H&H Classics | An Auction of Classic & Collector Motorcars

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An Auction of Classic & Collector Motorcars Sale 203 | 16th March 2022 | Imperial War Museum, Duxford


The Richard Colton Ferraris. Sold by H&H in October 2015 to benefit the RNLI: 1960 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Sold for: £7,425,000* 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Sold for: £2,171,250*

Trusted Auctioneers Since 1993 H&H Classics are one of just five auction houses in the world to have sold a car for over $10 million Consign your classic with H&H Classics HandH.co.uk | info@HandH.co.uk | +44 (0)1925 210035


ON THE COVER

1929 Bentley Speed Six ‘Le Mans’-style Tourer

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Estimate: £500,000 - £600,000* Reg No: UU 5911

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: BA2587

More details on pages 106-109

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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Notes for intending purchasers Prospective purchasers are respectfully advised to read the Terms and Conditions of Sale carefully before bidding on any lot, as they form the terms of your contract with us, whether or not you are a successful bidder.

Insurance Hagerty Classic Car Insurance be pleased to advise buyers in this area. Please be reminded that the insurance is the buyer’s responsibility from the fall of the hammer.

Admission Admission H&H has the right at its sole discretion, without assigning any reason whatsoever, to refuse admission to any of its sales or indeed its premises to any person. The purchase of a catalogue does not constitute an entry ticket or guarantee entry.

Warranty H&H is acting as the agent of the Seller in offering his lot for sale by auction. We cannot and do not inspect each lot in detail to verify the Seller’s description - often we only see it shortly before the Sale. Therefore, we cannot and do not take responsibility for the condition of the lot or the accuracy of its description. This is the reason for our very specific terms as to roadworthiness (Condition 19.1) and absence of warranties (Condition 12.1), which intending purchasers should read carefully.

Bidder Registration All intending buyers are required to complete a Bidder’s Registration Form. This will enable you to bid at the sale by means of a number allocated to you. All prospective bidders must complete the form online giving full identification and bank card details to verify their identity. Lots sold will be invoiced to the registered bidder. References We reserve the right to request banker’s references from prospective purchasers and these should be supplied in time to allow them to be taken up prior to the sale. Failure to comply with this could result in the facility to bid being withdrawn. Currency Converter Solely for the convenience of bidders, a currency converter is provided at H&H sales. The rates quoted for conversion of other currencies to pounds sterling are indicative only and provided by our partner Argentex. We will not be responsible for any errors, inaccuracies or omissions in the currency converter. Bidding Increments In the case of Commission, Telephone and Online Internet bidding, the following increments will apply: Under £1,000 £1,000 - £2,000 £2,000 - £5,000 £5,000 - £10,000 £10,000 - £20,000 £20,000 - £50,000 £50,000 - £100,000 Over £100,000

At the Auctioneers discretion £100 £200/300 £500 £1,000 £2,000/3,000 £5,000 At the Auctioneers discretion

Premium Purchasers are reminded that a Buyers’ Premium is payable on all lots and is subject to VAT at the prevailing rate. The rates are as follows: Motor Cars Registrations Motorcycles Bicycles Automobilia

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12.5% (minimum of £150) 15% (minimum of £50) 15% (minimum of £50) 15% (minimum of £10) 15% (minimum of £5)

Commission / Telephone Bids We will make reasonable efforts to execute commission and telephone bids when instructed provided they are received by 5pm the day before the Sale. Lot(s) will be bought as cheaply as is allowed by other bids and reserves. Where more than one commission bid is submitted at the same winning amount, the commission bid submitted to the Auctioneer first will be the winning bid. We reserve the right to request a refundable deposit of approximately 10% of the intended bid amount. Payment For immediate clearance of Lot(s) full payment must be made to H&H Classics Limited by means of Visa Debit or Credit Card, Maestro, MasterCard, Cash up to the GBP equivalent of €10,000 or Interbank Transfer by 12.00 noon the day following the sale. In any event purchasers are reminded that clearance of Lot(s) may only be effected once we have received cleared funds in our account. For Purchaser’s wishing to pay by bank transfer our bank account details are as follows: NatWest, 23 Sankey Street, Warrington, Cheshire, WA1 1XH Account Name: H&H Classics Client Account Account No: 58868984 Sort Code: 01-09-17 BIC: NWBKGB2L IBAN: GB20NWBK01091758868984 Racing Cars & Documentation Buyers are reminded that the presence of an old HVIF (FIA papers) or other documentation does not constitute a ‘promise’ on behalf of the MSA or other issuing authority that they will be re-issued on demand. A car’s application for a Historic Technical Passport will be subject to the prevailing regulation in Appendix K and can be reviewed, much the same way Veteran Cars can be re-dated, as new information comes to light. The Issuing Authority can refuse to issue new papers. Any prospective purchaser should check the position of the Lot prior to bidding. Veteran Car Club of Great Britain Dating Plates and Certificates When mention is made of the Veteran Car Club of Great Britain Dating Plates and Certificates in this catalogue it should be borne in mind that the Veteran Car Club of Great Britain does from time to time review cars

already dated and, in some instances, where fresh evidence becomes available, alter the date. Whilst the Club makes every effort to ensure accuracy, the date shown on the Dating Plate or Dating Certificate cannot be guaranteed as correct and intending purchasers should make their own enquiries as to the date of the car. Export Licence / Dates Export licences may be required for any lot manufactured or produced 50 years or more prior to the date of export from the U.K. It is the responsibility of the buyer to obtain the licence and correct documentation prior to the exportation of the lot. Vehicle Identity and Competition History Any motor vehicle is sold as a collector’s item and not as a means of transport. Buyers are specifically warned that any vehicle sold as such may well have had parts replaced and paint renewed or be made up of parts from other vehicles the condition of which may be difficult to establish. The Auctioneer has to rely on information as to the date, condition and authenticity provided by the Seller and does not provide its own description, and does not and cannot undertake its own inspection of vehicles or other Lot and it is the responsibility of the Buyer to ensure that the Lot conforms to the description in the catalogue. The Auctioneer cannot check or verify the authenticity of the chassis or VIN number under which a vehicle is offered, but relies on the Seller’s description. Buyers should take particular care to verify in advance the authenticity of a vehicle that is claimed to have important racing, rallying or ‘exworks’ history as it was common in period for a competition vehicle of a single identity to have more than one chassis, body or other mechanical components. This may have happened several times, both in a vehicle’s ‘works’ career and thereafter in private owner hands. Sometimes ‘works’ vehicles were fitted with different registration plates, so that a vehicle could meet a particular event’s start date deadline. These historical factors may lead to there being in existence multiple and competing claimants to the same vehicle identity. Removal of Lots A representative of our preferred transport provider E.M. Rogers will be present at the sale to assist with any transport requirements. All lots are held at the purchaser’s risk at the fall of the hammer and must be removed not later than 1pm on the day following the sale. Please note, if lot(s) are not removed by then the standard charges as stated in our Terms and Conditions will apply.


Auction Information Auction Venue

Imperial War Museum Duxford, Cambridgeshire, CB22 4QR

Schedule

Tuesday 15th March 2022 Viewing: 12:00pm to 6:00pm

Wednesday 16th March 2022 Viewing: 9:00am onwards Auction: 1:00pm start Bidding

Bidding will be available live at the venue Online at www.HandH.co.uk | Telephone | Commission

Buyer’s Premium

Motorcars 12.5% plus VAT

Buyer Enquiries

+44 (0)1925 210035 | sales@HandH.co.uk

Safety Guidance

• If you have Covid-19 symptoms, please do not attend

• Face masks are recommended where possible

• Observe social distancing at all times

• Wash hands regularly or use hand sanitiser if that is all you have access to

More information and full terms & conditions are available via our website www.HandH.co.uk


1951 Bentley MkVI Saloon Current family ownership since 1996

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No Reserve* Reg No: TFO 508

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Estimate: £12,000 - £14,000* Chassis No: B32LJ

MOT: Exempt

Introduced in 1946, the MkVI was Bentley’s first model with factory-designed coachwork, and the first to be assembled in Rolls-Royce’s Crewe factory. Aimed at the ‘owner-driver’ luxury market, it was built around a large cruciform-braced chassis with independent front suspension and leaf-sprung ‘live’ axle. Fitted with a 4257cc OISE (overhead inlet side exhaust valve) straight-six mated to a four-speed manual gearbox, over 100mph was attainable with factory ‘Standard Steel’ coachwork. Manufactured in 1951, the Bentley MkVI was supplied new to the United Kingdom being initially registered ‘LXU 375’. Despatched and first registered to Jack Barclay Ltd. of 12-13 St George St, Hanover Square, London W1, chassis number B32LJ was finished in Grey and is presented with complementing Red leather interior upholstery. Registered to the first private keeper Douglas Inglis Rawford Esq in 1951, the Bentley is known to have passed through two subsequent keepers, the second of which acquired the MkVI in 1976. Understood to have afterward been exported to America (sometime in the late 1970s), it returned to the United Kingdom in January 1996. In current family ownership since repatriation, the currently registered, ‘TFO 508’ is offered from a deceased estate as a restoration project, having spent a least the last five years in storage. ‘TFO 508’ is offered with the original buff logbook, copy of the previous logbook, a past MOT certificate and current V5C.

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1929 Austin Seven Chummy

Reg No: GC 187

Chassis No: 95713

MOT: Exempt

So-called because of the proximity in which its four occupants sat, the Austin Seven ‘Chummy’ is arguably the most endearing British car of the Vintage period. First registered in London on 30th December 1929, ‘GC 187’ has belonged to the vendor’s family for a total of sixty-eight years! Purchased by the seller’s father during 1947 for £103 while he was living and working in Surrey, the Austin was sold on four years later prior to the arrival of his first child. Reacquired during 1958, the four-seater was stored in Hertfordshire until 1985 when it was entrusted to John Foy Ltd for professional restoration. Although, gifted to the vendor in 1990 it would be another three years before he became aware of his good fortune. Driven to an Anniversary Rally at Beaulieu Abbey thereafter, the AD ‘Chummy’ Tourer returned to Hertfordshire during 1994. Laid-up once again, this time for almost three decades, ‘GC 187’ was recommissioned by John Foy Ltd earlier this year with works including the fitting of a new header rail and hood and fresh coolant hoses plus attention to the engine nose piece. Reportedly ‘running and driving well’, the Chummy has yet to cover 1,000 miles since 1958 and is offered with a small car trailer.


1985 Mercedes-Benz 380 SL

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No Reserve* Reg No: A36 WMK

1979 Bentley T2

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1 of just 558 examples made Estimate: £10,000 - £12,000*

Chassis No: 1070452A005059

MOT: May 2022

The R107-series SL was the result of an extremely thorough design process and in an attempt to avoid falling foul of threatened American safety legislation, Stuttgart produced an open car whose structural rigidity surpassed that of some contemporary saloons! Successor to the initial European 350SL and American 450SL models, the 380SL was introduced in March 1980. Utilising the same two-door monocoque bodyshell equipped with all-round coil-sprung independent suspension (wishbone front / semi-trailing arm rear), power assisted recirculating ball steering and four-wheel disc brakes as its predecessors, the newcomer boasted an enlarged 3839cc SOHC V8 engine and improved four-speed automatic transmission. Credited with some 204bhp and 232lbft of torque, European specification cars were reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 9.1 seconds and 127mph. Finished in Black with Cream leather this right-hand-drive SL, with hardtop, has covered some 153,000 miles and is offered with a current MoT up to 22nd May 2022. Said to require some improvement and renovation, it is offered at ‘no reserve’. The car is accompanied by a stamped service history up to 120,591 miles with some invoices for work carried out afterwards. The bodywork, paint, 3.8-litre engine, automatic gearbox, electrics and interior are described by the vendor as “average”.

Reg No: HFG 642T

Chassis No: SBH37176

MOT: Exempt

Among the rarest of all post-WW2 Bentleys, just 558 examples of the T2 were made between 1977 and 1980. Powered by a 6750cc V8 engine allied to Turbo Hydramatic automatic transmission, the hedonistic four-seater featured rack and pinion steering, improved air conditioning, more pedestrian friendly bumpers and a revised fascia. First registered as ‘YBW 50’ on 3rd April 1979, chassis SBH37176 retained that number plate for the next twenty-one years. Previously supplied by Jack Barclay Ltd (or so the kick plates to both front door shuts would imply), the Bentley entered the current family custodianship a decade or so ago. Handwritten notes affixed to its owner’s handbook suggest that marque specialists Ted Overton and Harvey Wash might well have looked after the T2 in the past. Despatched to Silver Lady Services for a recent interior refresh, the four-seater boasts notably smart wood veneers and sumptuous leather upholstery. The bodywork and paintwork are both a little scruffy in places but ‘HFG 642T’ started readily during our recent photography session and is said to be ‘notably sound underneath’. It is hoped that more history will have emerged by the time of sale but regardless this rare T2 represents an affordable entry to the world of classic Bentley ownership.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1966 Jensen C-V8 MKIII

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Estimate: £14,000 - £18,000* Reg No: VAM 896D

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 112/2412 By the late 1950s the need to offer automatic transmission in luxury cars, even those of sporting character, signalled the end of Jensen’s reliance on Austin’s 4.0-litre six. The latter being deemed insufficiently powerful, the West Bromwich concern turned to Chrysler’s 5.9-litre V8 that came with the admirable Torque-Flite automatic gearbox as standard. The engine/ transmission package debuted in the all-new, glassfibre-bodied C-V8 in October 1962, and while the car’s highly individual styling was not to everyone’s taste there were no complaints about its performance, the C-V8’s 136mph maximum speed and outstanding acceleration making it ‘one of the fastest cars we have ever tested, and the fastest full four-seater’, according to The Motor. The model was revised through MkII and III versions, Chrysler’s 330bhp 6.3-litre V8 becoming standard part way through MkII production. Introduced in 1965, the last-of-the-line MkIII differed from its predecessor by virtue of its dual-circuit braking, equal-sized headlamps, separate flashers and walnut dashboard. A total of only 178 Jensen CV-8 Mk IIIs had been produced when production ceased in 1966. Finished in striking Orange with Black leather interior trim and riding on Minilite alloy wheels; this C-V8 has been in current family ownership since approximately 1987. Said to be offered in “generally very good condition” and despite a lengthy period of dry storage; the car has been run and driven in recent years, even passing an MOT test as recently as June 2014. With just 178 MkIII C-V8s produced in right-hand drive configuration, it is believed that a mere 21 of these stylish sports cars survive on the UK roads today. Combining American ‘muscle’, with sleek British styling, this is arguably one of the rarest but affordable sporting grand tourers available. Attractively guided, this particularly example offers the purchaser what we believe to be a straightforward and highly rewarding recommissioning project, ready for summer.

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1998 Mercedes-Benz CL500

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Current family ownership since 2001 and 34,000 miles from new Estimate: £12,000 - £14,000* Reg No: J999 MMT

MOT: Feb 2023

Chassis No: WDB1400702A400574 Ordered via Mercedes-Benz Diplomatic Sales, chassis 400574 was delivered on March 19th 1998. Finished in Brilliant Silver Metallic with Black Nappa leather upholstery and polished wood veneers, the four-seater was purchased by the vendor’s mother from Mercedes-Benz Peter Harris Ltd on 17th May 2001 for £40,000. The price paid included the fitment of a Tracker, Sat-Nav and the personalised registration number ‘J999 MMT’. Understood to have previously belonged to a lottery winner, the CL500 sports BRABUS 20-inch split-rim alloy wheels, BRABUS tail pipes and appears to ride on lowered suspension. Still wearing ‘Peter Harris Ltd’ number plates, the Coupe’s odometer reading has increased from 15,612 miles to a still very modest 34,000 miles over the past twenty-one years. Professionally dry stored since 2018, the Mercedes-Benz is expected to possess a fresh MOT certificate by the time of sale. One of just twenty-nine 1998 CL500 cars currently known to the DVLA, ‘J999 MMT’ comes with its original book pack, 2001 sales invoice, MOT history and assorted bills / invoices. “In this S-Class coupé, the Stuttgart engineers had left nothing to chance technologically and in many ways it represented a level of ambition they never reached for again. That alone is probably a good reason for buying one” (Martin Buckley, Classic & Sportscar, Nov 2019) Allegedly costing $1billion to develop, the W140-Series of Mercedes-Benz flagship S-Class was in production from April 1991 – September 1998 with the C140 Coupe version debuting at the January 1992 Detroit Motor Show. A technological tour de force renowned for its wonderful build quality and refinement, the flagship ‘Benz boasted such niceties as double glazing and self-closing doors / boot. Introduced in June 1996, the CL500 was limited to 155mph and powered by a 4973cc DOHC 32-valve V8 engine allied to five-speed automatic transmission. Between them the 500SEC, S500 and CL500 variants of the C140 achieved just 14,953 sales with the majority being to left-hand drive specification.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1981 MG B LE Roadster

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1 of just 421 LE roadsters made Estimate: £11,000 - £13,000* Reg No: PAD 267W

Chassis No: GVADJ1AG522711

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No Reserve* MOT: July 2022

The production of 1,000 LEs (Limited Edition) in October 1980, included 421 Roadsters and 579 GTs, and marked the end of the line for home market MGBs. The LE Roadsters were all finished in a striking and unique Metallic Bronze for the UK and trimmed in Orange and Brown cloth and featured distinctive Gold stripes on their flanks, deep front spoilers and Triumph Stag-style 14 x 5.5 inch alloy wheels. The latter being cast by GKN Kent Alloys Ltd. The price tag was £6,445, for which you received a very well-sorted two-seater sports car. They have inevitably become collectible. The very smart 1981 example offered, was supplied new by F.W Cuffs and Co. of Chipping Campden. The credible but unwarranted odometer reading, currently 54,950 miles, is thought to represent the total covered from new. Only five former keepers are shown on the V5C registration document and the MG comes complete with copies of its service records plus a collection of old MOT certificates and invoices. Having received a new mohair hood, it is no surprise the vendor currently grades the engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork plus paintwork all as ‘very good’ and is offered with an MOT certificate into July 2022.

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1982 Lotus Eclat Excel

Reg No: ONP 300Y

Chassis No: SCC089912CHD11161

MOT: None

When you think of a Lotus you’d be forgiven for not recalling the Excel. In 1982 an evolution of the Eclat, the Lotus Excel (a.k.a. Eclat Excel) was introduced and praised by the contemporary motoring press for its strong performance and superlative handling, as you’d expect of a Lotus. The newcomer utilised a galvanised version of Lotus’s iconic ‘backbone’ chassis equipped with all-round coil-over independent suspension, four-wheel disc brakes and high-geared rack and pinion steering. It is ably powered by Lotus’s own 2174cc DOHC four-cylinder engine. With 76,500 recorded miles and current ownership since 2009, this could be a rewarding project. At first glance this Eclat Excel appears to be complete, although a collection of spares are offered alongside parts taken off the car such as some of the interior panels. The interior specification of Cream velour and leather suits the Black body and provides for a striking combination. It is nice to see characteristics such as the period front and rear Lotus independent specialist number plates and a Club Lotus window sticker. The engine bay appears to be complete, however, as with the rest of the car, it would require recommissioning and restoration. This Eclat Excel is said to have last been on the road in 2018 and offered with a history file and V5C.


1990 Jaguar XJ-S V12 Convertible

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Estimate: £14,000 - £18,000* Reg No: H445 XUC

Chassis No: SAJJNADW3DB174341

c.1972 Land Rover Series IIA 109 ex-MOD and in service until 1985

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Estimate: £11,000 - £13,000* MOT: March 2023

Launched in 1975, Jaguar’s XJ-S was designed to seamlessly blur borders rather than blast down back roads and so came with automatic transmission as standard. Though, when fed the quoted 295bhp and 318lbft of torque developed by a post 1981 H.E. (high efficiency) 5.3 litre V12 engine, this still resulted in a claimed top speed of 150mph and 0-60mph in less than eight seconds. Introduced at the 1988 Geneva Motor Show, the long awaited full convertible version featured a reinforced floorpan, frameless doors and sophisticated electric hood. Underpinned by the same all-round independent coil-sprung suspension and power assisted rack and pinion steering as its fixed head coupe siblings, the soft-top came with anti-lock brakes as standard. Priced at some £40,000, a waiting list was quick to form. Finished in the handsome combination of Westminster Blue with Magnolia leather upholstery and a Black hood, ‘H445 XUC’ has been dry stored for the last dozen years or so. Showing a modest 74,000 miles to its odometer, the Convertible has recently been recommissioned and is expected to possess a fresh MOT certificate by the time of sale. Riding on correct-type lattice alloy wheels shod with Pirelli tyres, the Jaguar is accompanied by a V5C Registration Document (showing just three former keepers), handbook, jack and assorted paperwork.

Reg No: AWU 428K

Chassis No: 25122018H

MOT: September 2022

A sympathetic update of its much loved predecessor, the Land Rover Series II was introduced in April 1958. The newcomer’s sleeker sheetmetal was the work of David Bache and clothed an improved chassis. As well as better rear wheel articulation and sharper steering, the Series II boasted wider axles and a new gearbox. Announced in 1961, the subtly upgraded Series IIA benefited from an improved cooling system and the arrival of a 2.25-litre diesel engine. Phased out of production in 1971, the Series IIA is judged by some to be the most durable Series Land Rover ever made. This ex-Ministry of Defence army vehicle is believed to have been in service c.1972, but first used ‘civilianised’ in 1985. Presented in a military Green (possibly NATO Green), with Black vinyl seats, ‘AWU 428K’ comes accompanied with an MOT valid until 12th September 2022 with ‘no advisories’ and a 2.25 litre (2286cc) petrol engine. Also included with the vehicle is the original military telephone with canvas bag, two spare upper doors still in boxes and documentation including a military users’ manual, complete with a chapter detailing how to de-commission the vehicle should it fall into enemy hands. The vendor rates the condition of the interior trim as ‘average’, the bodywork, electrical equipment, paintwork and transmission as ‘good’, with the engine ‘good to very good’.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1968 TVR Vixen S2

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Estimate: £16,000 - £20,000* Reg No: VUC 480G

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: LVX1236F The TVR Vixen was produced between 1967 and 1973, with most examples utilising Ford engines in different configurations. Succeeding the MGB engined TVR Grantura 1800S, it was also the basis for the high-performance TVR Tuscan which was available with both V6 and V8 engines. The Vixen S1 (Series 1) was introduced in 1967 as an evolution of the discontinued 1800S. Although it used the same chassis as the outgoing car, the significant change was the use of the 1599cc Ford Kent engine. Introduced in October 1968, the longer wheelbase of the S2 made it possible to lengthen the doors, improving accessibility, and there were numerous other improvements before the final S3 was launched in October 1970. This S2 Vixen was the third S2 manufactured and was produced in 1968, being first registered in the United Kingdom on 18th of October 1968. It retains some S1 features due to its early production number, such as the dashboard and pedal box. Presented in the attractive colour scheme of red paintwork with black cloth interior upholstery, it is fitted with the Ford 1.6-litre straight-four engine mated to a four-speed Ford manual gearbox. ‘VUC 480G’ has a recorded mileage of c.54,800 miles and entered into current ownership in 2014. Purchased by TVR specialists David Gerald in 1998 as an abandoned restoration project, the car was comprehensively restored retaining ‘as many period features as possible’. Benefitting from a replacement overhauled chassis; a gearbox refresh; overhauled engine with unleaded cylinder head and reconditioned radiator; bare shell repaint; rewire; new wire wheels and tyres and new front and rear screens. Accompanied by a history file that comprises several restoration images, a large collection of previous MOT certificates back to 1998, several old tax discs, copies of previous logbooks, a current V5C document and a spare set of keys.

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1961 Vauxhall Cresta PA

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Comprehensively restored over a thirteen-year period Estimate: £28,000 - £35,000* Reg No: 411 BEW

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: PADX141862 The PA Cresta, announced in October 1957, was heavily influenced by the American fashion for tail-fins, wrap-around windows and white-wall tyres. Taking its cues from the 1957 model Buick Special, it was relatively understated compared to contemporary Cadillacs and Buicks. All factory-built PAs were four-door saloons, with some estate cars converted by Friary of Basingstoke. Well-equipped with leather and nylon upholstery, bench seats and woven pile carpet, it even boasted a heater as standard. A radio remained an option for the home market, other options included fog lamps, reversing light, locking filler cap and external mirrors. To increase interior space the handbrake lever was mounted under the dashboard and the gear change was column mounted. In period, the car could be ordered in either single or two-tone colours. Manufactured in 1961, this PA Cresta was supplied new to the UK and is finished in two-tone Green and Black with a Green leather interior. Fitted with the 2.6-litre six-cylinder engine (introduced in these later cars) mated to a three-speed manual column gear change, it has had just two owners since 1979. The Cresta entered into current ownership in 2010, after being subject to a thirteen-year comprehensive restoration while in the previous custodianship, which had reached completion in 1991. The work included extensive bodywork repairs; fastidious preparation and repainting; engine overhaul with suspension renovation; reconditioned gearbox; complete braking overhaul; interior refresh and many new parts throughout. Winning the ‘Best Home Restoration’ award at the AutoGlym/Popular Classics Roadshow upon completion, the car was featured in Popular Classics magazine, documenting the restoration across three issues. ‘411 BEW’ is offered with original service book, copies of the Popular Classics feature, V5C and a Vanguard 1:43 scale model of the car. Maintained fastidiously, recent improvements include five new radial white-wall tyres, engine bay repainting and a new battery. It is unsurprisingly rated as “excellent” throughout by the vendor.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1964 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III

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Estimate: £30,000 - £35,000* Reg No: EGC 443B

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: SGT527 Rolls-Royce launched the Silver Cloud in April 1955 forming the company’s core model range for the next 11 years. For the final iteration, the Silver Cloud III, the exterior dimensions were subtly altered, the interior remodelled and weight reduced by some 220lbs. Engine improvements included replacing the 1.75-inch SU carburettors with 2.0-inch ones and raising the compression ratio to 9:1. The extra performance allowed 0-60mph in just 10.1 seconds with a top speed of 114 mph. The obvious visual change was the adoption of four headlamps. Less noticeable were the slightly increased slope of the bonnet and the 1.5 inch shorter radiator grille. This UK-supplied example was manufactured in 1964 and registered in October that year, being supplied through A & D Fraser Ltd of Glasgow to a N. D. Hodge Esq of Maidens, Ayreshire. Finished in Burgundy with a single Gold coachline, matched with Beige leather upholstery with Beige piping, it is understood to have had just six owners from new. Residing in current ownership since 2006, it has covered approximately 100,000 miles from new, with a mere 6,000 of these in the vendor’s hands. Originally specified with air-conditioning, electric windows, four-inch longer seat runners to the front seats and seat cushions reduced in height by an inch, two additional roof lamps, and combined parking and blinking lights. ‘EGC 443B’ has benefited from a full mechanical renovation while in the vendor’s ownership, including a comprehensive engine overhaul between 2017 and 2018 costing c.£30,000, by specialists Ristes Motor Company (with just c.500 miles covered since). The complex air conditioning unit was reconditioned in 2012 and a new heater matrix fitted. Accompanied by a large history file comprising copies of the original build records, paperwork and assorted correspondence, previous MoT certificates (the oldest from 1979), a large quantity of invoices, current V5C and previous logbooks.

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1981 Ferrari 308 GTB

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35,000 miles and just 2 former keepers from new Estimate: £50,000 - £60,000* Reg No: KPL 572W

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 29909 With its stunning and shapely Pininfarina-designed body, styled by Leonardo Fioravanti, and mid-mounted 2926cc quad-cam V8 fed originally by four Weber DCNF 40 carburettors, the Ferrari 308 has rightly become a significant collector’s car. Pininfarina had already penned such eternal classics as the Daytona, Dino and Berlinetta Boxer. The 308 GTB was Ferrari’s replacement for the immortal Dino 246 GT and made its debut at the 1975 Paris Salon 1975. The very earliest Ferrari 308s were built with fibreglass bodies, however, manufacturing quality issues meant that Ferrari quickly changed to steel in 1977. In 1980, the carburetted engine was replaced by a Bosch fuel-injected version for the sake of reduced emissions, however, the change left the revised unit short of power. Made famous by the TV series ‘Magnum PI’, the 308 has matured into a collectors’ favourite. When Maranello stopped production of the 308 in 1988, it had become the most popular Ferrari. Being one of just 211 right-hand drive examples, this 308 GTB is showing a low 35,154 miles from new. With only two former keepers, ‘KPL 572W’ was once owned by the ‘Thunderbirds’ TV series puppet maker Terry Curtis and has been in current lady ownership since 2010. It is nice to see the old ‘Maranello’ dealer plates still adorn the car. Certainly, this is an opportunity to bring an example of the beautiful 308 GTB back to its former glory. Externally there is some work required to repair the front air dam and bring the Rosso Corsa paint back to life, for example. Inside the dash binnacle requires some attention in order to realise its full potential. Offered with V5c, owners wallet, handbook and service book plus invoices dating back to the 1980’s and some old MOT certificates. A belt service was carried out in 2021.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1930 Morris Cowley ‘Flatnose’ Saloon Current ownership since 1971

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No Reserve* Reg No: DX 8813

Believed to be the only example in the UK

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Estimate: £15,000 - £20,000* Chassis No: 338152

MOT: Exempt

William Morris was one of Britain’s greatest pioneering motor manufacturers. Not only did he foresee the huge demand for private transport but he also revolutionised concepts of both marketing and production in order to satisfy it. Introduced in 1926, the ‘Flatnose’ Morris drew heavily on the design of its much-loved ‘Bullnose’ predecessor. Built on a light yet sturdy leafsprung ladder chassis and powered by a choice of two torquey four-cylinder side-valve engines (11.9hp Cowley or 14hp Oxford) mated to a three-speed manual gearbox, it tackled the primitive period road network with aplomb. Famed for their durability, many ‘Flatnoses’ remained in regular use after WW2. Manufactured in 1930, ‘DX 8813’ was first registered in the United Kingdom on the 30th of March that year. Fitted with the aforementioned straight-four engine with the manual transmission, the Morris is presented today in two-tone Blue and Black with matching Blue interior upholstery. Entering into current long-term ownership in 1971, the Cowley was provided with a comprehensive restoration during the period shortly after purchase and is still presenting well today. In use for a few decades thereafter, the ‘Flatnose’ was laid up in a garage in 2006, where it has remained until 2022 following the passing of the late vendor. Offered requiring recommissioning and without reserve, ‘DX 8813’ is offered with a mid-restoration photograph, a large collection of MOT certificates, and current V5C.

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1967 Ferves Ranger

Reg No: HSA 223E

Chassis No: FVS0349

MOT: Exempt

Ferves was an Italian automobile manufacturer from 1965 until 1970. First seen at the 1966 Turin Motor Show, Ferves (Ferrari Vehicoli Speciali) introduced the Ranger as a small ‘off-road’ derivative of the Fiat 500, ideal for farm or vineyard use. It was powered by a rear-mounted 18bhp 499cc twocylinder in-line engine. Approximately 50 examples are thought to survive out of the 600 made and this one is believed to be the only example in the UK. Purchased from Italy in October 2015 by the current vendor after having a ride in one a number of years ago the Ranger was in the limelight when it was invited to the 2017 Goodwood Festival of Speed, where it was displayed on the Cartier lawn. Said to be in ‘excellent’ order with regards to the engine, gearbox, paintwork, interior trim and bodywork ‘HSA 223E’ displays a credible 38,816 kms and is offered with a collection of invoices, V5C and full weather equipment. The designer Carlo Ferrari’s connection to the Maranello ‘Ferrari’ name, is unclear, however, but it is sure to turn more heads than anything from Maranello.


2003 Jaguar XJR Saloon

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Only c.29,000 miles from new Estimate: £15,000 - £17,000* Reg No: AM53 HKW

Chassis No: SAJAC73R84TG16276

1962 Vauxhall VX 4/90 FB

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Estimate: £12,000 - £14,000* MOT: December 2022

Originally purchased new from Minster Jaguar of Preston in October 2003, this super low mileage example has covered c.29,000 cherished miles. Finished in Pearlescent Pacific Blue with a Cream upholstery featuring Sand leather seat facings, this 2004 model year example wore the plate D6 FCH for many years and is expected to wear ‘AM53 HKW’ in new ownership. This attractive XJR Supercharged V8 is understood to have had just two previous keepers. Displaying c.29,000 recorded miles, the Jaguar’s impressive specification includes: Performance X350 19” alloy wheels, adaptive damping and cruise control. With a current MOT, this XJR has a full Jaguar dealer service history up to and including its last service in February 2019 at 25442 miles. It is offered with a V5C and a plethora of invoices and documentation including a number of Duckworth Jaguar vehicle health check reports from 2020 and 2021. The vendor assesses the condition of the bodywork, engine, electrical equipment, paintwork, interior trim and transmission and gearbox as excellent.

Reg No: 903 UXV

Chassis No: FB17529A

MOT: Exempt

Vauxhall’s more cleanly style Victor replacement was the FB, announced 14 September 1960. It was widely exported, only achieving sales of 328,000 vehicles by the time it was replaced in 1964. The flat front and turtle-deck rear resembling some US Fords, such as the Falcon. A sporty derivative, the VX4/90, was announced a year later. The potent VX4/90 had an over 90 m.p.h. turn of speed and good handling qualities. A worked over engine raised the power output by approximately 40 per cent and application of power was delivered via the excellent four-speed gearbox, a feature of the VX4/90. To cope with the performance, the suspension was stiffened both front and rear. The VX4/90 would hold 80 mph for long periods, the engine turning over at about 4000 rpm at this speed. This example of the ‘hot’ FB, with performance and handling, was built for the Australian market and sold new in Australia. A GM/Holden body tag displays the body plate displays the serial numbers. Imported to the UK from Australia in 2006, it currently displays 44,809 miles on the odometer, it is believed that the condition reflects the mileage and is likely to be genuine. The vendor describes the car to be ‘very original’ and in ‘time warp condition’. Amongst the paperwork is the V5C, original handbook, workshop manual and collection of invoices and old MOTs.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

17


2001 Mercedes-Benz SL500 ‘Silver Arrow’ 1 family and 14,000 miles from new!

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Estimate: £45,000 - £55,000* Reg No: A1 TSR

Chassis No: WDB1290682F204505

MOT: February 2023

“One glance is enough to tell you just how special this glorious car is. So special, in fact, that only 100 models will be produced for the UK – with each one certified as authentic by Mercedes-Benz and Sir Stirling Moss” (Mercedes-Benz SL-Class, limited edition brochure) Unveiled at the March 1989 Geneva Motor Show, the fourth generation (R129-series) MercedesBenz SL was styled in-house by Bruno Sacco. Often cited as the highlight of his career, the sleek Roadster was beautifully engineered. Based around a two-door monocoque bodyshell, its sophisticated all-round independent suspension (double-wishbone front / five-link rear) was augmented by a host of active and passive safety features including: electronic stability control, ventilated ABS disc brakes, adaptive-damping shock absorbers, front airbags and an integral rollover bar that deployed in less than a third of a second (if the car ever sensed an impending flip). Suitably cosseting, the convertible’s impeccably built cabin was protected by a fully automated power hood and featured such niceties as memory seats, electric windows and mirrors and an adjustable steering column. Yet, lurking beneath all the luxury and refinement was a performance orientated grand tourer. Launch flagship, the mighty 500 SL (known as the SL 500 from 1994 onwards) was powered by the first of Mercedes’ four-valve per cylinder, dual-overhead camshaft V8 powerplants. Credited with 326bhp and 332lbft of torque, this fearsome 4973cc (M119.982) unit was allied to four-speed (later five-speed) automatic transmission as standard. Reputedly capable of over 150mph and 0-60mph in 6.3 seconds, the model was updated with a more emissions friendly but marginally less powerful 4966cc (M113.963) engine from June 1998 onwards. Intended to be a fitting send off for the R129-series, the special edition SL500 ‘Silver Arrow’ boasted a unique specification which included: Silver Arrow ‘777’ paintwork, Black / Silver Nappa leather upholstery, AMG bodystyling, bespoke 18-inch multi-piece alloy wheels, Silver brake callipers, chrome-sheen aluminium exterior trim, illuminated door sills, ‘engine-turned’ aluminium instrument and gearshift surrounds and Bird’s-Eye Maple Black wood trim. Mercedes-Benz only allocated 100 special edition SL500 ‘Silver Arrow’ cars to the UK market. Although the distinctively hued Roadster was available in other countries, the British versions were the only ones to be accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity bearing the signature of Sir Stirling Moss. UK buyers also received a limited edition CMC 1:18 scale model of Moss’s 1955 Mercedes-Benz W196 Grand Prix car ‘No.6’. The vendor remembers his father weighing up the pros and cons of buying one of the special edition SL500 ‘Silver Arrows’ versus ordering a fifth generation (R230-series) Mercedes-Benz SL. Swayed by the R129’s exclusivity, he purchased Number 35 of the 100 British cars. The original sales invoice on file totals £71,753 and lists the addition of a panoramic glass roof, Sat-Nav and Tracker. First registered as ‘A1 TSR’ on 24th September 2001, the 2+2-seater was main dealer

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serviced at 2,601, 5,177, 6,516, 8,229, 9,729, 11,660 and 14,328 miles. Put into professional storage not long after its last bout of maintenance, the odometer reading has increased by a mere 50 miles or so, the Mercedes-Benz is expected to possess a fresh MOT certificate by the time of sale. Starting readily and running well during our recent photography session, ‘A1 TSR’ is in a condition commensurate with its extremely low, warranted mileage. Perhaps because it has only been owned by a father and son from new, the SL500 ‘Silver Arrow’ is unusual in retaining its Sir Stirling Moss-signed Certificate of Authenticity, CMC 1:18 W196 model, letter from Simon Oldfield General Manager, Car Marketing, first MOT certificate, hardtop winch and cradle, original book pack, numerous hard and softbound brochures and even an unopened pack of Mercedes-Benz History ‘Classic Collection’ playing cards! Surely a must for the Mercedes-Benz collector.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

19


1958 Bentley S1 Continental Sports Saloon Coachwork by James Young

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Estimate: £160,000 - £180,000* Reg No: FSU 940

Chassis No: BC49EL

MOT: Exempt

Despite the popularity of the Standard Steel bodywork, introduced when production of Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars resumed after WW2, independent coachbuilders continued to offer alternatives, perhaps the most stylish being those produced to clothe the Bentley Continental. The latter began life exclusively as a two-door car, but in 1957 H J Mulliner was sanctioned to build a four-door car on the Continental chassis, this elegant six-light model being known as the ‘Flying Spur’. James Young, by then part of the Jack Barclay Group, responded with its own equally sporting four-light four-door saloon. Elegant, well-proportioned and handsome, James Young’s four-door Continental offered the latest in automotive styling combined with practicality, grace and space. To put back together an old car that someone else has taken apart is never easy. When that car in question is a 1950s Bentley S1 Continental the problems only multiply. Restorer Matthew Rees of Swansea was tasked with this mammoth project, following our vendor’s acquisition of the rare James Young bodied Continental nine years ago – the perfect stable mate for his S1 fastback. But after using the James Young for a while, he noticed some paint bubbles on the sills and despite investigations revealing the inner structure to be sound, he embarked on the task of taking it apart anyway, having satisfied himself that its mileage of 31,000 was genuine. Given that he wasn’t that keen on the Mason’s Black original paintwork, this was at least a chance to change the colour to something that accentuated those glorious subtle curves more effectively. He took the big car to pieces, reducing it over several months to a rolling shell, still with its drive train in place but denuded of paint, glass and interior trim; however, life and other projects got in the way, meaning sadly the carcass and its parts lay dormant for a number of years. A former engineer and director of a major manufacturing company, Matthew Rees has an approach to restoring cars that is as forensic as it is logical – Introduced by motoring journalist Martin Buckley, Rees travelled to Bromyard to inspect the car and meet our vendor. They struck an instant friendship, came to a deal that kept both men happy, and the Continental was soon despatched across the border into Wales. “The initial challenge was that it arrived as a rolling shell with 16 boxes containing parts all thrown together and various loose larger items,” explains Rees. Rees found the quality of the James Young workmanship to be unmatched: “Everything was built in layers. You had to get every layer right or the next one wouldn’t fit. The door assemblies alone take hours to strip down and rebuild, held together by hundreds of BA-thread screws.” Maintaining these standards throughout was key; one rear door, for instance, was removed and refitted a total of 14 times: “Even then I still wasn’t 100% happy and poor Adrian, who worked with me on the body, looked as if he had lost the will to live. But then the owner came to view it, and pointed out that the shut lines were probably better than had come from James Young in period.” Several specialist areas were challenging, such as the structural woodwork that was rotten around the

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rear window: “I was hugely lucky to find a patternmaker locally who did an incredible job. Eurwyn Rees was brought in having previously worked on horse-drawn carriages for a museum and quite remarkably the techniques were all the same. Eurwyn enjoyed himself so much that he ended up staying, and he and I refitted the interior woodwork together. The tolerances were simply incredible. They were unlike any other vehicle I had worked on and we realised it was because it had been handmade by craftsmen. Some days you would fit several pieces and others just one… if you were lucky.” In the end, though, it all lined up perfectly: “The acid test was when we took it all off again and refitted it, and it still lined up–so we knew we had got it right. One of the hardest jobs was getting the original heated rear window working and whatever was original and still serviceable inside the car was saved and brought back to life with cleaning, such as the carpets and the headliner.” Where new parts were required, Flying Spares and Intro Car came up trumps. Somewhat in contrast to the quest for originality, Our vendor had spent much of his professional working life ‘in the city’ and wanted some modern in-car electrical equipment; naturally, it had to blend in perfectly with the interior, with no out-of-period hardware on display. Rees was able to source a retro-look head-unit at the local Jaguar Land Rover agents with built-in sat-nav, Bluetooth and DAB radio. Patternmaker Eurwyn created bespoke housings in the front door pockets and rear C-pillars for the Competition Boston Acoustics speakers that were felt to be in a style of which James Young would have approved. They were finished off with veneers to match the rest of the interior and period Tannoy badges.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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Part of the skill of tackling a big, complicated 60-year-old hand-built motorcar, and completing it within a sensible timescale and budget, is carefully choosing people to whom you are happy to outsource specialist jobs. So although Matthew Rees was hands-on, he enjoyed working with the different trades needed to restore a coachbuilt car such as this. Local lock specialist Swansea Timber & Plywood were tasked with rebuilding the Yale barrels, none of which locked when the car arrived in Wales. Interestingly, the signature James Young square-button door handles had metric screws, so Rees suspects they could be French in origin. The Cream leather, which was essentially in good condition, was refinished by GCJ Automotive Reconditioning–twice, because the team wasn’t happy with the first attempt. Our vendor eventually settled on his choice of Rolls-Royce Pewter for the paintwork on the recommendation of London-based dealer Graeme Hunt. Ian Davis and panel beater/sprayer Adrian Neale were tasked with preparation and final paintwork duties, whilst the coachlines on the flanks were applied freehand by signwriters, with matching beauty lines on the hubcaps. These were done, logically enough, on a potter’s wheel initially, then by hand when that method didn’t prove accurate enough. Retired 79-year-old master mechanic Alun Davis – father of painter Ian – tuned it by ear, and as light began to appear at the end of the tunnel, more information about the history of the Bentley started to emerge. The original buyer, Victor Ercolani, made his fortune producing television cabinets. A scion of the famous furniture-making family, Ercolani had a preference for James Young bodywork and presumably had no trouble finding the £8000 required to buy this Continental. The mileage was supported by contacting the dealer whose sticker is still in the rear window. He serviced the James Young for the Ercolani family and confirmed that they rarely used it. At the time it wore Victor’s private cherished registration number,’VE 25’, which is now on a modern Mercedes. It was also established that at some point the S1 had been used by the family in France – hence the Marchal parking lights – and was one of the many Rolls-Royce and Bentley models exported to America in the early ’70s, when the weakness of sterling against the dollar made such cars look temptingly inexpensive. The elegance of the £2500-cheaper Standard Steel S-types and Silver Clouds probably contributed to the demise of coachbuilt models such as the James Young Continentals as much as the technical challenges of monocoque construction. Even so, this Bentley is a leaner-looking car in the metal than any factory body. Inside, the dashboard (refurbished with the help of Michael’s Wood Restoration in Brighton) sweeps elegantly into the door cappings and the column itself was bespoke, 2 inches shorter, for the not notably tall Ercolani. This car has the later and more desirable combination of an 8.2:1 compression engine with 2in SU carburettors. Our vendor prefers the simplicity of this 4.9-litre, c180bhp straight-six to the later V8s, which are thirstier and marginally less refined in his eyes. There was no particular attempt to make the Continental radically lighter than the Standard Steels, so extra speed comes by way of a higher compression ratio and less frontal area. Hills are irrelevant, and it throttles down to 800 rpm in top. Massive and powerful, the twin-master-cylinder, twin-front-circuit drum brakes will put this hefty, rather firm-riding car on its nose when asked, and you can control its bulk with surprising delicacy through the power steering, which really does just assist rather than take over. Complemented by 20 kg of modern sound proofing, the quality of that much-agonised-over sound system is said to be “exquisite”. Tenacity and attention to detail were the routes to success in this job, which was finished in a remarkable 10 months. “You could never

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say ‘that will do’ because James Young’s craftsmen would never have said that,” says Rees, who was satisfied that the S1 is now as close to a new car as possible, stating it to be “as tight as if it had just left the factory yesterday” Starting readily and running faultlessly during our recent photographic shoot, this rare coachbuilt S1 Continental is sure to offer plenty of admiring glances wherever it goes. The car is blessed with some fantastic, yet subtle modern upgrades, meaning ‘FSU 940’ would be equally at home on the streets of central London, or the sweeping B-roads of the Cotswolds. Post-War Bentleys rarely come more beautiful or collectible.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

23


1961 AC Greyhound

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One of only 83 produced Estimate: £60,000 - £70,000* Reg No: RJT 999

Chassis No: BEF2538

MOT: Exempt

Introduced at the 1959 London Motor Show, the AC Greyhound was closer in price at £3,185 to an Aston Martin DB4 than a Jaguar XK150. Considerably rarer than either, just eighty-three were hand built before production ceased in 1963. A 2+2-seater featuring a tubular steel chassis, aluminium bodywork, all-round independent coil-sprung suspension, front disc brakes and rack and pinion steering, most examples were powered by Bristol straight-six engines (in either 2 litre or 2.2 litre guises) allied to four-speed manual transmission with optional overdrive. Concerns over future engine supply and the demands of the Shelby Cobra contract gave AC little choice but to shelve the Greyhound before its true potential could be realised. According to its original buff logbook, chassis BEF2538 was first registered as ‘RJT 999’ by Dorset County Council on April 13th 1961. Finished in Silver with Red leather upholstery, the same colour scheme it pleasingly sports today, the AC was supplied new to Colonel George Gould DSO of Upwey whose family were prominent local landowners. Bought by Alderman the Reverend Leland John Blashford-Snell MBE, Prebendary of Hereford Cathedral during 1963, it then passed to his son Captain John Nicholas Blashford-Snell whilst the latter was attending RMA Sandhurst. Subsequently Colonel and better known as an explorer and the founder of Operation Raleigh, the younger Blashford-Snell sold the Greyhound to Geoffrey Philip Wyle Esq in April 1967. That same year the vehicle was purchased by the vendor’s father, Richard Thomas Seymour after returning from living in Australia, following a cash deal in The Eagle public house car park, Norwich. ‘RJT 999’ has belonged to just two families for most of its life. Initially used for family holidays to Devon, the AC was spared commuting duties by a succession of motorcycles and effectively taken off the road after a 1972 house move. Started regularly and exercised on the driveway thereafter, an acrimonious divorce during 1980 saw ‘RJT 999’ relocate to Brighton and then Somerset. Reregistered with the DVLA in 1999 ,having fallen off their system, the Greyhound was acquired by the vendor from her late father’s estate during 2015. The vendor has kindly provided the following information: “The AC was found with all its spare parts, oil and a large sign on the steering wheel stating ‘No Water!’ It had a false set of number plates so that anyone driving past when the garage door was raised couldn’t identify ‘RJT 999’. I have in my possession a meticulous record of monthly start-ups in the garage, the Greyhound being run for 10 mins at a maximum of 3000rpm. The last recorded entry was November 2014, the month before my father died. There is no doubt in my mind that the Greyhound was never really driven after the divorce (there was no evidence in his meticulous record keeping of previous MOT, tax or insurance records). The car was garaged, covered and had its own central heating radiator in the garage.” Due to a move to France, the AC is reluctantly offered for sale. Invoices on file detail

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an amount of recommissioning including attention to the engine, brakes, ignition, cooling system, overdrive and steering etc. and a gearbox overhaul. Starting readily and running, the AC retains its original interior of gently patinated leather complete with ‘sunburst’ pattern door cards, a feature of the marque. The Silver paintwork is highly presentable. Riding on wire wheels painted in British Racing Green and believed, but not warranted, to have covered just 37,000 miles from new, this handsome Greyhound comes with its original buff logbook, current V5C registration document, sundry paperwork and assorted recommissioning bills. Also included in the sale are a spare set of spoked wheels and a brand new rear screen. A tempting opportunity to get into AC ownership.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

25


1960 Jaguar XK 150 3.8 Fixed Head Coupe

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Estimate: £25,000 - £35,000* Reg No: Un-Reg

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: S836810BW By the time the XK150 was launched in May 1957, Jaguar had won Le Mans four times and was about to do so again. Though the newcomer was a logical progression of the XK140, subtle changes to the bodywork gave this final iteration of the XK a distinctly more modern air. The split windscreen was replaced with a single sweep of toughened glass and the scuttle height was raised, along with the waistline. Inside, the walnut dashboard of the XK140 was replaced by one trimmed in leather. Thinner doors gave more interior space. The standard engine was the 3.4-litre DOHC straight-six unit of the XK140, but a larger 3.8 litre version became available in 1959 with buyers able to opt for a triple carburettor ‘S’ version of either powerplant. The XK150 was the first production Jaguar to be equipped with disc brakes and at launch was offered in Fixed Head Coupe (FHC) and Drophead Coupe guise, the Roadster following in 1958. By the time the model was superseded by the E-Type, some 4,445 FHCs had been produced. This XK150 was imported from the USA in early 2012 so it pre dates NOVA but comes supplied with a C&E 389 certificate together with a US title document to aid registration in the UK. Bought as a restoration project, the vendor over the years has fitted 4-pot calipers on the front brakes, new rear disc, Coopercraft rear brakes, new rear springs and dampers, an uprated servo, brake master cylinder, clutch master cylinder and a stainless steel exhaust system. Whilst still in need of more restoration work this XK is a very good solid starting point for what will be, once finished, an impressive and beautiful car.

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1935 Morgan Super Sports

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Beautifully restored example Estimate: £35,000 - £40,000* Reg No: WS 3892

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: B1389 An ingenious concept, HFS Morgan built his first three-wheeler in 1909. Based around a tubular steel chassis frame, the design’s low centre of gravity and advanced ‘sliding pillar’ independent front suspension endowed it with superlative roadholding. Progressively developed, the single rear-wheel-driven platform played host to a variety of JAP, Matchless, Blackburne, Anzani and Ford powerplants over the years (though, the prototype used a Peugeot unit). Fearsome competition cars, Morgan three wheelers driven by the likes of HFS himself, Clive Lones and Harold Beart acquitted themselves well on race circuits and trial stages alike (Mrs Gwenda Stewart recorded 115.66mph during a record run at Montlhery in 1930). By 1933 Morgan’s three-wheeler chassis could be ordered with four types of body, namely: Super Sports, Sports Two-Seater, Sports Family and Family. The Super Sports was notable for its chromium-plated exhaust pipes that run the length of the body. Interest in Morgans of this period has never waned and, if anything, increased in recent times - the company’s inspired decision to create a modern three-wheeler having brought the early cars to the attention of a new audience. Moreover, anybody who has seen them raced in anger – frequently beating infinitely more powerful four-wheeled Morgans and other marques – is likely to have acquired a firm admiration for the model. Reportedly discovered in marque enthusiast Bill Jones’s garage during 1984 as a chassis and new ‘Beetleback’ body, ‘WS 3892’ is said to have been subsequently restored over a two-year period with great attention to detail. The Matchless V-Twin engine was thoroughly overhauled, and the steel coachwork apparently treated to over ten coats of British Racing Green paintwork. Sporting a split windscreen, tail-mounted suitcase, Silver-painted wire wheels and Tan upholstery, the diminutive two-seater ran very well during our recent photography session. Offered for sale with V5C Registration Document and assorted paperwork.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

27


1972 Chesil 356 Speedster

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Estimate: £25,000 - £35,000* Reg No: T.B.A.

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 1132058379 Porsche created the Speedster at the request of its North American importer, Max Hoffman. He was having great success with the 356 Coupe but was convinced he could rival the coincident British Roadsters if armed with an open variant of the car. The Speedster was born in 1954 by creating a cut-down version of the Cabriolet with all creature comforts removed. The spartan cockpit featured lightweight bucket seats with fixed backrests, and instrumentation was limited to a speedometer and temperature gauge. The car was an instant hit, particularly in Southern California. The peak year was 1957 when the best-looking versions were made, and it is these iconic cars that the British-built Chesil evokes looking every inch, the real thing. Chesil are recognised as market leaders in their field having carved out a worldwide reputation for the quality of their products which are handcrafted with painstaking attention to detail. Correctly registered on its accompanying Swansea V5C document as a Chesil 356 Speedster, following conversion in c.2002, this example is finished to a very high standard. The beneficiary of a comprehensive restoration upon entering into the current ownership in 2019 by Redcastle Classics Ltd., the work completed included a mechanical refresh, interior retrim with Cream leather interior upholstery and a full repaint in striking Signal Red. Powered by a 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine allied to a fourspeed manual gearbox, the Chesil was in previous ownership from 2006 until the vendor’s purchase. An extremely eyecatching, attractive and convincing evocation, including authentic-looking instruments, road wheels shod with wideband white-wall tyres, and badging, it comes complete with a black soft-top. Accompanied by many previous MOTs dating back to 2002, several previous invoices (most from NBA Sports Cars), current V5C and a spare set of keys.

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1992 Rover Mini Cooper 1.3i

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One owner and c.40,000 miles from new Estimate: £11,000 - £13,000* Reg No: K703 WRJ

MOT: None

Chassis No: SAXXNNAYCBD049714 The meeting between John Cooper and Aurelio Lampredi at the 1959 Italian GP is part of Mini folklore. Having charmed an early 848cc from BMC and driven it to Monza, Cooper was accosted by the Fiat engineer and former Ferrari F1 designer Lampredi, who asked to borrow the new wonder. Returning later, he heralded it as the future of automotive design before adding “if it weren’t so ugly, I’d shoot myself”. Suitably encouraged, Cooper harassed BMC until they agreed to build a ‘hot’ version, the resulting Mini Cooper being launched in July 1961. Powered by an enlarged 997cc engine, it gave way to a succession of ever quicker variants culminating in the 1275 ‘S’ of 1964. Encouraged by the reaction to a limited edition RSP (Rover Special Products) version, Rover put the Mini Cooper back into full-time production in September 1990, the model’s enduring popularity resulting in it remaining available until October 2000. Manufactured in 1992, and UK registered on 30th September that year, this example was supplied new via Tom Berry Motors Rover in Leigh, Greater Manchester. Pleasingly retaining the original dealer sticker in the rear window and dealer number plates, the car is fitted with the 1275cc A-Series engine and four-speed manual transmission. Finished in Flame Red with White racing stripes and Black interior, it was purchased new by the late vendor, covering just 41,666 miles from new. Recently unearthed following a short period in storage following the vendors passing, and presented in ‘as found’ condition, the Mini started readily upon recent inspection though a thorough check over and some recommissioning is advised prior to road use. Offered with a history file containing the original book pack with service book and owner’s handbook, a collection of MOT certificates with almost every year present dating back to 1996, current V5C and a previous logbook.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

29


1994 Mercedes-Benz SL 500

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No Reserve* Reg No: M545 XBP

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Estimate: £12,000 - £14,000* Chassis No: WDB1290672F105374

MOT: October 2022

Following on from the success of the R107, the R129 had a tough act to follow, as it had to maintain the tradition of a fast and reliable grand touring convertible. The SL500 featured a 5.0 V8 producing 326bhp, with 0-62mph in 6.2 seconds and a top speed of 155mph. The model featured many innovations, including electronically-controlled damping, automatically expanding roll-over bar and multi-link rear axle. In addition there was a fully electric package of roof, windows, door mirrors and seats, making the ownership experience luxurious, stress free, comfortable and all easy to operate. Manufactured in 1994, this UK-supplied, RHD SL 500 was supplied new via Portfield MercedesBenz of Chichester on 27th July 1994. Presented in Midnight Blue with complementary Cream leather interior and Navy Blue hood, ‘M545 XBP’ has had just five former keepers with c.101,000 warranted miles from new. Subject to a steering box overhaul in 2018 and new exhaust and lambda sensor in 2020, approximately £6,000 worth of expenditure has been spent on it in the past eighteen months. Work has included a new hood, interior refresh, which included the leather, paintwork, paint protection and servicing. Accompanied by the original book pack including the stamped service book which illustrates eighteen stamps, many from main dealers and specialists, a collection of invoices, MOT until October and current V5C.

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1983 Ford Capri 2.8 Injection

Reg No: CRK 929Y

Chassis No: WFOCXXGAECDE17749

MOT: T.B.A.

Ford’s Capri was launched at the 1969 Brussels Motor Show. The fastback Coupe was intended to do for Europe what the Mustang had done for the USA. In 1981, the venerable 3-litre Essexengined variant was dropped in favour of the 2.8 Injection model - a single-car range powered by the lusty fuel-injected 2.8-litre Cologne V6. Power rose to 160bhp and, soon after launch, the old four-speed gearbox was replaced with a more contemporary five-speed one. Capris have become hot property and many enthusiasts regard the 2.8-litre injection cars as the best of the bunch. Manufactured in 1983 and presented in the attractive Burgundy with Grey leather interior featuring Recaro sport seats, ‘CRK 929Y’ is Fitted with the 2792cc Cologne V6 engine mated to the desirable five-speed manual transmission. Subject to works in 2019 including replacement track rod arms and ends, front discs, pads and calipers, fan belts, oil pump and tappets, as well as a full service, this vehicle has also benefited from a replacement clutch in 2019. Offered with a small collection of invoices from its current ownership and the V5 document, the vehicle also includes a workshop manual.


2002 Jaguar XK8 4.0 Convertible Only 39,000 miles and two owners from new

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Estimate: £12,000 - £15,000* Reg No: YS02 HFM

Chassis No: A28384

1985 Mercedes-Benz 280 SL

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Estimate: £11,000 - £13,000* MOT: February 2023

Living up to expectations can be a burden. Consider the handsome Geoff Lawson-penned XK8 that followed in the wheel tracks of such automotive icons as the XK120 and immortal E-type. Like the E-Type before it, the XK8 made its debut at the Geneva Salon in 1996 and, from launch, was available in either Coupe or Convertible guise. Like its immediate predecessor, the XJS, the original XK8 was more of a Grand Tourer than an outright sports car. It also had the distinction of being the first Jaguar to be powered by an eight-cylinder engine. Before 2003, the power came from either a normally aspirated (XK8) or supercharged (XKR) 4.0-litre version of the V8 AJ26 engine. YS02HFM was first supplied by Hatfields Jaguar on 25th July 2002 and then acquired by the current owner just over a year later in October 2003 the vehicle has been very well looked after and always garaged. With stacks of kerb appeal, finished in Light Blue metallic with Ivory leather interior and electric retractable soft top, it really does present well. The vehicle comes with a fresh MOT, New battery, service books, some invoices, current V5C and two sets of keys. The present owner is reluctantly selling this beautiful vehicle as part of a downsizing exercise.

Reg No: B865 OPH

Chassis No: 1070422A023814

MOT: T.B.A

Nicknamed the ‘Panzerwagen’ by Mercedes-Benz’s development engineers, the R107 series was the result of an extremely thorough design process. In an attempt to avoid falling foul of threatened American safety legislation, Stuttgart produced an open car whose structural rigidity surpassed that of some contemporary saloons! Indeed, even now some forty-seven years after its introduction, the R107 retains a reassuring air of solidity. Allied to this was sure-footed handling courtesy of all-around independent coil-sprung suspension, power-assisted steering, and disc brakes. Always more of a grand tourer than an out-and-out sports car, the vast majority of R107s were fitted with automatic transmission. Launched in September 1974, the Eurocentric 280SL was less powerful but more fuel-efficient than its V8 brethren. However, with some 185bhp and 177lbft of torque on tap from its fuel-injected 2746cc DOHC straight-six engine, the model could still boast authoritative 120mph performance. This UK-supplied right-hand drive example was manufactured in 1985 and is offered with hardtop and a new soft-top. Having been recently recommissioning after a long period of dry storage it currently displays 130,000 miles and has had seven former keepers. Fitted with factory rear seats and riding on later SL alloy wheels it’s understood ‘B865 OPH’ will possess a fresh MOT by the time of sale.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1955 Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk1 Current ownership since 1978 and sympathetically restored

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Estimate: £130,000 - £150,000* Reg No: RLT 807

Chassis No: LML1020

MOT: Exempt

“The Aston Martin DB2/4 is a sports car with a very definite appeal. It has full saloon car comfort, coupled with performance and roadholding of a very high order” (Autocar Magazine) Introduced at the October 1953 London Motor Show, the DB2/4 represented a new breed of longer-legged, more accommodating Aston Martin. Some seven inches longer and a little taller than its predecessor, the fitting of a smaller seventeen gallon fuel tank (still good for circa 300 miles), plus some minor platform changes, liberated enough room for two small seats to be positioned above the back axle. Visually distinguished by a one-piece windscreen and rear hatchback, the new model boasted such niceties as a telescopic steering column and adjustable backrests. Panelled in lightweight aluminium over an advanced tubular frame chassis, its independent front suspension featured a sophisticated trailing link, coil-sprung set-up tempered by an anti-roll bar, while at the rear a Panhard rod assisted radius arms in keeping the coil-sprung beam axle firmly tied down. Initially powered by a 2580cc version of the famous Willie Watson / W.O. Bentley designed DOHC straight-six engine, the adoption of a larger 83mm bore size saw capacity rise to 2922cc in mid 1954. Thanks to its ‘Vantage’ state of tune, the 2.6 litre unit was credited with developing some 125bhp and 144lbft of torque - outputs sufficient for a quoted 111mph top speed, while the more potent 2.9 litre variant was reputedly capable of 120mph. Overshadowed by its racing DB3 / DB3S siblings, the model still enjoyed a successful competition career winning the team prize on the 1955 Monte Carlo Rally. Interestingly, the factory also fielded a pair of DB2/4s for the Mille Miglia. Of the 565 MkIs made, just 451 are thought to have been twodoor saloons. Initially finished in Blue Haze with Blue leather upholstery, the same colour scheme it pleasingly sports today, chassis LML/1020 was first registered as ‘RLT 807’ by London County Council on 29th September 1955. Supplied new to Stanley Marino Harrocks Esq. and subsequently registered to his company, the Aston Martin was acquired by Andrew Osborn Esq. in 1956. Changing hands several times thereafter, the four-seater has been in the current ownership since October 1978. Taken off the road during the early 1980s due to a mechanical malady, the DB2/4 MKI remained in dry storage until four years ago when the vendor commissioned a sympathetic restoration with a particular emphasis on originality. Stripped to bare metal, the bodywork had any corroded and / or damaged sections repaired before being repainted in its original hue. The cylinder block was line bored and fitted with new liners and pistons, while the crankshaft was polished and balanced. Bearings were renewed and the cylinder head overhauled with the rest of the drivetrain gone through and refurbished as necessary. The majority of the Aston Martin’s factory-fitted interior was retained, with only the headlining, carpets and one door card requiring replacement. Original seats

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were renovated, with other trim components being cleaned and re-coloured and the instruments inspected. Bumpers and over-riders were re-chromed, while the remaining chrome was carefully cleaned. A new exhaust system was installed but to the correct single-pipe design. Authentic features under the bonnet include the starting handle, jack, partially recessed within the offside ‘sill’ as per a 1955 modification, and Vokes air filters for the twin SU carburettors. A factory-fitted radio incorporates a unique hinged mounting which facilitates access to the gearbox oil filler. A notably late, home market DB2/4 MkI boasting matching engine and chassis numbers, ‘RLT 807’ is offered for sale with the original ‘buff’ RG60 logbook, current V5C registration document, period workshop manual and numerous restoration invoices.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1973 Jaguar E Type Series 3 V12 Coupe

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Supplied with an extensive paperwork file Estimate: £40,000 - £50,000* Reg No: TGJ 238M

MOT: August 2022

Chassis No: 1S12631SA Born out of the fabulous D-type racer, the model soon acquired a strong competition heritage of its own. The Jaguar E-Type wowed the world upon its launch in 1961 and proved faster and more glamorous than virtually any production rival. Certainly few could match its reputed 150mph top speed. A sportscar that offered performance to beat Ferrari and Aston Martin at just half the price, wrapped up in a beautiful muscular body that was unlike any other contemporary sportscar. At a time when Ferrari’s lauded 250SWB and 250GTO made do with ‘live’ rear axles, the E-type utilised a sophisticated independent rear set-up with inboard disc brakes. While, rack and pinion steering enhanced the monocoque chassis’s excellent roadholding and handling; putting it light years ahead of American designs like the Corvette. This combination of style, speed, handling and value endeared it to the world’s elite and the E-Type was one of the coolest cars to be seen in throughout the 60s and 70s. The final Series 3 V12s ended production in 1975. The alloy blocked 5.3L V12 produced 272 BHP, with vastly improved torque at 349 lb/ft. This matching numbers British Racing Green V12 Coupe with desirable manual gearbox and Webasto roof, was supplied by H R Owen. The recorded mileage is a credible 41009 miles with 11 services recorded, suggesting this is correct. Timely services up to 40239 over the next 50 years are recorded in the Jaguar ‘Passport To Service’ book. All the MOTs are present with numerous receipts. In 2009 it was given a new fantail exhaust, starter motor, security system, and a later £1758 overhaul including rear springs. Recent maintenance was entrusted to XJ Motor services with invoices for almost £5000 worth of work. With a car cover and a spares kit are included, this is a rare chance to acquire a genuine low mileage E-Type with documentation, current V5C and even an MOT until the 1st August 2022.

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1976 Alfa Romeo GT Junior 1600

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45,300 miles from new and just two former keepers Estimate: £20,000 - £25,000* Reg No: WOL 865T

MOT: August 2022

Chassis No: AR11505*0001811* Among the final variants of Alfa Romeo’s beloved, Bertone-styled 105-series Coupe, the Tipo 115.34 was introduced in 1974. Sharing the same frontal styling as its 2000 GTV sibling, it was powered by the 00526 derivative of the Milanese manufacturer’s ubiquitous ‘twin cam’ engine. Reportedly retained by supplying dealer Eurocars Ltd on the Isle of Man for use as a demonstrator, this rare GT Junior 1600 – believed to be 1 of just 125 such RHD cars made – is further understood to have belonged to its first private keeper J. Clare Esq for some forty-one years. Responsible for bringing the Alfa Romeo over the to the mainland in 1978, Mr Clare laid it up with a warranted odometer reading of 45,000 miles twenty-two years later. Despatched to Greetham Garage during 2016, the Coupe was persuaded back into life with little effort and has since benefited from: new brake discs / pads / callipers, refurbished alloy wheels, replacement inner / outer door handles (2016); fresh clutch, engine ancillaries checked (2017); bare metal respray in its original Helios Alfa 728 Silver, new carburettor rubber mounts, replacement carpets (2018); new headlining, fresh window seals, replacement fuel filler neck rubber gaiter (2019); new brake servos x2, fresh Avon tyres x4, replacement engine / gearbox / differential / steering box oils, new HT leads / spark plugs, replacement heater fan assembly, antifreeze renewed, valve clearances checked (2021); new rear gearbox and engine mounts fitted, twin Weber 40DCOE carburettors fettled and sundry electrical snagging (2022). Responsible for much of the more recent work, the vendor rates ‘WOL 865T’ as being ‘very good’ with regards to its engine, five-speed manual gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork. Offered for sale with V5C Registration Document, original service book, various old tax discs dating back to 1979 and numerous old MOTs dating back to 1980 plus a current one valid until August 2022.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

37


2005 BMW M3 Convertible

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Estimate: £18,000 - £22,000* Reg No: HJ55 GHN

MOT: T.B.A.

Chassis No: WBSBR920X0PM97462 The E46 BMW M3 was previewed at the German Motor Show in 1999 as a concept. Although, when manufactured, the actual car bore a very close resemblance when it was introduced in October 2000, the E46 M3 was only available as a two door coupé or convertible body style. It was available with the 3.2-litre (3246cc) S54 M-tuned engine. The M3’s S54 engine had a redline of 8,000 rpm and as with most M engines, the S54 had 6 individual throttle bodies, in this case electronically operated (drive-by-wire throttle). With power going through either a six-speed Getrag gearbox or an SMG (sequential manual gearbox) drive logic transmission, the E46 M3 was full of electronic gadgetry, which included driver aids such as dynamic stability control, cornering brake control and a limited slip differential. With a reported top speed of 155mph and 0-60mph in a blistering 5.1 seconds, the M3 certainly lived up to its name and did not disappoint! This example of the desirable E46 M3 Convertible was manufactured in 2005 and is fitted with the 3246cc M Power straight-six engine mated to the desirable 6 Speed manual gearbox. Finished in Metallic Silver complemented with a Red leather interior upholstery, Parrot phone kit and headrest TV screens, the specification certainly makes it into a usable and comfortable ‘mile-munching’ Munich cruiser. It is said to have had the boot floor inspected and requiring no remedial action, as historically there have been issues with cracks in the floor where the subframe mounts are located in the boot area. The M3 has covered 75,100 miles from new across six former keepers and was subject to a full service in 2021. It is offered with a bookpack, handbooks and service book with 11 entries, collection of invoices, old MOT’s, spare key and rear parking sensors.

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1986 Ferrari 412

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One of just 55 UK supplied, right-hand drive examples Estimate: £35,000 - £42,000* Reg No: C537 RRR

MOT: T.B.A.

Chassis No: ZFFYD24000062419 The Ferrari 412 was the final glorious iteration of the ‘400’ series of luxury four-seaters that had commenced with the 365 GT/4 2+2 in 1972. Representing an evolution of the marque rather than revolution, the 412 debuted at the Geneva Motor Show in 1985. The newcomer retained its predecessor’s quad-cam V12 engine but enjoyed a capacity increase to 4,944cc and came with antilock brakes, a revised interior and bumpers colour co-ordinated with the bodywork. An improved front air dam and raised boot deck reduced the 412’s already exemplary drag co-efficient by around ten percent. By the time production ceased in 1989, Ferrari’s finest 2+2 had been in production for a remarkable 17 years, with a total of 576 412s produced over that period. Manufactured in 1986, this particularly very pretty example was supplied new via H. R. Owen Ltd of South Kensington to renowned English entrepreneur and property magnate Peter de Savary on 1st of July 1986. One of just 55 UK supplied cars fitted with three-speed automatic transmission, it is presented in Nero with a Red leather interior. Understood to have been gambled with and lost by de Savary during a golf game, it has covered just c.73,500 miles from new and has been in current registered ownership since 2019, having resided previously in a private collection. The 412 has been the recent beneficiary approximately £7,500 worth of expenditure that included removal of any corrosion and repainting; wiring overhaul; retrimmed dashboard and parcel shelf; overhauled engine manifold and new stainless steel exhaust system; improved engine presentation and a new battery. Offered with a history file which includes the original stamped service book displaying eleven entries (including from H. R. Owen, Graypaul, R&D Ferrari Specialists and Keys Motorsport), owners manuals, a collection of invoices, previous MOT certificates from 2005 and current V5C document.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1934 Rolls Royce 20/25 Sedanca de Ville

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Coachwork by Barker Estimate: £35,000 - £40,000* Reg No: AXM 519

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: GXB77 Launched in 1929, the Rolls-Royce 20/25 was powered by a 3669cc OHV straight-six engine allied to four-speed manual transmission. Usefully faster than its 20hp predecessor, the model remained in production until 1936 by which time some 3,827 had been sold. Capable of supporting a wide variety of coachwork, the 20/25hp’s substantial ladder frame chassis was equipped with all-round semi-elliptic leaf-sprung suspension, four-wheel drum brakes and a mechanical servo. Specified by coachbuilder Barker with an elongated and widened bonnet to better suit the proportions of the Sedanca de Ville body ‘AXM 519’ was crafted for first owner Miss Enos of South Street, Mayfair. Accompanying RREC build records also reveal that chassis GXB77 was intended for use ‘in the UK and on the Continent, mainly touring’. Taking delivery on March 12th 1934, Miss Enos kept the Rolls-Royce for some four-anda-half years before it was bought by Dr Norman Henderson of Harley Street. Relocating to Surrey by the late 1970s, the 20/25 was entrusted to marque specialist A&S Engineering for a thorough engine overhaul in 1985 which included the fitment of a new cylinder head and fresh clutch etc. Issued during June 1988, an old MOT certificate on file suggests that the Sedanca de Ville has covered just 12,000 miles or so over the past thirty-four years. The leather roof covering was renewed in 1991, while 2014 saw ‘AXM 519’ partially repainted by Justin’s Restorations. Finished in Maroon over Black with Brown leather up front and Bedford cord to the rear, this handsome Sedanca de Ville is rated by the vendor as being in ‘good’ condition with regards to its engine, gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork. Offered for sale with V5C, twenty-four old MOTs and numerous bills from the likes of A&S Engineering and Ristes.

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1972 Lincoln Continental Mk IV

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Estimate: £13,000 - £15,000* Reg No: TSX 451K

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 2Y89A821464 Introduced in 1972, the Lincoln Continental Mk IV was a personal luxury coupe and Ford’s answer to the Cadillac Eldorado. Styled both inside and out by Wes Dahlberg, the newcomer was longer, lower and lighter than its predecessor. Still very much a neoclassical design, its vertical Rolls-Royce-esque radiator grille and faux spare wheel housing trunk lid were augmented by opera windows let into the C-pillars. The interior featured a ‘Twin Comfort Lounge’ bench front seat with 6-way power adjustment, air-conditioning, Cartier clock, electric windows and plentiful sound deadening. Supremely comfortable thanks to its soft-riding coil-sprung suspension complete with four-link STA-BUL rear end, the Lincoln featured an early form of ABS called ‘Sure-Track’. Powered by a 460 cu in (7.5 litre) V8 engine allied to a three-speed automatic transmission, the Mark IV was reputedly capable of 120mph. They would probably have horrified Louis XIV but were very much in keeping with the Lincoln’s ultimate land yacht ethos. Manufactured in 1972, this Continental is understood to have resided in the United States of America until 2018, when it was imported into the United Kingdom. Presented in the rare colour combination of Black with a complementing Navy Blue interior upholstery, the Lincoln is fitted with the aforementioned 7.5-litre ‘big-block’ V8 engine allied to the three-speed automatic transmission. Having just two UK keepers since importation, the Lincoln benefitted from approximately £3,400 worth of expenditure in 2021 which included a new water pump, replacement vinyl roof, repaired exhaust manifold, servicing, fitment of whitewall tyres and a new battery. Accompanied by a previous invoice and current V5C. Iconic 1970s Americana on four wheels!

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1935 Triumph Gloria 10.8hp Southern Cross Tourer

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1 of just 15 known survivors No Reserve* Reg No: BYU 28

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: G12386VCS The Gloria range represented a concerted effort by Triumph to move upmarket. It could be bought with a variety of open and closed bodywork configurations, not to mention a choice of four-cylinder or six-cylinder Coventry Climax engines. Twice winner of its namesake rally, the six-cylinder Monte Carlo was engineered by Donald Healey and influenced the Gloria 10.8hp Southern Cross Tourer model. Based on a 96-inch wheelbase chassis equipped with all-round leaf-sprung suspension and hydraulic drum brakes, the latter was powered by a 1232cc four-cylinder engine allied to four-speed manual transmission. Tougher and stockier in stance than equivalent models from Riley and MG, the Gloria 10.8hp Southern Cross Tourer was bodied in aluminium over ash by Cross & Ellis. Sporting a mesh radiator grille, raked windscreen, heavily-louvred bonnet, cut-away doors, sweeping wings and twin rear-mounted spare wheels, it was praised by Motor Sport magazine as ‘a solidly built light car, well sprung, comfortable and suitable for long distance touring’. Perhaps due to the sheer profusion of Gloria models, the 10.8hp Southern Cross Tourer was not a strong seller with the Pre-1940 Triumph Motor Club estimating that just 15 of the 31 cars made have survived to the present day. Reportedly entrusted to Colin Clifford Restorations for an ‘outstanding back to original, no expense spared refurbishment’ by its previous keeper, the work took some two years to complete between 2002 and 2004, with Mr Clifford then looking after ‘BYU 28’ until his retirement. Serviced and maintained by Jim Allen of Holten le Clay Garage since, the Triumph Gloria is understood to have been ‘enthusiastically campaigned’ and to have shown itself to be ‘ideally suited to long distance touring and perfectly capable of keeping up with modern traffic on numerous holidays and events throughout Europe’. Stated by the vendor to be ‘driving and performing well’, this decidedly rare 10.8hp Southern Cross Tourer is offered for sale with five volumes of paperwork containing numerous restoration photographs and invoices.

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1942 Ford GPW JEEP

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Estimate: £24,000 - £28,000* Reg No: XVV 106

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 57148 Think of World War Two and the Jeep will be there somewhere the two are synonymous, even though production didn’t begin in earnest until 1942. The vehicle’s evolution is complex, but resulted from the US army’s approach to 135 American automotive manufacturers to submit designs for ‘a general purpose personnel or cargo carrier especially adaptable for reconnaissance or command and designated as a ‘Truck ¼-ton 4x4’’. Willys won the resulting three-way tussle with Ford and Bantam, but by the Autumn of 1941 it was clear they could not satisfy demand, so Ford was tasked with manufacturing the vehicle in parallel. The Ford version was dubbed GPW (Government Passenger Willys) which, in contracted form, may have spawned the generic term Jeep (GP said slowly, sounds a bit like Jeep!). With a torquey L-headed 2.2-litre engine driving all four wheels via a three-speed manual box and two-speed transfer case, the tough, go anywhere Jeep did its job well, sparking a number of imitations – not least the original Land Rover, post-war. By the end of the war, close to 750,000 Jeeps had been produced. Many examples survive around the world due to their iconic status as a mechanised marvel born out of necessity and functionality, and they are regularly employed in screen work, war games etc. Self-evidently the subject of an extensive past restoration, this smart Ford GPW Jeep has been UK road registered since October 2017. Originally built on 17th August 1942 and finished in US Army livery, the 4x4 has the side mounted shovel for digging the vehicle out of the rough stuff and for comfort the seats, including a rear bench seat, have canvas covers. This Ford GPW is described by the vendor as being in ‘very good’ condition with regards to its engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork. Said to be ‘running well’ and seemingly ready for the show circuit, this appealing WW2 Jeep is offered for sale with V5C registration document and sundry paperwork.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1935 Riley 12/4 Special 2018 Riley Motor Club National Rally Concours Winner Best in Show

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Estimate: £40,000 - £50,000* Reg No: 197 YUD

Chassis No: 22T574

MOT: June 2022

Specials vary in execution from those which give Heath Robinson a bad name through to others that a manufacturer would have been proud to catalogue. We humbly submit that ‘197 YUD’ is an example of the latter. A mechanical engineer by training whose career ended as the Technical Director of an international electrical engineering firm, the vendor had been a Riley enthusiast ever since his time rallying a 1.5 Litre saloon. Deciding to build a pre-WW2 Special which would accommodate his tall frame in comfort, he located the dilapidated remains of a Falcon 12/4 Saloon in a Barbadian chapel and had them repatriated on a Geest banana boat! The bodywork had rotted away but the original 1496cc engine, four-speed pre-selector gearbox and axles had all survived. The refurbished chassis was not shortened but had its engine mounts and gearbox crossmember moved back by some eighteen inches which in turn allowed the radiator shell to be lowered. The engine was thoroughly overhauled to ‘Sprite’ specification with the appropriate camshafts / pistons etc and fully balanced. The pre-selector gearbox was renovated with hundreds of pounds worth of new internals and the rejuvenated back axle fitted with a taller ratio for more relaxed high-speed cruising. Loosely modelled on an Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Zagato Spider complete with integrated rear spare wheel mounting, the bespoke bodywork was crafted by Jim Marland of Proteus Cars fame (ash frame) and Mick Sharp of Western Coachworks (aluminium panelling). The Black leather seats are complemented by a matching hood, sidescreens and carpets. Completed in 2011 after five years’ graft, ‘197 YUD’ was subsequently judged ‘Best Special’ at the Riley Register Annual Show; one of several awards it has garnered. Having covered some 16,000 miles, the vendor rates it as ‘very good’ (bodywork, paintwork, electrical equipment, interior trim) or ‘excellent’ (engine, gearbox). Worthy of close inspection, this beautifully crafted Special is offered for sale with V5C Registration Document, history file, maintenance record and MOT certificate valid until June 2022. Awards History: 2012 Riley Register Coventry Rally - 1st in the Specials Class 2012 Lancaster Insurance Classic Car of the Year - Runner-Up 2012 Cumbria Classic Car Show - 1st in class 2013 Bank Hall, Bretherton Classic & Vintage Car Show - Winner Best Vintage Car 2015 Lytham Club Day - 1st in class 2018 The Riley Motor Club National Rally Concours d’Elegance - Best in Show 2018 The Riley Motor Club National Rally Concours d’Elegance - 1st in Pre-war Class

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1969 Jaguar E-Type 4.2 2+2

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Estimate: £35,000 - £40,000* Reg No: MVU 991G

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: J691R41950BW For many, the Series II E-Type represents an ideal combination of design, practicality and value for money. Unveiled in October 1968, the model included improvements in safety and emissions standards to comply with US regulations, providing such practicalities as fully-reclining seats with headrests, recessed door handles and one-piece bumpers. The 4,235cc 6-cylinder engine was carried over from the previous series but benefited from improved cooling. The brakes were also improved. The Heritage Certificate shows this example was built in May 1969 as a 2+2 Coupe, originally specified with an automatic gearbox, a factory option solely available for that body style. Destined for the US market, its coachwork was finished in Metallic Sable with Tan leather interior. Imported to the UK in 1990 and converted to right-hand drive, the E-Type underwent a substantial body restoration including a repaint in Opalescent Bronze in c.2014. Purchased by the current owner in 2019, the vendor advises that the Jaguar has benefited from an estimated £40,000 worth of expenditure in their ownership, comprising a comprehensive mechanical renovation, most notably with a conversion to a four-speed all-synchromesh manual gearbox with overdrive. An overhauled 4.2-litre engine is fitted with new SU carburettors (the original block and head accompany the car). The braking system has been fully renovated. Further attention was paid to the clutch, fuelling system, steering, charging system, and differential, along with a new stainless steel exhaust system. Since completion the vendor states he has travelled three times to the South of France without issue. With a recorded mileage of c.94,000 (albeit the speedometer stopped working an estimated 1,000 miles ago), chassis J691R41950BW has just two former keepers in the UK. ‘MVU 991G’ is accompanied by a history file comprising a large number of invoices, MOTs certificates dating back to 1996, documentation relating to its American history, and the current V5C document.

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1986 BMW 635 CSi

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Estimate: £28,000 - £35,000* Reg No: T.B.A

MOT: May 2022

Chassis No: WBAEC820908187407 With the size and no lesser elegance of a two-door 7 Series the 635 CSi vehicle had a coupé body styled by Paul Bracq with a naturally aspirated petrol, 3.4 litre, single overhead camshaft six-cylinder engine delivering its power to the rear wheels. It is part of BMW’s E24 range of cars. With a claimed kerb weight of 1460 kg, the BMW 635 CSi covers the 0-100 km/h sprint in 7.4 seconds and the standing kilometre in 28 seconds. Maximum speed was said to be 143 mph (230 km/h). This pretty example was supplied new by Wollaston Motors of Northampton. With a recorded 94,200 miles showing on the odometer, this 635 CSi was the subject of a complete glass out respray last year. To enhance this particular Blue Metallic coupe, genuine parts have been utilised to make it into an Alpina evocation adding genuine Alpina steering wheel and Alpina valances. Attractive Alpina Gold side-stripe livery has also been added to make it stand out in the crowd. For convenience there is remote central locking, while rear parking sensors and Bluetooth have been added for modern convenience. For peace of mind the automatic gearbox had a £2,500 overhaul in 2019 by Midland Automatic Transmissions. The coupe has been fitted with a stainless steel silencer plus Bilstein shock absorbers and poly bushes at the rear. Last year, injectors were overhauled, and a recent ‘Inspection II’ service was carried out. In current ownership since 2011 and with just 2 former private owners, one of whom registered it in his company making 3 former keepers showing on the V5C, the previous owner was from 1990 - 2011. Offered with the handbooks and service book, there is a large collection of invoices plus old MOT certificates. The vendor describes the bodywork, engine, paintwork, and gearbox as ‘excellent’ and the car’s electrical equipment and interior trim as ‘very good’.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1927 Ford Model T ‘Rajo’ Single Seater

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Estimate: £15,000 - £20,000* Reg No: BF 7403

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 14133575 Before ‘32 Coupes and Dry Lake Hot Rods, it was the Model T that was considered to be the original fast Ford. A market quickly sprang up for parts that would make the Ford perform better. The robust and simple nature of these cars allowed for all sorts of modifications. Most owners could only dream of owning a Stutz Bearcat or Mercer Raceabout, the resourceful Ford owner could actually craft his car into something similar. 1911, in Wisconsin, USA and retired engineer Joe Jagersberger formed Rajo Manufacturing. Starting out building spark plugs and other various engine parts Jagersberger began manufacturing a cylinder head with double the performance of the stock Model T head. This 1927 Ford Model T is a stripped down souped-up ‘special’, understood to be an original American racer from the 1920s and 1930s. ‘BF7403’ was brought to the UK in 2011 and has been subject to a recent engine refresh. It was built with high compression aluminium pistons for performance and bestowed with what is believed to be a genuine Rajo Manufacturing cylinder head; Rajo is in fact written in red on the side of the black casing. A ‘4 into 1’ ‘header’ is also fitted for better performance. A low ratio rear axle makes it ideal for hillclimbs and sprints. It has been an entrant of VSCC meetings at the Curborough sprint course, Loton Park Speed Hillclimb, Shelsey Walsh and Pendine Sands. This 1927 Model T special has a genuine patina look and a deep sense of functionality is evoked by every inch of metal. Being a race car the look is enhanced by the aluminium gas tank sat atop, behind the single seat. The car comes with a VSCC buff form and has participated in hillclimbs and sprints for a number of years until recently, last competing in anger during 2018 and 2019. With potential for eligibility in a wide range of vintage motoring events, it is bound to be a real crowd pleaser. It is offered with a V5C and is road registered for UK roads.

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1971 Fiat Dino Coupe 2.4

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Estimate: £30,000 - £35,000* Reg No: ALG 134J

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 0004302 Unable to produce sufficient numbers of its newly designed 2 litre ‘quad cam’ V6 engine to satisfy the FIA’s homologation requirements for Formula 2 usage, Ferrari entered into a marriage of expediency with FIAT during the mid-1960s. The result was a series of ‘Dino’ badged models across both marques; the name being a tribute to Enzo Ferrari’s son Alfredo who had sadly died in 1956 at the age of just twenty-four. The first Fiat Dino, a Pininfarina-penned Spider, debuted in 1966. Joined the following year by a Bertone-styled Coupe, the duo shared their ‘heart’ with the Ferrari Dino 206GT and boasted 120mph plus performance. Assembly of the Dino Spider and Coupe moved from Fiat to Ferrari during 1969. The Maranellobuilt cars benefited from a number of amendments including: a switch to independent coil-sprung rear suspension, superior braking and cooling, the fitment of a new 5-speed ZF gearbox and an increase in engine capacity to 2.4 litres (the latter mirrored by the Ferrari Dino 246GT). Some 2,414 Fiat Dino 2400 Coupes were made. Reportedly boasting known ownership history from new, chassis 0004302 was imported from Umbria in 1989. Said to be highly original with no obvious signs of past welding repairs, the Fiat is further understood to pleasingly retain its original interior complete with factory plastic sill protectors. Treated to a respray approximately twenty years ago, the Coupe is apparently still in good cosmetic order with minimal evidence of corrosion. Old MOTs on file date back to 1994 at an indicated 51,416km and thus lend credence to the current odometer reading of 88,000km (c.55,000 miles) perhaps representing the total covered from new. Rated by the vendor as being in ‘good’ (bodywork, paintwork) or ‘very good’ (engine, five-speed manual gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim) condition, ‘ALG 134J’ is being offered for sale with V5C Registration Document, original tool kit and owner’s handbook.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1959 Mercedes-Benz 190 SL Subject to a bare-metal, rotisserie restoration

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Estimate: £120,000 - £140,000* Reg No: 38 YMP

Chassis No: 121040109500961

MOT: Exempt

The 190SL was introduced in 1955 – the year Mercedes swept all before it on the Mille Miglia with the 300SLR. Indeed, the graceful, new two-door, convertible grand tourer was sold alongside the road-going version of the SLR – the 300SL - whose styling it strongly resembled. In fact, the underpinnings of the two cars were quite different and, while the 300SL had a purpose-built tubular spaceframe (W198), its smaller sibling was built on a shortened version of the ‘Ponton’ saloon (W121) platform, which was of monocoque construction. The 190SL also boasted an all-new engine - an over-square SOHC straight-four unit of 1897cc that produced some 120bhp, which was sufficient to propel the car to a maximum speed of 112mph. The engine was coupled to a manual four-speed gearbox. The suspension comprised double wishbones and coil springs at the front and a coil-sprung swing axle at the rear. Steering was by recirculating ball and braking by powerassisted drums all around. Built to the highest standards and among the quickest comparable cars of the time, the 190SL featured a well-appointed cockpit, notable comfort for its occupants and relatively generous luggage space. Under the circumstances, even the steep asking price of £2,693 did nothing to deter purchasers. Options included a third seat placed transversely behind the front ones which was big enough to carry an adult. The 190SL continued in production until 1963 when both it and the 300SL were replaced by the 230SL (W113). By this time 25,881 190SLs had been produced. Ordered by the Orbis Trading Co of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, who remain a Mercedes-Benz concessionaire to this day, chassis 121040109500961 was built in 1959 to left-hand drive specification. How long the two-seater spent in Ethiopia is unknown but by January 1960 it had been imported to the UK and issued with the Middlesex registration number ’38 YMP’. Belonging to Sheila Marie Buxton of Greater Manchester that same decade (who may or may not have been the radio and tv star of the same name), the 190SL passed to Edward Frederick Sydney Franklin Esq in 1964. Remaining in his possession until at least the mid-1970s, the MercedesBenz was subsequently taken off the road. Acquired by the vendor as a restoration project in 2015, he entrusted ’38 YMP’ to renowned specialist Redcastle Classics Ltd of South Wales for an exhaustive two-year mechanical and cosmetic refurbishment. Reportedly stripped down to ‘the last nut and bolt’, the two-seater’s painstaking repair and reassembly was photographically documented in an accompanying album. Refinished in its original shade of Red, the 190SL was trimmed in contrasting Cream leather with the same colour being used for the soft-top and tonneau cover. The result is eye-catching to say the least! Having thoroughly enjoyed his custodianship which, among other things, resulted in an invitation from Mercedes-Benz World at Brooklands for the Roadster to join their heritage display for twelve months (with an accompanying letter of thanks

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in the history file), the vendor has now decided to let someone else enjoy ’38 YMP’. Worthy of close inspection, this stunning left-hand drive 190SL is accompanied by a large history file, which contains the original buff-logbook, the aforementioned photo album, numerous old tax discs / MOT certificates, a current V5C document and further assorted paperwork.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1937 Bentley 4.25 Litre Sports Saloon

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Coachwork by Thrupp & Maberly Estimate: £40,000 - £50,000* Reg No: ELK 139

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: B168 KT Unveiled to great acclaim at the August 1933 Ascot Races, the Derby Bentley was underpinned by a ‘double dropped’ chassis featuring all-round semi-elliptic suspension. Although powered with a 3669cc straight six, responding to increased competition, Bentley gave the option of a larger 4257cc engine during 1936. Just 105 of the 1,241 4¼ Litre cars produced were clothed by the London coachbuilder Thrupp & Maberly whose work was particularly popular with dealer Jack Barclay Ltd of Mayfair. Chassis B168KT, with Thrupp & Maberly body, was supplied new via Jack Barclay Ltd and issued with the London registration ‘ELK 139’ on December 10th 1937. Purchased by Mr & Mrs Joseph Carter Wood of the brewing dynasty as a present for their newly married daughter. Eventually willed to an aristocratic friend - Mrs Glory Evelyn Howard (nee Rollo) - alongside a mink coat, the Sports Saloon relocated to Johnby Hall near Penrith, Cumbria. Sold to former VSCC President Chairman and RAC Historic Car Committee member Kenneth Neve OBE in 1973, the Bentley changed hands several times thereafter before migrating to America. Classic Sports in Brookfield, Massachusetts gave the 4¼ Litre a thorough engine overhaul and an ‘overdrive’ rear axle ratio in the late ‘80s. Owner Robert Small of Maine from 1996, it was treated to a bare metal repaint in the current Burgundy over Black colour scheme. The patinated interior is believed to be original and the car is thought to have covered some 40,000 miles since its mechanical refresh. With current ownership since 2018, the Bentley has benefited from a new clutch and maintenance work. Described by the seller as being in ‘very good overall’ condition with regards to its engine, gearbox, electrical equipment, bodywork and paintwork, he goes on to sum-up ‘ELK 139’ as having been “in regular use in recent years and drives well’. Offered for sale with original buff logbook, RREC copy build records, original buff logbook (plus two continuation ones), copy Jack Barclay purchase order, current V5C and sundry invoices.

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1934 Riley 9 Lynx

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Estimate: £24,000 - £26,000* Reg No: AYT 97

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 6025922 The Riley 9 was by far the most popular prewar model Riley ever produced. The model was launched with a choice of saloon (Monaco) or Tourer bodies. The range rapidly expanded, before being completely refreshed in 1933 to form the basis of Riley’s body range across all chassis. This comprised the Falcon, Kestrel, Lynx and of course the Monaco. Most subsequent ‘9’ models were scaled down versions of the bodies available on other chassis. With aluminium panels stretched over a timber bodyframe, and with the 9hp 4 cyl. OHV engine capable of 65mph, the packaging made up the Lynx, which was essentially a topless Kestrel, sharing the same ‘sports’ engines, and other features. Launched at the same time as the Kestrel, for the 1934 season, the original 2 door model was replaced with a 4-door model, which more closely resembled the large Lynx models. The 4-door 4-seater bodywork made it more practical than the many 2-seater sports that Riley built. Cut aways in the doors made it resemble the Riley racing cars. Manufactured in 1934 and presented in the appealing Green with Red scheme, ‘AYT 97’ has been in current ownership as part of a small collection for the last 7 years. Subject to fully documented restoration between 1996 and 2001, the vehicle benefited from replacement side screens in 2013 as well as rewiring, a replacement alternator and carburettor in 2016. Included with the vehicle is an impressive history file, a continuation book, large collection of brochures and informative material. A large number of previous invoices and MOTs and a printed spreadsheet of self-servicing. Also included in the V5 document and a number of spare parts including twin carburettor manifold, 4 wheel spinners, instrument panel, solex carburettor, gear selector forks, dynamo brushes, starter motor, half shafts, differential, timing chain casing and more. The vendor rates the condition of the paintwork as ‘Average to Good’, with the bodywork, engine, transmission and interior trim ‘Good’ and the electrical equipment ‘Very Good’.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1980 Rolls-Royce Corniche

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Estimate: £35,000 - £45,000* Reg No: JLY 160V

MOT: July 2022

Chassis No: CRH50178 The first models to bear the Corniche moniker were the Coupe and Convertible versions of the Silver Shadow launched in 1971. Penned by in-house designer John Polwhele Blatchley, initial assembly was carried out by Mulliner Park Ward - by then a wholly-owned division of Rolls-Royce. The cars were then transported to Crewe for installation of the running gear, before returning to London for trimming, painting and finishing. Power was provided by the company’s all-alloy 6.75-litre V8 mated to a GM Turbo Hydramatic 400 three-speed automatic transmission. Suspension was independent by coil springs all round, augmented by a hydraulic self-levelling system. Braking was by discs, with ventilated units being phased in for 1972. Though not immediately dubbed as such, the Series II arrived in 1977, featuring rack and pinion steering and alloy and rubber bumpers. It was also notable for a switch to an alloy radiator and the addition of an oil cooler. Developments included the adoption of rear suspension from the Silver Spirit, Flying Lady mascot and Bosch fuel injection. Supplied new by Hadley Green Garages Ltd to a J J Francis of Essex, JLY 160V has covered some 104,350 miles in the hands of 6 former keepers from new. It has been subject to much mechanical fettling over the past two years including a lubrication service by Harvey Wash Ltd in June 2021 at a cost of £1265. Other items include the fitment of a new air con compressor, new centre silencers in 2020, exchange water pump, exchange gearbox and alternator in March 2020. Finished in Nutmeg with Beige Everflex roof and Beige hide, it comes with jack, wheel brace, hub removal tool, full set of tools and copies of its factory records, collection of invoices, copy of the original sales invoice, handbooks and service books showing an impressive 38 stamps. The vendor currently rates the body, paint, interior, engine and gearbox as all being “Very Good”.

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1971 Triumph TR6

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Estimate: £16,000 - £20,000* Reg No: HLP 497K

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: CP544580 Introduced in 1968 as a replacement for the outgoing TR250/ TR5 models, the Triumph TR6 proved a strong seller on both sides of the Atlantic. Crisply styled, its smooth flowing lines and Kamm tail hid a cruciform-braced chassis equipped with all-round independent suspension, disc/drum brakes and rack-and-pinion steering. Powered by a refined 2498cc OHV straight-six engine allied to four-speed plus overdrive manual transmission, it was deceptively fast with contemporary road testers recording 0-60mph in 8.2 seconds and a 121mph top speed. Writing in 1969, Autocar magazine went as far as to comment that ‘...even if the Austin-Healey 3000 had not been dropped, the TR6 would have taken over as the he-man’s sports car in its own right’. Held in a private collection for the last 28 years, ‘HLP 497K’ is offered boasting a desirable specification. After a colour change in 1987 from Saffron to Pimento red, the vehicle is offered with overdrive on 2nd 3rd and 4th, benefits from an unleaded Bosch fuel pump and metering unit and sits on replica minilite wheels dressed in Pirelli tyres, with the correct steel wheels also available. The car has also benefited from a replacement hood and comes with matching hard top and displays just 73,000 warranted miles on the odometer. ‘HLP 497K’ has been stored since 2013, when it benefited from a full recommissioning with a well-respected Triumph engineer. Included with the vehicle is a comprehensive history containing a number of previous invoices and MOTs, a workshop manual, some magazines and informational material and the V5 document which displays just 5 previous keepers. The vendor rates the condition of the bodywork, engine, paintwork, engine, transmission, electrical equipment and interior trim all as ‘Very Good’. Please note the rev counter will require some attention as it is currently not working.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1964 Aston Martin DB5 Current family ownership since 1985 and restored by Fullbridge and Rikki Cann

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Estimate: £400,000 - £500,000* Reg No: 393 EUK

Chassis No: DB5/1432/R

MOT: Exempt

Arguably the greatest piece of product placement in cinematic history, the DB5’s starring role in Goldfinger did more for Aston Martin’s profile than winning the 1959 Le Mans 24-hours or securing that year’s World Sportscar Championship! Unfortunately, the marque’s products were too expensive for its newfound James Bond kudos to translate into a significant sales jump. The DB5’s DNA grew out of the DB4, and though more evolution than revolution was still a significant step forward when it took to the stage in 1963. For a start it was faster than its predecessor. Courtesy of a new 3995cc 282bhp triple carburettor version of Tadek Marek’s masterpiece, it was now capable of almost 150mph and could reach 60mph in a whisker over seven seconds. Initially, there was the option of a five-speed ZF gearbox, but this soon became the standard fit. The car’s general specification had also improved and now included: an alternator in place of the dynamo, reclining seats, pile carpets, electric windows, tinted glass and four silencer exhaust. A total of just 898 DB5s are understood to have been produced at Newport Pagnell before the model was replaced by the altogether larger, Kamm-tailed DB6 in late 1965. Originally finished in Sierra Blue with Fawn leather upholstery, chassis DB5/1432/R was supplied new to G. Wolsey & Co Ltd of Central Markets, Smithfields, London EC1. Equipped with a ZF five-speed manual gearbox, 3.77:1 rear axle ratio and chrome wire wheels, the Aston Martin was bought by P.T.D. Marcus Esq during November 1967 and registered to Howletts, Edenbridge, Kent; the same address at which the gambling impresario John Aspinall Esq. established his private zoo. Sold to William Thomas Vivian Esq. of Bulphan in 1970, the four-seater has been an Essex resident ever since passing through the hands of Roger Howard Davenport Esq. and Andrew Wood Esq. (of the renowned Rolls-Royce specialist P & A Wood) amongst others before entering the current family ownership in 1985. Extensively refurbished by the vendor’s late husband from 1989-1996, he tackled the brakes, suspension, engine ancillaries, fuel system, clutch, electric windows and headlining himself but entrusted the bodywork to the highly respected Fullbridge Restoration Company. The exterior panels were stripped back to bare metal and the underside treated to new sills (galvanised steel inners / aluminium outers) and jacking points etc. The engine bay was similarly renovated and the car repainted in Dubonnet Rosso (a colour it had worn since the 1970s). Dry stored for a period, more recent has seen the DB5 benefit from a full overhaul of its factory-fitted engine by marque specialist Rikki Cann (FIMI) Ltd at a cost of £37,571.40, including enlargement to 4.2 litres, with the same firm also fitting a handling kit (uprated coil springs, anti-roll bar) and stainless steel exhaust system not to mention repairing the original Fawn leather upholstery, improving the brakes,

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re-coring the radiator, renewing various rear axle oil seals and rejuvenating the king pins etc to the tune of a further £25,628.57. Due to have its chrome windscreen trim reinstated by Rikki Cann (FIMI) Ltd ahead of the sale, ‘393 EUK’ remains highly presentable. The Fullbridge Restoration Company repaint has held up predictably well, while the predominantly original interior has a lovely patina. Showing an unwarranted 40,800 miles to its odometer and thanks to recent improvements able to go, stop and handle better than a standard car, this glorious DB5 is offered for sale with original logbook, copy factory build and service records, various restoration photos and numerous invoices and bills.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1965 Mercedes-Benz 230SL

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Garaged since 1985 Estimate: £20,000 - £30,000* Reg No: GLH 198C

MOT: None

Chassis No: 11304222013530 Successor to both the exotic race bred 300SL ‘Gullwing’ Coupe and its humbler 190SL sibling, the W113 series SL proved more comfortable than the former and faster than the latter (a point emphasised by Eugen Bohringer’s 1963 Liege-Sofia-Liege rally victory). First of the line, the 230SL was introduced at the March 1963 Geneva Salon. Penned by Paul Bracq, its wonderfully crisp styling clothed a monocoque chassis equipped with all-round independent coil-sprung suspension and disc brakes. Powered by a 2308cc SOHC straight-six engine mated to four-speed manual transmission, the model was credited with 150bhp and 159lbft of torque. Available in Californian Coupe, Convertible or Coupe Convertible guises, the last of these came with both a soft-top and the famous ‘Pagoda’ hardtop roof, so called because of its gently scalloped centre section. The original bill of sale from Normand Mercedes of Mayfair shows that GLH198C was supplied new to Mr William Emms on the 1st December 1965. Ownership transferred onto William’s son Christopher Emms in 1979 who used the vehicle up until 1985 when it was placed in storage. Christopher, now sadly no longer with us always intended to restore the car but never got around to making a start. The current mileage of 59124 is believed genuine, and is substantiated by all the previous MOT certificates. The vendor was also intending to restore the vehicle and even went as far as purchasing over £6,000 worth of genuine Mercedes body panels, these are included in the sale. Due to many other commitments the vendor has reluctantly decided to let the vehicle go to a good home where it can be restored in the manner it deserves. The engine starts and runs well and the transmission appears ok. Along with the vehicle there are the new body panels, some seals, and a large history file containing lots of invoices, bill of sale, MOT certificates and the V5C etc. This is a fabulous opportunity to purchase a genuine low mileage appreciating classic and restore to its former glory.

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1986 BMW 635 CSi

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Current ownership since 1990 Estimate: £14,000 - £18,000* Reg No: C784 HRH

MOT: February 2023

Chassis No: WBAEC820508186951 Finished in Bronzitbeige Metallic with Perl Beige leather upholstery, chassis WBAEC820508186951 was built on December 2nd 1985 to right-hand drive. Boasting a leather M-Sport steering wheel, air conditioning, electric sunroof, switchable four-speed ZF automatic transmission, front sport seats and star-spoke alloy wheels, the BMW was supplied via Hartshill Autos of Newcastle Ltd and first UK registered as ‘C784 HRH’ on February 1st 1986. The 635CSi remained in regular usage up until the mid-1990s with the vendor. Last main dealer serviced by Wollaston Motors of Northampton on December 18th 1995 at 85,439 miles, it has covered a further 5,000 miles over the course of the past twentytwo years. ‘C784 HRH’ started readily during our recent photography session. Entrusted to Richards German Car Specialists of Northampton for a recommissioning during 2021, the BMW received attention to its fuel system, brakes, ignition system and cooling system. The underside was deep cleaned with repairs being made to the inner sills before a fresh coat of underseal was applied. The bodywork benefited from a partial respray following some remedial attention and wheelarch corrosion treatment. Expected to possess a fresh MOT by the time of sale and coming to market for the first time in thirty-two years, this much loved 635CSi is accompanied by its original book pack, BMW Quality Control Card, JVC stereo handbook and numerous invoices and bills.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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2013 Jaguar F-Type S V8

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Estimate: £40,000 - £45,000* Reg No: T.B.A

MOT: July 2022

Chassis No: SAJAC66K1EMK00202 Introduced at the 2012 Paris Motor Show, the Jaguar F-Type was penned in-house by Ian Callum. Taking stylistic cues from the marque’s legendary E-Type as well as its C-X16 concept car, the newcomer struck a fine balance between muscularity with elegance. Initially available as a Roadster with a Fixed Head Coupe version being added for 2014, the newcomer was based around an aluminium monocoque featuring power assisted steering, all-round independent suspension and four-wheel ABS disc brakes. Powered by a choice of 3.0 litre V6 or 5.0 litre V8 supercharged engines, the F-Type was indecently rapid. With a quoted 488bhp and 461lbft of torque on tap, the V8 S model was reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 4.3 seconds and 186mph. Far rarer than one might expect, just 15,090 examples had been sold worldwide by the end of 2016 (with 2013 production amounting to a mere 2,250 cars). Finished in the striking combination of Black with Red leather upholstery, this particular example is equipped with the 5.0 litre V8 supercharged engine allied to eight-speed automatic transmission. Said to have had only four former keepers and to have covered a modest 34,000 miles from new, the Jaguar has recently benefited from the refurbishment of its 20-inch alloy wheels. A rare and highly desirable modern classic, this appealing Roadster is offered for sale with V5C Registration Document and service history.

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1995 Rolls-Royce Silver Spirit III

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One of just 182 right-hand-drive examples Estimate: £16,000 - £20,000* Reg No: M612 TVM

MOT: August 2022

Chassis No: SCAZS02CXSCH55550 Although, based on the Shadow floorpan, the Spirit offered considerable improvements in both its ride and handling. By combining copious amounts of sound deadening with the finest quality upholstery, Crewe’s engineers kept the intrusion of the beat of the 6.75 litre V8 engine to a muted hush. Unveiled at the 1989 Frankfurt Motor Show, the earlier Spirit II featured a sophisticated automatic ride control system that adapted to changing road conditions almost instantaneously. Additionally, there was a ergonomically enhanced `new look’ dashboard, four-speed automatic transmission and standard-fit alloy wheels. Arriving in 1993, the Spirit III boasted more power thanks to redesigned cylinder heads and manifold. There were airbags for both driver and front seat passenger and revised rear lights. Decidedly short lived, just 234 Spirit III saloons are thought to have been made, of which 182 were to right-hand drive specification. This UK-supplied, right-hand drive example was manufactured in 1995 and supplied new through Stratstone Rolls-Royce in Wilmslow, Cheshire. Finished in the attractive colour scheme of Red Pearl with Cream piped leather upholstery, the Spirit III has been in its current registered family ownership since 2007, with the husband and wife equating to two of the five total owners. Covering a modest 70,833 miles (at time of consignment) from new, the car has benefited from replacement head gaskets in 2014 by a specialist garage, along with a brake overhaul in the same year, again with a specialist. This elegant example is accompanied by a large history file including the original book pack, a stamped service book showing fourteen stamps from main dealers and specialists, along with further servicing invoices, most recently within the last 1,000 miles. Also present with the Silver Spirit III, are a selection of previous MoT certificates, numerous invoices relating to work completed (much of that work by specialists), along with a current V5C document.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1984 Audi Quattro Rally Car Converted by AM Cars with numerous authentic ‘Works’ details

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Estimate: £40,000 - £50,000* Reg No: B379 TFK

Chassis No: WAUZZZ85ZEA881267

MOT: January 2023

Having campaigned a Ford Escort MK2 RS with the British Trials and Rally Drivers’ Association (BTRDA) during the 1990s, the vendor chose another rallying icon – Audi’s ground-breaking ‘Ur’quattro - for his return to the series a decade later. Mindful of the widespread acclaim that AM Cars of Ilminster had achieved for its meticulous recreation of Hannu Mikkola’s famous (but scrapped) ‘Works’ car ‘IN-NP-50’, he commissioned Adam Marsden to convert ‘B379 TFK’ into a fully BRTDA capable machine. Boasting a service history dating to back to its first owner, Mr R Hardy, and known to AM Cars for a decade, the white Coupe was duly stripped to a bare shell and treated to fresh metalwork as necessary. A new alloy rear firewall was fabricated, all the suspension mounts reinforced, B-pillar supports added and numerous seams welded. The front and rear subframes received the same treatment, while the wishbones gained gussets. The springs were uprated and Bilstein shock absorbers added. Vented and cross-drilled brake discs with Red Stuff pads were fitted together with a front / rear bias adjuster and cable for the MOT compliant handbrake. The steering column was strengthened and given nylon bushes, while the differentials were shorn of their electronic locks (though, a manual lock was later added for the centre diff). A bespoke Safety Devices roll cage was integrated with extension bars running to the front strut mounts. The use of fibreglass body panels kept weight down to circa 1250kg. A stronger and more tuneable ‘MB’ (2226cc) engine was sourced and upgraded with a hybrid turbocharger and specially enlarged intercooler (albeit BTRDA regulations saw the inlet restricted to 34mm rather than the 100mm potentially available). The purposeful interior was modelled on that of ‘IN-NP-50’ with a bespoke dashboard and plain Black door cards (albeit the rev counter ‘only’ reads to 8,000rpm, whereas the ‘Works’ cars ran to 10,000rpm). Underbody protection was provided via a fibreglass and alloy sump guard, rear diff guard and stone deflectors just ahead of the rear subframe to reduce the risk of rock damage to the half shafts etc. A set of original magnesium Fuchs alloys contributed to the authentic look of the reborn ‘B379 TFK’ as did a sextet of Bosch spotlights not to mention the protruding Sport-style radiator grille. Shaken down on the 2007 Cambrian Rally, the Audi finished a highly creditable thirdin-class at the end of the following year’s BTRDA Rally Championship despite competing against far younger machinery (Group N Subaru Impreza and Mitsubishi Evos etc). Treated to an engine out service and further developmental work during the off season, the Audi Sport-liveried Coupe gained a revamped sump guard, stiffer motor mounts, further subframe location reinforcement, sundry ducting for oil cooling and a specially fabricated alloy fuel tank with swirl pot arrangement and dual Bosch pumps (again a la ‘IN-NP-50’). A regular BTRDA Rally Championship Class B13 entrant, ‘B379 TFK’ was classified as third-in-class at the end of the 2012 season and remained competitive until retiring three years later.

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Potentially eligible for the recently created Class H4 in historic rallying and not long awakened from several years’ dry storage, the Audi passed its most recent MOT test on 24th January 2022. Surprisingly civilised and tractable on the road, this fabulous ‘Ur’-quattro is described by the vendor as follows: ‘‘B379 TFK’ is not your usual half-hearted effort at a track or single venue rally car. It has been built professionally by a respected outfit of experienced engineers and has proven itself on National Rallies over a number of years. It will need some general service and checking and the inevitable replacement of ‘lifed’ components such as seats, belts and fire equipment but is ready to compete ’as is’ or to be fine-tuned into an historic rally car ready to woo the fans and satisfy any nostalgic petrolhead’.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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2018 Lamborghini Aventador LP740-S Roadster One owner and under 6,000 miles from new

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Estimate: £230,000 - £270,000* Reg No: T.B.A.

Chassis No: ZHWEV4ZD3JLA07359

MOT: April 2022

Latest in a line of spectacular supercars from Lamborghini stretching back to the iconic Miura of 1966, the Aventador was launched at the 2011 Geneva Motor Show, replacing the ageing Murcièlago as the Sant’Agata factory’s flagship model. Designed by Filippo Perini, the new midengine coupé borrowed heavily from Lamborghini’s limited edition Reventón and the Estoque concept car. One of its more striking features was the scissor doors - a 21st Century supercar ‘must have’. Like its predecessors, the newcomer was powered by a V12 engine, in the Aventador’s case an all-new 6½-litre unit producing 690bhp. Power reached the ground via a seven-speed semi-automatic gearbox and electronically controlled four-wheel drive transmission. A top speed of 349km/h (217mph) was claimed by the factory, yet the French Sport Auto magazine managed to wind ‘their’ car up to 370km/h (230mph). With the original Aventador LP700-4 being phased out after five years in production, Lamborghini unveiled the extensively revised Aventador S in December 2016 at Sant’Agata, with the car’s official launch taking place at the Geneva Motor Show the following March. Lamborghini’s head of design Mitja Borkert was responsible for the car’s updated exterior, while the 6.5-litre V12 now produced 740PS (730bhp), an increase of 40PS (39bhp) over the superseded LP700-4. With a maximum torque of 509lb/ft at 5,500rpm, the Aventador S can reach 97km/h (60mph) in 2.9 seconds on the way to its top speed of 349 km/h (217mph). In addition, the Aventador S received four-wheel steering, permanent four-wheel drive, and revised suspension controlled by Lamborghini’s Dinamica Veicolo Attiva (LDVA) control unit. The LDVA has four selectable modes: Sport, Strada (Street), Corsa (Track) and Ego (Individual). Carbon-ceramic brakes are standard. Borkert made relatively few changes to the Aventador’s overall look, the most noticeable being a new nose, cleaner side intakes, and a new rear diffuser. Even though its claimed performance figures represented no advance over the original, the Aventador S was rated as a significant step forward by Car magazine: “The difference isn’t subtle. Where the old car feels very nose-led and slightly stubborn, it’s steering lethargic where you need flighty flicks left-to-right, the S dances through the slalom with a balance that feels much more in line with your hips, and steering that feels light years faster. You’re also more aware of that heavy V12 shifting about behind you, helping point the nose...The Aventador has always been unique in its segment, but the S takes it to a whole new level. Would we buy one? Absolutely.” Manufactured in 2018, this Aventador was supplied new to the United Kingdom in right-handdrive to the sole keeper via Lamborghini Leicester. Offered directly from the one owner and having covered under 6,000 miles from new, the S-Roadster is presented in the striking colour combination of Arancio Atlas with a complementing Nero leather interior upholstery with Arancio

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Leonis stitching. Fitted with the aforementioned 6.5-litre V12 engine and seven-speed semiautomatic gearbox, the Aventador was very well specified from new with park assist, S-trim interior with optional stitching, branding pack with the embroidered shield, orange brake calipers, dianthus forged rims in Black and the magneto-rheological suspension with the all-important liftkit. Serviced only by the supplying dealer with the most recent service completed at 4,241 miles in May 2021 to the cost of approximately £3,700. Accompanied by current V5C and the service history records.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1960 Bristol 406

56

No Reserve* Reg No: XCT 309

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Estimate: £12,000 - £15,000* Chassis No: 4065303

MOT: Exempt

At the end of WW2 the Bristol Aeroplane Company found themselves with a surplus of skilled labour and were able to quickly develop their own car; in the autumn of 1946 the Bristol Car Division unveiled the 400 saloon powered by a Filton-built, mildly modified version of the BMW 328 engine. The 406 two-door saloon introduced in 1957 was the last of the Filton-engined Bristols, its OHV straight-six enlarged to 2216cc and now known as the ‘Bristol 110 Series’. It was identified by the absence of the then-familiar bonnet scoop of its predecessors and was one of the first saloon cars of its class to feature disc brakes on all four wheels. A stalled restoration project and fitted with a Daimler 2.5 V8 engine, the vendor bought this Bristol Type 406 two years ago from a fellow Bristol enthusiast. It was without an engine. He wanted to fit an engine that he believed suited the quality of a Bristol and so sought out a Daimler 2.5 V8 with automatic transmission, the work of fitting this engine and modifications needed were carried out. The intention was to completely renovate it. Unfortunately, the pandemic has stopped the work. 1 of just 174 examples made, the vendor feels it is a very worthy project with many parts included. The original Green logbook is present along with V5c and a reproduction Bristol Type 406 Instruction Manual.

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1991 Jaguar XJ-S 4.0

Reg No: J642 PDE

Chassis No: SAJJNAED3EK179900

MOT: February 2023

In 1991, parent company Ford thoroughly reworked the luxury Grand Tourer at a cost of £50 million. The new version was powered by either a punchy straight-six (3980cc) or a soporific V12 (5343cc) engine; the former DOHC unit developed some 223bhp and 283lbft of torque. Featuring a fivespeed manual transmission as standard, the 4.0-litre XJS could also be had with a four-speed automatic gearbox. Capable of over 140mph, the model proved to be a refined and relaxing drive, and production continued until 1996. Manufactured in 1991 and thus an early facelift example, ‘J642 PDE’ is presented in the attractive ‘Arctic Blue’ with contrasting beige leather interior and boasts an impressive factory specification including cruise control, heated seats with memory, lumbar support, power jet and CD multichanger. Offered with just 56,358 miles on the odometer and just 4 former keepers, ‘J642 PDE’ is supplied with an MOT certificate valid until 17 February 2023. Included with the vehicle is the original bookpack including service pack stamped from 1991 to 2015, a number of previous invoices and MOTs, the V5C document and the vehicle’s tool kit and spare wheel.


1980 Chevrolet Corvette Turbo

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Estimate: £20,000 - £24,000* Reg No: LDV 584V

Chassis No: 1Z878AS402073

1969 MG B Roadster

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Estimate: £15,000 - £17,000* MOT: Exempt

And now for something rather different and very potent - a 350ci (5.7-litre) V8 Chevy Corvette complete with Martin turbocharger! Rumoured to have been inspired by a limited-edition model involving the father of the Vette, Zora Arkus Duntov, who, following his retirement from GM, embarked on a consulting deal with American Custom Industries of Sylvania, Ohio to produce a series of force-fed C3 ‘Vettes. Their idea was to create the ultimate C3 Corvette with Duntov’s help, and the result was a wider, altogether meaner, better handling machine powered by an L48 350ci V8 engine, force fed by a Martin turbocharger to give 70bhp more than standard. It is believed around 86 examples were produced, from which ‘LDV 584V’ appears to have drawn its inspiration. Finished in White and trimmed in a suitably colourful shade of Red, it came to the UK in 2014 and has since been treated to new front coil springs, rear silencers, fresh tyres and subject to a front brake overhaul. Currently displaying a credible 20,800 miles, it comes complete with original Martin turbo brochure and a collection of invoices plus old MOT certificates.

Reg No: GPP 488G

Chassis No: GHN4164437C

MOT: Exempt

Introduced in 1962, the MGB Roadster enjoyed an eighteen-year production run. With nicely balanced handling and a good turn of speed, it merited the old MG marketing slogan ‘Safety Fast’. Based around a monocoque chassis featuring independent coil-sprung front suspension and a leaf-sprung ‘live’ rear axle, its 1798cc ‘B’ series four-cylinder engine was allied to four-speed manual transmission. Capable of over 100mph (especially if specified with overdrive), the provision of disc/drum brakes and rack and pinion steering greatly aided control. Today, it enjoys a very strong following and with its GT sister has spawned a dedicated support industry making it among the most practical and cost effective of all classic cars. Showing just five previous keepers to its V5C Registration Document and in the current ownership since 1990, this handsome MG B Roadster has previously benefited from an extensive, ‘ground up’ restoration. Finished in Red with Black leather upholstery piped in Red, the two-seater is said to be ‘body coloured and immaculate’. Sparingly used as a part of a private collection, ‘GPP 488G’ has recently been treated to ‘a full recommissioning’. Riding on period correct Silver-painted wire wheels and boasting overdrive, this appealing B Roadster would make a great summer companion.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1961 Bentley S2 Continental Sports Saloon Coachwork by James Young

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Estimate: £95,000 - £115,000* Reg No: JAS 767

Chassis No: BC26BY

MOT: Exempt

‘In the twilight of their coachbuilding years, James Young had with these cars reached the pinnacle of excellence.’ - Martin Bennett, Rolls-Royce and Bentley. In the 1950s and 1960s the Bentley Continental was a car in which you could set off from any European capital in the morning and arrive at Monte Carlo fresh enough to play the tables that evening. Introduced in 1959, the Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud II and Bentley S2 appeared unchanged externally from their Cloud and S-Type predecessors, although the duo’s performance was considerably enhanced by the new 6,230cc V8 engine. Despite the popularity of the standard steel bodywork, introduced when production of Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars resumed after WW2, a declining number of independent coachbuilders continued with alternatives. Arguably the most stylish were those produced to clothe the Bentley Continental which, of course, was only available with bespoke coachwork. One of the most prominent coachbuilders was James Young, a company that had established itself among the foremost coachbuilders for upmarket chassis by the end of the 1930s. The Bromley-based carriage-maker had bodied its first automobile in 1908, affiliating itself with a succession of quality marques throughout the 1920s and 1930s before being acquired by the Jack Barclay Group in 1937. Devastated by wartime bombing, the company did not resume exhibiting at the London Motor Shows until 1948, continuing to offer coachbuilt designs of distinction on (mainly) Rolls-Royce and Bentley chassis until the arrival of the unitary construction Silver Shadow/T-Series range in the 1960s. A lack of suitable chassis would force the firm’s closure before the 60s decade ended, but in its declining years James Young produced what are widely recognised as its finest creations, this beautiful Bentley Continental among them. As one of only 23 RHD 4 door S2 Continentals by James Young, ‘JAS 767’ is an already rare proposition. Originally ordered by a John Rogerson Esq, but due to cancelling his order, chassis number BC26BY was built to the specification of Greek Businessman C H Dracoulis. Ordered in ‘Glasso Green’ paintwork, with contrasting beige leather interior featuring walnut veneer, the total build cost amounted to £7,876, nearly three times the average house price in the UK at that time. After postponing his order, due to residing in Greece, the vehicle was eventually delivered new in 1961 to a W Turner Esq. Acquired by its current custodian in April of 2005, ‘JAS 767’ has become of a ‘veteran’ of numerous international tours and rallies, all completed without problems and covering some 35,000 miles. Trips include European tours between 2005 and 2008; in 2009 the ‘Arabian Gulf Adventure’. The Northern Italian lakes were toured in 2011 before the car was flown to the USA, where it toured the north west and Canada, covering 2,750 miles in 2013. Between 2014 and 2016 ‘JAS 767’ saw further European trips, before again being air freighted to the US in 2017, for a south-eastern tour

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of some 2,400 miles. Most recently, ‘JAS 767’ toured Sweden (in 2018). ‘JAS 767’ has been subject to much expenditure during the current ownership, totaling over £76,000 to the present day. Within this expenditure, over £41,000 was spent in the first two years of ownership on a complete engine, steering, brake and exhaust overhaul. In addition, an air conditioning unit was fitted under the existing facia; entirely removable. ‘JAS 767’ comes accompanied with its original tool kit and spare wheel, as well as a comprehensive folder containing photocopied records of the build, a number of previous invoices, MOTs, tax discs, hand-written notes containing mileages at the point of MOT and expenditure, and finally the V5 document.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1954 Bentley R-Type Saloon

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Estimate: £24,000 - £28,000* Reg No: TMA 372

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: B145YA An obvious evolution of its MkVI predecessor, the Bentley R-Type was introduced at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show. Subtly reworked from the previous model by in-house stylist John Blatchley, it boasted a notably larger boot and reprofiled rear wings. Switching from riveted to welded frame construction at chassis B349TO, the newcomer featured independent coil-and-wishbone front suspension, a leafsprung ‘live’ rear axle and servo-assisted four-wheel drum brakes (hydraulic front / rod rear). Powered by a ‘big bore’ 4566cc straight-six inlet-over-exhaust engine allied to either four-speed manual or automatic transmission, the R-Type was a surprisingly strong performer, able to reach more than 100mph. Praised by the contemporary motoring press for its high-speed handling and well-appointed interior, the model remained in production until 1955 by which time some 2,017 Standard Steel Saloons are thought to have been made with many features the same as the R-Type continental. Supplied new to Spirax-Sarco Engineering of Gloucestershire, this R-Type has been in the current family ownership since 2014 and is understood to have had just 8 former keepers. Subject to a gearbox and mechanical overhaul c.2015 and the fitting of Blockley tyres following a period of dry storage it has also benefited recently from attention to its braking system, a recent exhaust and fluid change. Now described as being in “Good” condition as regards its bodywork, paint, engine, transmission and beige interior, ‘TMA 372’ is accompanied by a collection of invoices dating back to the 1960s, old MOT certificates, original owner’s handbook, green logbook and copies of its factory records plus chassis cards and original sales invoice.

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1966 Vanden Plas Princess 1100 Mk1

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A truly exceptional example and just 18,000 miles from new Estimate: £18,000 - £22,000* Reg No: GUF 870D

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: V-AS1-11980 Inspired by a bespoke Morris 1100 that Fred Connolly of the eponymous currier had commissioned from coachbuilder-turned-manufacturer Vanden Plas, BMC tasked its Kingsbury-based subsidiary with replicating Mr Connolly’s car to gauge public reaction at the October 1963 Earls Court Motor Show. Sporting a revised radiator grille, the resultant machine attracted a deluge of enquiries. Entering production in April 1964, the Vanden Plas Princess 1100 boasted a twin-carb 1100cc engine, fourspeed manual gearbox, front disc brakes and Hydrolastic interconnected suspension. Priced at £896 (£195 more than the MG 1100 with which it shared a powerplant), the newcomer also featured a West of England cloth headlining, Wilton carpets, reading lights, rear picnic tables and individual folding front seat armrests. In an age of coachbuilt Minis by Wood & Pickett and Radford etc, the Princess 1100 with its ‘shrunken Rolls-Royce’ cabin proved a strong seller. Though, an affinity for tin worm means that the website howmanyleft.com records just seventy surviving Vanden Plas Princess 1100s. Supplied new by Caffyns of Eastbourne to Mrs F.M. Llewellyn, ‘GUF 870D’ remained in her family until 1991. Last taxed for road use the following year, the luxury saloon has been treasured for the last three decades. Treated to a fastidious six-year restoration by a former bodyshop proprietor between 2014 and 2020, the Princess 1100 is said to have never had any corrosion or accident repairs and to retain its original factory spot welds throughout. Refinished in its original colour of Peat and reunited with its timewarp Vanden Plas interior, the four-seater is warranted to have covered just 17,900 miles from new. The best example we have encountered in terms of both condition and originality, we believe that a lesser car could not be commercially restored to the same standard for anything like the guide price. Offered for sale with V5C Registration Document, handbook, Passport to Service, original touch-up paint tin, Smiths Electric Clock instructions, model brochure and sundry paperwork.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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2017 Realm Heritage C-Type

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Estimate: £40,000 - £50,000* Reg No: IG 4475

MOT: T.B.A

Chassis No: REALMCJS167680064 Many enthusiasts regard the C-Type Jaguar as one of the most attractive and desirable sports racing cars ever. The problem is only 53 were built, the values of which are now way beyond the pocket of the average aficionado, as a result of which a healthy supply of evocations has been available for many years. Inevitably some are of superior quality to others, with those built by Realm Engineering of Honeybourne, Worcestershire generally considered to be among the best. Realm’s enviable history can be traced back several decades and has more recently encompassed equally competent evocations of the D-Type Jaguar, its road-going cousin the XKSS, and the C-Type Jaguar. The latter is constructed around a spaceframe of impressive design that’s then clothed in either a glassfibre or alloy body. This Realm Heritage C-Type was built between 2015 and 2017 using a Jaguar 420 donor vehicle. It is finished in Bronze as a tribute to chassis number XKC018 which was purchased new by Juan Manuel Fangio in October 1952 through Jaguar’s Belgian distributor. Fangio’s C-Type quickly boarded a ship for his home country of Argentina where it passed through Jaguar’s distributor, Jose Millet, into an active South American racing career. This C-Type evocation is IVA tested and correctly registered with the DVLA as a Realm Heritage C-Type. A 4.2L engine powers the Heritage C-Type and that is carburetted by triple Webers. Power is transferred to the wheels via a 5 speed manual gearbox sourced from Toyota. The rear axle is believed to be from a Mk2 Jaguar. Being a Realm it has a strong strength tubular steel spaceframe chassis, not dissimilar in ethos to that of the Coventry manufacturer’s original design, and GRP bodywork of a high quality. Having had little use since completion in 2017 it is offered with V5c, collection of invoices plus notes from the build and will be freshly serviced by the time of sale.

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1990 Ferrari Mondial T Cabriolet

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One of just 71 UK-supplied, right-hand drive examples Estimate: £44,000 - £46,000* Reg No: G909 CLC

MOT: March 2022

Chassis No: ZFFKC33C000083442 The so-called T was the final iteration of Ferrari’s mid-engined Mondial model range produced from 1980 to 1993. The T referred to the re-positioned drivetrain that, as per Ferrari F1 cars of the period, featured the engine mounted longitudinally driving through a transversely positioned transmission. This set the pattern for the marque’s mid-engine V8 cars for years to come and endowed the T with far superior handling to previous Mondials, whose engines were mounted higher up and across the frame. It could cover the 0-60mph sprint in 5.6 seconds with wind in your hair. It is believed just 53 of which were right-hand drive. We are delighted to offer this Classiche Certified and former Concours contending Mondial. The most sought-after variant with 3.4-litre V8 and transverse gearbox, registering c.57,800 warranted miles. With a detailed history, it benefits from a major engine-out service by Italia Autosport, which included a belt change, completed in October 2021. Ordered new in 1989 by Evans Halshaw for Peter Inston of Worcestershire, in addition to a list price of £62,702.80 the optional leather dashboard was specified at £890.77. Passing through a number of custodians the car has been in the care of specialists such as Strattons, Neal Lucas’ of Surrey, Foskers and John Markey of Surrey, with maintenance carried out throughout its ownership, including an engine out belt service, water pump, tensioner bearings and clutch at 53,408 miles. More recently, in 2016 the starter motor and gear linkage were refurbished followed by the interior in 2017. The belts were last changed in 2021. Classiche Certified by Stratstone in 2018, it is described as being correct and complete with original handbooks, service book, wallet and tools. Rarely do right-hand drive Mondials come to market, never mind examples that have Classiche certification, making this is an attractive opportunity for the discerning collector.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1928 Morgan Aero

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Estimate: £30,000 - £40,000* Reg No: BS 9897

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 720A Progressively developed from 1909, HFS Morgan’s ingenious three-wheeler ultimately played host to a variety of JAP, Matchless, Blackburne, Anzani and Ford powerplants. The Aero derivative soon became a favourite among sporting motorists, and with stark bodywork, impressive power-to-weight ratio and nimble handling was capable of embarrassing far more expensive machinery. Initially equipped with 980cc JAP V-twin side-valve engine allied to a twospeed manual transmission, it continued to evolve until production ceased in 1933. Manufactured in 1928, chassis number 720A was subject to many years of enthusiast ownership, improvements and engine upgrades. Power comes from a water-cooled 50-degree OHV LTOW/C/W 1100cc JAP engine mated to a two-speed bevel box transmission with an outside tub gear-shift. With a higher compression ratio and hotter cams, the power output is believed to be approximately 60bhp. The JAP unit was also provided with a recirculating oil pump, an electric starter (a factory option from 1923) and a plate clutch rather than a traditional cone. A restoration which had begun in 2003, however, it had briefly halted before being purchased by the vendor in 2006. The vendor overhauled the engine, wired the electrical system, finished the paintwork, overhauled the brakes and completed the reconstruction. Presented in Mercedes Maroon Red with Red leather interior upholstery, the Aero is equipped with weather protection, for those days you might get caught out, in the form of a black hood and frame, as well as a black tonneau. The Morgan has been further upgraded with front pedal-operated hydraulic brakes and a rear hand brake. Retained in the vendor’s private collection since, the car is accompanied by a large history file comprising a photo album of restoration images, a large collection of invoices relating to the restoration and other correspondence, a current V5C document and a copy of ‘The Automobile’ in which the Morgan was featured following completion of the restoration (see volume 24, number 6, August 2006).

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1932 Riley Nine Gamecock

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One of just 52 thought to have survived Estimate: £30,000 - £35,000* Reg No: GW 3228

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 6016255 Having been introduced in 1932, the Riley Nine Gamecock featured the marque’s latest Plus Ultra underslung chassis and jewel-like 1.1-litre four-cylinder engine. Fed by twin-carburettors allied to a fourspeed manual transmission, top speed was promised at 70mph-plus. Sporting a lightweight aluminium body, large diameter drum brakes, all-round semi-elliptic leaf springs and Duplex Andre adjustable shock absorbers, it retains good road manners to this day. The handsome Gamecock was summed up by Motor Sport as ‘a neat and handy vehicle which combined a lively performance with freedom from constant tuning’. No stranger to competition, a three-strong ‘Works’ team won a prestigious Coupe des Alpes (up to 1100cc class) on the 1932 International Alpine Rally. Just fifty-two Riley Nine Gamecocks are thought to have survived from the two year production. Manufactured in 1932, chassis 6016255 is understood to have been first registered to a Colchester vet. This handsome Riley is finished in Green with Black wings and running boards with complementary Green leather interior upholstery and Black hood. Thought to have been retained in original ownership and one subsequent family member until 1973, the car was placed in dry storage upon passing into third ownership until 1996, then stripped for renovation before the project stalled, the vendor then purchased ‘GW 3228’ in 2008, subjecting it to an eight-year comprehensive restoration. Restoration included a replacement ash frame, chassis refresh, engine overhaul, including refurbished carburettors, body repairs and repainting, re-cored radiator, shock absorber refurbishment, new wiring loom, re-upholstery and a new hood. Additionally, uprated with hydraulic brakes and electric fan, since completion, ‘GW 3228’ has been used on the Scottish 500 and a tour of Ireland. This attractive Riley is offered with a history file documenting the restoration. One of approximately 52 examples that are thought to survive ‘GW 3228’ has been subject to an eight-year restoration upon entering current ownership. It is understood to have had just four owners from new, with two owners from the same family. The car is accompanied by a history file documenting the restoration.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1948 Bentley MkVI 4.25 Litre ‘Simpson’ Special Former Bentley Drivers’ Club Concours Award Winner

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Estimate: £60,000 - £80,000* Reg No: HWT 929

Chassis No: B484DA

MOT: Exempt

Introduced in 1946, the MkVI was Bentley’s first post-WW2 model. Aimed at the emerging ‘owner-driver’ luxury car market, it was closely based on the 1939 MkV (of which only fifteen were produced). Built around a massive cruciform-braced chassis with independent front suspension and a leaf-sprung live rear axle, it was fitted with a freshly developed 4257cc (later 4566cc) overhead inlet/side exhaust straight-six engine mated to four-speed manual transmission. Suspension was independent by coil springs at the front and by leaf springs at the rear. Braking was by mechanically-assisted drums all-round. As with its forebears, a central lubrication system allowed oil to be applied to the moving parts of the suspension via a central reservoir. Unfortunately, the variable quality of steel available in the post-WW2 period meant that the MkVI’s Standard Steel Saloon coachwork rarely lasted as long as Crewe had intended, and by the mid1960s there were a good number of mechanically strong but cosmetically untidy cars running around. Dating from that time onwards, the tradition of building Bentley MkVI-based Specials is long and proud. Well known in ‘winged B’ circles with several examples of his work being featured in the Ray Roberts’ book ‘Bentley Specials and Special Bentleys’, David Simpson was commissioned by Brian Hughes - the then Chairman of the Bentley Drivers’ Club’ South East section - to convert ‘HWT 929’ from a Standard Steel Saloon into a Special during 1991. Having completed his first such transformation for renowned marque collector Charles Teall two decades earlier, Mr Simpson followed established practice by relocating the cruciform brace further back within the chassis thus allowing the engine and gearbox to be repositioned well behind the front axle line. New mounts for the drivetrain saw it lowered with the bulkhead, radiator and radiator grille being shortened accordingly (the latter by four inches). These modifications gave the rolling chassis a far more rakish and sporting stance which was complemented by the lightweight aluminium over ash coachwork affixed atop it. Featuring a dual cowl scuttle, nearside-mounted spare wheel, external handbrake, single-door and recessed footwells, the four-seater body was trimmed in Black leather. Imposing large Lucas FP1100 headlights, 16-inch wire wheels and extravagant blade wings completed the look which so impressed the judges at the Bentley Drivers’ Club’s 1993 Hatfield House and 1995 Broughton Castle Concours events (no mean feat for a Special). Uprated with a Continental crown wheel and pinion (14/41 ratio) for high-speed cruising and entrusted to coachbuilder James E Pearce for the fabrication of a rear luggage trunk and more aesthetically pleasing hood, ‘HWT 929’ had covered nearly 20,000 post transformation miles by November 1996 when Mr Hughes sold it to the vendor. Toured extensively throughout the UK and Europe, the Bentley accompanied the seller to North America for eighteen years with journeys to

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several of the fifty states as well as Canada. Starting readily and running well during our recent photography session, ‘HWT 929’ is only being offered for sale because it has become surplus to requirements (the vendor’s garage houses two other MkVI / R-Type Specials). Now showing some 40,300 miles to its odometer and still highly presentable, the four-seater was valued at £85,000 by marque authority Dr Tim Houlding a decade or so ago. Accompanying paperwork includes a copy build record showing that the MkVI’s first owner was the television mogul Edward Fattorini and correspondence from Anne Edwards recounting several humorous episodes that occurred during her father’s stewardship of the car (1957-1961). Able to boast ‘matching’ chassis and engine numbers, this decidedly handsome Special is worthy of close inspection and would cost considerably more than the guide price to build today.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1933 Rolls-Royce 20/25 All Weather Tourer

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Estimate: £60,000 - £70,000* Reg No: JR 700

Chassis No: GSY 68

MOT: Exempt

First owned by Sir Cecil Algernon Cochrane DCL, JP, a former Liberal Party MP, successful businessman and benefactor of Newcastle University. Original Hooper All-Weather coachwork and subject to a previous engine overhaul. Offered from long-term family ownership and matching chassis and engine numbers. Continuation buff logbook, copy Hooper paperwork, V5C Registration Document, sundry correspondence and restoration bills. Supplied new to the successful businessman and former Liberal Party MP Sir Cecil Algernon Cochrane DCL JP, chassis GSY68 was clothed by Hooper with All-Weather Body Number 7804. An ingenious design that aimed to provide occupants with the best of both worlds, its fully convertible roof and retractable window frames stowed neatly out of the way when true open-air motoring was desired but were also easy to raise should the weather turn inclement. The provision of an insulated headlining and wind-up windows made the ‘All-Weather’ far cosier than a conventional Tourer. Such versatility came at a price with Hooper charging £594 17s 6d for Body Number 7804; a sum which would have bought a house nine decades ago. That said, the build quality which had won the renowned coachbuilder a Royal Warrant helped ensure the Rolls-Royce’s survival with a letter on file from J. Fewster Esq dated December 1984 reading as follows: ‘I purchased chassis GSY68 from the family of the original owner in the 1960s. To the best of my knowledge the indicated mileage of 87,000 is correct’. As well as reinstating the Rolls-Royce’s original Northumberland registration number ‘JR 700’, the vendor’s late husband significantly improved its mechanical and cosmetic condition during 20002001. Repainted Exeter Blue and partially retrimmed, the 20/25 also had its wiring attended to. Entrusted to Rolls-Royce & Bentley Specialists Dennis Pilling & Son, the original engine (number A2N) received a thorough overhaul with associated bills totalling more than £15,000. Maintained and improved thereafter, an invoice from Ristes Motor Company Ltd dated August 2014 for two front brake drum finned rings is among the more recent on file. This rare Hooper-bodied ‘All-Weather’ Rolls-Royce is worthy of close inspection. Offered for sale with continuation buff logbook, copy Hooper paperwork, V5C Registration Document, sundry correspondence and restoration bills.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1965 Ford Mustang Notchback

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Estimate: £20,000 - £24,000* Reg No: FRR 49C

Chassis No: 5R07C175345

MOT: T.B.A.

Introduced at the New York World’s Fair on the 17th of April 1964, the Ford Mustang was primarily aimed at the post-WW2 ‘baby boomer’ generation. Backed by an enormous publicity campaign that included television coverage beamed to over 30 million homes and some 2,500 newspaper advertisements, it proved an instant hit. It was the first of the so-called `pony’ cars that subsequently inspired the Chevy Camaro, AMC Javelin and a revamped Chrysler Barracuda. It also inspired such coupes from elsewhere in the world as the Ford Capri and even the Toyota Celica. Soon available in Coupe, Convertible, and Fastback guise, the Mustang came with a range of straight-six and V8 engines, a bewildering array of options, and enough style and charisma to ensure its place as one of the most iconic automobile designs ever built. Manufactured in 1965 at the Ford San Jose, California plant, chassis number 5R07C175345 was manufactured with the 289 cu in (4.7-litre) ‘C’-code V8 Windsor small-block engine; this engine has a two-barrel carburettor, but it also has a larger displacement earlier Ford ‘F’-Code engines. The engine is mated to the rarer and more desirable manual transmission, in three-speed guise. Costing a base of $2,372, the Mustang is presented today in Pale Yellow with Gold stripes and complementing black interior upholstery. Understood to have resided in America until being imported to the United Kingdom in 2011, the car has subsequently passed through three former keepers until being purchased by the vendor in 2017. This 1965 example was subject to a respray in approximately 2014, following its entry into the current ownership, this Mustang has benefited from a mechanical restoration and attention to its electrics. Displaying a recorded mileage of just 62,670 miles at the time of consignment, ‘FRR 49C’ is accompanied by a selection of previous MOT certificates along with a current V5C document. It is expected to possess a fresh 12-month MOT certificate in time for the sale.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1928 Sunbeam 20hp Weymann Saloon Exceptional survivor retaining its original fabric covered coachwork

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Estimate: £15,000 - £20,000* Reg No: UC 635

Chassis No: 2023H

MOT: Exempt

The 1920s witnessed Sunbeam win the French and Spanish Grand Prixs, finish second at Le Mans, set numerous Land Speed Records and cause Henry Royce consternation regarding the quality and refinement of its products. Introduced in 1926, the Twenty (20.9hp) was powered by a 2916cc OHV straight-six engine allied to four-speed manual transmission. Reputedly capable of over 70mph (coachwork permitting), the newcomer shared numerous drivetrain components with its glamorous 3-Litre Super Sports sibling. Available in Tourer, Fixed Head Coupe, Folding Head Coupe, Coachbuilt Saloon, Weymann Saloon and Rally Weymann Saloon guises, some 2,560 20.9hp cars are thought to have been made before the model was revised for 1931. Though, today survivors are comparatively few and far between. Contemporary Sunbeam brochures reveal that the Weymann Saloon was priced at a hefty £875 and could be ordered in ‘Claret, Black or Grey’ over Black and with ‘cloth or best quality English leather of suitable colour to match the paintwork’. Less impervious to the elements than their metal counterparts, it was unusual for fabric-covered Weymann Saloon bodies to last more than a few decades regardless of which manufacturer’s chassis they adorned. Hence, our excitement at encountering one which is substantially original despite its ninety-four years! According to its accompanying buff logbook, chassis 2023H was first registered as ‘UC 635’ on 6th February 1928. Supplied new to Rowland Hugh Hill Esq., he is understood to have kept the Sunbeam for thirty-five years. Offered for sale by Sotheby’s in association with the Montagu Motor Museum at Earls Court on 5th November 1965, the 20hp’s catalogue description stated that: ‘This saloon model was stored from 1929 to 1962 and has thus covered only 25,000 miles’. Gracing the pages of Motor Sport magazine as part of an advertisement for Chiltern Cars during 1966, the five-seater was priced at £425 and described as follows: ‘Two owners from new, low mileage, outstanding original order’. Treated to a re-cored radiator, fresh clutch, brake overhaul, re-spoked wheels and new safety glass all round during the mid 1980s, a handwritten log kept by the previous keeper, R.E. Denton Esq., indicates that the Sunbeam’s recorded mileage had only risen to 26,833 by 1993. Entering the current ownership four years later, the 20hp is still showing less than 35,000 miles to its odometer which may well represent the total covered from new and would certainly explain why its fabric covered Weymann Saloon coachwork has survived so well. Taking full advantage of the fact that her father had restored a similar Sunbeam from the ground up, the seller has had him look after ‘UC 635’. As well as overhauling the factory-fitted engine, he re-wired the car, refurbished the brakes and renewed the rear wheel bearings (often calling upon Bill Barrott’s expertise). Fresh Michelin ‘double rivet’ tyres were fitted and modern hazard warning lights added. Starting readily and running well during our recent photography session, the five-seater will be driven some 50 miles to IWM Duxford

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for the auction. A potential winner in the preservation class of concours d’elegance events, this fabulous Vintage Sunbeam really needs to be seen ‘in the fabric’ to be appreciated. Offered for sale with V5C Registration Document, buff logbook, Sotheby’s catalogue, copy handbook and assorted invoices etc. A unique opportunity.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1966 Austin-Healey 3000 MKIII

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Estimate: £57,000 - £67,000* Reg No: GVU 315D

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: HBJ8-L/36116 A significant step in terms of ‘Big Healey’ evolution and foundation block for one of the 1960s’ most charismatic rally cars, the 3000 MkI was introduced in March 1959. Powered by an enlarged 2912cc version of BMC’s C-Series straight-six engine that developed some 124bhp and 167lbft of torque, it could be had in two-seater (BN7) or 2+2 seater (BT7) configurations. Progressively improved, the 3000 metamorphosed through MkII and MkIIa guises before the arrival of the ultimate MkIII BJ8 in October 1963. Boasting a centre console, proper convertible hood, wood veneer dashboard, redesigned exhaust system and wind-up windows, the 2+2 seater BJ8 proved a comfortable and fast grand tourer. With engine output boosted to 148bhp and 165lbft of torque thanks to a new camshaft and better valve springs etc, its reputed 124mph top speed was accessed via a four-speed manual gearbox. Last of the line, the Phase Two variant benefited from redesigned rear suspension, strengthened splined hubs and larger diameter front disc brakes. Finished in the arguably the best colour combination for a Big Healey – Ice Blue over Old English White – HBJ8L36116 spent much of its life in a dry American state before being repatriated and treated to ‘a comprehensive, ground up cosmetic and mechanical restoration between 2013 and 2015 with accompanying invoices and CD of photos’. For anyone who has put enough home market cars on a ramp and seen what patchwork quilts their chassis can become, the time that ‘GVU 315D’ spent Stateside is a definite plus. Riding on stainless steel wire wheels and boasting ‘a stunning interior’, the 2+2-seater further benefits from overdrive and a full tonneau. Said to be ‘driving well’ and to possess ‘a large history file’, this decidedly handsome BJ8 has had just one registered UK keeper and is worthy of close inspection.

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1928 Austin Twenty Landaulette

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Estimate: £28,000 - £32,000* Reg No: TK 274

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 6PL5154 Herbert Austin was nothing if not ambitious. By the outbreak of WW1 the company that bore his name was Britain’s fifth largest motorcar manufacturer. Accepting government contracts for aircraft, shells, heavy artillery and 3-ton lorries saw the Austin Motor Company prosper during WW1. Sensing an opportunity to leapfrog his rivals and taking a leaf from Henry Ford’s book, Herbert Austin decided to offer just a single model when peace returned. Hugely impressed by the Hudson Super Six he ran during the hostilities he challenged his designers to create a similarly well-engineered machine. The first prototype Austin Twenty began to take shape in the chassis erecting shop at Longbridge during 1917. Like the Hudson Super Six, the newcomer featured a substantial ladder frame chassis equipped with all-round semi-elliptic leafsprung suspension, rear wheel brakes, an engine of monobloc construction with in-unit, centre-change gearbox and a sheet metal radiator cowl. Displacing 3610cc, its unstressed sidevalve fourcylinder engine developed 40bhp @ 2,000rpm (an output sufficient for Austin to later warrant that the chassis could reach 70mph). Eminently tuneable, privateer Felix Scriven’s `Sergeant Murphy’ and the Works’ `Black Maria’ both proved that an Austin Twenty could beat a Bentley 3 Litre or Vauxhall 30/98 in competition, Scriven mount reaching 104mph at Brooklands. Understood to have been fully restored between 2000 and 2005 by George Fulton, the Vintage Austin Register’s representative in Ireland, this elegant Twenty Landaulette has been in the current ownership since 2014 and records only 2 former keepers on the HPI report. The interior features black tufted buttoned leather which offers a pretty juxtaposition with the polished gauge bezels and green piping to the door cards. Repatriated with its original registration mark ‘TK 274’, it is said to start and run “very well”, whilst the paint, bodywork, engine, transmission and interior are described as being “very good”. Offered with V5C, handbooks and spares list, this handsome vintage Austin is finished in Green with matching interior and Black roof.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1960 Jaguar MK II 3.4 Litre Beacham A well sorted MK II

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Estimate: £45,000 - £55,000* Reg No: 159 UXE

Chassis No: 153414

MOT: May 2022

The Mk2 was a fast and capable saloon in line with Sir William Lyons’ 1950s advertising slogan, ‘grace, space, pace’. Dr Greg Beacham saw a market for rebuilding and uprating Jaguar cars, primarily Jaguar Mk2s, that were in New Zealand, finishing them to a very high standard and selling them to Japan, Australia, UK etc as an upmarket fully restored car. Beacham provided a classic Jaguar Mk2 with the comfort of a modern car and a restoration that left no stone left unturned. The father and son team have, arguably, been building the finest upgraded Mk2 Jaguars for over 25 years. To do this, he built a special facility where the cars were completely dismantled, stripped out, shot blasted and any body repairs, welding and finishing was done. There was a separate hi-tech paint shop to complete the body. Finally, the cars were assembled and finished off. During this process the Jaguar XK engines were restored, the gearbox, steering, suspension and electrics were uprated, chrome wire wheels and a stainless steel exhaust fitted. The cars leaving the world renowned Beacham facilities were essentially new cars with a new identity using the original chassis number. Owning a Beacham places the owner in what is a very distinguished community of Beacham owners. The Mk2 was a fast and capable saloon in line with Sir William Lyons’ 1950s advertising slogan, ‘grace, space, pace’. The Mk2 was re-engineered above the waistline, with vision dramatically improved by an 18% increase in the cabin’s glass area. The radiator grille was changed, and larger side, tail and fog lamps repositioned. This Jaguar Mk2, was originally manufactured in Coventry, England, to right-hand drive specification on December 1960 and was immediately exported to New Zealand in 1961. Independent Motor Sales of Wellington, New Zealand, sold the car as new after import from the UK, and it was delivered to its first owner, Mr A S Johnson of Hastings, New Zealand. Nothing more is known of the car until it was acquired by Dr Greg Beacham in the 1980s. The car was repatriated to the UK in 1991. Now registered ‘159 UXE’, (chassis number 153414), it was purchased by the current owner in 2008. The vendor describes the car as driving ‘very well and has been used for continental tours and been shown at numerous shows in the South East of England, winning numerous trophies’. The specification of ‘159 UXE’ is a catalogue of almost ‘money no object’ improvements that includes: a Getrag 5 speed manual gearbox, hydraulic rack and pinion power steering, negative earth electrical system and alternator, electronic ignition, halogen H4 headlamps, stainless steel exhaust, central locking, uprated front suspension, Koni shock absorbers, electric thermostatically controlled cooling fan. Since 2008, the following additional upgrades and work have been carried out: a bare metal respray in British Racing Green, front brakes uprated to improved 4 pot calipers, central locking, rear axle rebuilt, new chrome wire wheels fitted, LED interior instruments, front side and rear stop and tail lights.

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More recent work has included a rechromed bumper, oil change, new battery, water pump, new clutch and all the interior wood re-varnished plus a service and the rear axle overhauled in 2021. There is a large collection of invoices, itemised details of the work carried out by the vendor, a Beacham catalogue, sales brochure, heritage certificate, old tax discs, collection of old MOTs. An original driver’s handbook and a history file are also offered with the car. A great opportunity to acquire a well-sorted MK2 that is ready to be enjoyed.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1938 Rover 14hp Three Position Drophead Coupe

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Coachwork by Salmons & Sons Estimate: £20,000 - £24,000* Reg No: DZ 5900

MOT: January 2023

Chassis No: 931227 Unveiled on 14th October 1938 for the following model year, the thoroughly revised Rover 14 gained a wider 48-inch track, more powerful 1901cc straight-six engine, Luvax automatic chassis lubrication and synchromesh on third and fourth gears. Part of the revered P2 range, it could be had in Saloon or Drophead Coupe guises with the latter being crafted by Salmons & Sons of Newport Pagnell. Built for the 1939 model year, chassis 931227 was despatched to Salmons on 18th November 1938. Clothed with Body No. JJ17, it is now among the earliest known survivors from the 177 made. Bill McCreath’s 2018 book ‘Rover – The Salmons Tickford Drophead Coupes’ posits that only 8-11 of the 25 cars thought to still exist are currently roadworthy. Road registered as ‘DZ 5900’ on 11th January 1939, the four-seater was supplied new via the Ulster Motor Works to Sir George Ernest Clark 2nd Baronet of Dunlambert and Deputy Chairman of the Great Northern Railway. Changing hands several times thereafter, the 14 was advertised for sale by Jim Crockard of Co. Down in 1991 with the vendor jumping at the chance to acquire such a rarity. Showing an unwarranted 44,426 miles, the Rover was then treated to a very extensive and photographically documented restoration emerging in time to claim the runner’s up prize in the prewar class of the 1993 G-MEX Northern Classic Car Show. Twice winner of the Rover Sports Register’s Belvoir Trophy for ‘Best pre1950 car’ in 1994 and 2018, ‘DZ 5900’ has toured extensively (and reliably) through the UK and Europe. Benefiting from a thorough engine overhaul at 77,600 miles in 2016 (c.4,000 ago), more recent work has encompassed attention to the rear wheel bearings, suspension, distributor and gear selector indent springs. Summedup by the seller as ‘a usable classic that is a joy to drive’, this lovely Rover is offered for sale with voluminous history file and MOT valid until January 2023.

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1993 Bentley Continental R

75

Estimate: £26,000 - £30,000* Reg No: ROI 6696

MOT: April 2022

Chassis No: SCBZB03C2RCH52016 The Continental R (code-named ‘Nepal’ by the engineering department) was designed and built entirely at Crewe. This was a significant change from previous Continentals that were offered out to coachbuilders to complete, although Mulliner Park Ward was involved in developing the body shape. The Continental R filled the space left by the Carmargue, sharing with that model an eye-watering list price. When launched in 1991, the initial press release had the price as £160,000, only for that to be tweaked upwards soon afterwards to £175,000, when the new VAT rate was announced in that year’s budget. The sleek shape had more than a nod to a more modern Bentley, to an exciting future, rather less obviously classic, and benefitted from work in the wind tunnel; the windscreen was raked to lower the vehicle’s drag coefficient, enhancing fuel consumption, lowering wind noise and raising the model’s top speed. It is said that when the model was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show, the assembled audience broke out into spontaneous applause. Supplied new by H.A. Fox of Torquay and finished in the handsome combination of Diamond Blue Silver Metallic with Parchment hide upholstery and Maple wood veneers, ‘ROI 6696’ boasts extensive main dealer and specialist service history, comprising of twenty-one service stamps across two books. Now showing a warranted 68,913 miles from new, the vehicle was treated to some £4,048.24 worth of fettling by John Hall Motor Vehicle Engineer during August 2020 including attention to the engine, automatic transmission, turbocharger, lambda sensor, suspension and brakes. ‘ROI 6696’ comes accompanied with its original handbook, two service books, a number of previous invoices, MOTs and the V5 document.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1971 Aston Martin DB6 Mark 2 61,746 miles from new and current family ownership since 1972

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Estimate: £290,000 - £330,000* Reg No: EJW 520J

Chassis No: DB6MK2/4285/R

MOT: August 2022

Retaining its all-important matching chassis and engine numbers, this last of the line Mk2 DB6 with desirable ZF 5-speed manual gearbox is one of just 238 examples produced (excluding the 38 Volante examples). Attractively finished in its original shade of Olive Green Metallic complemented by a Tan leather interior, ‘EJW 520J’ has covered just 61,746 miles from new in the hands of one former keeper and subsequent family ownership since 1972. Understood to have been purchased new from HR Attwood Ltd of Williamson Street, Wolverhampton by a Mr Roger Turner, resident of the West Midlands, it has remained in the Worcestershire area ever since. Subject to some £40,000 of expenditure with Torque Automotive Engineering in 2008, the engine and differential were overhauled in 2013 by marque specialist David Warburton’s Specialised Automotive Services of Clitheroe, Lancashire when the mileage was recorded as 61,000. Further mechanical fettling also carried out by them at this time included chassis and suspension repairs with the works totalling some £40,000 for which invoices are on file. In June 2021 they were requested to carry out a full service, these works entailing stripping and cleaning of the braking system, changing of fluids including the anti-freeze and brake fluid and replacement of the rocker cover gaskets. A further invoice for this amounting £1280.71 is contained in the history file. Unsurprisingly, the vendor now describes the engine and transmission as “excellent” whilst the paintwork, bodywork and interior are rated as “very good”. Clearly well cared for and offered with its original handbook, service book stamped to 1975, old MoT certificates back to 1975 (at 38227 miles), a large number of invoices and current MoT to August 2022, this highly collectible late model DB6, family owned since 1972 and with just 61,746 miles recorded, is well worthy of the closest inspection. Entering production in July 1969 but not formally unveiled for another month, the rakishly elegant DB6 Mk2 was the ultimate evolution of the iconic Aston Martin DB4/DB5/DB6 line. Sharing the same sheet steel platform chassis as its immediate predecessor complete with all-around coil-sprung suspension (independent double-wishbone front, trailing arm/beam axle rear), fourwheel disc brakes and Armstrong Select-a-ride adjustable rear shock absorbers, the newcomer nevertheless incorporated a host of detail improvements. Sharper and more responsive to drive thanks to wider wire wheels on 6” rims and fatter tyres sourced from the DBS model (hence the need for its trademark flared wheel arches), the Mk2 also benefited from the provision of standardfit power-assisted rack and pinion steering. Automatic transmission remained a `no cost’ option, while cars equipped with the five-speed ZF manual gearbox gained a lower first gear ratio and more positive Borg & Beck clutch. The fabulous Tadek Marek designed 3995cc DOHC straight-six engine could be had with a nascent form of electronic fuel injection. However, most buyers wisely

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opted for carburettor-fed variants in standard (triple SU, 282bhp) or high-performance Vantage (triple Weber, 325bhp) tune. Indeed, so troublesome did the AE Brico EFI system prove that several Mk2s were converted to Vantage specification by the factory. Revised seating both front and rear meant that the last of the classic DB-series family could also lay claim to being the most comfortable. Only in production until November 1970, just 238 DB6 Mk2 saloons are thought to have been made (of which a mere 122 were reputedly to triple SU carburettor-fed specification).


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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2007 Jaguar XKR Convertible

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Just c.39,000 miles from new Estimate: £18,000 - £22,000* Reg No: RF56 HFW

Chassis No: SAJAC44R579B13822

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Estimate: £15,000 - £17,000* MOT: February 2023

Introduced at the 2005 Frankfurt Motor Show, the second-generation Jaguar XK range (codenamed X150) was styled by Ian Callum. Deliberately evoking the E-Type via its oval grille, speeding teardrop glasshouse and muscular haunches, the newcomer featured bonded / riveted aluminium construction, all-round independent suspension, power steering and four-wheel disc brakes. Powered by a supercharged 4.2-litre V8 engine developing some 420bhp and 413lbft of torque, the range topping XKR variant was reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 4.9 seconds and was limited to 155mph. Finished in the highly attractive Liquid Silver with contrasting charcoal hide interior, this example is offered with just 39,284 miles and 4 previous keepers. ‘RF56 HFW’ boasts a desirable factory specification including 20” Senta alloys, adaptive cruise control, automatic headlights, heated front ‘highline’ seats, parking aid with rear sensors, electric seats, bi‑xenon headlights and super sports CATS suspension. Included with the vehicle is an impressive number of documents, including the service book containing eight stamps between 2009 at 12,008 miles to 2021 at 39,193 miles, all previous MOTs, 2011 main dealer bill of sale at £34,500, receipts dating between 2008 to the present, various documents, handbooks and wallet.

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1960 Chevrolet C20 Apache

Reg No: 915 XVG

Chassis No: 0C2540106800

MOT: Exempt

Launched the preceding Autumn, Chevrolet’s 1960-model year line-up included a new, lighter capacity pick-up truck that featured many firsts. Most notable were a ‘drop-centre’ ladder frame chassis, allowing the cab to sit lower, and independent front suspension, giving an almost carlike ride in a truck. Also new for 1960 was a revised designation system for trucks made by GM. Gone were the 3100, 3200, and 3600 monikers. Instead, a new scheme assigned a 10, 20, or 30. Since 1957, Chevy trucks had been available from the factory with four-wheel drive, and the fresh nomenclature saw those with rear-wheel drive carry a ‘C’ prefix and those with four-wheel drive a ‘K’ one. Finished in Olive Green with Grey Cloth upholstery and ‘Desert Dog Towing’ motifs to each door, this particular example was imported to the UK in 2019 and has since been treated to an overhauled braking system, new master cylinder, alternator conversion, new battery, plugs, points and condenser and had all the oils changed. Riding on Black painted wheels and wearing ‘Chevrolet Apache 20’ badging, ‘915 XVG’ is described by the vendor as being in ‘Good’ condition with regard to its 4.6 litre (283 cu in) V8 engine, four-speed floor change transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork plus paintwork and is fitted with functional Harvey Frost break down equipment.


1972 Lenham Le Mans GT

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Estimate: £22,000 - £24,000* Reg No: LPC 8K

Chassis No: GAN5119035

2007 Jaguar XJ

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34,000 miles from new Estimate: £11,000 - £13,000*

MOT: Exempt

The brainchild of Julian Kingsford-Booty and David Miall-Smith, the Lenham Motor Company grew from their restoration business at The Vintage and Sports Car Garage, in Lenham, established in the early 1960s. Following the successful creation of a lightweight hardtop for a customer’s ‘Frogeye’ Sprite, subsequent demand led to the production of all manner of fastbacks, bonnets and hardtops for a range of British marques including MG, Triumph, Jaguar and Jensen-Healey. In 1967 the Lenham Le Mans GT was born, featuring Le Mans style glassfibre GT bodywork; the subsequent Spridget conversions enjoying an enviable level of success on the racetrack and becoming more sophisticated as time went by. This 1972 example has been treated to a ground-up restoration by renowned historic racer and engineer, Michael Schryver, during 2020-2021. Powered by a JS Motorsport prepared 1293cc engine with zero race miles, with a fresh clutch and new Hardy Engineering four-speed manual gearbox, full roll cage and plumbed-in fire extinguishing system, LPC 8K is eminently suitable for fast road or historic competition usage. Currently described as being in “excellent” condition as regards its body, green paintwork, engine, transmission and Green and Black interior, this pretty GT is effectively a fresh Lenham Le Mans ready to be enjoyed.

Reg No: SD57 AXH

Chassis No: SAJAC891987H22175

MOT: December 2022

The Jaguar XJ (X350) was a full-sized four-door luxury saloon manufactured and marketed worldwide by Jaguar for model years 2003–2009. Designer Ian Callum spruced up the retro appearance of the Geoff Lawson designed XJ, for the third generation. If you really wanted to stretch out this long wheelbase version offers 125mm extra body length. The long wheelbase was offered from 2005 to 2009. These extended length models were the longest of Jaguars. A full aluminium unibody chassis and bodywork was among the first for a mass-produced automobile. Production ended after seven years with a total production of 83,566. This Silver TDVi Long wheelbase example comes with a multitude of Sovereign specification features as expected including; satellite navigation, remote central locking, electric rear sun blinds, ivory leather, climate control, computer, cruise control, electric windows, electric seats and heated seats. Cherished by the two previous owners, ‘SD57 AXH’ was originally sold by Taggart’s Jaguar of Glasgow on 14th September 2007. It has a full service history from that dealer up until September 2016 at 28143 miles and then an independent garage in Glasgow up until the last stamp which shows 31310 miles in January 2019. Offered with 2 keys, the owners handbook, old MOTs and invoices and V5C. The vendor describes the condition of the bodywork, paintwork and interior as very good and the engine, electrical equipment, transmission and gearbox as excellent.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1963 AC Ace 2.6

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The mortal remains of ‘032’ No Reserve* Reg No: Un-Reg (was ‘150 PH’)

Chassis No: RS5032

MOT: None

When Bristol announced that 1961 would see it cease making six-cylinder engines for its own or anybody else’s cars, AC was left in a quandary. A hugely accomplished Ace exponent and the proprietor of competition preparation specialist ‘Ruddspeed’, Ken Rudd soon persuaded the Thames Ditton factory to adopt Ford’s Zephyr MKII powerplant as a replacement. Notably shorter than its Bristol predecessor and just 40lb heavier, the Ford engine allowed AC to reduce the Ace’s frontal area and imbue it with a smaller, prettier grille. An acknowledgement of Ken Rudd’s involvement, the Zephyr-powered cars carried ‘RS’ prefixes to their chassis numbers and could be had in five levels of Ruddspeed tuning. The ultimate development of the iconic AC Ace, the 2.6 would also prove by far the rarest. Produced for just 30 months or so, from mid-1961 until the end of 1963, a mere 37 examples were made with only 24 being to right-hand drive specification (plus the prototype). According to the AC Owners’ Club, chassis RS5032 was despatched from the Works on 29th May 1963. Finished in Pearl Black with Red leather upholstery and originally road registered as ‘150 PH’, the car’s impressive specification included a curved (Cobra-style) windscreen, Raymond Mays alloy cylinder head, triple SU carburettors, fibreglass hardtop and Ford Zephyr MKIII four-speed manual gearbox. A keen amateur driver who also campaigned a Kieft-Ford Formula Junior singleseater, first owner W.J. Williams hillclimbed the Ace 2.6 as did his immediate successor Dr Stuart Saunders. Acquired by the vendor’s late father during 1969 whose first job coincidentally had been in AC’s technical department, the two-seater was taken off the road a decade later and stripped pending a restoration that has yet to happen. A friend kindly agreed to store the chassis and front and rear clips in a barn he was renting but failed to notify the family when his landlord chose to develop the site. Previously shorn of its bonnet, boot, doors, interior, engine, gearbox, back axle, suspension, brakes, wheels, interior body panelling and all badging etc, the unidentified assembly was thus consigned to the W.J. & D.J. Mills scrapyard in East Suffolk. A recent conversation with a member of the Mills clan has confirmed that the chassis and front and rear clips caused quite some bafflement but were ultimately dismembered. Although, if the condition of the tubular steel chassis was anything like that of the remaining suspension components then its reusability, had its survived to the present day, would have been very doubtful! We cannot guarantee that everything shown in the website photographs relates to an AC Ace 2.6. However, we believe that the mortal remains of ‘032’ comprises the following original parts: engine (complete with Mays cylinder head), gearbox, differential, chassis plate, bonnet / bootlid / doors (all correctly stamped with ‘032’), much of the internal body panelling, steering column / box, wheel spinners, bumper overriders, fuel tank, washer bottle, heater, headlamp rims, tail lights, pedals,

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radiator grille and assorted brake / suspension items not to mention the factory-fitted seats, door cards, carpets, dashboard, instruments, hardtop, soft-top, tonneau cover and side screens. Even the original ignition key and barrel are present, while the odometer shows a credible 58,423 miles. Several manufacturers including W.O. Bentley regarded a car’s chassis as a replaceable service item and there are no shortage of companies that could fabricate a new one including AC Heritage of Brooklands who have access to the original factory tooling. Coming to market for the first time in fifty-three years, there is no doubt that the mortal remains of ‘032’ require a huge amount of work before they can constitute a complete car again. However, this is surely a project worth tackling especially as one of its sister cars, ‘030’, sold for $500,000 at Monterey last August.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1925 Lagonda 12/24

82

1 of just 5 known survivors Estimate: £15,000 - £17,000* Reg No: YM 221

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 7122 Although best known as a manufacturer of sports and luxury cars, Lagonda began by making motorcycles and tri-cars before progressing to a series of highly innovative Light Car designs culminating in the 12/24 of 1924. Weighing just 12cwt (c.600kg), the newcomer was of semi-monocoque construction – like the Lancia Lambda – whereby its chassis and lower body were assembled as a single integral unit. Powered by a 1460cc four-cylinder engine allied to three-speed manual transmission, the 12/24 also featured a revised back axle with spiral bevel final drive and improved rear wheel drum brakes (fronts were an optional extra). Capable of over 50mph and 40mpg, the Lagonda was praised by the contemporary motoring press for its hillclimbing ability and high-quality fittings / fixtures. Of the 2,250 12/24 cars thought to have been completed, just five survivors are known to the Lagonda Club. Issued with the London registration number ‘YM 221’ on 30th November 1925 and surviving WW2, this decidedly rare Lagonda belonged to Roger Seabrook Esq by the early 1970s. Extensively refurbished by subsequent keeper J. Cortese Esq including attention to its engine, gearbox and dynamo etc, the four-seater still required finishing when Walter Beesly Esq bought it from a Coys auction during Winter 1990. Re-registered with the DVLA in 1991, the 12/24 later spent twenty years stabled alongside a 1934 Lagonda M45 T7 Tourer. Dry stored for a decade before entering the current ownership during 2020, the 12/24 has since benefited from overhauls of its radiator, starter motor, magneto and Motometer. The bonnet and front wings were repainted and most of the brightwork refurbished. Presenting as an older restoration ‘YM 221’ is variously rated by the vendor as being ‘very good’ (engine, electrical equipment), ‘good’ (gearbox, bodywork, paintwork) or ‘average’ (interior trim). Offered for sale with V5C Registration Document, sundry expired MOT certificates, handwritten provenance, various restoration photos and recent invoices totalling over £3,000.

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1930 Morgan Aero

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Restored to flat-sided Aero specification Estimate: £35,000 - £40,000* Reg No: BF 7889

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: JTOR/572838 An ingenious concept, HFS Morgan built his first ThreeWheeler in 1909. Based around a tubular steel chassis frame, the design’s low centre of gravity and advanced ‘sliding pillar’ independent front suspension endowed it with superlative roadholding. Progressively developed, the single rear-wheeldriven platform played host to a variety of JAP, Matchless, Blackburne, Anzani and Ford powerplants over the years (though, the prototype used a Peugeot unit). Fearsome competition cars, Morgan Three Wheelers driven by the likes of HFS himself, Clive Lones and Harold Beart acquitted themselves well on race circuits and trial stages alike (Mrs Gwenda Stewart recorded 115.66mph during a record run at Montlhery in 1930). Gracing the pages of a marque brochure for the first time during 1920 (but available a couple of seasons before then), the Aero soon became a favourite among sporting motorists. With its stark yet sleek bodywork, impressive power to weight ratio and nimble handling, the two-seater was capable of embarrassing far more expensive machinery. Initially propelled by a 980cc JAP V-twin sidevalve engine allied to twospeed manual transmission, the model continued to evolve until production ceased in 1933. Reportedly beginning life as a more pedestrian Family model, chassis 2452B was restored to ‘Flat-Sided Aero’ specification during an extensive, two-year long restoration. Fitted with a highly desirable JAP JTOR 998cc V-Twin engine that is said to have been overhauled by Harper Engineering on a ‘no expense spared’ basis, the Morgan was apparently coach painted with ten plus coats. Running extremely well during our recent photography session and sounding fantastic, ‘BF 7889’ represents a great opportunity to acquire a fast and well-sorted Vintage Three-Wheeler. Offered for sale with a bespoke trailer, V5C Registration Document, spare cylinder heads / crankcases and assorted paperwork.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1929 Bentley Speed Six ‘Le Mans’-style Tourer Current ownership since 2003

84

Estimate: £500,000 - £600,000* Reg No: UU 5911

Chassis No: BA2587

MOT: Exempt

Verily, the car was alive, time after time it seemed to laugh, gather itself together and jump from the banking at a pace that really thrilled, as wild a ride as ever Valkyrie dreamed’ (S.C.H. ‘Sammy’ Davis recounting his drive to second overall at the 1929 Brooklands 500-mile race aboard a Bentley Speed Six).

Introduced in October 1928 as a high-performance variant of the existing 6½ Litre model, the Speed Six twice won the Le Mans 24 hours as well as distinguishing itself at various Brooklands meetings. Although the factory racing cars sat on an 11ft wheelbase, their production siblings could be had with 11ft 6in, 11ft 8.5in and 12ft 8.5in wheelbases. Hailed as marque founder W.O. Bentley’s favourite creation, the Speed Six was powered by a 6597cc straight-six engine that developed 160bhp (later 180bhp) and well over 400lbft of torque thanks to a ‘hotter’ camshaft, higher compression ratio and twin SU carburettors. Capable of over 100mph (depending upon gearing) and with nearly twice as much power on tap as a Rolls-Royce Phantom I, the Bentley has some claim to being Britain’s first supercar. Thanks to the efforts of the Bentley Drivers’ Club and numerous marque specialists, the Speed Six has long been valued as an events car proving its mettle on long distance endurance rallies such as the Peking to Paris, Colorado Grand and 1000 Millas Sport not to mention at race meetings including the Le Mans Classic, Goodwood Revival and Monterey Historic. Only in production for two seasons, just 182 Bentley 6½ Litre cars were completed to Speed Six specification with values of the factory team cars running into eight figures! According to Dr Clare Hay’s definitive work, ‘Bentley – The Vintage Years’, chassis BA2587 was built on the shortest production Speed Six wheelbase (11ft 6in) and fitted with Close Coupled Saloon coachwork by H.J. Mulliner. Granted the London registration number ‘UU 5911’ and delivered in June 1929, the car’s first owner is recorded as Ernest Taylor Esq. of Heath Lodge, The Bishop’s Avenue, Finchley; an address on what is today known as ‘Billionaire’s Row’. The ‘Mr Taylor’ in question is thought to have been none other than Vice Admiral Sir Ernest Augustus Taylor KCMG, CVO who served as a MP after retiring from the Royal Navy. Well known in society circles, he was photographed with the likes of Douglas Fairbanks and Charlie Chaplin. The Bentley’s second keeper, Peregrine Philip Saillard Pratt Esq., gave his address as the Naval & Military Club of Piccadilly, W1; an august institution whose past members have included HRH Prince Philip, T. E. Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia), Ian Fleming, David Niven and Rudyard Kipling. A wealthy gentleman with a passion for speed, Mr Pratt also owned a De Havilland Gipsy Moth biplane which he kept hangared at Brooklands Aviation. The car’s accompanying copy service record contains entries up until August 1939 and reveals that a new front axle bed and nearside stub axle were fitted three years earlier at an indicated 76,010 miles.

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The Speed Six’s post-World War Two history in unclear albeit a letter on file from Brian Fenn, then chairman of the Bentley Drivers’ Club’s Eligibility Committee, to the DVLA dated 24th May 2004 states: ‘So far as we can ascertain, about twenty-five years ago the car was in a collision which damaged the chassis and was immediately garaged and not used or repaired. It has now been completely renovated using the existing components’. Among a barrage of W.O. Bentleys amassed by the Kamper family in Cambridgeshire, the Speed Six passed to renowned marque enthusiast William Sykes during 1995 at which time it was assessed to comprise the following usable Cricklewood components: engine bearer crossmember (BA2587), steering box (BA2587), Type ‘C’ gearbox (6015), rear axle (MD2561), rear axle nosepiece (BA4003) and front axle (SM3923). Interestingly, the latter is understood to have been first fitted to a 4½ Litre ‘Blower’ Bentley. Mr Sykes had the chassis refurbished using new side rails and sourced a ‘Le Mans Replica’ body from H&H Coachworks of Henley, Oxon. The engine was assembled using a new crankcase allied to an original block, cambox, throat and three-throw gear with the former being stamped up as ‘BA2589S’ so as to give the appearance of a factory service replacement unit (the car’s original engine – BA2589 – was apparently transplanted into chassis BR2359 but subsequently failed). Still a work in progress when the vendor acquired it in 2003, he lost little time in entrusting chassis BA2587 to renowned marque specialist R.C. Moss of Bedfordshire; the same company that restored the ex-Works Bentley Speed Six ‘Old Number 3’ to Pebble Beach concours winning standards.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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Tasked with preparing the Speed Six for long distance rallies and tours, Graham Moss of R.C. Moss removed the ‘Le Mans Replica’ body and went right through the chassis fettling the steering, suspension and brakes. He also fabricated a dashboard to the seller’s requirements, installed a new high ratio 3:1 crown wheel and pinion, had the Carl Zeiss headlamps renovated, overhauled the three throw mechanism, rewired the car and had it painted and trimmed etc. The associated bills total some £75,800 and start with a labour rate of £28 per hour. Reunited with its original London-issued registration number – ‘UU 5911’ - by the DVLA on 3rd June 2004, the Bentley has since been enjoyed by the vendor on the 2005 Rallye des Alpes, 2006 Bentley Tour of Aquitaine and Bordeaux, 2007 The Jewel that is Jordan III, 2008 Eighth Autumn Ramble, 2009 Ninth Autumn Ramble and 2010 Summer Saunter to Ireland etc. Returning to Graham Moss in between times for maintenance and improvement, he last serviced the Speed Six during August 2021 at a cost of £5,568.40 and has described it to us as ‘a fantastic driving car’. The vendor echoes this opinion and is only offering the car for sale due to his advancing years. Starting readily upon inspection and sounding wonderful, ‘UU 5911’ rewards detailed inspection. Sat on an 11ft 6in wheelbase, much of the detailing mimics that of the factory team cars which twice won the Le Mans 24 hours including the placement of the side-mounted spare wheel, various quick-release filler caps, skimpy three-door fabric covered body and shovel-backed lightweight front seats etc. Currently valued for insurance purposes at £1,200,000 and eligible for a host of prestigious and exciting events, this splendid Speed Six is seemingly ready for yet more adventure! Offered for sale with the V5C registration document, copy of factory service records, numerous R.C. Moss Ltd invoices, assorted photographs and entry packs for various past events.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1969 MG C GT ‘Sebring’ Evocation

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Estimate: £25,000 - £30,000* Reg No: UYD 96G

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: GCD14584G The MGC GTS Sebring is arguably one of the best looking and most iconic creations to come out of the BMC Competitions Department from the 1960s. MG felt that success in international competition would help their image in general and the forthcoming launch of the MGC in particular. Design work began in 1966 to compete in the World Sportscar Championship with six bodyshells built with the centre structure made of steel, similar to the production cars. Exterior panels, such as the roof, doors, and bubble-arched wings, were formed in aluminium. Ultimately, only two lightweight versions of the MGC GT were assembled by BMC at Abingdon. Their final Works-supported outings were at Sebring in 1969, when the MGC competition project was cancelled. Chassis number ‘GCD14584G’ remained standard until 1982, at which point it was converted into a ‘Sebring’ evocation. Raced by several owners from 1986 to 2002, it is understood to have been used sparingly on the road and for track days until purchased by the vendor in 2008. Comprehensively restored over three years, the fibreglass ‘Sebring’ was finished in its original shade of Grampian Grey. The engine was overhauled and set up on a rolling road. A Quaife LSD unit was incorporated in the rear axle and an uprated four-speed gearbox is fitted with a straight-cut gear set. Riding on replica ‘Minilite’ wheels (spare pair included), the foam-filled alloy fuel tank holds sufficient fuel for around an hour’s running at race pace and brand new Ridgard driver’s seat comes with race harness. Offered in ‘fast-road’ configuration, it features a steel tailgate and wind-up glass windows although a lightweight tailgate and polycarbonate windows accompany the car. Not raced since its restoration, ‘UYD 96G’ is said by the vendor to be ‘box fresh’ and is eligible for several race series such as the CSCC Swinging Sixties and MGCC BCV8 series, or alternatively for fast road and track day use.

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1998 Dare Ginetta G4

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Estimate: £26,000 - £30,000* Reg No: XPF 162

MOT: August 2022

Chassis No: SABTVR03598219120 Following the sale of the original Ginetta company (1958), the Walklett brothers under Dare (UK) negotiated a license to produce the Ginetta G4 and G12 and the well-respected Essexbased company are still in business today fabricating shells and an extensive number of parts. One of the cars reportedly built by the Walkletts themselves, ‘XPF 162’ was manufactured in 1998 and is presented in Metallic Silver with Metallic British Racing Green body stripe and features a complimentary Black and Green interior. As designed, this particular example is a relatively rare convertible offered with both hard and soft tops and was built as a competition car that is equally useable on the road and is therefore fully road legal, whilst still being eligible for a number of championships, notably the Sports Specials Championship within 750MC, Ginetta’s own series, Classic & Sports Car Club Modern Classics is also an option as well as HSCC’s Historic Road Sports (with some minor modification perhaps). It may also be possible to apply for a historic passport with a replacement engine. ‘XPF 162’ is thought to be the only car powered by a 2.0 Zetec. The most recent dyno printout shows 220bhp. The car features an Omex 600 ECU and loom, Ford Type 9 gearbox with semi-helical 5-speed close-ratio, rear Ford Sierra LSD with uprated driveshafts, uprated adjustable dampers with bespoke Brembo/Dare front four-pot calipers and brake bias adjuster, Dare chrome rollover bars and Toyo R888 semi-slick tyres. ‘XPF 162’ was subject to restoration in 2010 which included a full engine overhaul at a cost of some £7,000 and comes accompanied by a number of previous MOTs and invoices totaling over £26,000. The odometer displays 33,061 miles and the V5 document shows 5 former keepers. The vendor rates the condition of the bodywork and paintwork and interior trim as ‘Good’, with the engine, electrical equipment, transmission and gearbox as ‘Very Good,’ and the car is offered with an MOT valid until 18 August 2022.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1983 Audi Quattro 10V

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Estimate: £50,000 - £60,000* Reg No: A717 BWV

Chassis No: WAUZZZ852DA902121

MOT: March 2023

Audi’s Quattro is a legend that re-wrote the form book of international rallying, as well as causing rival manufacturers to rethink their offerings to members of the public desiring road cars of above average traction. It was, quite literally, a trail blazer. The story began with Audi chassis engineer Jörg Bensinger, who spent a Finnish winter testing the Volkswagen Type 183 Iltis, a four-wheel drive West German military vehicle previously developed by VAG, and found it could out perform all other machines on snow, whatever their type or power output. He put the idea of a four-wheel drive version of the Audi 80 Coupe to the company’s hierarchy and, well, you know the rest. The resulting model was launched to great excitement at the 1980 Geneva Salon and then released to European customers later the same year. It was initially powered by a 2144cc in-line, five-cylinder, 10-valve SOHC unit with turbocharger and intercooler. This was the first time the mass car market had been introduced to the intoxicating combination of turbo power and four-wheel drive, and the results were electric. Motor magazine rocketed their test car to 30mph in a dismissive 1.8 seconds and to 60mph in 6.5 seconds, causing them to comment ‘…such acceleration can hardly be bettered by any other four-seater in current production’, and that was irrespective of engine size. With such a devastating weapon at its disposal, Audi wasted no time in taking on the rallying establishment. The results came thick and fast, with victory for versions of the model in the 1982 and 1984 Manufacturers’ Championship and in the Drivers’ one for Hannu Mikkola in 1983 and Stig Blomqvist in 1984. It was also in a Quattro that the French female driver ace Michelle Mouton became the first woman ever to win a World Championship rally, and was very unlucky not to enjoy outright victory in the 1982 Championship. During its production cycle, what enthusiasts now refer to as the ‘Ur’ (original) Quattro enjoyed two engine upgrades and continuous development, but the basic concept never changed and even the outward appearance altered very little. Boasting its own dedicated assembly line and crew, some 11,452 examples are understood to have been completed between 1980 and 1991. Enthusiasts will never totally agree on a list of cars that changed the world, but few would deny Audi’s ‘Ur’ Quattro a place. Owned since 1985 by the vendors brother-in-law then purchased by the vendor in 1999, ‘A717 BWV’ covered just 94,000 miles before being taken off the road in 2005 and dry stored. During 2020/2021 the vehicle underwent a professional, extensive but sympathetic restoration by Allard Sports Cars. The engine has been fully rebuilt with new cylinder liners, piston rings, main and big end bearings, new oil pump, water pump, all new gaskets and belts. The cylinder head has been refaced, a new camshaft fitted with the cam followers re-shimmed. The transmission has been reconditioned also. The entire bodyshell has been stripped, repaired, paint prepared and repainted in original Alpine White, including full reconditioning of the underside. All vehicle components have

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been reconditioned, tested and refitted. Suspension has been overhauled and reinstalled with new bushes. All brakes checked and reconditioned where required including new brake pads. The wheels have been reconditioned and shod with four new tyres. The vehicle has also had all new fuel and brake lines and a new battery. Very rarely does the opportunity arise to purchase such a sort after vehicle with all the hard work and expense already dealt with, this legendary 80’s icon is in excellent condition and ready for everyday use.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1947 Bentley MkVI

88

Estimate: £24,000 - £28,000* Reg No: JGX 926

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: B30BH Introduced in 1946, Bentley’s MkVI was the first vehicle offered by the company with factory-designed coachwork, and the first assembled in Rolls-Royce’s Crewe factory. Aimed at the emerging ‘owner-driver’ luxury car market, it was closely based on the 1939 MkV. Built around a massive cruciform-braced chassis with independent front suspension and a leaf-sprung ‘live’ rear axle, it was fitted with a freshly developed 4257cc OISE straight-six engine mated to a four-speed manual gearbox. Capable of over 100mph when clad in ‘standard saloon’ coachwork, the MkVI developed a reputation for being refined yet responsive. Delivered in September 1947, to Jack Olding of Jack Olding & Co Ltd of London W1, ‘JGX 926’ was finished in Pearl Grey Metallic with Blue hide. By April 1983, the MkVI had changed hands a few times, yet the MkVI’s odometer had increased by a mere 292 miles since 1961. In 2016, ‘JGX 926’ changed hands once more through Harvey Walsh Ltd, with the car receiving significant work to the engine and chassis before being sold to its current keeper later that year. Since 2016, the car has seen nearly £4,000 in expenditure with Harvey Walsh Ltd, including the trafficators being renewed, fuel pumps overhauled and wings refinished in 2018, replacement tyres, replacement drive belt and general maintenance in 2019 and a fuel system overhaul in 2020. Now showing just 66,162 miles, believed to be genuine, ‘JGX 926’ is still presented in its original combination of Pearl Grey Metallic with contrasting Blue hide, and is believed to retain its original interior. The accompanying history file containing details of its initial build, ownership changes and numerous old MOTs / invoices. Also included are rare leather boot straps, a full set of tools and more. The vendor rates the condition of the bodywork, engine, electrical equipment, paintwork, transmission and interior trim all as ‘Good’.

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1982 Mercedes-Benz 280 SL

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Only 35,000 miles from new Estimate: £20,000 - £25,000* Reg No: CWL 842Y

MOT: April 2022

Chassis No: 10704222014948 The R107 series was the result of an extremely thorough design process. In an attempt to avoid falling foul of threatened American safety legislation, Stuttgart produced an open car whose structural rigidity surpassed that of some contemporary saloons. Indeed, even now some forty-seven years after its introduction, the R107 retains a reassuring air of solidity. Allied to this was sure-footed handling courtesy of all-around independent coil-sprung suspension, power-assisted steering, and disc brakes. Always more of a grand tourer than an outand-out sports car, the vast majority of R107s were fitted with an automatic transmission. Launched in September 1974, the 280SL was less powerful but more fuel-efficient than its V8 brethren. However, with some 185bhp and 177lbft of torque on tap from its fuel-injected 2746cc DOHC straight-six engine, the model could still boast authoritative 120mph performance. This UK-supplied right-hand drive car was manufactured in 1982 and UK-registered in November that year. Finished in Silver with Grey interior upholstery, along with a Black soft-top, the car is offered with a body-colour factory hard-top. In current ownership since 2019, it shows only four former keepers and has covered just c.35,334 miles from new. Showing 21,596 miles on the speedometer, it was subject to a documented speedometer change at 13,738 miles by Castles Northgate Ltd. Mercedes-Benz. Specified from new with power-assisted steering, a period Pioneer radio cassette player with electric aerial and central locking, ‘CWL 842Y’ has benefited from a new water pump and servicing in 2017 at 20,074 miles. Covering minimal mileage since, although further serviced in 2019, at 21,102 miles, this 280 SL is offered with original book pack comprising owner’s manual and stamped service book showing 17 entries, previous MoT certificates (the oldest from 1998), a small number of older invoices, sales literature and a spare key.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1967 Land Rover Series IIA 109 Ambulance

90

No Reserve* Reg No: NEG 269E

91

Estimate: £16,000 - £18,000* Chassis No: 25112938D

MOT: Exempt

A sympathetic update of the Series I, the Series II was introduced in April 1958. Available with a choice of 2.25-litre petrol or 2-litre diesel engines, it accounted for some 62,000 sales by 1960. In 1961, the subtly upgraded Series IIA benefited from an improved cooling system and is thought to have been the most successful for sales. Land Rovers were utilised by both the RAF and army as ambulances, with approximately 3000 ‘109’ Field Ambulances manufactured. Manufactured in 1967, this Series IIA, registration number ’03 ET 31’, was dispatched to the Central Vehicle Depot Irvine on 19th February that year. Fitted with the 2.25-litre straight-four petrol engine and four-speed manual transmission, it remained in service until 1998 before being sold through MVSL Disposals. The Land Rover is understood to have remained in storage from then until 2012, when purchased by the vendor. ‘NEG 269E’ was then sympathetically restored comprising of a brake overhaul, clutch and wheel cylinders, ignition system, exhaust renovation and bodywork repairs. This Series IIA was extensively improved cosmetically whilst retaining the patina from its service life. Many new parts were fitted to complete the restoration. Offered with a history file which includes a BMIHT certificate, vehicle service history report, collection of invoices, several past MoT certificates and the current V5C.

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1990 Porsche 944 Turbo

Reg No: G886 PUA

Chassis No: WP0ZZZ95ZLN100770

MOT: T.B.A.

This is no ordinary 944 Turbo, having been meticulously improved and fastidiously maintained - all it needs now is a suitably caring new keeper. ‘G886 PUA’ is finished in Guards Red teamed with a Black interior and rides on genuine Design 90 alloy wheels shod with Toyo Proxes T1-R1 tyres. Every aspect of the body has received attention in recent years and is presented in impressive order for its age. 23,500 miles ago all the mechanicals were treated to a comprehensive overhaul, during which the engine was simultaneously blue-printed and tuned for increased driveability and fitted with adjustable shocks front and rear. The major components were overhauled and balanced and the unit treated to a new hybrid turbocharger and remapped ECU, resulting in a higher boost and lack of lag - this raised output from 250 to 318bhp. The attention to detail and its desirable modifications make this a special example of a sought-after model and is offered with a large collection of invoices, old MOT certificates, original handbook and service book. Featured in an edition of Modern Classics ‘G886 PUA’ has covered 167,400 miles, is offered with an MOT certificate into October 2022 and has been described by Jon Mitchell at JMG Porsche as “awesome”.


1950 Lincoln 2 Door Coupe

92

Estimate: £16,000 - £20,000* Reg No: YWG 448

Chassis No: 50LP7331L

1989 Mercedes-Benz 190E 2.5-16

93

Estimate: £14,000 - £16,000* MOT: Exempt

The Lincoln range featuring ‘rounded’ styling were Lincoln’s first truly post-WWII cars. The aerodynamic hood ornament and recessed ‘French-stylised’ headlights were unique design features that later became popular with hotrodders and known as ‘Frenching’. Lincoln dropped its ageing V12 engine in 1949, replacing it with a 337ci flathead V8 that originated from Ford truck powerplants. The 150hp unit delivers power through an optional Hydra-Matic 4-speed automatic or 3-speed manual transmission, while power windows and seats were standard. Offered in sedan, coupe and roadster body styles, the first generation was only produced from 1949 until 1951 before being replaced by the second and final generation. Chassis number 50LP7331L was built at the Lincoln Plant as a ‘6 Passenger Coupe’, Body Style L-72’, often referred to as the Lincoln ‘Club Coupe’. It was manufactured in 1950 and is understood to have resided in America until 2016 when it was imported to the UK. Having just two UK keepers since importation, this ‘Club Coupe’ is fitted with the 337ci flathead V8 engine is mated to the four-speed automatic transmission offered by Lincoln. Showing off the attractive Lincoln lines, the Black bodywork is combined with Grey cloth upholstery. This rare two-door coupe variant, is understood to have been built for the 1950 model year and is offered with import documentation, original sales literature for a 1949 model and the V5C document.

Reg No: F425 UJN

Chassis No: WBD2010352F585571

MOT: TBA

The 190E was arguably Mercedes-Benz’s most driver orientated car since the legendary 300SL `Gullwing’. Flagship of the recently introduced 190 range, the newcomer had originally been conceived as a potential World Rally Championship contender to outfox the Escorts and the Lotus Sunbeams that dominated rallying at the time, before morphing into a high-performance road car. Campaigned by AMG with factory backing, the championship-winning machines netted the last of their 50 victories during 1993. During its four-year production run, just 4,784 2.5-16s were sold worldwide. Presented in Smokey Silver with contrasting Black leather interior, F425 UJN features the desirable manual gearbox and has been in current ownership for the last 13 years. The car is offered having had £6,288 spent in 2021 after being in storage since 2011. Work on the car has included a service including replacement injectors, fuel distributor, spark plugs, a replacement battery and engine tuning, as well as replacement self-levelling rear suspension and brake calipers, replacement clutch master and slave cylinders and more. Currently showing some 90,400 miles, ‘F425 UJN’ is offered for sale with the original tool kit, spare wheel, owner’s manual, service booklet (the latter carrying sixteen stamps) and old MOT certificates from 1999-2011. The car returned to the road last year, with the odometer reading 90,400 miles.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1965 Jaguar E-Type 4.2 Coupe Genuine ‘Barn Find’ Example

94

No Reserve* Reg No: DPW 785C

Chassis No: 1E 20247

MOT: Exempt

Among the last century’s great motoring icons, Jaguar’s E-type has always inspired loyalty and devotion. Born out of the design and pedigree of the fabulous D-type racer, the model soon acquired a strong competition heritage of its own. Early iterations are referred to as the Series 1 and are the most sought after and coveted of the E-Type. Launched at the 1961 Geneva Salon, the ‘Big Cat’ proved faster and more glamorous than virtually any production rival. Certainly few could match its reputed 150mph top speed. At a time when Ferrari’s lauded 250SWB and 250GTO made do with ‘live’ rear axles, the E-type utilised a sophisticated independent rear set-up with inboard disc brakes. While, rack and pinion steering enhanced the monocoque chassis’s excellent roadholding and handling; putting it light years ahead of American designs like the Corvette. Revised as the Series 2 in 1964, the E-type gained a torquier 4235cc powerplant and four-speed all-synchromesh gearbox of Jaguar’s own design. The 4.2-litre engine produced the same power as the 3.8-litre (265 bhp;198 kW) and same top speed (150 mph;241 km/h), but increased torque 18% from 240 to 283 lb-ft (325 to 384 Nm). Acceleration remained pretty much the same and 0 to 60 mph times were around 6.4 seconds for both engines. With the 4.2 Litre maximum power was now reached at 5,400 rpm instead of the 5,500 rpm of the 3.8-litre. That all meant better throttle response for drivers that did not want to shift down gears. Of the 72,507 E-types and 31,699 Series 1 E-Types , on offer today is one of just 1583 Right Hand Drive Fixed Head examples produced between October 1964 and July 1967. This particular example presents an incredibly rare and exciting opportunity to acquire not only a genuine barn find, but that in the guise of the incredibly sought after Series 1 E-Type. ‘DPW 785C’ was manufactured in 1965 and is presented in Blue with contrasting Grey leather interior. This specification Series 1 is particularly sought after because of the improved gearbox, torquier engine and better brakes. After spending 49 years sitting in storage the car is now a restoration project, with only traces of its original paint visible, though the original interior and matching numbers engine are still present and correct. This automobile has always resided locally, in both Norfolk and Suffolk. The car was first registered on 03 March 1965 to Grawford (Oaklands) Farm Ltd of Wood Farm, Carbrooke. Signed by a R. Grawford. A year later, on 20 June 1966, ‘DPW 785C’ saw its first change of keeper to a Mr David Trenchard Thom, a professional jockey turned racehorse trainer, based in Exning, Newmarket. The vehicle passed hands twice more before being sold via Roger Bradbury Motors to its current custodians in 1971, who purchased it to celebrate getting a teaching job. ‘DPW 785C’ was driven, reportedly often with a white husky riding in the passenger seat, as well as to school on a daily basis. The car was parked up to replace the brake calipers and undertake some repairs to the bodywork, it is thought, at some point between 1973 and 1974, as

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supported by the tax disc in the windshield and the bonnet in primer. It is understood that they got distracted with other projects and so the car remained in place. Worth noting is the car was running at the time it was stored. The odometer currently displays just 79,651 miles, believed to be correct. ‘DPW 785C’ is offered for sale, incredibly, with its original registration document, current registration document and a couple of pieces of associated paperwork. In addition, a number of spare parts are also included which presumably are enough to complete or nearly complete the car.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1966 Sunbeam Tiger Matching numbers example, restored to a high standard

95

Estimate: £50,000 - £60,000* Reg No: BIG 260

Chassis No: B9473623

MOT: Exempt

The Sunbeam Tiger was conceived on the West Coast of the USA and inspired by the success of the AC Cobra – the result of inserting a small-block American V8 engine into the nose of the British designed and built AC Ace. Rootes American Motors Inc. saw the potential for performing a similar operation on the Sunbeam Alpine, whose 1.5-litre, the four-cylinder engine made it more of a loping GT car than an out-and-out sports machine. Preliminary research suggested that the engine used to produce the Cobra – Ford’s 4.2-litre (260ci) ‘Windsor’ unit - would be the appropriate powerplant, and a prototype was commissioned from Carroll Shelby, the man behind the Cobra project. The basic layout of the Alpine was retained and the 164bhp engine endowed the car with a top speed of around 120mph and 0-60mph acceleration time of under eight seconds, leading Tigers to enjoy success in both racing and rallying over the years. A total of some 7,085 examples were eventually produced. Manufactured in 1966 and supplied new to the UK, this Mk1 Tiger is a ‘matching numbers’ example, being still fitted with its original 260ci (4.2-litre) V8 engine mated to the four-speed manual gearbox. Presented in Rosso Red with complementary Cream with Red piped leather interior upholstery. ‘BIG 260’ has had just five owners from new, having entered current ownership in 2002 with a recorded mileage of just c.69,000 miles from new. The beneficiary of an extensive restoration in 2009 by Brian Postle with restoration correspondence amassing approximately £40,000 worth of expenditure, the Tiger’s history file also contains photographic records of the work completed. Accompanied by cherished registration number ‘BIG 260’ which is said to relate to the 260ci V8, the history file further contains the original buff logbook, a large quantity of past MOT certificates and a current V5C. Serviced approximately two years ago with minimal mileage covered since, the Tiger is worthy of close inspection!

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

123


1985 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2 Supersport One of just 34 UK RHD Coupes manufactured

96

Estimate: £80,000 - £90,000* Reg No: C16 GBP

Chassis No: WPOZZZ912G5100922

MOT: April 2022

For the increasing number of customers that coveted the Turbo’s distinctive ‘wide body’ look, but did not need its marginally superior performance, Porsche introduced the SSE package, also known as the Supersport, which could be specified for other models in the 911 range. The Supersport became a very successful model for Porsche even though this car cost over £10,000 extra compared to other models. These SSE cars were the most flexible and usable of all the Porsche models available in 1985 with the all alloy, flat-six engine, which had been fuel injected since 1971, being modified to become the 3164cc and producing an extremely torquey engine. One of the most notable advances in the development of Porsche’s long-running 911 was the introduction for 1984 of the 3.2-litre engine, which was 80% new and incorporated an effective cam chain tensioner and associated lubrication system that, at last, addressed a perennial 911 shortcoming. With 230bhp on tap, the new ‘boxer’ motor endowed the Carrera with a engaging level of performance: a 0-60mph time of 5.3 seconds and a top speed of 152mph. Although it enjoyed a 52hp advantage, the Turbo was only marginally faster, and most considered the normally aspirated Carrera easier to drive. All 3.2 litre Carreras had a redesigned engine inlet and exhaust system, along with the fitment of a service-free Digital Engine Management ignition system (DME) and high compression ratio of 10.3:1, the air-cooled 6-cylinder with Bosch L-Jetronic fuel metering which provided a significant increase in engine performance but a significant reduction in fuel consumption. The engine efficiency was thanks to the fuel cut-off when coasting. In addition to the wide body, the SSE (option code M491) included the Turbo’s spoilers; suspension; four-piston brake calipers; 16” forged alloy wheels; and low profile tyres. Despite adding considerably to the purchase price, the SSE package proved surprisingly popular, with almost 75,000 delivered worldwide between 1984 and 1989. Only 75 right-hand drive examples were delivered to the UK, with just 34 coupes, as offered here. The success of orders for the SSE led to the announcement in 1986 of Porsche to became the world’s first car manufacturer to establish a specialist department at the factory dedicated to tailoring cars to bespoke requirements. Of these 34 UK coupes, ‘C16 BGP’ is one of just 9 cars manufactured worldwide with external rear fog light specification and the 915 transmission. First registered on 25th of November 1985, this particular example was finished in the incredibly desirable Grand-Prix White with contrasting Black leather interior. The specification of this example includes a steel sliding sunroof and electric windows and Continental Sport Contact tyres. Subject to photographically documented restoration between 2016 and 2019, by Cridfords Porsche for its previous owner, there are supporting invoices that total in excess of £50,000. ‘C16 BGP’ is offered for sale with just 65,786 miles on the odometer supported by the accompanying documentation and is a ‘matching numbers’ example. This vehicle

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has been exhibited at a number of UK events, including representing Porsche GB at Goodwood Festival of Speed, as well as further exhibits at events including Boxengasse, Porsche Festival at Brands Hatch, as well as being featured in Classic Porsche magazine. Included with the vehicle is the related registration ‘C16 GBP’, representing the ‘C16’ Model designation and GB Porsche. There is a fully documented history from new, with an extensive file including a full photographic history of the restoration; original bookpack including the driver’s manual, maintenance pack, stamped service book and more. There is a significant collection of previous invoices and MOTs and the V5C document which displays just 7 former keepers. The vendor rates the condition of the bodywork, paintwork, engine, electrical equipment, transmission and gearbox and interior trim all as ‘Excellent’.


*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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c.1930 McDowell Special Sprint Racer

97

Estimate: £20,000 - £25,000* Reg No: N/A

Engine No: CAA148575

MOT: N/A

A letter on file dated February 28th 1997 from Fred Sherk who was not only a previous owner of the ‘Circus Burner’ but also served on the board of directors for The Eastern Museum of Motor Racing in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania makes for interesting reading: ‘From the body style and the fact that it was steel, it was evident to me it was a car from the 1920s / 1930s era . . . The car’s frame is from an Essex automobile. These frames were especially popular among early race car builders because of the graceful kick-up at the rear and the tapered side rails . . . As I recall, the car also had Franklin steering which would be correct for a racer of this vintage. The nose, which strongly resembles the type seen on Miller race cars, is not unusual . . . In summary, having restored six sprint cars ranging in vintage from 1933-1956, I would say the main parts of the car indicate it was a real racer’. After decades in hibernation, the single-seater was restored with a McDowell DOHC engine and returned to competitive usage. Belonging to Jack Hansell of New Jersey thereafter, the sprint car was bought by Bill and Fred Sherk in conjunction with Pittsburgh dealer Jim Etter. The Sherks removed the McDowell DOHC powerplant for a Dreyer single-seater they were reviving and Etter sold the resultant rolling chassis to Joe Cagiono of New Jersey who fitted another heavily modified Ford engine and took the ‘Circus Burner’ racing again. Purchased from Cagiono by Mike Holt who imported it to the UK on behalf of Ian Denny in 1989, the single-seater passed to F3 500cc authority Rodney Cummings eight years later and into Paul Hobb’s possession during 1999. Mr Hobbs obtained a stamped Vintage Sports Car Club Eligibility Form for the sprint car that July. Advertised for sale by dealer Paul Shipley in 2013, the ‘Circus Burner’ has not long emerged from a full mechanical and cosmetic restoration. As well as reworking the steel body and finishing it in period colours with hand painted detailing, renowned pre-WW2 Ford specialists Belcher Engineering Ltd of Norfolk went through the chassis, transmission, suspension and brakes not to mention building a special Ford Model A derived engine. Fitted with a counterbalanced Ford Model B crankshaft and billet conrods, the potent ‘Four Banger’ also boasts: a vernier adjustable alloy cam gear, uprated oil pump, baffled sump, reprofiled sports / touring camshaft, lightened / balanced flywheel, aluminium front plate, right-angle distributor, Roof 101 Cyclone ‘inlet over exhaust’ cylinder head, full pressure lubrication, insert bearings and twin 40mm Venturi Pump carburettors. We are informed that the engine alone would cost £15,000 or more to replicate and there is surely something appealing about driving something with an exhaust pipe that is roughly the same width as its rear tyres! Beautifully detailed with 12-volt electrics, electric cooling fan and Stewart Warner gauges, this glorious sprint car is potentially eligible for a host of VSCC and VHRA events (including the latter’s wonderful Pendine Sands meet). Offered for sale with large history file.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

127


1984 Volkswagen Golf GTI Campaign

98

Estimate: £16,000 - £18,000* Reg No: A350 ORO

MOT: November 2022

Chassis No: 17EW095842 Announced by Douglas J Clarke, Volkswagen UK’s then Marketing Manager, in a letter written to the dealer network on 8th June 1983, the Campaign model was intended to run to 1,000 units. Available in Mars Red, Alpine White, Schwartz Black, Diamond Silver, Helios Blue, Lhasa Green or Atlas Grey, the limited-edition hatchback featured a sunroof, tinted glass, twin auxiliary front lamps and special Pirelli 6J x 14 alloy wheels. Sharing the same mechanical specification as a late Mk1 GTi – fuel-injected 1.8 litre engine and five-speed manual gearbox – the Campaign model was so sought after that it soon inspired a host of imitations. According to the Mk1 Golf Owners’ Club, a genuine UK-designated Campaign will carry the option codes 707 and 750 on its factory build sticker. Chassis 095842 was supplied new by Executive Motors (St Albans) Ltd to John Bull Esq of Sheffield who uprated the brakes via a BR Motorsport servo conversion and later repurchased it. His two custodianships being the subject of an article in VW Motoring magazine (September 1991). Road registered as ‘A350 ORO’ on 10th February 1984, accompanying service books contain 18 stamps. Gracing the front cover of The Golf magazine (April 1997), the Campaign entered the current ownership during November 2003. Warranted to have covered 95,000 miles from new, the hot hatch was effectively taken off the road during 2006. Recommissioned last year, the VW received attention to its brakes, battery, seals, fuel / coolant pipes and Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection system (warm-up regulator, fuel filter, injectors). Fully serviced by a classic car specialist in November 2021 including a cambelt change, the Campaign’s trademark Pirelli alloys are shod with fresh P7 tyres. Rated by the vendor as ‘one of the best original examples in the country’, ‘A350 ORO’ is further said to pleasingly retain its factory-fitted engine and body panels (with associated manufacturer stickers). Offered for sale with original book pack, large history file, V5C and MOT current until November 2022.

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1983 Land Rover Series III 109

99

Current ownership since 1996 and subject to a full restoration Estimate: £14,000 - £16,000* Reg No: STG 287Y

MOT: April 2022

Chassis No: SALLBCAH1AA184292 The world famous Land Rover was launched in 1948 and developed from a single offering to a family of long and short wheelbase derivatives with an ever-increasing choice of engines. The Series III of 1971-1985 was the most numerous, with some 440,000 being produced. Outwardly it was almost identical to the IIA, but the gearbox now, thankfully, benefitted from synchromesh on all ratios, while the cab featured a more modern, moulded plastic facia. Manufactured in 1983, this well-presented LWB Series III was registered new in the United Kingdom on the 2nd of March, 1983. Finished in Marine Blue and White with Black interior upholstery, the Land Rover is fitted with the 2.25-litre straight-four petrol engine and a four-speed manual transmission. Entering into current longterm ownership in 1996 (albeit being transferred from the vendor’s company to private name in 1999 equating to another registered keeper), the Series III has had just three owners from new and just c.65,000 recorded miles. This handsome Series III has been subject to a comprehensive restoration by marque specialists Haywards Revive in 2017, to the tune of some £20,000. ‘STG 287Y’ was uprated with powerassisted steering and a front disc brake conversion. Also bestowed with more modern LED lights for tail/stop, side and turn signals, ‘Wolf’ style steel wheels are painted in a period correct Cream; upgrades that retain the classic Land Rover look that is so attractive to buyers that intend to enjoy them today, on or off road. Having seen minimal mileage since completion, the Land Rover has benefitted from further mechanical fettling in 2021. Accompanied by a couple of invoices and a current V5C document, this is an opportunity to enjoy a classic Series III Land Rover in a more usable specification which includes enhancements for safety whilst retaining the classic look.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1995 Dodge Viper RT/10 Roadster

100

Estimate: £40,000 - £45,000* Reg No: M2 EKO

MOT: July 2022

Chassis No: 1B3BR65E4SV201347 Wonderfully politically incorrect, the Dodge Viper was launched in January 1992. A pure American muscle car, it was conceived by Bob Lutz, Tom Gale, Francois Castaing and Carroll Shelby. Built around a tubular steel backbone frame equipped with all round double-wishbone independent suspension, vented disc brakes and power-assisted rack and pinion steering, it did without ABS or a traction control system. Extensively reworked by Lamborghini (another Chrysler subsidiary at the time), its 8 litre V10 former truck engine gained a new aluminium block and cylinder heads. Quoted as developing some 400bhp and 465lbft of torque, it was mated to a six-speed Borg Warner T-56 manual gearbox. Clad in lightweight resin transfer moulding glassfibre body panels, the targa-roofed RT/10 claimed a 0-60mph time of 4.6 seconds and a top speed of 165mph. Remaining in production until 2017, the Viper has long since attracted a cult following (though, later versions came with a far fuller complement of driver-aid electronics). Finished in the eye-catching combination of Viper Red with White racing stripes and Dark Grey leather upholstery, ‘M2 EKO’ was imported from its native America in 2020. Riding on ‘chrome effect’ 18-inch alloys shod with low profile tyres, the two-seater features a removable roof panel and side windows and shows just 31,500 miles to its odometer. The steering wheel and seats are said to be in ‘incredible’ condition with minimal signs of wear. Reportedly a real ‘head turner’ whenever it is seen or heard in public, the Alpine stereo has its work cut out competing with the formidable 8 litre V10 rumble which emanates from the side pipe exhausts! Offered for sale with the original drivers’ pack, 2 sets of keys and V5c document. It is estimated that less than 100 Dodge Vipers are currently registered for UK road use.

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1967 Jaguar MK2

101

High custom specification Estimate: £31,000 - £33,000* Reg No: YOB 199

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 121567DN Some would say ‘widely regarded’ as the best-looking saloon ever made on these shores, the Jaguar Mk2 embodied the Sir William Lyons’ famous philosophy of ‘grace, pace and space’. Some owners are never fully content and try to improve the ownership experience, which is where the creator of this car comes in. The owner of ‘YOB 199’ has said he always loved the lines of the Mk2, however, the reality couldn’t live up to the dream. His answer was to get one bespoke-built just the way he wanted it. He decided on having the car completely rebuilt with modern improvements and was not bothered about keeping the car original, he just wanted it to drive like a 21st century executive car. His first task was to source the best possible shell he could find. Over six years he had the car ‘professionally rebuilt’, adding many upgrades along the way. Highlights of the full specification include a fully rebuilt 3.8 Litre engine, mated to a reconditioned Jaguar X300 automatic gearbox. Uprated systems include disc brakes and rear coil suspension, modern air conditioning from RetroAir USA, electrics and high intensity discharge headlamps, electrically adjustable X300 sport seats, modern sound system, 4 new 15” MWS 72-spoke chrome wire wheels with new Avon tyres; the list goes on. Taking inspiration from the upgraded Mk2 Jag built for Jaguar designer Ian Callum, he copied the front and rear styling. The wheel arches were also subtly flared and the whole car treated to a bare metal repaint in Rouge Lucifer (Diablo Red) metallic. Offered now at a fraction of the costs lavished upon it to date, this unique Mk2, registered as ‘YOB 199’ has covered fewer than 50 ‘shakedown’ miles since 2018 and will need a further period of careful recommissioning. This ‘special’ Jaguar comes with Jaguar books and tools, cherished plate ‘YOB 199’ (worth £5,000) V5C. Road tax and MOT exempt.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1958 Mercedes-Benz 300d ‘Adenauer’

102

Estimate: £70,000 - £80,000* Reg No: T.B.A

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 1890108501131 Synonymous with (and nicknamed after) Konrad Adenauer - the first Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany - who ran no less than six during his tenure, the Mercedes-Benz Type 300 (or W186) was launched at the 1951 Frankfurt Motor Show. Derived from pre-WW2 practice, its cruciform-braced ovoid tubular chassis frame was nonetheless equipped with all-round independent suspension, hydraulic drum brakes, worm and sector steering and an innovative rear load-levelling control. All new, the model’s 2996cc SOHC straight-six engine featured such niceties as a hardened crankshaft, alloy cylinder head, deep water jackets, thermostatically controlled oil cooling, twin Solex carburettors and copper-lead bearings. Designed to withstand the rigours of high-speed autobahn cruising, it was allied to a four-speed allsynchromesh manual transmission. Able to accommodate up to six people, the Type 300 was available in Saloon or Cabriolet guises. Elegant, powerful, exclusive and expensive, the big MercedesBenz was targeted at plutocrats and politicians (though, more than a few found favour in Hollywood too). The 300c was succeeded by a limousine-length 300d in 1957. It featured sweeping changes that included revised bodywork, fuel injection, and unique hardtop configuration transforming it into a pillarless phaeton. The right-hand drive 300 d offered here, was originally exported new to Australia and is finished in gleaming Schwartz paintwork with Bordeaux leather interior and is powered by a fuel-injected, 3.0-litre straight-six engine making 180bhp coupled to a 3-speed automatic transmission. A matching chassis and body number example it’s pleasingly accompanied by its original book pack with service book and driver’s manuals, copy of its factory data card and a letter from the Mercedes-Benz Club confirming originality. Understood to have had a full lubrication service in 2020 and previously benefitting from some cosmetic attention to the bodywork, it is currently going through the process of being registered with the DVLA.

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1972 Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow LWB

103

Single family ownership until 2021 and only c.28,000 miles Estimate: £18,000 - £24,000* Reg No: FWX 257L

MOT: June 2022

Chassis No: LRH14158 Launched in 1965, the Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow was a bold departure for the Crewe-based company. Their first monocoque design, it also benefited from the oleo-pneumatic rear suspension, power disc brakes and, from 1968, GM’s silken 400 series automatic gearbox. Such ‘new technology’ did not encroach on the luxurious interior with its sumptuous leather hides, rich wood veneers and deep lambswool carpets. Though smaller than the Silver Cloud III, it possessed greater space and boasted far more contemporary looks. At launch, it was powered by a 172bhp V8 engine of 6,230cc, though this was enlarged to 6,750cc during 1970. Performance from the smooth V8 engine was assured, the car wafting forward on a seemingly unstoppable wave of torque. Still immensely cosseting to drive, Shadows offer a genuinely different ownership experience to their massmade peers. The long-wheelbase Silver Shadow benefited from an extra four inches and was in manufacture from 1967 and 1976 with a total of 2,772 examples produced. Manufactured in 1972 this LWB Shadow was supplied new via Jack Barclay in London to the first family ownership in the car-friendly climate of Singapore. Retained in said family ownership (and remaining in Singapore) until 2021, the Rolls-Royce was repatriated to the United Kingdom in 2021. Fitted with the aforementioned 6750cc V8 engine allied to the automatic transmission, chassis number LRH14158 is presented in Blue with Grey leather interior upholstery, ‘FWX 257L’ has covered just c.28,000 miles from new. Said to have been maintained by the same Rolls-Royce technician for its whole time in Singapore, the Shadow has LWB features to the rear compartment such as passenger air conditioning, telephone, footrests and a separate sound system. Benefitting from reconditioned gearbox from Flying Spares and steering box in the past six months to the cost of some £4,000, the Shadow is accompanied by copies of original build sheets and order forms, a small collection of invoices, a typed letter from the Singapore technician, a no advisory MOT until June and a current V5C.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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1959 Austin-Healey ‘Frogeye’ Sprite

104

An exciting ‘garage find’ example from long-term ownership No Reserve* Reg No: 654 FNK

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: AN5/10782 Intended as a spiritual successor to inexpensive pre-war sports cars such as the MG M-type or Austin 7 Nippy, the AustinHealey Sprite was launched in May 1958. Fruit of the growing partnership between Donald Healey and Austin’s Leonard Lord, its design costs were kept to a minimum through some inspired BMC parts-bin raiding. Built around a lightweight monocoque, it combined the Austin A35’s independent front suspension and four-speed gearbox. Powered by a twin-carburettor fed 948cc A-series four-cylinder engine developing some 43bhp and 52lbft of torque, it was capable of over 80mph. Credit for the Frogeye’s wonderful styling lies with both Gerry Coker and Les Ireland. Put on sale for just £669 including purchase tax rarely before or since has a sports car enjoyed such a large fun-to-price ratio. Manufactured in 1959, this home market ‘Frogeye’ was registered new in the United Kingdom on the 6th of March that year. Pleasingly retaining its steel bonnet and side screen, ‘654 FNK’ is presented in Red with a complementing Red interior upholstery, the Austin-Healey is fitted with the aforementioned straightfour engine and manual transmission. Entering into current long-term ownership in 1973, chassis number ‘AN5/10782’ was used for many local trips and teaching the late vendor’s children to drive through the 1970s before being placed into garage storage in approximately 1984. Remaining in the same garage for the subsequent four decades, until being recently unearthed following the passing of the late vendor, the Sprite is now requiring a full restoration and is offered as an exciting prospect, coming to the market for the first time in five decades, as a genuine ‘garage find’ and without reserve. Accompanied by the green ‘buff’ logbook and current V5C.

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1960 Kaiser Jeep CJ-5

105

Estimate: £14,000 - £18,000* Reg No: SSL 710

MOT: Exempt

Chassis No: 8305014248037 In 1955, under new leadership by Kaiser Industries, Toledo, Ohio, USA, Willys Motors began to promote their newest member of the CJ series, the CJ-5, a model that marked a significant departure from the “flat-fender” CJs, with its rounded front fender design and squeezed grille (to accommodate larger headlights). Influenced by the Korean War M38A1 Jeep, the CJ-5 included updates such as rounded fenders, a hood and body made of heavy gauge sheet metal, a larger windshield frame, increased length on the riding springs, form-fitting front adjustable bucket seats, a deeper, back-lit instrument panel, rear seating options for 4 passengers, and a new passenger car type handbrake located to the left of the driver underneath the instrument panel. Manufactured in 1960 this Kaiser-Jeep is fitted with a 2.2 litre straight-four overhead-value engine mated to the manual gearbox. Presented in Green with Green interior vinyl upholstery, ‘SSL 710’ was imported into the United Kingdom in the year 2000. Formerly part of a private collection on two separate occasions, the Jeep has had just five UK owners from new. Recently the beneficiary of an engine refresh, the CJ-5 is said to be a ‘very original example’. Accompanied by the canvas doors and a current V5C.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% plus VAT

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An Auction of Classic & Collector Motorcycles 6th April 2022 | National Motorcycle Museum, Solihull HandH.co.uk | sales@HandH.co.uk | +44 (0)1925 210035 *All hammer prices are subject to the following Buyer’s Premium | Motorcycles 15% plus VAT


Terms & Conditions of Auction Sale These conditions apply to all sales held by H&H Classics Limited in England and Wales to the exclusion of all other Terms and Conditions and no alteration or modification to these Conditions will be binding on H&H Classics Limited unless accepted in writing by them. Your attention is specifically drawn to the “Notes for Intending Purchasers” published in the front of the catalogue. DEFINITIONS In these Terms and Conditions the following words and expressions shall unless the context otherwise requires have the following meanings: Auctioneer means H&H Classics Limited whose Registered Office is at 8 Eastway, Sale, Cheshire UK M33 4DX; company number 02852199 and Auctioneer means its representative who actually conducts the sale. Bidders Registration Form means the form to be completed by each bidder pursuant to Condition 12.5. The Buyer is the only person whose bid is accepted by the Auctioneer to conclude the contract for the purchase of a Lot. Buyer’s Commission shall have the meaning given in Condition 14. Catalogue includes any advertisement, brochure, estimate, price list and other publication generated or published by or on behalf of the Auctioneer in relation to a sale. Contract means the contract formed pursuant to these Conditions between any of the Seller, the Buyer and the Auctioneer. Entry Form means the form to be completed by the Seller as to each separate Lot pursuant to Condition 1.1. Estimated Value means the value given by the Seller in the Entry Form as the Estimated Value of the vehicle and if more than one value is given, the higher of those values.

Storage - £5 per day for the first fourteen days or part thereof and £12 per week or part thereof thereafter (subject to change without notice). Bicycles Uplift - £20 Storage - £3 per day for the first fourteen days or part thereof and £8 per week of part thereof thereafter (subject to change without notice). Automobilia/Motobilia Charges for these items are determined by size and weight: ‘A’ - the standard charge and will not be marked in the sales catalogue £8 uplift and £1 per day storage (subject to change without notice). ‘B’ - larger items and marked * in the sales catalogue - £20 uplift, £2 per day storage (subject to change without notice). ‘C’ - the largest items marked ** in the sales catalogue - £50 uplift, £5 per day storage (subject to change without notice). ‘R’ - items needing to be ‘Referred’ for individual quotations marked ‘R’ in the sales catalogue (subject to change without notice). Hammer Price means the price in £ sterling at which a Lot is knocked down by the Auctioneer to the Buyer at the fall of the hammer. Lot means any item or items consigned with a view to its or their sale at auction. Premises means the place at which the Auctioneer are conducting that particular sale. Reserve means the minimum Hammer Price (if any) agreed between the Auctioneer and the Seller at which the Lot may be sold. The Sale means the auction sale in respect of which the Lot is consigned for sale. Sale Proceeds means the net amount payable by the Auctioneer to the Seller being the Hammer Price less the sum of the commission, the expenses, the entry fee (if not already paid) and the VAT chargeable on any of them.

Motorcycles 15% to the Buyer, 10% to the Seller (minimum £50 to both parties) Entry Fee - £50 for a Standard Catalogue entry £100 for a Premium Catalogue entry £150 for a Deluxe Catalogue entry Registration Numbers 15% to the Buyer, 15% to the Seller (minimum £50 to both parties) Entry fee - £50 Bicycles 15% to the Buyer (minimum of £10) Seller’s charges available on application Automobilia/Motobilia 15% to the Buyer (minimum of £5) Seller’s charges available on application Total Amount Due means the Hammer Price in respect of the Lot sold plus the Buyer’s commission and additional charges and expenses due from a defaulting Buyer under these Conditions plus VAT chargeable on any of them expressed in £ sterling. Payment can be made by bank transfer using our bank account details as follows: Nat West, 23 Sankey Street, Warrington, Cheshire WA1 1XH Account Name: H&H Classics Client Account Account No: 58868984 Sort Code: 01-09-17 BIC: NWBKGB2L IBAN: GB20NWBK01091758868984 Usual Charges means the total of the Commissions, Entry Fees and any other reasonable costs and expenses plus VAT payable thereon. VAT means UK Value Added Tax at the prevailing rate from time to time. Vehicles includes, where appropriate, incomplete vehicles.

Expenses in relation to a Lot means the Auctioneer’s charges and expenses for illustrations, special advertising, packing, freight, transport, storage and any other charges and expenses of that Lot (other than the commission) plus VAT on any of them. The charges for uplifting an item, either sold or unsold, into storage, with charges, are as follows: Motor Cars Uplift - From £175 Storage - £10 per day for the first fourteen days or part thereof and £30 per week or part thereof thereafter (subject to change without notice). Motorcycles Uplift - From £100

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Seller means the person who offers the Lot for sale whether or not he is the true owner. Seller’s Commission means commission payable by the Seller pursuant to Condition 6. Stated rates means the usual rates of Commission, Entry Fees and any other charges for the time being plus the VAT chargeable on any of them. The current rates are as follows: Motor Cars 12.5% to the Buyer, 5% to the Seller (minimum £150 to both parties) Entry Fee - £100 for a Standard Catalogue entry £200 for a Premium Catalogue entry £400 for a Deluxe Catalogue entry

CONDITIONS MAINLY CONCERNING SELLERS AND CONSIGNORS 1.1 An Entry Form in respect of each Lot must be completed fully and accurately, with an honest description of the Lot, signed and dated by the Seller and accompanied by the Entry Fee, when the Lot is entered. The Auctioneer may at any time ratify an incomplete form. 1.2 Any documentation pertaining to the Lot must be sent with the Entry Form to the Auctioneer’s office, or in any event delivered with the Lot to the Premises. The Contract between the Seller and the Auctioneer will be formed when the Auctioneer receives a signed Entry Form for the Lot, whether by hand, post, fax, email or by any other means, and whether or not the Entry Fee for that Lot has been paid, and whether or not the Form has been signed by the Auctioneer.


1.3 All relevant matters pertaining to the Lot such as a financial encumbrance, serious accident damage or other factors affecting value which are known to the Seller must be stated on the Entry Form. If a sale is lost because of the failure of the Seller to disclose to the Auctioneer all information which may reasonably be expected to affect the provenance, title, value or any other aspect of the Lot, the Auctioneer will charge and the Seller must pay the stated rates (both to Seller and Buyer) plus VAT. 1.4 If the Seller wishes to retain the registration number of a Lot, it is the Seller’s responsibility to notify the Auctioneer in writing on the Entry Form. It is the Seller’s responsibility to take all necessary steps to ensure that the current registration number is retained and a new number allocated prior to the Lot being sold. If the Seller does not do so, the Auctioneer shall not be responsible for any loss or damage whatsoever and howsoever arising out of the Seller’s loss of the right to the registration number following the sale of the Lot. 2.1 The Auctioneer shall have absolute discretion whether or not to accept any Lot for sale and shall be entitled to select the auction place, date, catalogue placement and photographs for the Lot. 2.2 The Seller gives the Auctioneer full and absolute right to photograph and illustrate any Lot placed in its hands for sale, and to use such photographs and illustrations as are provided by the Seller at any time at its absolute discretion (whether or not in connection with the Sale), with indemnity against copyright infringement. 2.3 The Seller is wholly responsible for the factual accuracy of, and for any judgments or opinions expressed in, the catalogue description of each Lot entered by him, and for any error, misstatement or omission of information in that description. Whether the description has been prepared by the Auctioneer or the Seller, a copy of the typed text will be provided to the Seller within a reasonable time prior to the Auction, and unless the Seller reacts with comments or changes prior to the Auction, the Auctioneer may treat that description as accepted by the Seller. 3.1 The Seller warrants to the Auctioneer and to the Buyer either that he is the true owner of the Lot or that he is duly authorised to sell the Lot by the true owner, and is able to transfer or procure transfer of good and marketable title to the Lot free from a third party claims or encumbrances. 3.2 In the event of an unsettled hire purchase, finance agreement or any other charge or lien affecting the Lot, the Auctioneer reserves the right to settle the amount due of such charges not exceeding the Sale Proceeds and if the Sale Proceeds are less than the charges outstanding the Seller will be responsible for the settlement of the balance forthwith. There will be a charge of £75 plus VAT for this service. 3.3 Each Lot, in the condition as described on the Entry Form, and with all keys, spare or extra items and documents shall be delivered to the Premises at the expense of the Seller. The Seller of a Lot not held by the Auctioneer at the Premises or under its control warrants and undertakes to the Auctioneer that the Lot will be

made available and in a deliverable state at the time stated by the Auctioneer. 3.4 The Seller shall indemnify both the Auctioneer, its Employees and Agents, and the Buyer separately, against all payments, costs, expenses, demands, or any loss or damage whatsoever and wheresoever incurred or suffered by any of them in respect of any breach of these Conditions on the part of the Seller. 4.1 The Seller shall be entitled, prior to the sale to place a Reserve on any Lot, this being the minimum Hammer Price at which the Auctioneer is authorised to sell that Lot and to make its usual charges. A Reserve once placed by the Seller shall not be changed without the consent of the Auctioneer. 4.2 The Auctioneer may, at its option, sell the Lot at a Hammer Price below the Reserve but in any such case the Sale Proceeds to which the Seller is entitled shall be the same as if the sale had been at Reserve. 4.3 Where no Reserve has been placed on the Lot the Auctioneer shall in no way be liable should the Lot be purchased for a price below the lowest estimated selling price. In any event, any written or oral estimate of likely selling price given by the Auctioneer is an expression of opinion only and may not be relied upon by the Seller nor give rise to any claim. 4.4 If a Reserve is placed by the Seller in a currency other than Pounds Sterling, such a Reserve shall be calculated and converted into Sterling at the spot rate of exchange quoted to the Auctioneer by the National Westminster Bank Plc at close of business on the last banking day prior to the date of the Sale. The certificate in writing of the Auctioneer as to such rate shall be conclusive. 4.5 Where a Reserve has been placed, only the Auctioneer may bid on that Lot on behalf of the Seller. Should the Seller buy in his own Lot, the Seller must pay to the Auctioneer its stated rates (both Seller and Buyer) before the Lot is removed. 5.1 The Seller may by notice to the Auctioneer withdraw the Lot from the Auction. If the Seller does so he shall be liable to pay the Auctioneer the stated rate of the Seller’s and Buyer’s commission calculated on the estimated value of the Lot that the Auctioneer would have received had the Lot been sold for the estimated value. For the purposes of this clause the estimated value shall be the higher of:(a) the Seller’s estimate of value as previously notified to the Auctioneer or if more than one figure the highest figure or if none; (b) the value estimated in the catalogue or if more than one figure is given the highest figure, or if none, (c) the Auctioneer’s reasonable estimate of its value; (d) plus VAT on such fee in either case and expenses;

5.2 In the event that the Seller withdraws the Lot from the Auction the Seller shall arrange for the collection/removal of the Lot at his own expense within 2 working days after the date of withdrawal provided that the Seller may not collect the Lot unless or until any withdrawal fee payable under Conditions 5.1 shall have been paid in full and any storage charges have been met by the Seller. 6. The Seller authorises the Auctioneer to deduct from the Hammer Price commission at the Stated Rate subject to the relevant minimum commission for each Lot, plus Expenses and VAT on both. The Seller acknowledges the Auctioneer’s right to charge and retain the Buyer’s Premium also in accordance with Condition 14. 7. The Seller of a Lot which is a road going means of transport warrants and undertakes to the Auctioneer that, as at the date of the Sale, either: (a) the Lot will be VAT paid in the EU and registered in the UK, will be lawfully usable on the public road, complying with the provisions of current Road Traffic Legislation and all relevant regulations made thereunder and any statutory modifications thereof, and there is or will be in force an MOT Certificate required in relation to such use; or (alternatively) (b) the Seller has notified the Auctioneer that the Lot does not or will not meet these requirements, and cannot legally be used on the road. 8. The Seller hereby agrees to indemnify the Auctioneer, its Agents and Employees against any and all claims, liability or damage and all related costs and expenses arising out of the proper execution by the Auctioneer of their obligations to the Seller under these Conditions, and in particular against any liability or claim which may be incurred by the Auctioneer as a result of any defect in the Lot, whether proving dangerous to human life or health or otherwise giving rise to a claim against the Auctioneer, or as a result of any default by the Seller or any breach of any of the warranties or undertakings herein by the Seller. 9.1 Where any Lot fails to sell, the Auctioneer shall notify the Seller accordingly. The Seller shall make arrangements either for the Auctioneer to re-offer that Lot for sale, or forthwith to collect the Lot and to pay the Expenses. If such arrangements are not made: (a) by 1pm on the day following the date of the Sale, the Seller shall be responsible for the costs of any removal, storage and other expenses related to that Lot; (b) within 3 months after formal notification by the Auctioneer to the Seller, the Auctioneer shall have the right (pursuant to the Torts (Interference with Goods) Act 1977 or any legislation that re-enacts or replaces it) to sell the Lot by private treaty or at public auction without reserve and to deduct from the Hammer Price or price received any sum owing to the Auctioneer including (without limitation) removal, storage and insurance expenses, the Expenses of both auctions, Commission at the Stated Rate on the sale and all other reasonable expenses, before remitting the balance to the Seller; or if he cannot be traced,

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placing it in a bank account in the name of the Auctioneer on behalf of the Seller. 9.2 If the Seller later sells the Lot as a result of its exposure at the auction the Auctioneer will be entitled to their normal commission. In any event the Auctioneer will be entitled to try and effect a sale as the Seller’s agent within 14 days after the date of the auction (that time limit does not apply to a sale by the Seller). If the Auctioneer does so sell the Lot, they will also be entitled to their normal commission. 10.1 Where a Lot is sold, the Auctioneer shall initiate payment, by bank transfer, of the Sale Proceeds to the Seller 14 days after the Auctioneers have received in cleared funds the Total Amount Due from the Buyer. Should no bank details be provided by the seller, the Auctioneer will effect payment by sending its cheque, drawn in favour of the Seller, 14 days after receipt of cleared funds, by first class mail at the Seller’s risk. 10.2 If before the Total Amount Due is paid by the Buyer (whether or not because the Auctioneer has given credit terms to the Buyer) the Auctioneer pays to the Seller an amount equal to the net Sale Proceeds, title in the Lot shall pass from the Seller to the Auctioneer. 10.3 In the case of overseas Sellers, the Sale Proceeds will be paid to the Seller either in Sterling or in such other currency available to the Auctioneer as may have been agreed in writing between the Seller and the Auctioneer before the date of the Sale. The Auctioneer shall calculate the rate of exchange for the Sale Proceeds by reference to the spot rate of exchange quoted by the National Westminster Bank Plc at close of business on the date of the Sale, whichever is more favourable to the auctioneer. 10.4 If the Auctioneer receives notice of any dispute related to a sold Lot before the Sale Proceeds have been remitted to the Seller, the Auctioneer may withhold payment from the Seller until it thinks fit or until the Dispute is resolved, whichever is earlier. 10.5 The Auctioneer retains the right to withhold partial or total payment for any Lot if items committed to the Sale by the Seller and sold as part of the Lot, including any relevant documents, have not been delivered by the Seller. 10.6 The Seller shall maintain their insurance of the Lot until they are in receipt of the Sale Proceeds 11.1 If the Buyer fails to pay the Auctioneer the total Amount due within 21 days after the Sale, the Auctioneer will notify the Seller and take the Seller’s instructions as to the appropriate course of action. So far as in the Auctioneer’s opinion it is practicable, the Auctioneer will at the Seller’s expense assist the Seller to recover the Total Amount Due from the Buyer, but the Auctioneer shall be under no obligation to institute proceedings in its own name. 11.2 If circumstances outside the Auctioneer’s control do not permit the Auctioneer to take instructions from the Seller, the Seller hereby authorises the Auctioneer, at the Seller’s expense, to agree special terms for payment of the total Amount Due; to remove, store and insure the Lot sold; to settle claims made against the Buyer or the Seller on such terms as the Auctioneer shall in its absolute discretion think fit; to take

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such steps as are necessary to collect the monies due by the Buyer to the Seller; and if necessary to rescind the sale and refund money to the Buyer. CONDITIONS MAINLY CONCERNING THE BUYER 12.1 Any motor vehicle is sold as a collector’s item and not as a means of transport. Buyers are specifically warned that any vehicle sold as such may well have had parts replaced and paint renewed or be made up of parts from other vehicles the condition of which may be difficult to establish. The Auctioneer has to rely on information as to the date, condition and authenticity provided by the Seller and does not provide its own description, and does not and cannot undertake its own inspection of vehicles or other Lot and it is the responsibility of the Buyer to ensure that the Lot conforms to the description in the catalogue. The Auctioneer cannot check or verify the authenticity of the chassis or VIN number under which a vehicle is offered, but relies on the Seller’s description. Buyers should take particular care to verify in advance the authenticity of a vehicle that is claimed to have important racing, rallying or ‘exworks’ history as it was common in period for a competition vehicle of a single identity to have more than one chassis, body or other mechanical components. This may have happened several times, both in a vehicle’s ‘works’ career and thereafter in private owner hands. Sometimes ‘works’ vehicles were fitted with different registration plates, so that a vehicle could meet a particular event’s start date deadline. These historical factors may lead to there being in existence multiple and competing claimants to the same vehicle identity. 12.2 The Buyer shall be the person making the highest bid at or over Reserve (if any) that is accepted by the Auctioneer, and the Contract shall be concluded at the fall of the hammer. The Auctioneer shall have the absolute discretion to settle any dispute related to bidding at the Sale. All sales are deemed not to be sales in the course of a business, unless notified to the contrary. 12.3 Every bidder shall be deemed to act as a principal unless the Auctioneer has, prior to the auction date, acknowledged (either by acceptance of the Bidder’s Registration Form which discloses the true principal, or otherwise in writing) that the bidder is acting as agent on behalf of a disclosed principal. 12.4 The Auctioneer may in its absolute discretion refuse to accept any bid, advance the bidding as it may decide, withdraw or divide any Lot, combine any two or more Lots, and in the case of dispute may put up any Lot for auction again.

13.1 Where a Lot is illustrated by a photograph, in the case of a vehicle with a registration number visible, that number will not be transferred with the vehicle to the Buyer unless the registration particulars appear in the written part of the description and the transfer has been authorised by the Seller. If the vehicle is sold to the Buyer before the formalities of the allocation of a different registration number to that vehicle are completed with the DVLA, the Buyer accepts that he will take all steps necessary to co-operate with either the Seller or the Auctioneer to have the number re-transferred to the Seller or as may be, and will take no steps to register the vehicle with the number in his name. 13.2 Whilst the interests of prospective Buyers are best served by personal attendance at the Sale, the Auctioneers will if so instructed execute bids on their behalf. Neither the Auctioneer nor its Employees or Agents will be responsible for any error or default in doing so or in failing altogether to do so. Where the Auctioneer executes bids on behalf of an absent bidder, each Lot will be bought as cheaply as is allowed by other bids and any relevant Reserve. 14. The Buyer shall pay to the Auctioneer in respect of each Lot the Buyer’s Commission calculated on the Hammer Price at the stated rates as set out above. 15. Where a Lot is described in the Catalogue or announced at the time of Sale as being subject to VAT on import, VAT will be payable in addition to the Hammer Price (which VAT may or may not be refundable by HM Customs & Excise on proof of export). 16.1 Upon the sale of a Lot, the Buyer shall: 16.2 Unless he has already done so, complete a Bidder’s Registration Form as in Condition 12.5 above; 16.3 Pay to the Auctioneer the total amount due, at latest by midday on the day after the Sale, notwithstanding that where the Buyer wishes to export the Lot, an export licence may be required which must be obtained by the Buyer at his own cost; 16.4 Accept that any payments received by the Auctioneer from a Buyer may be applied by the Auctioneer towards any sums owing from that Buyer to the Auctioneer on any account whatsoever, without regard to any directions of the Buyer or his agent, whether express or implied. 17.1 Until the total amount due has been received by the Auctioneer: (a) title in a Lot shall not pass to the Buyer but the risk shall;

12.5 A prospective bidder should register his intention to bid for a Lot by completing fully and signing a Bidder’s Registration Form prior to executing his bid. If this has not been completed before the fall of the hammer, the Buyer shall forthwith complete the Bidder’s Registration Form. The Bidder shall also provide photographic identification. Failure to do so shall not invalidate the sale, unless the Auctioneer, in its absolute discretion, so decides. 12.6 Any bid which fails to reach the Reserve may be submitted by the Auctioneer to the Seller and if the Seller accepts that bid, the Lot will be deemed to have been sold to the Buyer at the sum bid at the fall of the hammer and the normal Terms and Conditions will apply to that sale.

(b) no Lot may be taken away by or on behalf of the Buyer. 17.2 The Buyer shall be responsible for any removal, storage and insurance charges and any other Expenses on any Lot not paid for and taken away from the by 1pm on the day following the day of the sale. 17.3 If the Lot remains under the vendor’s control for any reason, either at their property or a third-party one, then the Buyer must remove it within ten days of the sale. Failure to do so will result in the Lot being uplifted to secure storage at the Buyer’s expense.


18.1 If a Buyer fails either to pay for or to take away any Lot, the Auctioneer may without further notice to the Buyer, at its discretion and without prejudice to any other rights or remedies it may have, exercise one or more of the following rights or remedies, as may be relevant, in relation to any and all remedies for non-payment that the Auctioneer may choose to exercise. The Buyer will pay to the Auctioneer all legal and other costs borne by it on a full indemnity basis. 18.2 To charge interest at a rate not exceeding 3% per month over Natwest Bank’s base rate on so much of the total amount due as remains unpaid after the date and time referred to in condition 16.3 for the first two months. After that period of time to charge interest at a rate not exceeding 1.75% per month over Natwest Bank’s base rate on so much of the total amount due as remains unpaid after the date and time referred to in condition 16.3. 18.3 To issue proceedings against the Buyer for payment of the total amount due and/or for damages for breach of contract. If the Seller decides to sell the Lot elsewhere, the Auctioneer may proceed against the Buyer for the Commission which it would have earned both from the Seller and the Buyer together with VAT on both had the Buyer paid for the Lot in accordance with these Conditions. 18.4 To rescind the sale of that or any other Lots sold to the same Buyer at this or any other Sale, in respect of which title has not passed. 18.5 To resell the Lot or cause it to be resold by public or private sale, such that any deficiency in the total amount due resulting from such resale (after giving credit for any payment) together with the full costs incurred in connection with the Lots shall be paid to the Auctioneer by the Buyer; any surplus in excess of the Sale Proceeds of that resale shall belong to the Seller. 18.6 To store the Lot at the sole expense of the Buyer and to release the Lot only after payment in full of the total amount due, together with the accrued cost of the removal, storage and insurance and all other expenses incurred in connection with the Lot. 18.7 To retain that or any other Lot sold to the Buyer at the same or any other auction and to release the same only after payment of the total amount due. 18.8 To apply by way of set-off any Sale Proceeds of any Lot then due or at any time thereafter becoming due to the Buyer towards settlement of the total amount due and expenses and the Auctioneer shall be entitled to a lien on any property of the Buyer which is in the Auctioneer’s possession for any purpose. 18.9 To reject or ignore any bids made by or on behalf of the defaulting Buyer at any future sales or insist upon a cash deposit before accepting any bids in future.

any indirect or consequential loss whatsoever, and the maximum liability of the Auctioneer together with its Employees and Agents, in the event of any claim against them arising from the sale of any Lot shall be limited to the Hammer Price plus Buyer’s Premium in respect of that Lot. GENERAL CONDITIONS 20. The Auctioneer in all respects acts and will be treated as agent for the Seller (except where the Auctioneer is expressly stated to be selling as principal), and is not responsible for any default by the Seller or the Buyer to the other party. 21. The Auctioneer will not accept any liability for damage sustained to a Lot that is attributable to members of the public or non-Auctioneer operatives during the Sale or any removable items left within lots during the same period. Any claims for damage and / or lost items must be submitted to the Auctioneer in writing no later than 3 working days after the date of the Sale and include a valid quote for repair or replacement and digital photographs where applicable. 22. The Auctioneer shall be under no liability for any injury, damage or loss sustained by any person while on the Auctioneers premises (including any premises where a sale may be conducted or where a Lot, or a part of a Lot, may be on view from time to time) except for death or personal injury caused by the negligence of the Auctioneers or its employees and agents in the course of their duties to the Auctioneers. 23. The Auctioneer shall have the right, at its sole discretion, without assigning any reason, to refuse any person admission to its Premises or attendance at any of its Sales, or to view any Lot. 24. The Auctioneer shall keep and use any data relating to the Buyer and the Seller in accordance with the provisions of all relevant data protection legislation. The Buyer and the Seller consent to such data being kept and used for appropriate purposes, including informing the Buyer and the Seller of any offers or other matters of interest from time to time. 25. The copyright in all written matter and illustrations relating to Lots shall remain at all times the absolute property of the Auctioneer, and any person wishing to use such materials, or any part of them, shall require the prior written consent of the Auctioneer. 26. If any Condition or part of a condition in these Terms shall be held to be invalid or unenforceable, the validity or enforceability of the remaining Conditions will not thereby be affected. 27. These Conditions shall be governed by and construed in accordance with English Law. All transactions to which these Conditions apply and all matters connected therewith shall also be governed by English Law. Each of the Auctioneer, the Seller, the Buyer and any bidder hereby submits to non-exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of England and Wales.

19.1 All Lots are offered as seen with all faults and defects without any guarantee or warranty attaching thereto as to condition, roadworthiness or otherwise and with all faults and defects whether apparent upon examination or not. 19.2 In any event, neither the Seller nor the Auctioneer shall be liable for

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Notes

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Motorcars in today’s auction Lot No. 81 21 32 30 49 76 87 54 71 104 2 72 45 75 88 67 1 61 20 60 84 4 56 41 51 33 24 78 58 86 100 14 34 64 16 43 27 38 42 69 94 40 31 52 73 101 80 9 57 17 22 77 28 5 105

1963 AC Ace 2.6 1961 AC Greyhound 1976 Alfa Romeo GT Junior 1600 1955 Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk1 1964 Aston Martin DB5 1971 Aston Martin DB6 Mark 2 1983 Audi Quattro 10V 1984 Audi Quattro Rally Car 1966 Austin-Healey 3000 MKIII 1959 Austin-Healey ‘Frogeye’ Sprite 1929 Austin Seven Chummy 1928 Austin Twenty Landaulette 1937 Bentley 4.25 Litre Sports Saloon 1993 Bentley Continental R 1947 Bentley MkVI 1948 Bentley MkVI 4.25 Litre ‘Simpson’ Special 1951 Bentley MkVI Saloon 1954 Bentley R-Type Saloon 1958 Bentley S1 Continental Sports Saloon 1961 Bentley S2 Continental Sports Saloon 1929 Bentley Speed Six ‘Le Mans’-style Tourer 1979 Bentley T2 1960 Bristol 406 1986 BMW 635 CSi 1986 BMW 635 CSi 2005 BMW M3 Convertible 1972 Chesil 356 Speedster 1960 Chevrolet C20 Apache 1980 Chevrolet Corvette Turbo 1998 Dare Ginetta G4 1995 Dodge Viper RT/10 Roadster 1981 Ferrari 308 GTB 1986 Ferrari 412 1990 Ferrari Mondial T Cabriolet 1967 Ferves Ranger 1971 Fiat Dino Coupe 2.4 1983 Ford Capri 2.8 Injection 1942 Ford GPW JEEP 1927 Ford Model T ‘Rajo’ Single Seater 1965 Ford Mustang Notchback 1965 Jaguar E-Type 4.2 Coupe 1969 Jaguar E-Type 4.2 2+2 1973 Jaguar E Type Series 3 V12 Coupe 2013 Jaguar F-Type S V8 1960 Jaguar MK II 3.4 Litre Beacham 1967 Jaguar MK2 2007 Jaguar XJ 1990 Jaguar XJ-S V12 Convertible 1991 Jaguar XJ-S 4.0 2003 Jaguar XJR Saloon 1960 Jaguar XK 150 3.8 Fixed Head Coupe 2007 Jaguar XKR Convertible 2002 Jaguar XK8 4.0 Convertible 1966 Jensen C-V8 MKIII 1960 Kaiser Jeep CJ-5

Lot No. 82 55 90 10 99 79 92 36 8 97 93 44 50 89 29 102 3 6 26 19 7 59 85 65 83 23 15 96 91 63 39 46 66 68 35 47 13 103 53 74 25 70 95 37 48 11 62 12 18 98

1925 Lagonda 12/24 2018 Lamborghini Aventador LP740-S Roadster 1967 Land Rover Series IIA 109 Ambulance c.1972 Land Rover Series IIA 109 1983 Land Rover Series III 109 1972 Lenham Le Mans GT 1950 Lincoln 2 Door Coupe 1972 Lincoln Continental Mk IV 1982 Lotus Eclat Excel c.1930 McDowell Special Sprint Racer 1989 Mercedes-Benz 190E 2.5-16 1959 Mercedes-Benz 190 SL 1965 Mercedes-Benz 230SL 1982 Mercedes-Benz 280 SL 1985 Mercedes-Benz 280 SL 1958 Mercedes-Benz 300d ‘Adenauer’ 1985 Mercedes-Benz 380 SL 1998 Mercedes-Benz CL500 1994 Mercedes-Benz SL 500 2001 Mercedes-Benz SL500 ‘Silver Arrow’ 1981 MG B LE Roadster 1969 MG B Roadster 1969 MG C GT ‘Sebring’ Evocation 1928 Morgan Aero 1930 Morgan Aero 1935 Morgan Super Sports 1930 Morris Cowley ‘Flatnose’ Saloon 1985 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2 Supersport 1990 Porsche 944 Turbo 2017 Realm Heritage C-Type 1935 Riley 12/4 Special 1934 Riley 9 Lynx 1932 Riley Nine Gamecock 1933 Rolls-Royce 20/25 All Weather Tourer 1934 Rolls Royce 20/25 Sedanca de Ville Cross Tourer 1980 Rolls-Royce Corniche 1964 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III 1972 Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow LWB 1995 Rolls-Royce Silver Spirit III 1938 Rover 14hp Three Position Drophead Coupe 1992 Rover Mini Cooper 1.3i 1928 Sunbeam 20hp Weymann Saloon 1966 Sunbeam Tiger 1935 Triumph Gloria 10.8hp Southern 1971 Triumph TR6 1968 TVR Vixen S2 1966 Vanden Plas Princess 1100 Mk1 1961 Vauxhall Cresta PA 1962 Vauxhall VX 4/90 FB 1984 Volkswagen Golf GTI Campaign


Already consigned to Pavilion Gardens 1973 Jaguar E-Type V12 Roadster Estimate: £65,000-75,000*

Trusted Motorcar Auctioneers Since 1993

An Auction of Classic & Collector Motorcars 27th April 2022 | Pavilion Gardens, Buxton HandH.co.uk | sales@HandH.co.uk | +44 (0)1925 210035 *All hammer prices are subject to the following Buyer’s Premium | Motorcars 12.5% plus VAT

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Trust your consignment to H&H Classics HandH.co.uk | sales@HandH.co.uk | +44 (0)1925 210035 H&H Classics, The Motor House, Lyncastle Road, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4SN, United Kingdom


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