 Ford 91C V8 Ambulance 1963 Ford Cortina MK1 Limousine 1996 Ford Escort RS2000 4x4 1943 Ford GPW Jeep 1943 Ford GPW Jeep c.1931 Ford Model A Roadster Pick-Up 1931 Ford Model A Deluxe Phaeton 1912 Ford Model T Tourer 1909 Ford Model T Town Car 1972 Ford Mustang Fastback 1982 Frazer-Tickford Metro

86 34 23

2005 Porsche 911 Carrera S 1970 Porsche 911 E 1992 Porsche 944 S2 Cabriolet

56 8 55 74 85 3 4

1988 Range Rover Vogue EFi 1966 Reliant Scimitar GT SE4 1932 Rolls-Royce 20/25 Saloon 1926 Rolls-Royce 20hp Landaulette by Park Ward 1929 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Sedanca 1971 Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow 1974 Rover P6 3500S

1 22

1939 Standard Flying 12 1954 Sunbeam Alpine MKIII Roadster

40

1967 Hillman Hunter

47

1975 Triumph Stag

75 52 26 67 42 64 89 84

1972 Jaguar E-Type V12 1972 Jaguar E-Type V12 Coupe 1973 Jaguar E-Type V12 Roadster 1990 Jaguar XJ-S V12 Convertible 1959 Jaguar XK 150 3.8 Fixed Head Coupe 1959 Jaguar XK 150 Fixed Head Coupe 2007 Jaguar XKR 4.2 1970 Jensen Interceptor II

33 29

2003 Volkswagen Golf VR5 1974 Volkswagen SP2

54

1934 Wolseley Hornet Shelsey Special


Already consigned to Pavilion Gardens 1953 Aston Martin DB2 Vantage Estimate: £150,000-180,000*

Sell your classic with the UK’s No.1 Trusted Auction House An Auction of Classic & Collector Motorcars 8th December 2021 | Pavilion Gardens, Buxton HandH.co.uk | info@HandH.co.uk | +44 (0)1925 210035 *All hammer prices are subject to the following Buyer’s Premium | Motorcars 12.5% plus VAT

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Trust your consignment to H&H Classics HandH.co.uk | info@HandH.co.uk | +44 (0)1925 210035 H&H Classics, The Motor House, Lyncastle Road, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4SN, United Kingdom