H&H - An Auction of Classic & Collector Motor Cars

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An Auction of Classic and Collector Motor Cars 26th May 2021 | Imperial War Museum Duxford


World Class Auctioneers of Motor Cars, Motorcycles and Automobilia

TRUST YOUR CONSIGNMENT TO H&H CLASSICS HandH.co.uk | info@HandH.co.uk | +44 (0)1925 210035 H&H Head Office, The Motor House, Lyncastle Road, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4SN United Kingdom


ON THE COVER:

1935 Lagonda M45 Rapide Three Position Drophead Coupe

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Coachwork by Freestone & Webb ESTIMATE:

£140,000 - £160,000*

REG NO:

BYU 647

CHASSIS:

Z11149

FIND MORE INFORMATION ON PAGES 78 - 81

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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Notes for intending purchasers Prospective purchasers are respectfully advised to read the Terms and Conditions of Sale carefully before bidding on any lot, as they form the terms of your contract with us, whether or not you are a successful bidder. ADMISSION

INSURANCE

H&H has the right at its sole discretion, without assigning any reason whatsoever, to refuse admission to any of its sales or indeed its premises to any person. The purchase of a catalogue does not constitute an entry ticket or guarantee entry. Visitors are required to book an appointment to attend and must wear a face mask, use hand sanitiser on arrival. Temperature checks may be conducted on entry and contact details held for 21 days.

Hagerty Classic Car Insurance be pleased to advise buyers in this area. Please be reminded that the insurance is the buyer’s responsibility from the fall of the hammer.

BIDDER REGISTRATION All intending buyers are required to complete a Bidder’s Registration Form. This will enable you to bid at the sale by means of a number allocated to you. All prospective bidders must complete the form online giving full identification and bank card details to verify their identity. Lots sold will be invoiced to the registered bidder.

We reserve the right to request banker’s references from prospective purchasers and these should be supplied in time to allow them to be taken up prior to the sale. Failure to comply with this could result in the facility to bid being withdrawn. CURRENCY CONVERTER Solely for the convenience of bidders, a currency converter is provided at H&H sales. The rates quoted for conversion of other currencies to pounds sterling are indicative only and provided by our partner Argentex. We will not be responsible for any errors, inaccuracies or omissions in the currency converter. BIDDING INCREMENTS In the case of Commission, Telephone and On-line Internet bidding, the following increments will apply. At the Auctioneers discretion £100 £200/300 £500 £1,000 £2,000/3,000 £5,000 At the Auctioneers discretion

We will make reasonable efforts to execute commission and telephone bids when instructed provided they are received by 5pm the day before the Sale. Lot(s) will be bought as cheaply as is allowed by other bids and reserves. Where more than one commission bid is submitted at the same winning amount, the commission bid submitted to the Auctioneer first will be the winning bid. We reserve the right to request a refundable deposit of approximately 10% of the intended bid amount. PAYMENT For immediate clearance of Lot(s) full payment must be made to H&H Classics Limited by means of Visa Debit or Credit Card, Maestro, MasterCard, Cash up to the GBP equivalent of €10,000 or Interbank Transfer by 12.00 noon the day following the sale. In any event purchasers are reminded that clearance of Lot(s) may only be effected once we have received cleared funds in our account. For Purchaser’s wishing to pay by bank transfer our bank account details are as follows: Nat West, 23 Sankey Street, Warrington, Cheshire WA1 1XH Account Name: H&H Classics Client Account Account No: 58868984 Sort Code: 01-09-17 BIC: NWBKGB2L IBAN: GB20NWBK01091758868984

PREMIUM

RACING CARS & DOCUMENTATION

Purchasers are reminded that a Buyers’ Premium is payable on all lots and is subject to VAT at the prevailing rate. The rates are as follows:

Buyers are reminded that the presence of an old HVIF (FIA papers) or other documentation does not constitute a ‘promise’ on behalf of the MSA or other issuing authority that they will be re-issued on demand. A car’s application for a Historic Technical Passport will be subject to the prevailing regulation in Appendix K and can be reviewed, much the same way Veteran Cars can be re-dated, as new information comes to light. The Issuing Authority can refuse to issue new papers. Any prospective purchaser should check the position of the Lot prior to bidding.

Motor Cars Registrations Motorcycles Bicycles Automobilia

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H&H is acting as the agent of the Seller in offering his lot for sale by auction. We cannot and do not inspect each lot in detail to verify the Seller’s description - often we only see it shortly before the Sale. Therefore, we cannot and do not take responsibility for the condition of the lot or the accuracy of its description. This is the reason for our very specific terms as to roadworthiness (Condition 19.1) and absence of warranties (Condition 12.1), which intending purchasers should read carefully. COMMISSION / TELEPHONE BIDS

REFERENCES

Under £1,000 £1,000 - £2,000 £2,000 - £5,000 £5,000 - £10,000 £10,000 - £20,000 £20,000 - £50,000 £50,000 - £100,000 Over £100,000

WARRANTY

12.5% (minimum of £150) 15% (minimum of £50) 15% (minimum of £50) 15% (minimum of £10) 15% (minimum of £5)

VETERAN CAR CLUB OF GREAT BRITAIN DATING PLATES AND CERTIFICATES When mention is made of the Veteran Car Club of Great Britain Dating Plates and Certificates in this catalogue it should be borne in mind that the Veteran Car Club of Great Britain does from time to time review cars already dated and, in some instances, where fresh evidence becomes available, alter the date. Whilst the Club makes every effort to ensure accuracy, the date shown on the Dating Plate or Dating Certificate cannot be guaranteed as correct and intending purchasers should make their own enquiries as to the date of the car. EXPORT LICENCE / DATES Export licences may be required for any lot manufactured or produced 50 years or more prior to the date of export from the U.K. It is the responsibility of the buyer to obtain the licence and correct documentation prior to the exportation of the lot. VEHICLE IDENTITY AND COMPETITION HISTORY Any motor vehicle is sold as a collector’s item and not as a means of transport. Buyers are specifically warned that any vehicle sold as such may well have had parts replaced and paint renewed or be made up of parts from other vehicles the condition of which may be difficult to establish. The Auctioneer has to rely on information as to the date, condition and authenticity provided by the Seller and does not provide its own description, and does not and cannot undertake its own inspection of vehicles or other Lot and it is the responsibility of the Buyer to ensure that the Lot conforms to the description in the catalogue. The Auctioneer cannot check or verify the authenticity of the chassis or VIN number under which a vehicle is offered, but relies on the Seller’s description. Buyers should take particular care to verify in advance the authenticity of a vehicle that is claimed to have important racing, rallying or ‘ex-works’ history as it was common in period for a competition vehicle of a single identity to have more than one chassis, body or other mechanical components. This may have happened several times, both in a vehicle’s ‘works’ career and thereafter in private owner hands. Sometimes ‘works’ vehicles were fitted with different registration plates, so that a vehicle could meet a particular event’s start date deadline. These historical factors may lead to there being in existence multiple and competing claimants to the same vehicle identity. REMOVAL OF LOTS A representative of our preferred transport provider E.M. Rogers will be present at the sale to assist with any transport requirements. All lots are held at the purchaser’s risk at the fall of the hammer and must be removed not later than 1pm on the day following the sale. Please note, if lot(s) are not removed by then the standard charges as stated in our Terms and Conditions will apply.


Auction Information AUCTION VENUE

Imperial War Museum Duxford, Cambridgeshire CB22 4QR

SCHEDULE

Tuesday 25th May 2021 Viewing: 12:00pm to 6:00pm

Wednesday 26th May 2021 Viewing: 9:00am onwards Motor Car Sale: 1:00pm onwards BIDDING

At venue - online at HandH.co.uk, by telephone or via commission.

BUYERS PREMIUM Motor Cars: 12.5% (+VAT) BUYER ENQUIRIES +44 (0) 1925 210035 | info@HandH.co.uk SAFETY GUIDANCE • If you have Covid-19 symptoms, please do not attend • All attendees are required to enter contact details for NHS Track & Trace • Temperature checks may be taken • Face masks are mandatory unless exempt • Observe social distancing at all times • Wash hands regularly or use hand sanitiser if that is all you have access to

More information and full Terms & Conditions are available via our website ww.HandH.co.uk

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1973 Lotus Elan +2 130S/5 ‘John Player Special’

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NO RESERVE REG NO:

ROJ 22M

CHASSIS:

73121823L

We are delighted to offer this rare Lotus Elan Plus 2 130S/5 ‘John Player Special’ edition. Built to commemorate Lotus’s 50th Grand Prix victory, the iconic ‘JPS’ livery Lotus Elans were finished in the same black / ‘metalflake gold’ colour scheme as the F1 cars of that period, then piloted by champion drivers such as Emerson Fittipaldi and Mario Andretti. The ‘Elan 2’ was revealed to the world in 1962 with a 1500cc engine and a four-speed gearbox in a small and stylish 2-seater roadster form. The Plus 2 (code-named M20) was born and introduced in 1967 and had arguably better proportions than the ‘baby’ Elan. In 1971, the +2S 130 was launched with a ‘Big-Valve’ version of the Lotus ‘Twin Cam’ engine, providing an improved 126bhp hence the “130” model suffix. It produced a maximum torque of 113lb/ft at 5,500 rpm, providing plenty of power to fully enjoy this lightweight and useable family sports car. The +2S 130 was an appreciable step up in quality with a raft of ‘luxury’ fittings from quartz halogen fog lights to burr walnut facia and electric windows. In October 1972, the long-called for five speed gearboxes finally arrived as an option, to make cruising smoother, and the Lotus Elan +2S 130/5 became ‘the’ version to have. This particular example features all available ‘JPS’ options including the aforementioned five-speed transmission, electric windows, handbrake warning lamp, oil pressure gauge, walnut dashboard, battery condition indicator, clock, temperature gauge, auxiliary fog lamps and an FM radio. Barn-stored since circa 2002, ‘ROJ 22M’ is offered ripe for restoration. Seemingly solid and complete, the paintwork is blistered and faded, but highly original. Offered with a file of sundry paperwork including a 2002-dated MOT certificate and some correspondence with the DVLA, it will be the responsibility of the purchaser to apply for a V5c registration document.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1961 Daimler SP250 Dart

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Desirable B-Specification Example and a True ‘Barnfind’ ESTIMATE: £14,000 - £18,000* REG NO:

16 PKE

CHASSIS:

102719

The futuristic Daimler Dart was introduced at the New York Motor Show in 1959 and had its European debut at the 1959 Earls Court Motor Show; the Dart name was soon dropped after the threat of legal action from Chrysler who had a car of that name within their Dodge division. Thereafter this new sports car was known as the Daimler SP250. Power was provided by the 2.5 litre, Edward Turner designed, V8 that soon became revered for the smoothness in its power delivery with 140bhp on tap. This desirable 1961 ‘B’ specification ‘SP 250’ was purchased by the vendor’s late husband in November 1983 from a prolific ‘Dart’ enthusiast and regular competitor at Daimler Owner’s Club concours events. ‘16 PKE’ became his daily form of transport until some 4 years later when the steering system became too heavy for him to operate and he accidentally damaged the steering wheel - this unit was later removed, retained and is included in the sale. The car was placed into a barn at his home and life commitments took over, leaving ‘16 PKE’ in hibernation for over 25 years. Upon retirement, the vendor’s husband decided he would set about putting the ‘Dart’ back into road-worthy order. A new rack and pinion steering system was purchased, but only loosely installed. Unfortunately, he died suddenly before the work was completed and the car languished for a further 4 years in storage. Offered with an extensive history file documenting 30 years of ownership, this includes the car’s original folding log book and receipts for extensive work carried out including the fitment of a stainless steel exhaust system. With 2,650 Daimler SP250s produced, it is believed that fewer than 700 of these stylish sports cars survive today making this one of the rarest but affordable British classic cars available - this attractively guided example certainly offers the purchaser a very worthwhile and rewarding project.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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1932 Riley 9 Gamecock

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1 of just 52 known to survive​ ESTIMATE: £12,000 - £14,000* REG NO: TF 7539

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NO RESERVE CHASSIS: 6016106

It was the Riley 9 models produced with a wide choice of body styles between 1926 and 1938 that really put the company on the map, which with its unique 42bhp 1,087cc twin-camshaft engine soon found success in competition, further boosting the order book. During 1931, the Gamecock variant became the range’s prime two-seat Tourer. It was an immediate success, with the underslung chassis producing a sleek, low body design quite unlike anything else available at the time. ‘TF 7539’ is one of c.52 Gamecocks known to remain in existence. Within long term family ownership previously it is currently part dismantled and in need of restoration, but believed to be complete apart from weather equipment and lights. A replacement engine was installed in 1965 and another unit plus gearbox and back axle are available by separate negotiation. Finished in White and trimmed in Red, the Riley comes complete with green log book and selection of invoices and old MOTs. A unique opportunity.

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1928 Austin ‘Heavy’ 12/4 Two-Seater with Dickey

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

REG NO: RM 4841

CHASSIS: 45106

Introduced in late 1921, the Austin 12 (later known as the ‘Heavy 12/4’) became a legend within its own production lifetime. In many ways a scaled-down version of the existing 20/4 model, it was based around a sturdy ladder-frame chassis equipped with drum brakes and all-round semi-elliptic leaf-sprung suspension. Powered by a 1661cc sidevalve four-cylinder engine, the newcomer could be had with a variety of open or closed body styles and even saw service in the carriage trade. Updated in 1927, the 12 gained a longer-stroke 1861cc powerplant, higher scuttle and wider track. Renowned for its durability and dependability, the Austin has long held a special place in vintage car circles. Formerly the property of newspaper and radio entrepreneur Sir Ray Stanley Tindle CBE DL, this Heavy 12 Two-seater plus Dickey was first registered in Cumberland on 24th March 1928 (or so its ‘RM 4841’ number plate would imply). Providing transport for the Farnham Show’s Carnival Queen as recently as 2019, it features coachwork by Mulliners of Birmingham (complete with an unusual sidemounted spare wheel). An older restoration now showing various imperfections, the Austin has been started and run this year but will require recommissioning prior to usage. Offered for sale with side screens, V5C Registration Document and sundry paperwork.


1991 Rolls-Royce Silver Spirit II Just 40,500 miles from new​

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ESTIMATE: £14,000 - £18,000* REG NO: H110AFM

1947 Rover 12 P2 Sports Tourer Coachwork by APA Ltd

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ESTIMATE: £12,000 - £14,000* CHASSIS: SCAZS00A3MCH34138

The Fritz Feller-penned Silver Spirit debuted at the 1980 Paris Salon. It was not entirely new, however, and employed the floorpan of the outgoing model as well as its proven OHV 6750cc V8 powerplant. The opulent incomer was lower and longer than the Silver Shadow. Courtesy of its finely-tuned Girling hydraulic self-levelling suspension, it was said to provide the best roadholding ever offered by the marque. Finished in Rhapsody Blue with a Cream Everflex roof and Parchment hide, ‘H110 AFM’ was first registered to Rolls-Royce. Having covered just 40,500 miles under 5 former keepers, this smart looking Spirit is offered with its original book pack, handbooks plus well stamped service book, collection of invoices, large assortment of old MOT certificates and a spare key. Subject to an exchange steering rack in 2019 plus attention to the A/C in 2017 and further benefiting from having a reversing camera fitted, the vendor currently grades its engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘very good’. The current MOT certificate runs until August 2021.

REG NO: LLO 73

CHASSIS: R7250014

Introduced in 1937, Rover’s P2 range encompassed 10, 12, 14 and 16hp derivatives. Boasting a stiffer chassis than their predecessors, the newcomers also featured all-round leaf-sprung suspension, rod-operated drum brakes and overhead valve engines. Reintroduced after WW2, the 12hp model was powered by a 1496cc four-cylinder unit and spawned an attractive Sports Tourer variant in 1947. Bodied in aluminium over ash, just 200 examples of the open four-seater were made with all but the first four being clothed by APA Ltd of Stoke Row, Coventry. First registered in London (or so its ‘LLO 73’ number plate would imply), this rare P2 Sports Tourer – reputedly 1 of just 30-40 survivors - is described by the vendor as being in ‘very good’ condition with regards to its engine, gearbox, bodywork and paintwork. Though, he rates the electrical equipment as ‘good’ and what is thought to be the original maroon leather upholstery as ‘poor / average’. Accompanying paperwork includes a buff logbook, sundry invoices and correspondence with fellow owners. Riding on correct type steel wheels and boasting a replacement Black hood and sidescreens, this appealing Rover shows an unwarranted 41,279 miles to its odometer and comes with a MOT certificate valid until April 2022.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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1981 Ford Capri 3.0 Ghia

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ESTIMATE: £9,000 - £11,000* REG NO: VOO362W

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ESTIMATE: £13,000 - £15,000* CHASSIS: WFOCXXGAECBU18888

The Capri Mk III was referred to internally as “Project Carla”, and although little more than an update of the Capri II, it was often referred to as the Mk III. The first cars were available in March 1978, and sold very well initially. The bonnet’s leading edge was pulled down over the top of the headlamps, making the appearance more aggressive. At launch the existing engine and transmission combinations of the Capri II were carried over, with the 3.0 S model regarded as the most desirable model although the softer, more luxurious Ghia derivative with automatic, rather than manual transmission, was the bigger seller of the two V6-engined models like the sale car on offer. Finished in Dark Blue matched to a Blue cloth interior, ‘VOO 362W’ displays a credible but unwarranted 83,900 miles and is offered with V5c, collection of invoices and old MOT certificates. Subject to an engine overhaul in 2011 and fitted with sports exhaust manifolds plus equipped with later 280 Capri alloy wheels, the vendor currently grades its engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘very good’.

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1958 Triumph TR3A

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

REG NO: 65 EPK

CHASSIS: TS26103

The Triumph TR3 of 1955 was a direct evolution of the TR2. With it came minor styling revisions, a slight hike in power and the options of an occasional rear seat and a bolt-on steel hard top. The final iteration of the TR3, the TR3A, appeared in 1957. It was instantly recognisable by its wider front grille, exterior door handles and lockable boot latch. Production lasted until 1962, by which time 58,236 are said to have been built. Contemporary road tests achieved 0-60mph acceleration times of some 11.5 seconds and a mean top speed of a whisker under 110mph. Extensively restored and uprated by the vendor for competition usage during the mid/late 1980s, ‘65 EPK’ was treated to a new chassis in 1999. The Triumph’s impressive specification includes: a larger core radiator, Rover 2000 brake servo, Charlene brake limiter, aeroquip brake lines, Watts linkage, coil-over fully adjustable rear shock absorbers and adjustable front suspension. Fitted with a close ratio 4-speed gearbox with overdrive on all gears and a lightweight fibreglass bonnet, front panel and wings, the TR3A also boasts wet weather equipment. A desirable, ‘home market’ car, it is described by the vendor as being in ‘good’ (interior trim, bodywork and paintwork) or ‘very good’ (engine, gearbox, electrical equipment) condition.


1930 Ford Model A Tourer

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ESTIMATE: £8,000 - £10,000* REG NO: SV 7418

1977 Triumph Stag Comprehensively Restored in 2018/19

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ESTIMATE: £12,000 - £14,000* CHASSIS: RBA030148

Amid rumours that several States were preparing to ban his Model T due to its ‘unsafe’ handoperated braking system, Henry Ford begrudgingly succumbed to pressure and authorised development of a successor. Introduced in December 1927, the Model A was greeted with unprecedented demand. Longer and lower-slung than the Model T, it retained transverse-leaf suspension but proved significantly more refined. Designed by Howard Hicks, its 3285cc, L-Head four-cylinder engine developed 40bhp (twice the Model T’s output) boasting niceties like coil ignition and integral water pump. Mated to a three-speed manual gearbox, it gave a top speed of 65mph necessitating the fitment of four-wheel brakes. This handsome Model A Tourer resided in Argentina for the majority of its life before eventually being imported to the UK where a restoration was carried out. Having formed part of a large collection for the past few years, the car has not been used since approx. 2013, although we are informed it remains in running condition whilst the hood and frame will require attention. Rated as having “very good” bodywork with “good” engine, gearbox, paintwork and interior trim, it is accompanied by a V5 registration document.

REG NO: SER 426S

CHASSIS: SDLDCC4PXVC011323

For the buyer seeking a practical and stylish British convertible, the Triumph Stag has a great deal going for it. A Michelotti-designed body, four seats and a 145bhp 2997cc V8 under the bonnet make a very persuasive combination, especially when combined with the desirable manual gearbox as is offered here. Finished in Red with Black leather interior upholstery, ‘SER 426S’ has a recorded mileage of 73,524 miles (atoc) and has been in current ownership since 2009. Comprehensively restored between 2018 and 2019, the Stag’s history file contains correspondence from Ogilvy Car Restoration in Scotland detailing £18,000 worth of expenditure. The restoration works included body restoration and repaint, engine, brake and gearbox overhauls, an interior retrim in leather and wheel refurbishment. The Triumph further benefits from renewed rear brakes, new rocker cover gaskets, coolant system remediation and repairs to the earthing in 2020. Offered with a large history file that comprises the Stag books; a vast collection of past MOTs, several past MOT certificates; Hamilton fitted car cover. Described as ‘excellent’ throughout all categories (engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork), the Triumph currently has an issue with its hood whereby the material is in good condition but the frame will not retract.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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1934 Riley 9 ‘Monaco’

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NO RESERVE REG NO:

JG 4867

CHASSIS:

60-23084

Introduced in 1926, Percy Riley’s 9hp, 1,087cc twin-camshaft ‘four’ was an outstanding engine design by any standards, various versions powering Rileys until 1957. Clothed in stylish bodywork by Stanley Riley, the Coventry manufacturer’s pre-war offerings were among the world’s finest small-capacity sporting cars. 1929 saw the introduction of the MkIV chassis featuring wider front/rear track and much larger brakes than hitherto. Models available were the Monaco saloon, Biarritz saloon, fabric-bodied four-seat tourer and a brace of coachbuilt tourers. First registered as ‘JG 4867’ on 18th August 1934, confirmed by the Birkenhead Council-stamped buff continuation logbook, this handsome Monaco was briefly resident in Manchester, Huntingdon, Yeovil and Essex before heading back north to Coventry again thereafter. This delightful Riley entered its current ownership in January 2005 and has undergone much improvement at vast expense over the past sixteen years. This included the replacement of the ash body frame (to scuttle) during August - October 2010 and a full respray of the bodywork by marque specialists Ashridge Automobiles during 2017 2018 at a cost of circa £13,000. Twenty-three old MOT certificates on file suggest that this delightful pre-war saloon has covered less than 10,000 miles since 1978 (the current odometer reading is c.31,500). Finished in gleaming red and complemented by the car’s original green leather upholstery, there’s considerable charm and charisma in the cockpit. The patina throughout is wonderful, with that heady and intoxicating old car whiff of ancient leather and timber. Electrical equipment is described by the vendor as ‘very good’ and this includes a functioning dashboard clock and illuminated fuel gauge - many Riley owners will confirm that this is a rarity in itself! Starting readily upon inspection, this decidedly elegant and useable ‘Monaco’ saloon is offered for sale with a large and comprehensive history file, factory instruction book and lots of invoices, receipts and other related maintenance/service paperwork. An ideal VSCC starter car with the added benefit of having one of the oldest and best respected badges on the radiator grille.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1998 Aston Martin DB7 Volante

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Extensive AML service history ESTIMATE: £15,000 - £20,000* REG NO:

M1 VTG

CHASSIS:

SCFAAWK202090

Although Victor Gauntlett had long mooted the idea, it took the arrival of Ford money and TWR Group know-how for a new generation, ‘small’ Aston Martin to become a reality. Introduced at the March 1993 Geneva Salon - albeit deliveries did not start until late the following year - the newcomer had been subjected to more testing and development work than any of the marque’s previous models. Indeed under the watchful eye of Engineering Director Rod Mansfield Project NPX (as the nascent DB7 was labelled) got through some thirty prototypes. Based around a steel semi-monocoque chassis the production version was equipped with all-round independent suspension, four-wheel disc brakes and power assisted rack and pinion steering. Derived from a proven Jaguar unit, the DB7’s 3239cc DOHC straight-six engine boasted four valves per cylinder, Zytec multi-point fuel injection and an Eaton supercharger. Credited with developing 335bhp and 360lbft, it was allied to five-speed manual transmission as standard and reputedly enabled the Aston Martin to sprint from 0-60mph in 5.8 seconds and reach 161mph. Styled by Ian Callum just 879 straight-six powered DB7 Volantes were reputedly made like the sale car including several limited edition models. Finished in Mendip Blue matched to a Cream leather interior with Blue piping, ‘M1 VTG’ has covered just 64,080 miles from new and has been in current ownership since 2016. Offered with extensive AML service history and its original handbook / service book, the Aston also comes with 2 keys, tool kit and has recently been shod with new front tyres. The cherished registration number ‘M1 VTG’ is included in the sale. Said to have been maintained with no expense spared for the last 10 years, it is no surprise the vendor currently grades the DB7’s engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘excellent’. Offered with an MOT certificate into February 2022.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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1958 Austin-Healey 100/6

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Echoing the BMC rally cars of the period ESTIMATE:

£35,000 - £40,000*

REG NO:

381 UYT

CHASSIS:

BN4-L/73991

The Healey 100/4 was designed by Donald Healey’s eponymous company, and assembled by Austin at Longbridge using Austin A90 Atlantic mechanicals and bodies crafted by Jensen Motors. It had been the star of the 1952 London Motorshow and subsequently took the American market by storm too. For 1956, the wheelbase was lengthened, the bodywork facelifted and the four-cylinder engine replaced by BMC’s six-cylinder C Series engine. Called the 100/6, it was initially available in 2+2 guise (BN4), with the twoseater (BN6) version like the sale car following in 1957. Echoing the Works Healey rally cars of the period such as FAC 57, ‘381 UYT’ was originally dispatched on December 22, 1958 as an LHD, North American Export example to Seattle, Washington with factory equipment such as laminated windscreen, wire wheels, heater and overdrive. Brought back to the UK in September 2016, and was soon the subject of an extensive mechanical overhaul which included the following: engine and carburettor overhaul, refurbished and upgrade to the braking system, upgraded and overhauled suspension and many new parts including aluminium fenders, sports side exhaust, aluminium fuel tank with le mans style filler cap plus new starter motor, alternator, water pump, fuel pump, radiator, wire wheels with Avon road sport tyres and a new interior. Furthermore, the gearbox was overhauled just 60 miles ago at a cost of £1,400. ‘381 UYT’ is offered with Works-style hardtop, large collection of invoices from AH spares, Heritage certificate, reproduction service manual plus handbook and a collection of photographs of the restoration on a memory stick. A matching numbers car that starts and drives ‘very well’, the vendor presently classifies its manual gearbox as ‘excellent’, the interior trim and straight-six engine as ‘very good’, the electrical equipment and bodywork as ‘good’ and the paintwork as ‘average’.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1981 Mercedes-Benz 500 SL ESTIMATE:

£28,000 - £32,000*

REG NO:

YFC 897X

CHASSIS:

10704622000629

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Launched in 1971, the R107 Mercedes-Benz SL was the replacement for the iconic Pagoda W113 model developed from the chassis of the mid size W114 saloon and fitted with engines from the larger W108 S-class. Originally launched as a 350SL, the range expanded upwards with larger V8 engines and downwards with six cylinder options, broadening its appeal while remaining just as desirable and prestigious as the model it replaced. For most markets, the 500SL represented the pinnacle of a range which was a modern classic right from its launch. All 500SLs used the same Mercedes four speed automatic gearbox. For those seeking a softer experience, Mercedes had offered a long wheelbase fixed head called the SLC – but production overlapped the 5.0 engine by just a few months, making the convertible the variant that most enthusiasts will have craved when new. Following the fitment of fuel injection in 1985, Mercedes replaced the R107 range in 1989 with the new R129 SL. Finished in Champagne Metallic with Beige Check Cloth upholstery front and rear, this particular example has belonged to the vendor since 1986 and is warranted to have covered just 56,000 miles from new. Describing the Mercedes-Benz as being in ‘excellent overall’ condition with regard to its engine, automatic transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork, the seller also notes that the soft top is in ‘very good order, with the exception of some slight milkiness in the lower corner of its rear window’. The 500 SL is supplied with a hard top as well as its fabric hood, and this comes with a storage rack for when not fitted to the car. An extensive file of old MoT certificates and maintenance invoices is supplied with the car, and it reportedly underwent a major inspection and check by MercedesBenz in 2019.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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2001 Lotus Elise

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Low Mileage and Current Ownership for a Decade ESTIMATE: £13,000 - £15,000* REG NO:

Y826 JNM

CHASSIS:

SCCGA11111HE70125

First registered on the 10th April 2001 and showing just six previous keepers, this Series 2 Elise is fitted with the reliable Rover K-series engine which gives it a highly respectable quoted top speed of well over 120mph. Period road tests suggest it can reach 62mph in just over five seconds and can crack three figures in a little over 14, normally reserved for those with supercar budgets. Although well over a decade old, the Elise has evolved to keep abreast of the opposition, demonstrating the soundness of the original concept and it continues to represent an affordable purchase for sports car enthusiasts on a budget who value both performance and aesthetics. Offered with less than 52,000 miles recorded at the time of cataloguing and entered directly from the collection of a prominent figure within British motor racing; this right-hand drive Lotus Elise was purchased by the vendor in August 2011 and has been maintained regardless of cost ever since. Breathing through a performance air filter and stopping with the assistance of upgraded ‘Green Stuff’ brake pads, this otherwise standard roadster is offered with its original instruction book, V5C document and valid MoT certificate showing no advisories at the time of its last inspection. ‘Y826 JNM’ offers champagne motoring for lemonade money and ideal transport for those looming warmer months ahead.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1960 Chevrolet C20 Apache ESTIMATE:

£12,000 - £14,000*

REG NO:

915 XVG

CHASSIS:

0C2540106800

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Launched the preceding Autumn, Chevrolet’s 1960-model year line-up included a new, lighter capacity pick-up truck that featured many firsts. Most notable were a ‘drop-centre’ ladder frame chassis, allowing the cab to sit lower, and independent front suspension, giving an almost car-like ride in a truck. Also new for 1960 was a revised designation system for trucks made by GM. Gone were the 3100, 3200, and 3600 monikers. Instead, a new scheme assigned a 10, 20, or 30. Since 1957, Chevy trucks had been available from the factory with four-wheel drive, and the fresh nomenclature saw those with rear-wheel drive carry a ‘C’ prefix and those with four-wheel drive a ‘K’ one. For decades the Chevrolet C/K series of trucks served as the backbone of the make’s range and millions were delivered to hard working men and woman around the world. As a result, a dedicated following has persisted. Finished in Olive Green with Grey Cloth upholstery and ‘Desert Dog Towing’ motifs to each door, this particular example was imported to the UK in 2019 and has since been treated to an overhauled braking system, new master cylinder, alternator conversion, new battery, plugs, points and condenser and had all the oils changed. Riding on Black painted wheels and wearing ‘Chevrolet Apache 20’ badging, ‘915 XVG’ is described by the vendor as being in ‘good’ condition with regard to its 4.6 litre (283 cu in) V8 engine, four-speed floor change transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

17


1927 Austin Seven Chummy

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NO RESERVE REG NO: RO 6165

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Low Mileage and Ownership ESTIMATE: £12,000 - £14,000*

CHASSIS: A42413

Arguably the forefather of mass motoring ‘giants’ such as the Volkswagen Beetle, Citroen 2CV and BMC Mini, the Austin Seven was launched in 1922 and quickly went on to become the epitome of economic small car family motoring. An extremely versatile design, its simple but well executed A-frame, leaf-sprung chassis also played host to a bewildering range of derivatives from Brooklands single-seaters to two-speed tractors (all powered by the ubiquitous, four-cylinder, sidevalve 747cc engine) though, it is perhaps in the guise of a ‘Chummy’ tourer that the model is most fondly remembered. Continuing spares availability means that owning a Chummy in the 21st Century is still a practical proposition as well as being a great entry into the Vintage Sports Car Club where its ability on driving tests and trials in the right hands is second to none. Formerly the property of newspaper and radio entrepreneur Sir Ray Stanley Tindle CBE DL, this Chummy was first registered in Hertfordshire on January 1st 1927 (or so its ‘RO 6165’ number plate would imply). Presenting as an older restoration, the Austin sports sundry blemishes to its red / black coachwork but the interior and hood appear to be in good order. Understood to be running nicely, the Seven would nonetheless benefit from recommissioning / servicing following a period of dry storage. Offered with a small quantity of expired MOT certificates dating back to the late 1990s (the most recent being issued in 2011) and a Swansea V5C registration document.

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1997 TVR Chimaera 4.0

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

REG NO: P829 VWX

CHASSIS: SDLDCC4PXVC011323

Introduced at the 1992 Motor Show, the Chimaera was intended to be a more practical, user-friendly machine than the formidable Griffith. To this end, it sported a proper boot and more cosseting interior. Power came from a variety of Rover V8-derived units. Though, even the entry level 4.0 litre was quoted as developing 240bhp/270lbft. Slowest of the range, it was reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 4.7 seconds, 0-100mph in 12.1 seconds and 152mph! Luckily all Chimaeras came with four-wheel disc brakes and a Quaife differential as standard. Finished in Dark Green with Cream leather upholstery and Green interior accents, ‘P829 VWX’ has covered some 51,000 miles from new in the hands of five keepers. Acquired by its previous owner in 2002 and passing to the seller during 2015, the TVR was treated to a new starter motor, ignition switch and upgraded Thatcham alarm in 2019 and a fresh battery last year. Describing the 4.0 litre V8 engine, five-speed manual gearbox, electrical equipment, paintwork and interior trim as ‘very good’, the vendor rates the bodywork as ‘excellent’. A great way to make the most of a staycation, this tempting TVR is offered for sale with a history file containing various old MOTs and invoices, two sets of keys and a current MOT certificate valid until July 2021.


1990 BMW 320i Convertible 70,400 miles from new, desirable five-speed manual

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ESTIMATE: £11,000 - £13,000* REG NO: G269 ALM

1960 MG A 1600 Roadster

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Home market example ESTIMATE: £18,000 - £22,000*

CHASSIS: WBABA12010EB66541

Far, far rarer than its saloon siblings, just 32,686 examples of BMW’s iconic E30-generation 320i Convertible were made (with most being to LHD specification). Powered by a 1991cc SOHC straightsix engine allied to either manual or automatic transmission, the four-seater droptop was reputedly capable of over 120mph. Finished in Alpine White with Blue Cloth upholstery and a Dark Blue soft-top, ‘G269 ALM’ is warranted to have covered some 70,400 miles from new (a figure corroborated by old MOTs on file). Recently recommissioned following a period of dry storage, the four-seater was serviced and treated to a good quality respray in its original livery. Pleasingly retaining its factory-fitted interior complete with optional leather covered Sports steering wheel, the Convertible is powered by BMW’s legendary M20 2-litre straight-six engine allied to five-speed manual transmission. Covering less than 2,000 miles over the past fifteen years, the 320i is said to ‘show no signs of corrosion’ and to ‘drive exceptionally well’. Riding on correct-type alloy wheels and described by the vendor as being in ‘excellent overall’ condition with regard to its engine, gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork, this increasingly collectable E30 drop-top is offered for sale with history file and ‘no advisories’ MOT certificate valid until April 2022.

REG NO: 420 SPE

CHASSIS: GHN92895

Introduced in Autumn 1955, the MGA Roadster married a proven chassis design derived from its TD/ TF predecessors to the new B-series four-cylinder, pushrod-ohv engine first seen in the Magnette saloon. Borrowing cues from the Abingdon factory’s successful EX182 prototype racers (5th- and 6th-in-class at that year’s Le Mans), its wonderfully elegant styling ensured strong sales on both sides of the Atlantic. Continually updated, the MGA range was joined by Coupé and ‘Twin Cam’ variants in 1956 and 1958 respectively. Prompted by the latter’s performance advantage, the standard pushrod model received a capacity increase to 1588cc and front disc brakes in May 1959. Equipped with a four-speed manual gearbox and rack and pinion steering as standard, the resultant ‘1600’ MKI was reputedly capable of 100mph plus. 1 of only 1,334 1600 MKI Roadsters made, ‘420 SPE’ is finished in Old English White with Red upholstery. A desirable ‘home market’ example, it has been in the current ownership since 2006. Understood to have benefited from an Ivor Searle reconditioned engine and offered with full weather equipment, rear luggage rack and history file, the MG is described by the vendor as being in ‘good’ condition with regards to its engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork. It also comes with an MOT certificate valid into October 2021.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

19


1935/6 Morris CS8 15cwt GS ESTIMATE:

£40,000 - £50,000*

REG NO:

DMV 753

CHASSIS:

787CS8780

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Deciding that it needed a new type of purpose-built General Service lorry in 1933, the British War Office issued a tender accordingly. The brief included the ability to carry loads of up to 15-cwt (1,500 pounds), a short wheelbase, semi-forward driver’s compartment and plentiful ground clearance not to mention the use of as many ‘tried and tested’ commercially available components as possible. Ford, Commer, Guy, Bedford and Morris all produced prototypes but it was the latter’s CS8 which entered production first. A derivation of the civilian C-Series, the newcomer was powered by a Six-cylinder, 3.5 litre engine and employed a circa 8-foot wheelbase (hence ‘CS8’). Entering service during 1934, the earliest versions were characterised by a rounded centre section bonnet, twin aeroscreens and canvas doors. The 4x2 Morris evolved through three Marks before being supplanted by the cheaper to produce, four-cylinder C4 for 1942. The CS8 proved its worth in Palestine but the majority of the 21,319 made were lost when the British Expeditionary Force withdrew from Dunkirk. Despite the model’s versatility as a temporary office, wireless station, water tanker, petrol bowser, 2-pounder portée and mobile compressor etc, survivors are decidedly few and far between today. Presumed to date from late 1935, chassis 787CS8780 was issued with the War Office / Middlesex County registration number ‘DMV 753’ on 15th January 1936. Understood to be the earliest known surviving 1935/36 type CS8 with Mark II bodystyle, the Morris was reportedly ‘a very original vehicle’ when found by previous keeper, Rory Ballard, complete with ‘a 1938 military exempt tax disc’ and ‘details of its military Z number’. Renowned in military vehicle circles, Mr Ballard treated the General Service pickup to an exhaustive 2,500-hour, chassis up restoration which included the fitment of a new old stock correct-type powerplant and thousands of pounds worth of parts. Unable to locate the appropriate BSF bolts for the body, he and his father fabricated suitable replacements that featured authentic rounded off heads.

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Beautifully finished in the proper shade of Bronze Green, ‘DMV 753’ is meticulously detailed throughout from its bronze petrol tank dipper to its lugged rear wheels (designed to accept chains for off roading). Indeed, the attention to detail shown by Mr Ballard would not disgrace a concours d’elegance field. Starting readily upon inspection, the vendor had no hesitation in demonstrating the Morris’s ability to maintain a 45mph – 50mph cruise on a nearby dual carriageway. Featured on the front cover of the Invicta Military Vehicle Preservation Society’s ‘Imprint’ magazine in Spring 2020 and enjoyed on a Continental sortie to Hallincourt, this exceptional CS8 is worthy of close inspection and offered for sale with history file, handbook and tool kit. The nicest example we have encountered.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


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1966 Ford Mustang 289 Fastback ESTIMATE:

£26,000 - £30,000*

REG NO:

LAX 168D

CHASSIS:

06T09C193359

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Manufactured on 18th January 1966 at Ford’s Metuchen, New Jersey plant, chassis 6T09C193359 was originally finished in Candy Apple Red with a Red Crinkle and Red Rosette vinyl interior. Fitted with the Blue Oval’s iconic 289 cu in (4.7 litre) ‘Small Block’ V8 engine allied to C4 automatic transmission, the Mustang was despatched to Buffalo, New York. Resident in Indiana by the time its last American keeper acquired it during 2009, the Fastback was imported to the UK a year later. A well-known Muscle Car Enthusiast and the former proprietor of Barons Auctions, its new owner – Laurence Sayers-Gillan – treated the 2+2-seater to a DeLuxe wood-rimmed steering wheel, ‘GT’ front fog lamps, new floors throughout and fresh carpets etc. A former classic car dealer, the vendor acquired ‘LAX 168D’ in December 2012 and then again during January 2020. Belonging to a long-term friend and customer in between times, the Mustang was used sparingly for local shows etc and only relinquished due to failing eyesight. The seller’s plans to enjoy the Fastback last summer were thwarted by Covid-19, while this year he is hopeful of undertaking a busy classic racing season; hence the reason for putting the Ford under the hammer. Starting readily upon inspection and sounding wonderful, ‘LAX 168D’ is said to ‘drive well’ with the vendor further commenting: ‘Whilst a cruiser rather than a racer it is a great experience. The body is excellent with sound arches, rear quarters, torque boxes etc. The interior too is lovely. There is a period-looking but modern radio which will pair with an iPhone etc. The paintwork is bright and very attractive but not perfect. There are some local areas of micro-blistering but this has been completely stable in all the years that I have known the car. In some lights, but bizarrely not all, the doors are slightly darker than the adjacent panels but with no actual bodywork required this would be easy to correct if desired’.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1951 Bentley Mark VI Saloon

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ESTIMATE: £14,000 - £18,000* REG NO:

LXT 560

CHASSIS:

B74LJ

Bentley’s MKVI was the first vehicle ever offered by the company with factory-designed coachwork, and the first to be assembled in Rolls-Royce’s Crewe factory rather than the old Derby premises. Its sizeable, X-braced chassis featured hydraulic front brakes and independent coil-and-wishbone front suspension. Power came from the new six-cylinder unit first seen in the short-lived MKV Saloon. Initially 4257cc but later enlarged to 4566cc (for the rarer ‘Big Bore’ version of which just 1,202 were made), it featured an F-Type alloy head. The adjoining four-speed manual gearbox had synchromesh on all but first gear. First supplied to the Dunlop Rubber Co. Ltd at Fort Dunlop, this MK VI later spent some time in the Lebanon before being returned to the UK and reunited with its original registration number. Last on the road in approximately 2014, ‘LXT 560’ is said to have since been serviced so as to maintain it in ‘good running and driving condition’. Further described as having ‘very good’ bodywork and interior trim, with ‘good’ engine, gearbox and paintwork, we are advised it has been converted to a keyless starting system.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

23


1960 Daimler Majestic

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NO RESERVE REG NO: RBF 250

25

ESTIMATE: £12,000 - £14,000* CHASSIS: 99277

Introduced in July 1958, the Daimler Majestic was powered by a 3794cc OHV V8 straight-six engine allied to three-speed automatic transmission. Based around a massive cruciform-braced box-section chassis equipped with coil-sprung independent front suspension, a well located ‘live’ rear axle, power steering and four-wheel disc brakes, the Daimler boasted a 100mph top speed. Trimmed in a luxurious manner that befitted former holders of the Royal Warrant, the Majestic remained in production until 1962 by which time some 1,490 are thought to have been made. Finished in Golden Sand over Maroon with Maroon leather upholstery, ‘RBF 250’ is described by the vendor as being in ‘good overall’ condition with regards to its engine, automatic transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork. Supplied new by Reeve & Stedeford of Birmingham, the Daimler is believed but not warranted to have covered some 75,632 miles (atoc) from new in the hands of eight keepers. Certainly, the Majestic’s nicely patinated cabin lends credence to such moderate usage. Sporting a stainless steel exhaust and treated to a new battery in 2019, this charming Daimler is offered for sale with original owner’s handbook, sales brochure, wiring diagram, Heritage certificate, buff logbook, collection of old invoices, old MOT’s, Tax discs and owners club correspondence.

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1977 Ford Capri 2.0S MkII

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

REG NO: TMD226S

CHASSIS: GAECTC03643

The MKII Capri was launched in 1974. It was an example of gentle evolution rather than revolution, via which Ford heeded the lessons imposed by the oil crisis and attempted to make their popular Coupe better suited to the needs of the time. The revised model was treated to a shorter bonnet, larger cabin, more modern fascia and smaller steering wheel. Most significantly, the Capri now gained a hatchback rear door making the stowage area far more easily accessible and giving rise to a boot space of 630 litres. The 2.0S was powered by a 2.0 single overhead camshaft Pinto unit, that in standard form produced 98bhp at 5,200rpm and 112 lb ft of torque at 3,500rpm. This drove through either a four-speed manual gearbox or C3 three-speed automatic. The result was no supercar, but a lively performer. Supplied new by Allen Ford of Romford, ‘TMD 226S’ displays 48,200 miles and shows just one former keeper on its V5C with current ownership since 2014. Offered with bookpack, handbook and service book, it is understood to have been Ziebart treated from new and rides on rare RS four-spoke alloy wheels. The vendor currently grades its engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘very good’.


1982 Chevrolet C10 Shortbed Pickup

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ESTIMATE: £18,000 - £22,000* REG NO: ABW 653X

1929 Ford Model A

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ESTIMATE: £13,000 - £17,000* CHASSIS: 1GCDC14H9CJ138343

Extensively cosmetically and mechanically customised, this striking Chevy C10 Pick-Up belonged to its previous keeper for ten years. Heavily involved in the transformation, he had the rear tailgate formed and sucked-in, the rear bumper tucked and the taillights relocated. Professionally painted in White over Teal, the C10 received a brand-new Black interior including the dashboard, door panels, bench seat and carpets. A white gauge pack, chrome GT steering wheel and chrome fire extinguisher provide some welcome contrast and the Pick-Up also boasts a rubber bed mat, kill switch, AM/FM radio, power steering, power brakes, steering wheel tilt mechanism and Positraction rear end. Sourced from a 1997 Chevrolet 1500, the 350 cu in (5.7 litre) V8 sports an Edelbrock intake and carburettor, Vortec heads and long tube headers. It is allied to an automatic gearbox which has covered c.5,000 miles since being overhauled. The restoration work was chronicled in an accompanying booklet. Imported by the vendor in January 2020, this attention-grabbing Chevy is kept on trickle charge in a dry barn and comes with a valid MOT certificate.

REG NO: DS 9667

CHASSIS: A1561027

The Model T phenomenon lasted 18 years, but by 1926 even Henry Ford had to admit that the car that ‘put the world on wheels’ had finally run out of steam. No follower of convention, he terminated T production on May 26th 1927 immediately after the 15 millionth example had rolled off the line, despite having nothing to replace it with. Henry himself directed the development of: a new longer, lower-slung chassis; a Howard Hicks-designed 3285cc, four-cylinder engine; three-speed manual transmission and novel electrical system. By the time the Model A made its debut on December 2nd, there was a backlog of 400,000 orders for a car nobody had seen! Imported from the USA in 1992, a collection of invoices on file show that ‘DS 9967’ has since benefited from a large programme of refurbishment including the fitment of a reconditioned Snyder engine (sourced from the States), brake overhaul, uprated radiator and new kingpins, bushes, steering box, carburettor and water pump etc. Said to be in ‘first class’ condition bodily, the Ford is offered for sale with a Vintage Sports Car Club Buff Form. Model As are well proven trials cars and ‘DS 9967’ should be no different. Ready for the Lands End . . .

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

25


1998 Lotus Elise ESTIMATE:

£15,000 - £17,000*

REG NO:

R389 GAA

CHASSIS:

SCCGA111XWHC32870

28

Introduced at the 1995 Frankfurt Motor Show, the Lotus Elise was a driver’s car par excellence. A paragon of lightness, agility and responsiveness, the newcomer utilised a bonded extruded aluminium chassis clad with fibreglass body panels. Mid-mounted and allied to five-speed manual transmission, its 1.8 litre K-Series engine produced a modest 118bhp and 122lbft of torque. However, with a kerb weight of just 725kg the two-seater was capable of 0-60mph in 5.8 seconds and over 120mph. Able to glide over a broken British B-road in typical Lotus fashion, the Elise did without power steering, ABS or traction control and was all the better for it. Early models featured Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) brake discs which not only minimised unsprung weight but also provided great feel. Enthusiasts are already seeking out Series 1 cars (especially MMC equipped examples) as representing the purest incarnation of the Elise; a trend which seems bound to continue. Finished in Blue with Beige leather/cloth upholstery, ‘R389 GAA’ is said to have had just two owners from new (though, HPi shows three former keepers). A desirable ‘MMC’ Series 1, the Lotus has reportedly been ‘very well cared for’ as evidenced by the fact that it has recently had ‘a service and cambelt change by GS Performance of Newmarket’ at a cost of £1,483’. Passing its last MOT test on 27th January 2001 with no advisories and shod with fresh rear tyres, the Lotus is described by the vendor as being in ‘good’ (interior trim, paintwork) or ‘very good’ (bodywork, engine, gearbox, electrical equipment) condition. Wearing its 99,000 recorded miles better than one might expect, this increasingly collectable Elise is worthy of close inspection.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1970 Jaguar E-type 4.2 2+2

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Supplied new to the Daily Express and finished in ultra-rare Porsche Tangerine ESTIMATE: £45,000 - £55,000* REG NO:

BME 63H

CHASSIS:

1R35848

The Jaguar E Type wowed the world upon its launch in 1961. Here was a sportscar which offered performance to beat Ferrari and Aston Martin at just half the price, wrapped up in a cigar-like body which was unlike any other contemporary sportscar. This combination of style, speed and value endeared it to the world’s elites, and the E-Type was one of the coolest cars in which to be seen throughout the 1960s. The range expanded with a 2+2 derivative joining the coupe and roadster, and evolved through steady stages until the final Series 3 V12s bowed out in 1975. According to its accompanying Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust Certificate, chassis 1R35848 was manufactured on 23rd April 1970 and despatched to dealer Henlys of London a few days later. Finished in special order Porsche Tangerine with Black leather upholstery and sporting the preferred four-speed manual gearbox, the Jaguar was supplied new to The Daily Express and first registered as ‘JAK 449’ on 20th May. Given his love of fast living and personalised number plates, it is thought that the E-Type was bought as a company car for the newspaper’s celebrated cartoonist, Raymond Jackson (better known by his byline ‘JAK’). Re-registered as ‘BME 63H’ prior to entering the current (third) ownership in 1976, the 2+2-seater has become an established member of the family over the past forty-five years even being used for camping trips with a roof rack! Professionally resprayed in 1994, the Jaguar has also been subtly enhanced with XJ6 6.5-inch wire wheels, stainless steel exhaust, stainless steel brake/clutch master cylinder brackets, 1-2-3 dual point distributor, spin-on oil filter conversion, Spax adjustable shock absorbers and single point accessible rear brake bleeders. In 2010 the engine was given an overhaul using a brand-new crankshaft, big end bearings, clutch, flywheel and uprated oil pump. It also had its chain followers and tensioners replaced. Since then, the only mileage covered has been to and from MOT stations.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

27


1985 Mercedes-Benz 280 SL

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67,000 miles from new ESTIMATE: £20,000 - £24,000* REG NO:

NCZ 1856

CHASSIS:

WDB1070422A032222

Nicknamed the ‘Panzerwagen’ by Mercedes-Benz’s own development engineers, the R107 series was the result of an extremely thorough design process. In an attempt to avoid falling foul of threatened American safety legislation, Stuttgart produced an open car whose structural rigidity surpassed that of some contemporary saloons! Indeed, even now some fifty years after its introduction the R107 retains a reassuring air of solidity. Allied to this was sure-footed handling courtesy of all-round independent coil-sprung suspension, power-assisted steering and disc brakes. Always more of a grand tourer than an out and out sports car, the vast majority of R107s were fitted with automatic transmission. Launched in September 1974, the Eurocentric 280SL was less powerful but more fuel-efficient than its V8 brethren. Though with some 185bhp and 177lbft of torque on tap from its fuel-injected 2746cc DOHC straight-six engine, the model could still boast authoritative 120mph performance. Dating from the last year of R107-series 280SL production (and thus 1 of just 2,838 such cars made), chassis 032222 was factory finished in Champagne Metallic with Brazil Brown upholstery. As well as hard and soft top roofs, its specification included electric windows, rear seats and headlamp wash / wipers. Remarkably original even down to the timing sticker affixed to the top of its M110.98 2.8 litre DOHC straight-six engine and the wheel fitting advice tag in the spare wheel well, the Mercedes-Benz started readily upon inspection and ran well during our recent photography session. Showing just one former keeper on its V5C registration document and warranted to have covered a mere 67,000 miles from new (a figure corroborated by the accompanying maintenance history), ‘NCZ 1856’ was last serviced earlier this year. Worthy of close inspection and a great way to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the R107-series, this delightful 280SL is offered for sale with V5C registration document, history file and ‘no advisories’ MOT certificate valid until March 2022.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1978 Lancia Beta Montecarlo Series 1 Spider

31

The subject of a £38,000 restoration from 2007-2011 ESTIMATE: £12,500 - £14,500* REG NO:

WHB 665T

CHASSIS:

137AS0003852

Attracted by its striking colour (only a very few UK-supplied cars are thought to have been factory finished in Verde Metalizzato), the vendor purchased ‘WHB 665T’ off eBay as a rough runner during 2005 for circa £1,100. Unbeknownst to him, the Lancia had been declared a Category C insurance write-off seven years earlier when Montecarlo values were a fraction of what they are today. Determined to have the two-seater brought back to its former glory, he enlisted the services of marque specialist Day & Whites of Brands Hatch (the same firm that are currently restoring Harry Metcalfe’s Fulvia) in 2007 for what turned out to be a four-year and £38,000 project! We have spoken to John Day who has confirmed that the original bodyshell was carefully stripped and acid dipped before being restored with new floor pans, sills, rear inner and outer wings, rear suspension turrets and door frame repair kits not to mention a replacement noseband support panel and rear screen channel etc. Indeed, Mr Day said that in hindsight it would have been much easier (and cheaper) to re-shell ‘WHB 665T’ using the Azzuro Blue Series 1 Coupe which the vendor had acquired as a source of spares! The factory-fitted engine was extensively overhauled by John Day and uprated with twin Weber 40DCNF carburettors to develop circa 150bhp (30bhp more than standard). The brakes and suspension were similarly upgraded but otherwise the Montecarlo was returned to standard specification. Kept garaged and subjected to fair weather use only, ‘WHB 665T’ has covered some 8,000 post-refurbishment miles. Regularly MOT tested and maintained by marque specialist Omicron of Norwich and more recently Revivals of Thriplow over the past decade, the two-seater is variously described by the vendor as being in ‘good’ (interior trim), ‘very good’ (engine, five-speed manual gearbox, electrical equipment) or ‘excellent’ (bodywork, paintwork) condition. Sounding decidedly rorty thanks to a sports exhaust, this rare surviving Series 1 Spider is worthy of close inspection. Offered for sale with V5C registration document and a wealth of bills and photographs documenting the restoration.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

29


1980 Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith II The property of HRH Princess Margaret for twenty-two years ESTIMATE:

£45,000 - £55,000*

REG NO:

PMY 542W (FORMERLY ‘3 GXM’)

CHASSIS:

LRH0039342

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Handbuilt to special order, the Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith II had a four-inch longer wheelbase than its humbler Silver Shadow II sibling. Beloved of the world’s elite, just 2,135 were made between 1977 and 1980. Those familiar with Hans Christian Anderson’s fairy tale ‘The Princess and the Pea’ will be unsurprised to learn that HRH Princess Margaret insisted that the upholstery piping on the front and rear seats of this, her final Rolls-Royce, be moved back so that there was no danger of it contacting her neck should she choose to recline at any stage. Genuine Princesses it seems really are more sensitive than their subjects. The rest of the car’s interior is similarly bespoke with a false floor to the rear, the back seat squab mounted as low as possible (HRH was only 5ft 1in tall), enlarged C-post vanity mirrors, special small spotlights added to each rear cantrail, Green Cloth upholstery throughout (with a loose cover for the driver’s seat), and Black Nuella leather being used to clothe the top and bottom of the dashboard, centre console and door cards. The dashboard itself carried a Matt Rosewood veneer and did without a lock for the glovebox. The latter contained the switch for the roof-mounted Police Escort light and thus needed to be instantly accessible. A centre rear seatbelt was omitted as were armrests to the rear doors and Duchess straps (hardly fitting for a Princess). H&H have had the privilege of offering several Royal cars over the years and it is not uncommon for them to be specified with similarly non-reflective interiors so as to make photographing their occupants easier (HRH The Duke of Edinburgh’s 1954 Lagonda 3 Litre that fetched £340,000 in April 2016 eschewed wood in favour of Dark Green leather for its dashboard and door cappings). Such alterations are not motivated by pride but rather a consciousness that once in the public eye members of the Royal Family are very much on parade. To the exterior, HRH Princess Margaret ordered that chassis LRH0039342 should have opening front quarter lights and its side indicator repeater lights repositioned in the chrome swage line (rather than below it as was standard). The accompanying copy build sheets also note: ‘Silver Wraith II emblem on boot and RR badges on rear quarters are NOT REQUIRED’. The roof above the windscreen was modified to accommodate a flag mast and illuminated shield. HRH Princess Margaret gave Rolls-Royce less than five months to tailor the Silver Wraith II to her personal specification. Indeed, chassis LRH0039342 had originally been ordered in Moorland Green with Beige leather upholstery by J. Barrett Esq. via Jack Barclay Ltd before Crewe requisitioned it. To meet such a tight deadline many of the unique interior fittings were transferred across from HRH Princess Margaret’s former car, chassis LRH36157, and reconditioned accordingly.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

Finished in Cardinal Red and initially road registered as ‘3 GXM’, the limousine was delivered to Kensington Palace on 16th May 1980. A warranty card issued the same day lists the purchaser’s name correctly. However, all the way through the order process she had been referred to under the pseudonym ‘Mr Edgar’. No spendthrift, HRH Princess Margaret nevertheless kept her special order Rolls-Royce for twenty-two years; its last official journey being to convey family members to her funeral at St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle on 15th February 2002. Exactly how many notable personages have been conveyed in this one-off Silver Wraith II remains a mystery. Although, it is known to have hosted Paul Getty, Ronald and Nancy Reagan, Lady Diana Spencer (before she married Prince Charles), HM The Queen and Queen Mary, The Queen Mother. Maintained by Rolls-Royce and subsequently entrusted to marque specialist Chris Lee, chassis LRH0039342 had covered 44,000 miles by the time that The Earl of Snowdon David Linley inherited it. Pilloried in the tabloid press at the time for selling off so important an heirloom, Snowdon has since told the vendor that he only did so after offering the car to the Royal Mews. A keen Royalist, Ronald Allwright became the Silver Wraith II’s first registered keeper when he bought it from marque specialist P&A Wood in June 2002. In addition to renewing the Black Everflex roof, fitting a refurbished steering rack and routine maintenance, Mr Allwright also went to great pains to research the RollsRoyce’s history entering into correspondence with The Right Honourable The Earl of Snowdon and receiving Christmas cards from HRH Princess Margaret’s chauffeur, Dave Griffin. The subject of a four-page article by Martin Buckley in the February 2016 issue of Classic & Sportscar magazine, chassis LRH0039342 was purchased by the seller from JD Classics shortly thereafter. Joining a significant private collection, it had a battery trickle charger/conditioner installed and underwent a thorough waxoyl treatment at a cost of some £4,554. Starting readily upon inspection, the Rolls-Royce has covered less than a thousand miles since it was last serviced by Bentley Leicester on 3rd January 2018 at 47,336 miles. Forever in the shadow of her older sister HM The Queen, HRH Princess Margaret did her best to live her own life, her own way. Keeping a car for twentytwo years is not typical of the Royal Family nor is personalising it to this degree. A very special, very important and low mileage Silver Wraith II which surely belongs in a museum. Offered for sale with copy build records, service invoices and a wealth of period photos.


31


1971 Triumph TR6

33

1 of just 8,370 ‘home market’ cars ESTIMATE: £12,000 - £14,000* REG NO: AWW 145K

34

NO RESERVE CHASSIS: CP/54571-O

Introduced in 1968 as a replacement for the outgoing TR250/TR5 models, the Triumph TR6 proved a strong seller on both sides of the Atlantic. Crisply styled, its smooth flowing lines and Kamm tail hid a cruciform-braced chassis equipped with all-round independent suspension, disc/drum brakes and rack-and-pinion steering. Powered by a refined 2498cc OHV straight-six engine allied to four-speed plus overdrive manual transmission, it was deceptively fast with contemporary road testers recording 0-60mph in 8.2 seconds and a 121mph top speed. Writing in 1969, Autocar magazine went as far as to comment that “Even if the Austin-Healey 3000 had not been dropped, the TR6 would have taken over as the he-man’s sports car in its own right”. A ’home market’ car manufactured on 7th September 1971, chassis CP/54571-O was specified with overdrive, seatbelts and Dunlop Sport tyres. A stalled and incomplete restoration project when acquired by the vendor in late 2019, he has spent over a year bringing the Triumph back to life. Now fitted with a twin carburettor-fed 2.5 litre straight-six engine in place of its original fuel-injected unit, the TR6 is finished in Pimento Red with contrasting Black upholstery and a Black hood. Offered with V5C Registration Document and Heritage Certificate, it is understood that ‘AWW 145K’ will have benefited from further tidying by the time of sale.

32

1934 Austin Seven Box Saloon

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

REG NO: BHK 887

CHASSIS: 197313

By 1930, saloons had overtaken open tourers in popularity and the Austin Seven now known as the ‘Box Saloon’ was born. It featured a steel body bolted to the A-form frame chassis with steering by worm & wheel and developed some 24bhp at 4,500 rpm - enough to propel the little saloon to 60mph for those brave enough to try! Fuel consumption was rated at 35-40 mpg. Braking was by cable operated drums all round. In 1932 the chassis was lengthened by six inches to give more room for the rear seat passengers on the RN series of cars. Replaced in 1934 by the more modern Ruby model, these charming saloons are the final iteration of the original ‘Vintage’ design concept. This late example finished in Blue with Black wings and Black carpets was formerly the property of newspaper and radio entrepreneur Sir Ray Stanley Tindle CBE DL. First registered in Essex on 30th June 1934 (or so its ‘BHK 887’ number plate would imply), the Saloon was treated to a ‘body off’ restoration by lifelong Seven enthusiast Nigel Ricardo during 1968-1969. Some fifty-two years later, the Austin remains remarkably solid albeit with aged / microblistered paintwork and pitted chromework. A more recent re-trim has left the interior in good order. Although running and driving, ‘BHK 887’ would naturally benefit from some level of recommissioning due to its seeing little use in recent years.


1987 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL

35

ESTIMATE: £18,000 - £22,000* REG NO: E587FNU

1989/2010 Porsche 550 Spyder Evocation

36

ESTIMATE: £16,000 - £20,000* CHASSIS: WDB1070412A072024

The ultimate six-cylinder derivative of Mercedes-Benz’s renowned R107-series, the 300SL was introduced at the September 1985 Frankfurt Motor Show. Equipped with Bosch KE-Jetronic fuelinjection, its in-line SOHC M103 2962cc engine developed some 177bhp and 188lbft of torque (outputs sufficient for a reputed 125mph top speed). Sharing the same two-door monocoque bodyshell, all-round independent coil-sprung suspension and power-assisted steering as its V8 brethren it proved notably more fuel efficient. Fitted with four-speed automatic transmission as standard, it further benefited from improved anti-corrosion treatment and ABS brakes. Only in production between 1985 and 1989, just 13,443 300SLs are thought to have been despatched worldwide. Finished in Champagne Metallic matched to a Tan interior, ‘E587 FNU’ has covered 96,500 miles from new and has been in current ownership since 2000. Offered with both hard- and ‘very good’ soft-top, the SL is accompanied by a large collection of old MOT certificates back to 1990, original service book plus a collection of service invoices. Having had just 3 former keepers, the vendor currently grades its engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘good’.

REG NO: 555 OWY

CHASSIS: TMB136000GK5140069

Introduced at the 1953 Paris Salon, the Porsche 550 not only won the first event it entered but also took class victories on the Carrera Panamericana and Le Mans 24-hours. Notably low to the ground, Hans Hermann famously drove one under a railway crossing gate during the 1954 Mille Miglia, while the actor James Dean tragically lost his life aboard another. Initially known for the Convertible conversions he carried out on Ferrari 400i, Aston Martin V8 and Rolls-Royce Corniche fixed heads during the late 1970s, Paul Banham began to offer a series of evocations in the 1990s. Christened the Banham 130 Spyder, his Porsche 550 Evocation used the complete floorpan of a Skoda Estelle or Skoda Rapid and was thus classified as a bodyshell conversion rather than a kit car. Based on a 1989 Skoda Rapid 136 donor and still registered as such with the DVLA, ‘555 OWY’ had been completed a year and covered just 28 miles when the vendor acquired it in 2011. Still showing less than 500 miles to its odometer, the two-seater was treated to some £4,380 worth of mechanical fettling at Classic Workshop Ltd during October 2018. Said to be in ‘excellent overall’ condition, it comes with a racing hat, goggles, photographic build record, MOT valid until August 2021 and sundry paperwork.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

33


1991 Jaguar XJS V12 Convertible ESTIMATE:

£18,000 - £22,000*

REG NO:

J800 XJS

CHASSIS:

SAJJNADW3EN180948

37

Launched in 1975, Jaguar’s XJS was never envisaged as a direct replacement for the E-Type. More of a soporific grand tourer than an out-and-out sports car, it was designed to seamlessly blur borders rather than blast down back roads. To this end, it was equipped with automatic transmission as standard. Though, when fed the quoted 295bhp and 318lbft of torque developed by a post 1981 H.E. (high efficiency) 5.3 litre V12 engine, this still resulted in a claimed top speed of 150mph and 0-60mph in less than eight seconds. Introduced at the 1988 Geneva Motor Show, the long awaited full convertible version featured a reinforced floorpan, frameless doors and sophisticated electric hood (complete with heated glass rear window). Underpinned by the same all-round independent coil-sprung suspension and power assisted rack and pinion steering as its fixed head coupe siblings, the soft-top came with anti-lock brakes as standard. Priced at some £40,000, a waiting list was quick to form. Reportedly purchased from a prestigious Jaguar XJS specialist in 2015 with a warranted mileage of 53,000, this particular example has since added a further 6,000 to its odometer. The accompanying history file is said to contain ‘documented evidence of the mileage via the MOT history’ and ‘copies of various invoices for minor repairs’. Kept garaged, the appropriately registered ‘J800 XJS’ has been fitted with Marelli electronic ignition, converted to Evans waterless coolant (spare bottle included) and sports a discreet under dash isolator switch. Finished in Platinum Grey Metallic with Dark Blue leather upholstery and matching soft-top, this handsome Convertible is described by the vendor as being in ‘excellent overall’ condition with regards to its engine, automatic transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork.

34

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1960 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud II

38

The subject of a bare metal bodywork restoration ESTIMATE: £30,000 - £40,000* REG NO:

310 HYT

CHASSIS:

SWC384

Notable as the first Rolls-Royce to be powered by a V8 engine (descendants of which have only recently ceased production), the Silver Cloud II was faster and more powerful than its visually near identical predecessor. Introduced in 1959 and handbuilt to the same exacting standards, the newcomer remained in production for four years with just 2,717 examples being sold worldwide. Ordered with a number of special features including: a GB plate, Lucas wing mirrors, electric windows, whitewall tyres and additional high frequency horns operated via a footswitch, chassis SWC384 was supplied new via Jack Barclay Ltd to Gerald Stuart Corcoran Esq on 26th September 1960. Chairman and owner of Alex Reid & Lefevre, one of London’s most celebrated fine art dealers, Mr Corcoran kept the Rolls-Royce for three years. Thereafter the Silver Cloud II belonged to Colonel Hingston (and family), John Fox, Nigel Howard, Nicholas Stow and Richard Yeldon before entering the current ownership during 2019. Entrusted to marque specialist Colbrook of Peterborough for a bare metal bodywork restoration, replated brightwork and new stainless steel exhaust in 2005-2006, the vendor has used the same firm to carry out over £4,700 worth of servicing and improvement work during his tenure including the fitment of new exhaust manifolds. Pleasingly retaining most of its original interior trim, ‘310 HYT’ is believed to have covered just 69,000 miles from new (a figure corroborated by old MOTs dating back to 1978 whilst it was in Col. Hingston’s care). Still highly presentable and a credit to Colbrook’s workmanship, we estimate that having a similar level of bodywork renovation done today could quite easily exceed the guide price. Offered for sale with history file, MOT valid until August 2021, restoration photos and RREC copy build records.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

35


1971 Rover P5B 3.5 Coupe

39

Current Ownership Since 1978 and c.44,500 Miles from New ESTIMATE: £25,000 - £30,000* REG NO:

CTV598K

CHASSIS:

84504011D

Although a marriage of expediency, the union between Rover’s stately P5 model range and the ex-Buick 3528cc all-alloy OHV V8 engine resulted in an unexpectedly fine motorcar. Launched in 1967, the Rover P5B (or P5 Buick if you prefer) was conceived to stave off increasingly refined competition. Available in Saloon and Coupe guises, the big Rover was equipped with independent torsion-bar front suspension, a leaf-sprung ‘live’ rear axle and disc/drum brakes. Production lasted until 1973 by which time 9,099 Coupes and 11,501 Saloons had been built. However, survivors are thought to only number in the hundreds. Extensively waxoyled upon entering the current ownership in 1978, the Rover had some five gallons of the preservative applied to its box sections, sills, front/rear scuttle and doors. As a result, it is understood to be rust-free and to have never needed any welding. Finished in the attractive colour scheme of Burnt Grey with Silver Birch roof, the P5B is trimmed in contrasting Tan leather. An unrestored car, the vendor informs us that he has serviced the engine and gearbox annually and kept the interior upholstery fed with hide food. Maintained with originality in mind, the Rover has covered only 44,493 (atoc) miles from new and still boasts its factory-fitted headlining and shock absorbers. The P5B has benefitted from new hoses, brake pipes, suspension bushes, uprated radiator and exchange power steering box. The vendor informs that in his ownership it has been stored on a wooden floor and never driven on salty roads. Provided with a new battery in December 2020, the Rover is offered with a large history file that comprises almost every MOT since 1978, tax discs spanning most of the period 1980- 2007 and a collection of invoices. One of only 1,320 home-market cars understood to have been built in 1971 and recently valued at £35,000 by Classic Car Weekly, this is a rare opportunity to obtain a highly original, unrestored P5B. Rated as excellent throughout by the vendor.

36

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1989 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL

40

Just 43,500 miles from new ESTIMATE: £30,000 - £40,000* REG NO:

FJI 66

CHASSIS:

WDB1070412A098133

The ultimate six-cylinder derivative of Mercedes-Benz’s renowned R107-series, the 300SL was introduced at the September 1985 Frankfurt Motor Show. Equipped with Bosch KE-Jetronic fuelinjection, its in-line SOHC M103 2962cc engine developed some 177bhp and 188lbft of torque (outputs sufficient for a reputed 125mph top speed). Sharing the same two-door monocoque bodyshell, all-round independent coil-sprung suspension and power-assisted steering as its V8 brethren it proved notably more fuel efficient. Fitted with four-speed automatic transmission as standard, it further benefited from improved anti-corrosion treatment and ABS brakes. Only in production between 1985 and 1989, just 13,443 300SLs are thought to have been despatched worldwide. Finished in Pearl Grey matched to a Grey leather interior and a Black soft-top, this decidedly smart R107-series 300SL has covered just 43,500 miles from new and has been in current ownership since 2009. Supplied new to a Mr Eliot in London and first road registered as ‘PFE 657’, it now wears the Northern Irish number plate ‘FJI 66’. Offered with bookpack, handbooks and service book, two keys, both hard / soft tops plus a collection of old invoices and MOT certificates. Riding on correct-type ‘flat face’ alloys, the two-seater is described by the vendor as being in ‘very good’ condition with regards to its engine, automatic gearbox, bodywork, paintwork, electrical equipment and interior trim. Low mileage SL’s are a rare find and this special car would be a wonderful addition to any enthusiast’s garage.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

37


1935 Brough Superior 4.2-Litre Dual Purpose Drophead Coupé

41

One of Only 25 Eight-Cylinder Cars Made ESTIMATE:

£60,000 - £80,000*

REG NO:

BYN 486

CHASSIS:

542398

Having built a Meadows-engined prototype in 1933, George Brough decided bodying another manufacturer’s rolling chassis was the best way into small-scale motorcar production. Settling on Hudson’s high-performance ‘Eight’ as the ideal donor, he secured a supply from the American manufacturer only to meet with fierce resistance from Noel Macklin’s Railton concern which had had the same idea several years earlier and did not wish to share running gear with a UK rival. Threatened with legal action, Hudson only sold twenty-five eightcylinder chassis to Brough before providing fifty examples of their less contentious six-cylinder chassis. As he had with the prototype, Brough commissioned W.C. Atcherley of Birmingham to body his fourwheeled creations. Undeniably well-proportioned and attractive, the coachbuilder’s patented ‘Dual Purpose’ design featured a three-position convertible roof that folded almost level with the door tops. Understood to be the first Brough Superior eight-cylinder car in terms of its chassis number and the third one to be registered, ‘BYN 486’ was supplied new to Major Michael Wills of the tobacco importer and cigarette manufacturer, W.D and H.O. Wills. Involved in a road accident during February 1937, the ‘Dual Purpose’ then passed to Wing Commander Sykes of Buckinghamshire who had it repaired. Used by the Wing Commander up until 1943, he is thought to have swapped the original 4.2 litre eight-cylinder engine (placing it into storage) for a 16.9hp six-cylinder unit whilst on RAF leave. Laid-up for ten years or so before being purchased by the vendor’s father in 1960, an extensive restoration commenced the following year. Stripped to a bare chassis, the Brough Superior was reunited with its original engine (once suitably overhauled), had its bodywork renovated / repainted and was treated to a new hood. Coming to market for the first time in sixty-one years, ‘BYN 486’ was fitted with a new starter motor in April 2020 and is due to be driven some sixty miles to the auction. Offered with a current V5C, copy of ‘Ninety in Silence’ sales brochure and some assorted paperwork.

38

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1948 Bentley MkVI Saloon

42

Fitted with James Young ‘Design C11’ Coachwork ESTIMATE: £18,000 - £22,000* REG NO:

KKL 847

CHASSIS:

B292BH

With just two previous keepers and 78,000 genuine recorded miles, ‘KKL 847’ is finished in black with beige leather upholstery and is complemented by brown piping and carpets. It is one of just forty-nine examples produced to this configuration by respected coachbuilders James Young Ltd. The original purchaser was Charles Soukup - Czechoslovakian-born Managing Director of Richard Klinger Ltd (Sidcup, Kent). Described in a James Young inter-departmental memorandum as a ‘man of very small stature’, Soukup was clearly a demanding individual and supplying a vehicle to his exacting standards proved to be an onerous task for all parties involved. Copies of much period correspondence relating to the various (fairly trivial) issues encountered throughout his two year ownership are included within the car’s history file. By October 1950, KKL 847 had passed into the hands of Norfolk farmer Stephen Farrow Esq. It remained in his custodianship until the car was offered for sale at auction, consigned by his family in a non-running state, during the Spring of 2013. By this time, the car is thought to have spent approximately 23 years off the road, however dry storage in one Mr. Farrow’s barns did a great job of preserving the superb patina. The current owner purchased the car at the auction and expeditiously set about putting it back into road-worthy order - this process was fully documented. This recommissioning included the removal and cleaning of the fuel tank, overhaul of the fuel pumps, replacement of tyres, brake seals and hoses plus the repainting of the front and rear wings in cellulose. Retaining its original registration number, KKL 847 comes with its RREC chassis records and offers a unique opportunity to purchase a highly-original coachbuilt Bentley. The new owner can either enjoy this stylish and imposing saloon in its tatty, yet structurally solid and mechanically-sound guise, or embark on a worthwhile restoration project to put it back to factory fresh condition. A lot worthy of close inspection.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

39


1972 Jaguar E-Type V12 Coupe

43

1 of just 2,116 RHD examples made ESTIMATE: £45,000 - £55,000* REG NO:

JMA932K

CHASSIS:

1S50576

By 1971, Jaguar’s jaw-dropping E-Type had been in production for a decade. Despite continual improvements, new emissions legislation in the all-important American market threatened to strangle the big cat’s performance. Jaguar responded by giving its revered sportscar fresh claws in the shape of a 5343cc V12 developed from the stillborn XJ13 Le Mans project. The new engine was both effortlessly powerful and eerily refined. With some 272bhp and 304lbft of torque on tap, the Series III version once again had 150mph in its sights. A revised wheelbase yielded better cabin space which, together with wider tracks front and rear, new anti-dive front suspension and fatter tyres, gave improved road holding. Imbued with a more muscular stance thanks to its flared wheelarches, re-profiled wings and larger grille, it also benefited from vented disc brakes and a restyled interior. 1 of just 2,116 RHD examples made, ‘JMA 932K’ was dispatched on October 28th 1971 to supplying dealer Ernest W Hatfield of Sheffield with its first keeper being local resident, Dr R Moseley. Originally finished in British Racing Green with Cinnamon leather upholstery, the Jaguar pleasing still retains the same livery albeit the paint is now metallic rather than solid in keeping with the vendor’s preference. Boasting ‘matching’ chassis and engine numbers, the E-Type displays a highly credible 52,500 miles and shows just five former keepers on its V5C. Subject to an extensive bodywork and mechanical restoration after being bought by the vendor as a true ‘garage find’ in 2017, ‘JMA 932K’ was upgraded with a higher capacity radiator. The V12 engine was also inspected, pressure tested, serviced and fitted with new gaskets. Accompanying paperwork encompasses a collection of old MOT certificates dating back to 1977 at 49,395 miles (hence the seeming correctness of the odometer reading) not to mention a Heritage certificate, operating manual, parts list, numerous invoices and restoration photographs. The vendor currently grades its engine, manual gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘very good’.

40

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1983 Ferrari 400i Series 2

44

ESTIMATE: £35,000 - £40,000* REG NO:

APA 26Y

CHASSIS:

43905

Introduced at the 1976 Paris Salon, the Ferrari 400 shared the same crisp Pininfarina styling and Type F101AL tubular steel chassis frame as its 365GT4 2+2 predecessor. Powered by an enlarged 4823cc ‘quad-cam’ V12 engine, the occasional four-seater featured all-round independent suspension (self-levelling to the rear), power-assisted recirculating ball steering and four-wheel disc brakes. Notable as the first Maranello product for which automatic transmission could be specified; the 400 also boasted such luxuries as Connolly hide upholstery, electric windows and optional air conditioning. Arriving during mid 1979, the 400i enjoyed greater refinement, lower emissions and better fuel economy thanks to its adoption of Bosch K-Jetronic fuel-injection. Credited with some 310bhp and 289lbft of torque, the newcomer was reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 7.5 seconds and 149mph. A true front-engined, rear-wheel drive V12 Ferrari from the old school, the 400i remained in production until 1985 by which time some 873 automatic variants had been sold (though, just 152 of these are thought to have been to right-hand drive UK specification). Finished in PTO Blue Metallic with contrasting Sabbia leather upholstery, ‘APA 26Y’ was supplied new by Maranello Concessionaires of Egham to Sheikh Harlan Al-Maktoum of the Dubai Royal Family on 29th April 1983. Accompanying MOT certificates from 1986-2005 help prove that the Ferrari had covered just 35,963 miles by the time that it joined the Whitewebbs Museum of Transport in February 2013. The 400i’s history file runs to three folders and encompasses the original owner’s wallet, service book and handbooks as well as a workshop manual, information on previous keepers, past sales invoices, old advertisements sundry invoices and even a paint mixing formula etc. Now showing just over 36,000 miles, the four-seater is described by the vendor as being in ‘very good’ condition with regards to its engine, automatic gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork. Offered for sale with the aforementioned documentation and a MOT certificate valid until 29th March 2022.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

41


1966 Triumph TR4A IRS

45

Fitted with a Desirable ‘Surrey Top’ and Overdrive Transmission ESTIMATE: £17,000 - £19,000* REG NO:

GFU 209D

CHASSIS:

CTC68699

Finished in the relatively uncommon original Triumph colour of Royal Blue (Code 56) and complemented by a newly fitted Midnight Blue vinyl interior, Shadow Blue wool carpets, Midnight Blue sun visors and static seat belts. The subject of a recent paint respray, ‘GFU 209D’ was also treated to a set of re-chromed bumpers with overriders, rechromed door handles / plungers and new boot hinges. Protection from the elements comes in the form of a rare and desirable factory ‘Surrey’ top / backlight with both steel roof mid section and removable blue vinyl soft top mid canopy. High speed cruising is aided by a retrofitted Laycock de Normanville Type A Overdrive unit and the cockpit has been upgraded with a Mota-Lita wooden rimmed steering wheel which matches the original teak veneer dash. Riding on freshly painted original steel wheels with replacement chrome hub caps (each with new central Triumph Logo), all shod with new Michelin XZX 165R15 Tyres and inner tubes. Under the bonnet, the four cylinder petrol engine was treated to an unleaded conversion (with new exhaust valve seats), and the vendor reports it registers ‘good oil pressure’. Breathing through twin SU HS6 carburettors and upgraded with an AccuSpark Electronic Ignition unit, new C40 Dynamo and uprated water pump. A newly fitted stainless steel exhaust ensures ‘GFU 209D’ sounds as well as she looks! New GAZ adjustable shock absorbers were fitted at the front, whilst the original units were replaced at the rear. Uprated 390lbs springs are fitted throughout and the handling is further enhanced by a ‘Polybush’ kit, quickturn steering rack and TR6 anti roll bar to the front suspension. By repute only driven approximately 1,000 miles since a major overhaul (costing a total of c. £13,000) which was completed in 2020. Offered with a lever arch file of receipts for the parts recently fitted and overhaul work completed; this true British sportscar boasts an enviable specification and sensible guide price.

42

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1975 Rolls Royce Silver Shadow 1

46

ESTIMATE: £14,000 - £18,000* REG NO:

PAO 837P

CHASSIS:

SRH20390

Launched in 1965, the Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow was a bold departure for the Crewe company. Their first monocoque design, it also benefited from olio-pneumatic rear suspension, power disc brakes and GM’s silken 400 series automatic gearbox (though, the latter was not adopted until 1968). Such ‘new technology’ did not encroach on the luxurious interior with its sumptuous leather hides, rich wood veneers and deep lambswool carpets. Performance from the smooth 6230cc V8 engine (upgraded to 6750cc in 1970) was assured, the car wafting forward on a seemingly unstoppable wave of torque. Still immensely cosseting to drive, Shadows offer a genuinely different ownership experience to their mass made peers. Introduced in 1974, the so-called ‘Series 1A’ version featured ‘flared wheelarches’ which were added to accommodate a wider track and the use of superior radial tyres. Finished in Cardinal Red with Beige leather upholstery, ‘PAO 837P’ is stated to have covered just 55,900 miles from new in the hands of six owners. Accompanied by a service book stamped up to 48,000 miles and said to have had ‘thousands spent on it over the years’, the Rolls-Royce is described by the vendor as being in ‘excellent overall’ condition with regard to its engine, automatic transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork. Further rating it as ‘an absolutely first class Silver Shadow’ with ‘superb paintwork, immaculate wood and fantastic leather’, he informs us that the luxury saloon comes with ‘original handbooks, all tools, spare keys and lots and lots of paperwork. Treated to new suspension bushes and reportedly ‘driving really well’, this attractive Series IA is worthy of close inspection.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

43


1988 Jaguar XJ-S Convertible

47

ESTIMATE: £10,000 - £14,000* REG NO: UN-REG

48

ESTIMATE: £18,000 - £22,000* CHASSIS: 157307

Introduced at the 1988 Geneva Motor Show, the long awaited full convertible version of Jaguar’s handsome XJ-S featured a reinforced floorpan, frameless doors and sophisticated electric hood (complete with heated glass rear window). Underpinned by the same all-round independent coilsprung suspension and power assisted rack and pinion steering as its fixed head coupe siblings, the soft-top came with anti-lock brakes as standard. Priced at some £40,000, a waiting list was quick to form. Supplied new to America, this particular example was imported to the UK by the vendor with the intention of converting it to right-hand drive. Sadly, work commitments prevented him from getting further than a NOVA declaration / paying the import duty. Professionally resprayed and fitted with a new hood, the Jaguar is also understood to have had its interior refurbished. Showing a credible but unwarranted 48,000 miles to its odometer, the XJS is described by the seller as being in ‘good’ (5.3 litre V12 engine, automatic transmission, electrical equipment) or ‘very good’ (bodywork, paintwork, interior trim) condition. Offered for sale with import paperwork and VOSA documentation should a new owner wish to progress having the Convertible UK road registered.

44

1966 Ford Mustang V8 Notchback

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

REG NO: VAM 578D

CHASSIS: 6RO7C204102

Presented in Baby Blue with a Blue and Cream interior. Comes with a number of invoices from its time in America, totalling some $17,500Imported to the UK in June 2018, with the V5 displaying 2 former keepers. Launched in 1964, the Mustang has become Ford’s longest running nameplate. Available with a choice of straight-six or V8 engines, the definitive ‘pony car’ could be had in open or closed guises with the millionth example being sold within two years of the model’s introduction. Manufactured at Ford’s San Jose, California plant with the optional 289 cu in (4.7 litre) ‘C’-code V8 engine, ‘VAM 578D’ remains V8-powered to this day and is finished in the attractive livery of Baby Blue with Blue and Cream contrasting interior. Imported to the UK in 2018, the Mustang is thought to have formed part of a collection until being acquired by the vendor last June. ‘VAM 578D’ presents as an older restoration. There are traces of Seafoam Green paint to the bonnet’s underside, but the Ford has been painted Blue since at least 1997. Showing 61,483 recorded but unwarranted miles, the two-door Hardtop is accompanied by a number of invoices from its life in America. The majority date from 1997-1999 and total some $17,500 with associated work including overhauls of the engine and sundry other mechanical components. The seller rates the condition of the bodywork, engine, electrical equipment, paintwork, automatic gearbox and interior trim all as ‘good’.


1919 Ford Model T Speedster

49

NO RESERVE REG NO: BF 9233

2002 Jaguar XJ8 3.2

50

Just 14,800 miles from new ESTIMATE: £12,000 - £14,000*

CHASSIS: 3458559

Launched in 1908, the Model T’s chassis and mechanical components were made from exceptionally durable, high-grade vanadium steel. The Ford also featured a compact 2890cc sidevalve, fourcylinder engine that pioneered the use of a detachable cylinder head. Mounted in unit with the clutch and two-speed epicyclic gearbox assembly, it developed some 23hp at a leisurely 1,600rpm and 80lbft of torque. Top speed was limited to around 45mph depending upon bodywork, whiles brakes operated on both the transmission and rear wheels. Reputedly belonging to the same family from the 1930s until 2016 when it was discovered in a North Carolina barn, this particular example was basically complete but in need of restoration. Prompted to convert the Model T into a Speedster by the parlous state of its original bodywork, the previous owner also chose to upgrade the electrical system to 12-volts complete with a modern alternator and distributor. The four-cylinder engine was overhauled and treated to a high compression head, while the seats were re-trimmed. Purchased by the vendor in 2019 and imported to the UK, the Ford has proved great fun and is only now for sale to release space and provide funding for another project.

REG NO: AL02AEL

CHASSIS: SAJAC13LX2KF56495

By 1989, Jaguar / Daimler had been bought by Ford who changed the engine offerings of the XJ6. Six years later, recognising that its boxy lines could do with a facelift, the company allowed designer Geoff Lawson to adopt a somewhat retro path for the X300 Series version. This line was revised for the last time in 1997, at which point much-praised new, Bridgend-built V8 engines replaced the previous six-cylinder ones - enter the XJ8. The new units were available in 3.2, 4.0 normally aspirated and 4.0-litre supercharged form, the outputs of which ranged from 240bhp to 370bhp. Most other aspects of the handsome big Saloon were also an improvement on those of its predecessor - the ride in particular won many plaudits. Finished in Silver with a Cream parchment hide interior, ‘AL02 AEL’ is warranted to have covered just 14,800 miles and has been owned by just a husband and wife from new. The Jaguar pleasingly retains its original bookpack, handbooks and well-stamped service book plus 3 keys. Described by the vendor as being in ‘excellent’ condition with regards to its 3.2 litre engine, automatic transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork, this very smart XJ8 comes with a fresh MOT certificate.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

45


1949 Bentley Mk VI ‘Pillarless’ Coupe

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1 of Just Six Bodied by Freestone & Webb ESTIMATE:

£85,000 - £95,000*

REG NO:

7 HYY

CHASSIS:

B327DZ

Introduced in 1946, the MKVI was Bentley’s first post-war model. Aimed at the emerging ‘owner-driver’ luxury car market, the newcomer was closely based on the 1939 MKV (of which only fifteen were produced). Built around a massive cruciform-braced chassis with independent front suspension and a leaf-sprung ‘live’ rear axle, it was fitted with a freshly developed 4257cc OISE (overhead inlet side exhaust valve) straight-six engine mated to a four-speed manual gearbox. Capable of over 100mph when clad in the factory’s understated ‘standard steel saloon’ coachwork, the MKVI quickly developed a reputation for being a refined yet responsive drive. However, despite the excellence of the ‘basic’ car, there remained a core of marque enthusiasts who found its styling too anonymous. Despatched to master coachbuilders Freestone & Webb in November 1948, chassis B327DZ is one of just six Bentley MKVIs to wear this design of two-door, pillarless aluminium coachwork. Supplied new to James T. Cook & Son of Reading during April 1949, the rest of its early history is unknown. Resident in America for eighteen years after being purchased by D.J. Fuss Esq from the renowned Rolls-Royce and Bentley specialist Frank Dale & Stepson in 1971, the four-seater then formed part of the late Alan Browne’s collection until 2017. Stabled alongside a fabulous variety of machinery including RollsRoyce Silver Ghosts and Bentley S-Type Continentals, the MKVI was little used for those twenty-eight years but appreciated for its decidedly elegant body and original engine. Sympathetically refurbished since entering the current ownership, chassis B327DZ has been fully repainted in Black over Palerro Grey and completely retrimmed by Aldridge of Wolverhampton. The wood veneers have been re-lacquered throughout and the brightwork re-plated. The bumpers are markedly different from those of a Standard Steel Saloon as is the chrome switchgear on the dashboard.

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Illustrated in Bernard L King’s MKVI book with the same auxiliary spot, fog and small marker lights it sports today (p.309), the two-door fixed head has had the chrome and rubber trims atop its aluminium running boards renewed. The engine and gearbox were deemed to be in fine fettle and received little more than new gaskets and a bespoke stainless steel exhaust system (from the manifold back) courtesy of Hayward & Scott. The brakes have been overhauled to ensure that the four-seater stops as well as it goes. Although, Freestone & Webb bodied six Bentley MKVI chassis to its design number 3029, chassis B327DZ is one of only two 3029/A cars created with the other no longer thought to be resident in the UK. Exceptionally elegant and well-proportioned – just look at the way the spare wheel moulding on the boot lid arrows towards the rear window – this wonderful Bentley would not disgrace a concours field. Offered for sale with V5C Registration Document and history file.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


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1953 Jaguar XK120

52

Current family ownership since 1968 ESTIMATE: £60,000 - £70,000* REG NO:

GVL 65

CHASSIS:

S669087

Launched at the 1948 Earls Court Motor Show, the Jaguar XK120 Roadster caused a sensation. Penned by Sir William Lyons, the model’s sensuous lines seemed almost impossibly glamorous to a country still feeling the effects of rationing. While, the 120mph top speed that its name signified soon became the stuff of legend. Literally flooded with orders, Jaguar began limited hand-built production soon thereafter (although, it was not until 1950 that the factory was sufficiently ‘tooled-up’ to discard aluminium in favour of steel for the curvaceous bodywork). Based around a cruciformbraced box-section chassis equipped with independent torsionbar front suspension, a leaf-sprung ‘live’ rear axle and hydraulic drum brakes, the lithe two-seater proved equally adept on road or track winning both the RAC TT and Alpine Trial during 1950 (the former victory coming at the hands of Sir Stirling Moss). Credited with 160bhp and 190lbft of torque in standard tune, its legendary 3442cc DOHC straight-six engine was allied to four-speed manual transmission. Arguably, the defining sportscar of its generation, a perilously shaky post-WW2 British economy gave the Coventry manufacturer little choice but to concentrate on overseas sales. Finished in Old English White with a Black leather interior, ‘GVL 65’ is a rare, ‘home market’, Special Equipment model that boasts matching chassis and engine numbers. Entering the current family ownership in 1968, the Jaguar was extensively refurbished during the early 1990s including a conversion from fixed-head to roadster configuration with the work being carried out by Longmate Vintage Restorations of Norfolk. Displaying a credible but unwarranted 83,400 miles, this appealing XK120 is offered for sale with green logbook, original owner’s service manual, operation manual and a collection of invoices. Riding on painted wire wheels and sporting Black weather equipment, ‘GVL 65’ is described by the vendor as being in ‘good’ condition with regard to its bodywork, paintwork, engine, gearbox and interior.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1952 Austin A90 Atlantic Sports Saloon

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ESTIMATE: £12,000 - £14,000* REG NO:

LDA 903

CHASSIS:

101459

Aimed squarely at the American market, the Austin A90 Atlantic Convertible was a brave gamble that did not pay off. Intended to generate a steady flow of US dollars and so satisfy the British government’s ruthless ‘export or die’ edict, its flamboyant steel bodywork was a riot of bulbous curves, swooping lines and chrome accents. Launched at the 1948 London Motor Show, the Atlantic was underpinned by a rigid cruciform-braced chassis equipped with independent coil-sprung front suspension, a leafsprung ‘live’ rear axle and four-wheel drum brakes. Powered by a 2660cc OHV four-cylinder engine mated to four-speed columnchange manual transmission, it was more boulevardier than sports car. Not that this stopped Austin from pounding one round the Indianapolis Speedway for seven days non-stop. A feat that not only underlined the model’s 92mph top speed but also yielded an impressive sixty-three stock car records (the convertible in question managing to average 70.54mph including all stops over its marathon 168-hour run). Although, joined by a companion Sports Saloon in September 1949, the Atlantic failed to capture the American public’s imagination or wallets (its failure ironically being blamed on a lack of ‘Britishness’). Thus, by the time production ceased in 1952 just 7,981 are thought to have been made. First road registered in Wolverhampton on June 10th 1953 (or so its ‘LDA 903’ number plate would imply), chassis 101459 is understood to have been restored some fifteen plus years ago including a colour change from Blue to Red. Reportedly benefiting from a service, brake system overhaul, refurbished carburettor and replacement exhaust, the Sports Saloon is described by the vendor as being in ‘average’ (paintwork, gearbox) or ‘good’ (bodywork, engine, electrical equipment, interior trim) condition. Pleasingly retaining its original engine and perhaps some of its original Grey leather upholstery, this rare Austin is accompanied by ‘a large history file’.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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c.1942 Ford WOA2 Heavy Utility Car

54

Possibly the finest example extant ESTIMATE:

£45,000 - £55,000*

REG NO:

RBJ 599

CHASSIS:

7038837

The Miracle of Dunkirk which saw 800 boats (many of them fishing vessels and pleasure craft) evacuate some 340,000 Allied troops over the course of just eight days, May 26th – June 4th 1940, proved pivotal to the outcome of World War Two but also caused a major logistical headache with the abandonment of 85,000 in Northern France. Requisitioning passenger cars for Staff and Command usage as a stop gap, the War Office put out urgent requests to UK manufacturers for more suitable replacements. Ford responded with the WOA1 and WOA2. Both were derived from the Blue Oval’s prewar Model 62 Saloon but with a strengthened chassis, bigger 3.6 litre V8 engine, lower ratio back axle and 9.00 x 13 cross-country tyres. However, while the former resembled a jacked-up version of its civilian sibling, the latter wore a bespoke six-light body of imposing proportions (14ft 5in long, 6ft 3in wide and 5ft 10in tall). Designated as ‘Staff’ and ‘Heavy Utility’ cars respectively despite a comparatively modest 80kg weight difference, the pair saw active service in a variety of combat theatres. Despite Princess Elizabeth (now HM The Queen) famously piloting a WOA1, the Armed Forces showed a marked preference for the WOA2. Ford built some 9,059 of its ‘Heavy Utility’ cars between May 1941 and July 1944 and also released a less butch / more tarmac friendly WOA2/A variant when peace came. Tough, dependable and commodious, the six-seater was repurposed by ambulance services, utility companies and landowners throughout the UK. Literally driven into the ground with more than a few meeting their end via stock car racing (though, not before two starred in the Dambusters and Guns of Navarone), WOA2s are a decidedly rare sight today. Indeed, some sources put the number of known survivors as low as six. This particular example – chassis 7038837 – took the late Mike Ebeling, a noted WW2 vehicle restorer, four years of intensive work to return to its former glory (1997-2001). Known for his relentless pursuit of authenticity, Mr Ebeling used parts from five donors

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to renovate the WOA2. Interviewed by Classic Military Vehicle magazine in 2006, he explained his motivation thus: ‘To own a vehicle, or type of vehicle, that played a part in the most aweinspiring conflict the world has ever known gives me the inspiration to see the restoration through to the end. If I am honest, I get more of a kick from the research and the restoration work than I do from driving the vehicle. Days spent at the Imperial War Museum’s photo library in Lambeth going over photos with a magnifying glass, endless research into the manufacture and variations in design, the arm of service that would have used the vehicle, and even the equipment carried. Maybe, in some way, I do all this work in memory of my father who was killed in France a month or so after D-Day. Of course, my life in the motor trade and service with the REME must also play a part in my enthusiasm for the hobby’.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

Liveried in authentic Headquarters 21st Army Group 1944 markings (a unit that operated WOA2s), the Ford has won numerous awards and remains highly presentable some twenty years after its completion. Beautifully and correctly detailed throughout from its sliding steel sunroof to its rear convoy light, the six-seater further boasts such niceties as folding map tables and headlining-mounted canvas blinds. A Command Car with a commanding presence, the styling of which echoes through to today’s SUVs, this wonderful WOA2 is worthy of close inspection. A fitting tribute to the late Mr Ebeling’s remarkable skill, it surely belongs in a museum or major collection.


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1961 Lotus Elite S2 ESTIMATE:

£50,000 - £60,000*

REG NO:

NJN687F

CHASSIS:

EB1998

55

“The road manners of the Elite come as near to those of a racing car as the ordinary motorist would ever experience” (Autocar, May 1960) According to a typewritten report on file detailing its ownership history, this gorgeous Type 14 Elite is thought to have been sold new to a Lotus employee in 1961. Acquired by Roger Davies four years later, he crashed the Coupe probably around 1967 and rather than having its fibreglass monocoque repaired bought a replacement CBU (Chassis Body Unit) – number EB1998 – direct from Lotus. Mr Davies transferred much of the original running gear to the fresh shell but reportedly added: a new ZF gearbox, Series 1 differential cover, Lotus leather rimmed steering wheel, alloy Girling NR rear callipers; Irvin safety harnesses and 14-inch 60-spoke wire wheels. Re-registered for road use on March 1st 1968 as ‘NJN 687F’, the reborn Elite remained in his care for another four and a half decades. Laid-up for several years prior to Bob Wright taking delivery during 2013, the two-seater was treated to various recommissioning works including: cylinder head removed, timing chains renewed, replacement cylinder head gasket fitted, front brakes reconditioned by Classic Automotive, new door seals, fresh master cylinder, cam cover repainted and engine bay tidied. Re-joining the Lotus fold when it was purchased by Hethel Development Engineer, David Monument, to join his classic car collection in 2014, a subsequent divorce saw ‘NJN 687F’ pass to Mark Butler of Historic Motorsport Ltd (via renowned marque specialist Paul Matty) the following April. Belonging to Keith Fisher for three years, the Elite the current (deceased) ownership via our June 19th 2019 IWM Duxford at a cost of some £63,250. Having campaigned a Type 14 in his youth, ‘NJN 687F’ represented an irresistible trip down memory lane for its late custodian. Rated by the seller as being in ‘very good overall’ condition with regards to its Coventry Climax FWE engine, ZF gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork, this iconic Lotus is worthy of close inspection.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1948 Packard Special

56

Fitted with Eaton supercharger ESTIMATE: £30,000 - £35,000* REG NO:

JYP 9

CHASSIS:

226224461

The Alfa Romeo 158/159 was one of the most successful singleseater cars ever designed. Absolutely dominant once international motorsport recommenced after World War Two, it propelled Giuseppe Farina and Juan Manuel Fangio to the 1950 and 1951 Formula 1 Drivers’ Championships respectively. The brainchild of Gioacchino Colombo, its jewel-like supercharged 1.5 litre straight-eight engine initially developed 190bhp @ 6,500 rpm but was pumping out 425bhp @ 9,300 rpm by the time Alfa Romeo announced its withdrawal from Grand Prix racing at the end of the 1951 season. Beginning life as a 1948 Packard Eight, this amazing single-seater is the vendor’s homage to Alfa’s iconic Tipo 158/159. Like the original it features a supercharged in-line engine but whereas the Italian machine’s was a 1.5-litre 8-cylinder unit (hence ‘158’), the American powerplant displaces 288 cu in (4.7 litres) which would make it more of a Tipo 478! Force-fed by a suitably large belt-driven Eaton supercharger, which in turn draws fuel from twin SU carburettors, the Packard engine is allied to five-speed manual transmission. The massive box-section chassis features independent front suspension, a leaf-sprung ‘live’ back axle and four-wheel drum brakes. Fabricated from aluminium and painted Alfa Red, the attractive bodywork clothes the heavily canted back radiator and petrol tank. The latter sited behind the Brown leather driver’s seat. The extravagant side-mounted exhaust system is wrapped to lessen heat soak and the silver-painted wire wheels carry chrome-plated spinners. The well-stocked dashboard includes a 120mph speedometer, rev counter redlined at 4,500rpm and boost gauge for the blower. A true labour of love with some wonderful detailing, this unique special promises to be decidedly exciting on the road and will doubtless attract a crowd wherever it goes! Little used since its completion circa eight years ago, ‘JYP 9’ would cost considerably more than the guide price to have professionally replicated.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

53


1958 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud

57

Just 3 former keepers from new ESTIMATE: £25,000 - £35,000* REG NO:

XSM 555

CHASSIS:

SFE495

Rolls-Royce launched the Silver Cloud in April 1955. It was based on a completely new closed box section frame that was reputedly 50% stiffer than that of the outgoing Silver Dawn. The distinguished-looking standard body was penned by in-house designer John Polwhele Blatchley, the proportions of which belied its considerable overall length of 17ft 8in. Though the retention of a separate chassis allowed for the production of bespoke bodies, all but 157 of the 2,360 Cloud Is produced featured the in-house offering - a steel shell with aluminium doors, bonnet and boot lid. The car was powered by an alloy-headed, straight-six engine of 4887cc that delivered some 155bhp at 4,000 rpm. This was mated to a 4-speed automatic transmission. Braking was by servo-assisted 11 inch drums all round. The suspension was independent with coil springs at the front and featured a live axle hung on semi-elliptic leaf springs at the rear. Changes introduced in 1956 included the incorporation of twin brake master cylinders and the option of power steering and air conditioning. A test by Motor magazine in 1956 recorded a top speed of 102.9mph and a time of 13.5 seconds for the 0-60mph dash. This handsome home market Cloud I was supplied new in 1958 to Scottish laird Henry Smith of Dumfries before arriving in the West Midlands the following year. Purchased by the vendor from its second private keeper in 1986 when the mileage was 69,923, ‘XSM 555’ now displays a credible 79,114 miles and is offered for sale with owner’s handbook, workshop manual, buff logbook, handwritten service records and a collection of invoices / old MOTs. Subject to a brake overhaul in c.2013, new tyres in c.2015 and an oil change 18 months ago, the vendor currently grades the Rolls-Royce’s engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘good’.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1952 Bristol 401

58

1 of just 618 examples made ESTIMATE: £35,000 - £45,000* REG NO:

KGA 753

CHASSIS:

40L1071

Introduced in Autumn 1949, the 401 was characterised by its super-smooth, aerodynamic bodywork. Honed in the Bristol Aeroplane Company’s wind tunnel and built using Milanese coachbuilder Touring’s ‘Superleggera’ technique, it boasted a commendably lithe kerb weight (c.2,700lbs). Equipped with transverse-leaf independent front suspension and hydraulic drum brakes, the newcomer proved a notably fine handler taking Touring Class wins on both the Cannes and Tulip Rallies during 1951. Powered by a 1971cc OHV straight-six engine allied to four-speed manual transmission, the elegant sports saloon promised nigh-on 100mph performance. Only in production for four years (by which time a mere 618 are thought to have been made), the model’s exclusive £3,212 13s 4d price tag was a reflection of the aircraft quality materials used in its construction. Finished in Deep Burgundy with Tan upholstery, ‘KGA 753’ was subject to an extensive bodywork and paintwork restoration in 2008 before entering the current ownership eight years later. Believed but not warranted to have covered 82,000 miles from new, the Bristol is accompanied by a selection of old MOTs which date back to 1972 at 44,683 miles and thus go some way towards corroborating its odometer reading. Treated to £4,397 worth of engine work in 2018 by Stanton Motorsport including refurbishing the carburettors, ‘KGA 753’ has also been fitted with a high-performance radiator, brake servo, high-torque starter motor and Mike Robinson overdrive. Upgraded in 1963 by Bristol Cars with a 100A camshaft and discreetly hosting a Bluetooth stereo, the 401 is judged by the seller to be in ‘good’ order with regards to its gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork, while he rates the engine as ‘excellent’. Offered for sale with a copy of its original order form, collection of invoices, old tax discs, the aforementioned MOT certificates, parts of the buff logbook, and numerous photographs from the 2008 restoration. A rare opportunity.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

55


2000 Ferrari 360 Modena

59

Supplied new to Le Mans 24-hours winner and ex-F1 driver Martin Brundle ESTIMATE:

£55,000 - £65,000*

REG NO:

916 PJO

CHASSIS:

121402

‘The 360 is a devastating road car. It does everything you’d hope a Ferrari would but with such polish, precision and ease that you don’t have to think twice about unleashing all its performance. There is perhaps no other car yet made that combines so much raw emotion with so much technical finesse (Evo magazine, June 1999)’ Introduced at the 1999 Geneva Salon, the 360 Modena was notable as the first Ferrari to feature an all-aluminium spaceframe chassis. Developed in conjunction with Alcoa, the structure was forty percent stiffer and twenty-eight percent lighter than that of the preceding F355. The newcomer also boasted a fourfold increase in downforce thanks to careful underbody sculpting and two huge rear venturi tunnels. Enlarged to 3.6 litres, its high-revving, flat plane crankshaft, five valves per cylinder V8 engine developed a quoted 394bhp and 275lbft of torque. Allied to either six-speed manual or electrohydraulic-actuated ‘F1’ automated six-speed transmission, it enabled the 360 Modena to sprint from 0-60mph in 4.5 seconds and onto 183mph. ASR traction control and electronically controlled dampers complemented the all-round independent double-wishbone suspension, vented disc brakes and power steering giving the two-seater poise and precision aplenty. Rarer than its successors, just 8,800 Ferrari 360 Modenas were made of which just 352 were supplied new to the UK in right-hand drive with six-speed manual gearboxes. It is perhaps no surprise that the first owner of chassis 121402, Martin Brundle, ordered it with the rarer and more driver orientated six-speed manual gearbox. A former World Sportscar Champion, Le Mans 24-hours winner and multiple F1 podium scorer, the renowned TV commentator specified his new acquisition in the handsome combination of Argento Nurburgring with Bordeaux leather and had it road registered as ’99 MB’. Changing hands several times thereafter, the Ferrari was maintained at 7,276, 12,565, 17,569, 18,180, 19,140, 20,022 23,038, 25,023, 28,099, 28,690 and 28,869 miles before

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entering the current ownership in October 2013. Since then the 360 Modena has been treated to a service at 30,996, cambelt belt change at 31,986, new brake discs and pads all round at 33,302 plus another cambelt change at 34,065 miles. The latter was carried out by marque specialist Migliore Cars Ltd during May 2020. Infrequently used during lockdown, the Berlinetta has been kept in a heated garage. Starting readily and performing well during a recent test drive, the Ferrari’s appearance is a credit to the seller who has amassed numerous concours awards during his time as a collector.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

The personalised number plate shown in the photos ‘916 PJO’ is being retained. Able to deploy more of its performance more of the time than a contemporary F8 Tributo, this gorgeous, manual 360 Modena is offered for sale with book pack (confirming Mr Brundle’s ownership), MOT certificate valid until September 2021 and tool kit.


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1966 Mercedes-Benz 230 SL Pagoda

60

UK-Supplied, Right-Hand Drive Example ESTIMATE: £40,000 - £50,000* REG NO:

NAB 647D

CHASSIS:

11304222017337

Successor to both the exotic race-bred 300SL ‘Gullwing’ Coupe and its humbler 190SL sibling, the W113 series SL proved more comfortable than the former and faster than the latter (a point emphasised by Eugen Bohringer’s 1963 Liege-Sofia-Liege rally victory). First of the line, the 230SL was introduced at the March 1963 Geneva Salon. Penned by Paul Bracq, its wonderfully crisp styling clothed a monocoque chassis equipped with independent coil-sprung suspension and front disc brakes. Powered by a 2.3-litre straight-six engine mated to either four-speed manual or automatic transmission, the model was credited with 150bhp and 159lbft of torque. Reputedly capable of 124mph, it was praised by the contemporary motoring press for its performance, roadholding and refinement. Of the 48,912 W113 Series cars made between 1963 and 1971, 19,831 were 230 SLs. A rare, UK-supplied example that was first registered on 16th September 1966, ‘NAB 647D’ was reportedly barn-stored for almost twenty years before being unearthed in January 2008. Entrusted to independent Mercedes-Benz specialist Colin Ferns Ltd of Surrey thereafter, restoration work encompassed a brake overhaul, much panel work, repainting, engine fettling / servicing, an interior fresh and the installation of numerous new parts. Understood to have had eight former keepers, the 230 SL entered the current ownership in 2013. Fitted with four-speed automatic transmission, ‘NAB 647D’ boasts a hardtop and was despatched to marque specialist SS Motors of Surrey in 2020 for approximately £1,250 worth of attention to its starter motor, power steering and brakes. Offered for sale with a history file containing numerous invoices and past MOTs plus a current MOT certificate valid until July 2021.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1953 Humber Super Snipe Mark IV Limousine

61

Just 41,709 miles from new ESTIMATE: £20,000 - £24,000* REG NO:

RAR 476

CHASSIS:

A82025359HL0

Introduced at the 1952 Earl’s Court Motor Show, the MKIV version of Humber’s well-established Super Snipe was powered by a 4138cc OHV straight-six engine allied to four-speed manual transmission (though, an automatic gearbox was optional from 1956 onwards). A handsome three-box design with various transatlantic styling cues, the MKIV was marketed to bank managers, lawyers and government officials. Available in saloon or limousine guises, some 17,993 were sold between 1952 and 1958. Though, today survivors are few and far between. ‘RAR 476’ is a rare Touring Limousine with glass division that was first registered on November 27th 1953 to Henry Smith of Harry Smiths Auto Electrical Ltd, Lucas Agents of St Albans. Thought to have been a 1953 Motor Show Car which was bought off the stand by Mr Smith, ‘RAR 476’ was supplied to him by Grimaldi Brothers Ltd, Rootes Agents for St Albans. The Grimaldi Brothers were related to the Grimaldi Family in Monaco. Finished in Maroon Metallic with Beige upholstery, ‘RAR 476’ amazingly retains much of its original paintwork. Warranted to have covered just 41,709 miles from new in the hands of three keepers, the Humber has always resided in St Albans and been in the current ownership since 1999. Offered with a collection of Grimaldi Brothers service sheets, original owner’s handbook, workshop manual, parts catalogue, buff logbook, old MOTs, sundry invoices and tax discs dating back to 1953 plus its original tool roll housing a jack, tyre pump, starting handle, wheel brace and grease gun. The original engine was replaced with an overhauled unit of the correct-type in 2011 but has since been repaired and is available by separate negotiation together with a quantity of spares. The vendor currently grades the Super Snipe’s engine and transmission as ‘very good’, and its electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork as ‘good’. The current MOT certificate runs into April 2022.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

59


1951 Allard K2 Roadster

62

The sole example supplied new to The Netherlands ESTIMATE:

£60,000 - £80,000*

REG NO:

UN-REG

CHASSIS:

91K 2029

Paperwork on file from likes of Allard archivist and historian Gavin Allard suggests that chassis K2-2029 was initially ordered by Major Richard Seddon’s R/P Imported Motor Car Co Ltd of New York in late January 1951. Specified with White paint, Black leather upholstery and a De Dion rear axle. It was also due to be modified to take a Cadillac V8 engine. A factory memo dated 19th March 1951 requests a livery change to Bronze with Red hide, while copy Allard Motor Co Ltd Engineers Instructions have ‘Seddon’ and ‘Modify for Cadillac’ crossed out and ‘4375cc, Engine: 7018/87’ and ‘N.V. Haarlemache Auto Centrale’ added. Finally, the authentic Allard Motor Company Record Card for chassis K2-2029 confirms that it was built in left-hand drive with De Dion rear axle, 6 wire wheels, spare wheels in front wings and Mercury Engine Number: 7018/87 and supplied to N.V. Haarlemache Auto Centrale for G.J. Th. A. Van Wuck of Asten, Holland. The same document lists the order and delivery dates as June 4th and June 7th 1951 respectively which is interesting to say the least given that Allard often took five months rather than three days to complete a K2! Coincidentally (or not), the Record Card for chassis K2-2030 reveals that it was built in left-hand drive with De Dion rear end, 6 wire wheels, spare wheels in wings and Cadillac modification and delivered to R/P Imported Motor Car Co Ltd of New York on 11th July 1951 having been ordered on 25th January 1951. The quick turnaround from order to delivery of chassis K2-2029 indicates it was already built and awaiting despatch. It is our understanding that only a handful or so of the 117 K2s made featured front wing mounted spare wheels. The model was available with a choice of live or De Dion rear axles with the latter allowing the fitment of wire (rather than steel) wheels. The De Dion equipped cars handled better and were often used for competition in the Watkins Glen and Australian GPs.

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There is no indication of how long Mr Van Wuck kept chassis K2-2029 or whether he ever raced or rallied it. However, the twoseater belonged to Andre Boomkens of The Hague by February 1970 who sold it to the vendor, Dick Van Dijk, some fourteen years later as a ‘Racewagen’ or racing car. Mr Boomkens also told Mr Van Dijk that Mr Van Wuck had been a dentist by profession. Interestingly, photos on file from the mid-1980s show the Allard painted White, the same colour as on Major Seddon’s initial order form (though, its Record Card states Royal Blue). Mr Van Dijk was drawn to chassis K2-2029 because it was the only K2 supplied new to his native country. A true petrolhead, he amassed a museum collection of over 100 collector cars and had the Allard extensively restored by Rod Jolley and Solent Engineering during the mid-1990s. Rewired, repainted and retrimmed, the Allard also had attention paid to its gearbox, ash frame, steering box, front suspension and fuel system etc. The aluminium bodywork was modified to accept a hood frame and a new hood, tonneau cover and sidescreens fabricated. Little used since completion, the K2 was nonetheless treated to an extensive engine overhaul in 2015 including the fitment of new ‘Edelbrock’ 24-stud aluminium cylinder heads. The hope being that Mr Van Dijk and his son could use the car for historic rallying something that work commitments on both sides prevented (Mr Van Dijk’s son being too busy preparing engines for the Paris-Dakar Rally etc).

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Part of Mr Van Dijk’s collection for the past thirty-seven years, chassis K2-2029 would doubtless benefit from some recommissioning before returning to the road. Not currently registered, accompanying paperwork includes an old registration document issued to Andre Boomkens on 4th June 1974 for the Dutch numberplate ‘UT-66-54’. Stunning looking in period Pacific Green metallic with Black leather upholstery and weather gear, this unique Allard K2 is a testament to Rod Jolley’s restoration skills. Worthy of close inspection, it is offered for sale with a large history file. Model Background: Introduced in 1950, the K2 roadster sported a revised radiator grille, usable boot, cut-away doors and Buick-esque portholes to each flank. Benefiting from the same improved Allard coil-sprung divided front axle damped via tubular shock absorbers as the J2 and P1 models, not to mention a more sophisticated Phase 2 Lockheed braking system, the newcomer was propelled by a choice of Ford 3.6 litre or Mercury 3.9 litre ‘Flathead’ V8 engines mated to three-speed manual transmission (although, most American examples were supplied without powertrains). Only in production until 1952, just 117 K2s are thought to have been made.


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1942 Citroen Flatbed Truck Light Commercial

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NO RESERVE REG NO: 337BK24

Subject to a two-year restoration and fitted with period PAS

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ESTIMATE: £18,000 - £22,000* CHASSIS: NOT STATED

Nazi forces occupying France during World War Two permitted commercial vineyards a set fuel ration so that the latter’s produce was kept in plentiful supply. Converted into a Pick-Up to take advantage of this allowance, the Citroen is understood to have been commandeered by the Resistance on occasion. When the Germans finally retreated and liberation came, it was painted with Free French Independence (FFI) insignia along with a cross of Lorraine and partook in the victory celebrations. Allowed to fall into disrepair, the original owner’s son having left it outside at the family vineyard for many years, the Pick-Up was acquired by a visiting Englishman in the 1980s. The amusing tale of the purchase negotiation is recounted in an accompanying article. Subsequently restored in the 1990s, the Citroen featured in several further magazine articles and was reputedly much in demand for film work. Now a non-runner ready for a second restoration, once completed it should be a welcome entry to car shows everywhere. Offered with old French paperwork, photographs of it at the vineyard, assorted 1990s correspondence, copies of ‘Old Glory’ and ‘Windscreen’ magazines and a Revue Technique edition covering Citroen models from 1919 to 1926, it is quite simply a piece of living history well-deserving of preservation.

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1972 MGB Roadster

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

REG NO: DBE 56K

CHASSIS: GHN5274402G

Introduced in 1962, the MGB Roadster enjoyed an eighteen-year production run. With nicely balanced handling and a good turn of speed, it merited the old MG marketing slogan ‘Safety Fast’. Based around a monocoque chassis featuring independent coil-sprung front suspension and a leaf-sprung ‘live’ rear axle, its 1798cc ‘B’ series four-cylinder engine was allied to four-speed manual transmission. Capable of over 100mph, the provision of front disc brakes and rack-and-pinion steering greatly aided control. Finished in Red with Black leather upholstery, ‘DBE 56K’ really has to be seen in the metal to appreciate the amount of work and new parts which have gone into its extensive ‘nut and bolt’ restoration over the last two years. Highly unusual in being fitted with a period power steering kit, the two-seater is described by the vendor as being in ‘excellent overall’ condition with regard to its original engine, four-speed manual gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork. Showing some 71,000 unwarranted miles to its odometer (less than 10,000 of which have been accumulated since 2008), the MG is unsurprisingly said to ‘drive very well’. Riding on new wire wheels, this gorgeous B Roadster is offered for sale with fresh MOT certificate and receipts for all the parts used during its refurbishment.


1934 Lagonda Rapier Coupe

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ESTIMATE: £10,000 - £14,000* REG NO: BLY 131

1930 Austin Seven Chummy

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ESTIMATE: £10,000 - £14,000* CHASSIS: D10981

REG NO: DS 6992

CHASSIS: M128525

Introduced at the 1933 Olympia Motor Show, the Lagonda Rapier was intended to capitalise on the growing market for small capacity sports cars. The work of consultant Thomas ‘Tim’ Ashcroft, the newcomer’s 1104cc four-cylinder engine utilised twin overhead camshafts to produce a class-leading 50bhp @ 5,400rpm. Praised by the contemporary motoring press for its performance, refinement and agility, the model was supplied in bare chassis guise only and bodied via the likes of E.D. Abbott, John Charles, Maltby and E.J. Newns. The Lagonda Club estimates that just 69 of the 376 Rapiers made have survived to the present day.

The story of the Austin Seven is well documented. The original British people’s car and the car which popularised the now universal control layout, the Austin Seven also gave life to several prestigious brands including BMW and Nissan – who built Sevens under licence – and companies like Jaguar which offered coachbuilt derivatives. Its simple A-frame chassis with leaf springing also formed the basis of numerous specials from single seaters to trials cars, all powered by the same 747cc engine. Capable of 40mpg and 40mph, the Chummy was one of the most popular derivatives alongside the RK saloon.

First registered in London (or so its ‘BLY 131’ number plate would imply), chassis D10981 was taken off the road during 1973 pending a restoration that has yet to happen. Partially disassembled by the vendor since its acquisition twelve years ago, the Lagonda lacks carburettors but otherwise appears to be substantially complete. The engine has been stripped and shows no sign of a major failure, while the chrome plating to the headlamps and radiator shell is said to be ‘good’ (though, the latter has a small dent in it). The dynamo has been overhauled. A worthwhile project, this handsome Rapier is offered for sale with V5C Registration Document and a new / unused 2-litre supercharger.

Having purchased the Austin in 1997, well-known racing driver Terry Sanger treated it to an extensive restoration five years later including the fitment of a new body supplied by Seven specialist John Heath. Understood to retain its original engine, the Chummy was retrimmed by ex-Bristol and exRolls-Royce craftsman Frank Pritchard. Used for numerous Austin Club events up until 2013, the Tourer has been dry stored since then. Started and run on a regular basis, ‘DS 6992’ is deemed by the vendor to be in ‘very good overall’ condition with regards to its engine, gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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1952 Bentley MKVI 4.5 Litre Drophead Coupe

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1 of just 57 cars bodied by Park Ward to their Design Number 99 ESTIMATE:

£100,000 - £120,000*

REG NO:

MUV 993

CHASSIS:

B344NZ

Introduced in 1946, the MKVI was Bentley’s first post-war model. Aimed at the emerging ‘owner-driver’ luxury car market, the newcomer was closely based on the 1939 MKV (of which only fifteen were produced). Built around a massive cruciform-braced chassis with independent front suspension and a leaf-sprung ‘live’ rear axle, it was fitted with a freshly developed 4257cc OISE (overhead inlet side exhaust valve) straight-six engine mated to a four-speed manual gearbox. Capable of over 100mph when clad in the factory’s understated ‘standard steel saloon’ coachwork, the MKVI quickly developed a reputation for being a refined yet responsive drive. The availability of the so-called ‘Big Bore’ 4566cc powerplant from late 1951 onwards brought a welcome increase in flexibility and acceleration. However, despite the excellence of the ‘basic’ car, there remained a core of marque enthusiasts who found its styling too anonymous. Known for the quality and elegance of its renderings, Park Ward clothed some 172 MKVI chassis. Decidedly elegant, the London coachbuilder’s design number 99 - a well-proportioned four-seater drophead coupe with full flowing wings – was bought by the likes of: His Majesty King Frederik IX of Denmark, Nubar S. Gulbenkian, His Royal Highness Prince Frederick of Prussia, Maharaja of Darbhanga, Viscountess Errington, the actor John Mills, Miss Marjorie Carnegie, Prince Berar of Hyderabad, 6th Marquis of Bath and shipping magnate Stavros Spyrou Niarchos. Founded in the 1850s, Richard Haworth & Co became one of Manchester’s most successful cotton producers. A scion of the family, R.F. Howarth Esq took delivery of chassis B344NZ on 29th March 1952. One of just fifty-seven MKVI cars to be clothed by coachbuilder Park Ward to its design number ninetynine, the handsome four-seater Drophead Coupe was finished in Moss Green with Pigskin upholstery and equipped with a

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power operated hood. Ordered from Jack Barclay Ltd of Hanover Square, W1 and issued with the London registration number ‘MUV 993’, the Bentley was supplied new via J. Cockshoot & Co Ltd of Manchester. Remaining in Mr Haworth’s care until 1957, the MKVI is known to have belonged to G.S.C. Bishop Esq, Fattorini & Sons Holdings Ltd (an offshoot of the renowned Harrogate jewellers), S.R. Terry Esq and Mrs I.F. Terry before migrating to America. Repatriated during 1990, the Drophead Coupe suffered an interior fire (presumed wiring related) later that decade. Photos on file show that the flames barely troubled the front bulkhead and indeed the four-seater was running and driving when it entered the current ownership during 2002. A true Rolls-Royce and Bentley enthusiast who has owned and restored a number of Continentals (Phantom II and S-Series) over the years, the vendor entrusted marque specialist Colbrook of Peterborough with the task of stripping the bodywork back to bare metal, fabricating any replacement aluminium panels as necessary and applying numerous coats of Dark Green paint. Replacement seats were sourced from The Real Car Company (previously fitted to a Harold Radford Countryman conversion, the fronts were reclinable and housed fold down picnic tables in their backs). The interior was then completely refurbished by Sergent Autotrim of Norwich with a Mohair hood, West of England cloth headlining, Beige leather upholstery throughout and matching Wilton carpets. Derby Plating refinished much of the brightwork, while the Bentley was mechanically upgraded with a stainless steel exhaust system and R-Type Continental 3.08:1 rear axle ratio (courtesy of Norman Geeson) for more relaxed high speed cruising. Despatched to marque specialist P&A Wood in late 2010, the MKVI underwent an engine compression test, timing check,

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ignition system analysis and carburettor overhaul in a successful attempt to cure a niggling misfire (traced to an incorrect rubber top hat seal on a float bowl mounting bolt assembly). The clutch pedal was reset to remove free play, the handbrake ratchet sorted, a replacement steering box and column assembly installed, the nearside front kingpin rejuvenated, the front anti-roll bar bushes renewed and the hydraulic brake system bled. Carried out at an indicated 35,042 miles, the work took some 74.75 hours (then at £65 per hour) and cost £7,521.26. Returning to Colbrook during May 2014 at an indicated 37,341 miles, the Drophead Coupe had attention paid to its gearbox mounting and stabiliser bushes, propshafts, hydraulic roof rams, screen washers and rear axle shields plus a full service (£5,160.10). Further trips to Colbrook in July 2014 (37,667 miles, £1,655.94), July 2015 (38,402 miles, £408.50), March 2016 (38,662 miles, £1,915.68) and August 2016 (39,441 miles, £679.07) saw the front brakes improved, fuel pumps renewed, tappets adjusted and hydraulic roof pump / reservoir replaced etc. Treated to a new distributor cap, rotor arm, condenser, rocker cover gasket, ignition points set, and spark plugs not to mention fresh oil, anti-freeze and brake fluid plus a full grease-up, new headlight seals and a carburettor overhaul as part of a thorough service carried out by Owen Turner’s Complete Rally Services of Bury St Edmunds in May 2020 at circa 39,900 miles, ‘MUV 993’ started readily upon inspection and ran well during our recent photography session (March 2021). Some fourteen years on from the bodywork’s renovation, there are a few imperfections to be found in the paintwork but overall the Bentley remains highly presentable. The smart interior benefits from a battery cut-out switch and seatbelts. Road registered as ‘9368 AP’ and erroneously identified as an R-Type when pictured in Ray Roberts’ book ‘Bentley Specials and Special Bentleys’, chassis B344NZ pleasingly retains its original 4566cc ‘Big Bore’ straight-six engine. An appealing touring prospect thanks to its R-Type Continental rear axle ratio, this decidedly handsome MKVI is accompanied by copy RREC chassis cards, numerous restoration photographs / invoices, servicing bills and sundry correspondence. The vendor’s last coachbuilt car and one he describes as being in ‘very good overall’ condition with regard to its engine, four-speed manual gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork, ‘MUV 993’ will be much missed.


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1948 Allard M1 Drophead Coupe

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Extensively restored ESTIMATE: £40,000 - £50,000* REG NO:

JOF 560

CHASSIS:

81M705

Succinctly described as ‘the most consistently successful hot-rods of all time’, the cars that emerged from Sydney Allard’s small London premises were nothing short of a revelation. Victorious across a wide range of motorsport disciplines the recipe of large capacity V8 engines, low weight, simplistic suspension geometry and borderline brakes left critics dumbfounded and fans addicted. Introduced in 1947, the four-seater M-type drophead coupe was built around a massive box section steel chassis made by John Thompson Ltd of Wolverhampton. It was propelled by an 85bhp 3.6 litre sidevalve Ford V8 mated to a three speed manual gearbox. Commenting on the new model Autocar magazine noted that it was “full of life and capable of holding almost anything on the road up to speeds in the region of 90mph”. Total M-type production is thought to have amounted to just 499 cars. Finished in Flame Red with Beige mohair hood and re-trimmed interior in Beige leather upholstery, contrasting biscuit carpets and striking walnut woodwork ‘JOF560’ was delivered new to Bristol Street Motors in October 1948 to its first owner J E Keightley of the White Lion, Bideford-on-Avon. Understood to have been exported to the USA in 1990 ‘JOF560’ was the subject of an extensive body-off restoration that is understood to have cost the equivalent of almost £100,000. Purportedly, it was a Pebble Beach concours winner in the early 2000’s the M1 rides on chromed wire wheels in preference to the standard steel disc wheels. Being UK road regrated again in 2013 ‘JOF 560’ benefited from a carburettor overhaul, new clutch bearing, water pumps replaced, dynamo rebuild, braking system overhaul, new-old-stock radiator fitted, ancillary and drive belts replaced. More recently it has been intrusted to Just Historic Cars Ltd for an engine overhaul and further mechanical improvements and is offered with a collection of invoices, copy of the factory records and V5c. The vendor currently grades its engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘very good’. Surely one of the best M1’s around.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1956 Morris J-Type Van

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Subject to a ground up restoration ESTIMATE: £30,000 - £40,000* REG NO:

SXY 262

CHASSIS:

JR34824

The Morris Commercial J-type van was launched by Morris Commercial in 1949 and produced until 1961. After the formation of the British Motor Corporation in 1952, by the merger of Morris’ parent company, the Nuffield Organization, and Austin, the Commercial name was dropped and the van was marketed as the Morris J-type. The van followed the emerging trend of having forward controls and sliding doors on each side. It was made in both left- and right-hand drive versions and fitted with a 1476cc four-cylinder side-valve engine based on the one used in the contemporary Morris Oxford MO cars. As well as complete vehicles, the J-type was also supplied in chassis form to external body makers and it appeared, amongst other uses, as a pick-up, tipper truck, ice cream van and milk float like the sale example. Delivered new to the Maypole Dairy of Finsbury, ‘SXY 262’ was taken off the road in 1977 by its second keeper. Fitted with Mini wheels to facilitate hibernation in a small garage, the Morris lay undisturbed until being acquired by the vendor in 2006. Work on an extensive, ‘ground up’ restoration began shortly thereafter and took five years to complete. The vendor undertook much of the renovation himself but tasked Fairmile Restorations of Worcester with refurbishing the former milk float’s bodywork and paintwork. Offered with original driver’s handbook and workshop manual, copy parts book, technical drawings, Winter radiator cover and collection of invoices / old tax discs. Described as one of the best side valve J Types available, it is no wonder the vendor currently grades its engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘excellent’. A rare opportunity.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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1928 Marmon Model 68 Sedan ESTIMATE:

£22,000 - £26,000*

REG NO:

PK 2812

CHASSIS:

1083810

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Winners of the first Indianapolis 500 race in 1911 with the famous Marmon Wasp, the Marmon name became synonymous with fine automobiles until the Great Depression greatly reduced demand for luxury cars. In 1927, Marmon introduced a ‘Little Marmon’ powered by a 3.1-litre L-head straight-eight which sold for half the price of previous models. For 1928, the Model 68 was introduced, being almost the same size as the Little Marmon, but with a slightly larger 3.3-litre eight. The Series 68 acquired notoriety as the type of car Marvin “Buck” Barrow, brother of Clyde Barrow of Bonnie & Clyde fame, left behind in Joplin, Missouri in 1933 after a shoot-out that left two police officers dead. Despite Marmon’s product rationalisation sales continued to be affected by the Depression and production ceased in 1933. Supplied new by Pass & Joyce Ltd of West London to an Army Major living in Worthing, this rare RHD Model 68 Sedan has been with the vendor for approximately twenty-five years. Originally finished in two-tone green, it is known to have had new gears made and fitted in 1962 when the paintwork was also attended to. Repainted at some point in green, it is said to have an original interior. The wheels were powder coated and new tyres fitted c.2014 whilst the rear springs and steering have been refurbished. The brakes have also been fettled and the water pump overhauled. More recently, in 2019 the lights were rewired. Now described as having ‘very good’ body, paint and engine with ‘original’ interior, this rare Marmon is accompanied by an old buff logbook.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1929 Rolls-Royce 20/25 Tourer

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Displayed at the 1929 Olympia Motor Show ESTIMATE: £45,000 - £55,000* REG NO:

UW2726

CHASSIS:

GX026

Introduced in 1929, the Rolls-Royce 20/25 enjoyed swifter acceleration and a higher top speed (up to 75mph) than the preceding 20 thanks to the adoption of a larger 3669cc OHV straight-six engine. Nearly 4,000 chassis were ultimately produced, making it the company’s best-selling model between the wars. Today’s Rolls-Royces are undoubtedly technological wonders in their own way, and the company, though no longer British owned, does at least conduct its manufacturing on English soil. Whether they match the majesty of their wholly British forbears is a matter of opinion, however. Either way the presence of the matching numbers 1929 20/25 offered here takes some beating having been displayed at the 1929 Olympia Motor Show and being the 15th example sold to the public. Supplied new to Mr Alfred Sainsbury of the famous grocery chain, chassis GXO26 began life as a H.J. Mulliner-bodied Weymann Saloon. The original coachwork had long since fallen into disrepair by the time the vendor acquired the Rolls-Royce in 1994. In fact, at that time the 20/25 existed as a well restored rolling chassis with a handsome, but yet to be fitted, four-seater tourer body which is thought to have been crafted by Tony Robinson. Completing the project by 1997, the seller subsequently enjoyed ‘UW 2726’ on a number of Continental Tours. As part of the works, the interior was re-upholstered and a new hood and tonneau cover made by David Beswick Coach Trimming. Boasting a dynamo starter and full flow oil filter, the Rolls-Royce is said to possess ‘very good oil pressure’ not to mention ‘a fully functional central chassis lubrication system’. Having had its brakes relined c.4,500 miles ago, the 20/25 is described by the vendor as being in ‘very good’ condition with regards to its engine, gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim and bodywork. While, he rates the paintwork as ‘good’. Accompanied by chassis card records, collection of invoices and old MOT’s.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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1965 Jaguar E-Type 4.2

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Current ownership since 2004 ESTIMATE:

£75,000 - £85,000*

REG NO:

EFW699C

CHASSIS:

1E31573

Among the last century’s great motoring icons, Jaguar’s E-type has always inspired loyalty and devotion. Born out of the fabulous D-type racer, the model soon acquired a strong competition heritage of its own. Launched at the 1961 Geneva Salon, the Big Cat proved faster and more glamorous than virtually any production rival. Certainly few could match its reputed 150mph top speed. At a time when Ferrari’s lauded 250SWB and 250GTO made do with ‘live’ rear axles, the E-type utilised a sophisticated independent rear set-up with inboard disc brakes. While, rack and pinion steering enhanced the monocoque chassis’s excellent roadholding and handling; putting it light years ahead of American designs like the Corvette. Revised in 1964, the E-type gained a torquier 4235cc powerplant and four-speed all-synchromesh gearbox of Jaguar’s own design. The handsome Series 1 on offer started life as a left-hand drive fixed-head coupe that was despatched to Jaguar Cars of New York on September 1st 1965. Repatriated thirty years later, the E-type was subsequently treated to an extensive restoration which is understood to have included a conversion to right-hand drive and reconfiguration as a Roadster. Entering the current ownership in 2004 and benefiting from sensible upgrades such as a Coopercraft front brake conversion, uprated anti roll bar, stainless steel exhaust system and Koni shock absorbers, ‘EFW 699C’ also boasts a tracker (subscription required). The subject of £1,774 worth of mechanical fettling in 2019, the Jaguar is described by the vendor as being in ‘very good’ condition with regards to its 4.2 litre engine, four-speed manual gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork. Previously enjoyed on numerous classic tours and rallies, ownership of ‘EFW 699C’ would be a great way to celebrate the E-Type’s 60th anniversary. Offered for sale with a large collection of invoices, MOT certificates dating back to 1995, Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust Certificate and current MOT certificate valid until August 2021.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


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1975 Ferrari ‘Dino’ 208 GT4

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1 of just 840 made and beautifully restored by Modena Classic Works ESTIMATE:

£45,000 - £55,000*

REG NO:

229 LOM

CHASSIS:

11378

Launched at the 1973 Paris Salon, the Dino 308 GT4 was a seminal model for Maranello. The first V8-powered Ferrari, it was also the marque’s first non-Pininfarina styled production car. The work of Marcello Gandini at Bertone (whose other 1970s credits included the Lamborghini Countach and Lancia Stratos), its angular lines were in stark contrast to those of the outgoing Dino 246 GT. Enzo Ferrari personally oversaw the newcomer’s ergonomics, while multiple F1 World Champion Niki Lauda is said to have honed its driving dynamics. A 2+2-seater underpinned by a tubular steel spaceframe chassis featuring all-round independent suspension, four-wheel disc brakes, front / rear anti-roll bars and rack and pinion steering, the 308 GT4 was judged faster and better handling than its predecessor by the contemporary motoring press. The Dino range was bolstered in Spring 1975 by the arrival of a 2-litre version, the 208. Intended for the Italian market where cars over 2000cc were heavily taxed, the smaller capacity GT4 was powered by a 1991cc ‘quad-cam’ V8 allied to five-speed manual transmission. With a quoted 170bhp and 137lbft of torque on tap, the Dino 208 GT4 was reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 7.6 seconds ad 137mph. Only in production from 1975-1980, just 840 were made. Delivered new to official Ferrari dealer S.V.E.A. Spa of Bari, Italy in September 1975, chassis 11378 was road registered the following year. Migrating to Perugia by 1982 where it belonged to Mauro Dionigi, the 208 GT4 is thought to have been taken off the road not long after. Despatched to Modena Classic Works during April 2015 with an unwarranted but highly credible 37,236km showing to its odometer, the 2+2-seater was cosmetically and mechanically restored over the next fifteen months. Documented in an accompanying hardbound Modena Classic Works ‘Certification of Restoration’ folder, work even extended to having nuts and bolts yellow galvanised so as to mimic 1960s / 1970s Maranello practice.

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Repainted in its original and rare Blu Chiaro Metallizzato livery, the Dino pleasingly retains the majority of its factory-fitted Blue Cloth interior albeit deep cleaned and with some repairs to the driver’s seat. The gearbox was overhauled, the engine stripped and treated to new gaskets, repaired exhaust manifolds and rejuvenated Weber carburettors, while the brakes, fuel system

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

and suspension were refurbished too. Now displaying just over 40,000km (24,900 miles), this stunning looking 208 GT4 remains a credit to the craftsmen who renovated it. Offered for sale with V5C Registration Document, history file, MCW ‘Certification of Restoration’ folder and copy Classiche printout.


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1932 Alvis Firefly Tourer ESTIMATE:

£30,000 - £35,000*

REG NO:

KV 3382

CHASSIS:

10250

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Introduced in September 1932, the Alvis Firefly was built to the same high standards as its more expensive brethren. Notably lowslung, it was based on a ‘double-dropped’ ladder frame chassis equipped with all-round semi-elliptic leaf-sprung suspension, friction dampers and four-wheel 14in drum brakes. Utilising a 9ft 10.5in wheelbase and 4ft 4in track, the model was praised by the contemporary motoring press for its ride/handling capabilities. Powered by a 1496cc OHV engine - essentially a four-cylinder version of that found in the legendary Speed 20 - allied to either four-speed manual or ENV pre-selector transmission, the Firefly was reputedly capable of 75mph. Available with a choice of saloon, tourer, or drophead coupe coachwork, it remained in production until 1935 by which time some 871 are thought to have been sold. Despatched to Messrs John Thompson of Wolverhampton as a Carbodies Saloon on 21st December 1932, ‘KV 3382’ is understood to have acquired a replacement Cross & Ellis Tourer body during the 1980s when its then-owner and his brother embarked upon a ‘chassis up’ restoration. Treated to a replacement ‘J type’ steering arm in 2007 and a new clutch six years later by its previous keeper, the four-seater entered the current ownership during 2015. Featured in `Alvis Firefly Twelve’ by Simon Fisher (p.28), ‘KV 3382’ is finished in British Racing Green over Black with Red leather upholstery. This most handsome ‘Post-Vintage Thoroughbred’ from one of Britain’s premier sporting marques is offered for sale with a history file comprising current V5C, instruction book, and some past MOTs / tax discs.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1937 Talbot BD75 Sports Special

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ESTIMATE: £65,000 - £85,000* REG NO:

DYY780

CHASSIS:

2941

Beginning life as a 1937 Talbot BD75 Sports Saloon, this exciting Special is said to have been constructed over three years to an extremely high standard. With the original bodywork beyond economic repair the decision was taken to reconfigure the car as a period-style two-seater. The chassis was stripped and completely rejuvenated, all dampers, springs, bearings and suspension components being either overhauled or replaced. Framed in and skinned with - aluminium, the lightweight coachwork was fabricated by the well-known Vintage Special bodybuilding expert, Ian Pitney. The bulkhead and scuttle have been lowered and the radiator and cowling modified giving the car its unique look. The radiator is to high-flow specification but using correct top and bottom tanks. All components including the transmission have been refurbished and the engine overhauled with the cylinder head receiving the attention of the previous engineer owner. An uprated carburettor is fitted for reliability and power. The instrument panel and instruments have been restored. A new period look rev counter is fitted and of course, the car has been completely rewired with the starter motor and dynamo being fully overhauled. It is rare to find a two-seater Talbot and this ‘no expense spared’, fully road legal example pleasingly retains its original chassis and engine. Sporting fully trimmed bespoke seats, this car presents as immaculate inside and out and would be much at home in the paddock at Silverstone. The original buff logbook is available together with a current V5C Registration Document.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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1952 Daimler DB18 Special Sports Drophead Coupe

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Fully Restored During 1999 - 2000 at a Cost of £90,000 ESTIMATE:

£15,000 - £20,000*

REG NO:

XMK 899

CHASSIS:

D59131

Daimler is one of the few manufacturers that can rightfully claim to have been established from the birth of the motor industry. The company’s traditions of sound engineering, design and good workmanship were maintained throughout its life; hardly surprising therefore that Daimler enjoyed a lengthy association with Royalty as suppliers of motor cars. Development of the pre-war Daimler Fifteen culminated with the DB18 model announced for 1939. Independent suspension appeared for the first time on a Daimler and the DB18 featured an enlarged, 2,522cc version of the overhead-valve six first introduced in 1933. Daimler’s customary fluid flywheel, preselector gearbox and worm drive rear axle comprised the transmission. A new drophead coupé appeared at the first post-war London Motor Show in 1948: the DB18 Special Sports. Stylish in a most un-Daimler-like manner, the Special Sports featured coachwork by Barker, the latter, like Daimler and fellow coachbuilders Hooper, being one of the BSA Group’s many companies. The radiator grille was now curved, the alloy-panelled coachwork more streamlined, and the Special Sports benefited from hydro-mechanical braking and a power output raised to 85bhp courtesy of twin carburettors. In short: a model combining all the usual Daimler refinements with increased performance. When DB18 production ceased, only 500-or-so of these elegant and refined Special Sports roadsters had been completed. This DB18 Special Sports features Barker’s distinctive drophead coupé coachwork with bench front seat and single sidewaysfacing rear seat. It was manufactured in 1952 making it one of the very last coachbuilt examples produced. The stylish open bodywork is finished in two-tone blue and the interior is trimmed in dark blue leather which retains great patina. The property

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of Harrogate-based businessman Keith Boardall Esq for the majority of its life, XMK 899 had unfortunately started to show its age around the time of the millennium. Keith decided to grasp the nettle and appoint the services of respected vehicle restorer David Royle. Work commenced in July of 1999 and saw a comprehensive and full restoration, with absolutely no expense spared on the aesthetics or mechanical components. By December 2000, ‘Bertie’ was fit for the road once again having received £90,000 of documented and itemised renovation work. A leather-bound photograph album accompanies the car, comprising 121 colour photographs showing work carried out throughout the entire process. Following a period of ill-health, this delightful drop-top Daimler has reputedly seen little use since 2012. Starting readily upon inspection and running well during our recent photography session, this DB18 remains highly presentable despite those years of inactivity. Suffering with a hydraulic fluid leak and a very weak brake pedal, we would recommend a thorough recomissioning before tackling the open roads. Offered for sale with a current UK V5c registration document and comprehensive history file containing the aforementioned photograph album and invoices, plus a reprint handbook and much sundry paperwork.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


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1935 Lagonda M45 Rapide Three Position Drophead Coupe

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Coachwork by Freestone & Webb ESTIMATE:

£140,000 - £160,000*

REG NO:

BYU 647

CHASSIS:

Z11149

The 4½-Litre Lagonda was one of the most accomplished sports cars of the 1930s, as a succession of high-profile race wins, culminating in victory at Le Mans in 1935, amply demonstrates. Having established its reputation by winning the Moscow - St Petersburg Reliability Trial of 1910 with a 30hp six, Lagonda had concentrated mainly on the production of light cars before reverting to sporting and luxury models in the mid-1920s with the introduction of the 14/60. This four-cylinder, 2-litre model was joined in 1929 by the first of Lagonda’s own sixes - the 3-Litre but by the mid-1930s the Meadows-engined cars were seen as the way forward. Introduced at the 1933 Olympia Show and based on the preceding ZM 3-Litre model, the M45 deployed Meadows’ 4½-litre, twin-plug six to good effect, saloons being capable of reaching 90mph and tourers the ‘ton’ under favourable conditions.

The Rapide version of the M45 boasted a lighter chassis (10ft 3in wheelbase), uprated engine (RR50 alloy crankcase, Scintilla magneto, stronger connecting rods and larger crankshaft bearings) and more powerful Girling brakes plus a freewheel device for the transmission. Considerably more expensive than its standard sibling at £825, the Rapide accounted for just 53 sales making it particularly sought after today. This car:

Shortly after the M45’s introduction, The Autocar got its hands on one - “A short run on one of the first of the 4½-Litre Lagonda models, with an open four-seater body, left a vivid impression not only of brilliant acceleration and sheer performance, but of a car delightfully silent and easy running in a way that can be achieved to the fullest extent only by a big-engined machine working well inside its limits”. A team of three specially prepared short-chassis cars (effectively the soon-to-be-announced M45 Rapide) prepared by Lagonda main agents Fox & Nicholls performed creditably at the 1934 RAC Tourist Trophy at Ards, and the following year one of these TT cars driven by John Hindmarsh and Luis Fontes won the Le Mans 24Hour endurance classic outright.

Despatched from Lagonda’s Staines Works to the neighbouring Freestone and Webb coachbuilders of Willesden, chassis Z11149 was sold through Warwick Wright Ltd of Bond Street and first registered to a Mr H. Garside Esq. Documentation within the car’s history file suggests that he was a permanent resident of the prestigious Waldorf Hotel in London’s West End. Covering some 13,580 miles during its first seventeen months of his ownership, the drophead M45 Rapide was still resident in the United Kingdom for some twenty-six years, later exported to Canada in 1963. Sold to Willian Van Houten of Toronto, the four-seater subsequently belonged to R.P Suckling, also of Toronto, then K.R Morrell of Ontario who appeared to own the car for a lengthy period before advertising it for sale in April 1978. We believe the car’s substantial restoration was carried out to a very high standard around this time, with new owner John F. Le Blond of Pennsylvania being awarded first place in the ‘Primary Division’ at the Classic Car Club of America’s prestigious 1987 concours event (held that year in Michigan). Chassis Z11149 returned home to British soil in 1989, passing through the hands of a prominent collector, the late Christopher Bauer of Cheshire to Roger Groves of Kent. After four years of ownership, Groves offered the car to market through Brooks Auctioneers in their December 1998 sale; a bid of £58,150 secured the car for Simon Carrell of Mount Lawley, West Australia. The car was left under the care and jurisdiction of marque specialist Peter Whenman, garaged and maintained at his ‘Vintage Coachworks’ premises with sparing use from the owner during occasional visits to England and Europe. The bodywork is finished in silver with a dark blue bonnet, wings and boot. Arnold Davey suggests in a letter on file that photographs show “the car was originally one single dark colour until in Bauer’s ownership, when the two-tone finish appears.” The interior is trimmed in airforce blue leather with dark blue carpets. The dashboard and surrounding wooden trim are all in very good condition and are complemented by all the correct factory instrumentation. The car has a spacious boot, with concealed factory toolkit beneath a trap door. Continues overleaf

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


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In 1999, the car was prepared for the Lagonda Club’s Alpine Rally and completed the 2000-mile tour, including many mountain passes without drama. Work carried out at this time included the rebuilding of the gearbox with new gears and bearings, a Borg and Beck clutch conversion and new radiator core. In October 2001, Peter Whenman affectionately described BYU 647 as follows “Vintage Coachworks regularly uses the car and has found it to be a most reliable car, which motors and handles exceedingly well. This is indeed a very original Lagonda, in excellent condition and makes a fine continental touring car.” Purchased by the vendor’s late father in October 2001, the car has seen sparing use over the last two decades. Stored within a heated garage facility at his Harrogate home throughout this period, the car is now ready for the next chapter of its life. Equally suited to a relaxing drive in the UK countryside, but light and powerful enough to make it a serious contender for continental and long-distance rallying (in absolute style and comfort, of course!). Starting readily upon inspection and running well during our recent photography session, the Lagonda remains highly presentable despite eight years of inactivity. There are a few minor imperfections to the paint and upholstery but they do not detract from the car’s overall appearance. Retaining its original stylish and functional open three-position drophead coachwork, this rare and highly desirable M45 Rapide is a true Post Vintage Thoroughbred. Regarded by many to be the ultimate sporting Lagonda, ‘BYU 647’ is offered for sale with a current UK V5c registration document and history file containing much correspondence with Arnold Davey, Peter Whenman and former custodian Simon Carrell.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


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1957 Vauxhall Cresta E

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Low Mileage and Ownership ESTIMATE: £12,000 - £14,000* REG NO: 937 UYR

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NO RESERVE CHASSIS: CA259435

Introduced in 1954, the Vauxhall Cresta E was a more luxurious version of the company’s existing Velox. Powered by the same 2.3 litre straight-six engine allied to three-speed manual transmission, it was capable of over 80mph. Built to left-hand drive specification, this remarkable Cresta is understood to have been supplied new by Paul Lentz of Luxembourg (a Cadillac, Buick, Pontiac and Vauxhall dealer). Reputedly belonging to one family from new until 2015, they are understood to have placed the saloon into storage during the early 1960s (surviving service record tags include one issued in September 1963 at 41,159km). Imported to the UK six years ago since when it has had just one registered keeper, the Vauxhall was treated to a brake system overhaul (including reconditioning the master cylinder), minor engine recommissioning / servicing, new tyres and the replacement of assorted perishable rubber parts. Described by the vendor as ‘an exceptionally unmolested example that retains most of its original paintwork’, ‘937 UYR’ showed just 41,887km (circa 26,200 miles) to its odometer at the time of cataloguing. Offered for sale with UK V5C Registration Document, the aforementioned service tags and period polishing / anti-mist cloths (still in their protective plastic), this timewarp, left-hand drive Cresta must surely be unique?

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2007 Mercedes-Benz SLK 280

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

REG NO: M800 NAL

CHASSIS: WDB1714542F176385

Introduced at the 2004 Geneva Motor Show, the second generation SLK (codename R171-Series) echoed the frontal ‘F1 styling’ of its illustrious Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren hypercar sibling. Fully galvanised, the two-seater’s monocoque bodyshell proved an impressive 46 percent stiffer than that of its predecessor with the electro-hydraulic hardtop retracted. Featuring a 3 litre V6 developing some 228bhp and 221lbft of torque (despite its nomenclature), the mid-range SLK 280 was reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 6.3 seconds and 155mph (limited). Finished in Iridium Silver Metallic with Red Nappa leather upholstery, chassis WDB1714542F176385 has been in the current family ownership from new and covered just 52,000 miles. Purchased from Mercedes-Benz of Maidstone, its generous specification encompassed: speed sensitive power steering, Parktronic, COMAND, Airscarf, draft excluder, remote hardtop control, 7-speed automatic transmission, air-conditioning, heated seats and five-spoke alloy wheels. Regularly maintained, the SLK 280’s most recent service was in 2019 and included the fitment of new tyres all-round. Little used since then, it started readily upon inspection and ran well. Kept in a private museum building, ‘M800 NAL’ is expected to possess a fresh MOT certificate by the time of sale. There is a small split visible to the rear bumper (which is thought to be in the paint not the plastic) and some light scuffing to the front bumper ahead of the wheelarches. A future classic, this tempting SLK 280 is offered for sale with V5C Registration Document and history file (including the original order form).


1981 MG B LE Roadster

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1 of just 421 LE roadsters made ESTIMATE: £13,000 - £15,000* REG NO: PAD267W

1935 Lancia Belna Saloon

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ESTIMATE: £12,000 - £14,000* CHASSIS: GVADJ1AG522711

REG NO: JSJ 241

CHASSIS: F311484

The production of 1,000 LEs (421 Roadsters/579 GTs) in October 1980 marked the end of the line for home market MGBs. The LE (ie Limited Edition) Roadsters were all finished in Metallic Bronze, trimmed in Orange/Brown cloth and featured distinctive Gold stripes on their flanks, Triumph Stagstyle alloy wheels and deep front spoilers. The price tag was £6,445, for which you received a very well-sorted two-seater sports car.

Responsible for some of the most innovative cars ever designed, Lanica has a proud engineering heritage. Introduced in 1933, the Augusta featured Lancia’s trademark sliding-pillar independent front suspension and a compact V4 engine. Manufactured in Turin and at Bonneuil-sur-Marne, Lancia’s first factory outside Italy, it was rechristened the Belna for the French market. Approximately 3,000 Belnas were made before production ceased during 1938 with all but 500 or so being saloons.

They have inevitably become collectable, and the very smart 1981 example offered was supplied new by F.W Cuffs and Co of Chipping Campden. The credible but unwarranted odometer reading – currently 53,200 miles – is thought to represent the total covered from new. Only five former keepers are shown on the V5C Registration Document and the MG comes complete with copies of its service records plus a collection of old MOT certificates and invoices. Having received a new Mohair hood and last serviced in 2018, it is no surprise the vendor currently grades the engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘very good’. The current MOT certificate runs into July 2021.

Dating from 1935, this rare French-built Lancia is finished in Navy Blue over Sky Blue with a contrasting Burgundy vinyl interior. Self-evidently the subject of past restoration work, the Belna retains an 1196cc V4 engine allied to four-speed manual transmission. Imported to the UK in 1998 and understood to have become part of a private collection that same year, the saloon was apparently used for a variety of shows, weddings and school graduation balls. Taken off the road in 2013 due to a suspected head gasket leak, the Lancia was purchased by the vendor five years later. Recommissioned with a new head gasket and thorough service, more recent work saw it rewired in 2020. Offered for sale with several past tax discs and MOTs, the Belna possesses a current V5C Registration Document.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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1990 Rolls-Royce Silver Spirit II

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Just 15,800 miles from new ESTIMATE: £28,000 - £32,000* REG NO:

H9 ORP

CHASSIS:

SCAZS00A6LCH33743

The Fritz Feller-penned Silver Spirit debuted at the 1980 Paris Salon. It was not entirely new, however, and employed the floorpan of the outgoing model as well as its proven OHV 6,750cc V8 powerplant. The opulent incomer was lower and longer than the Silver Shadow and featured a considerably larger glass area. Courtesy of its finely-tuned Girling hydraulic self-levelling suspension, it was said to provide the best roadholding ever offered by the marque. It was also the first Rolls-Royce to feature a retractable version of the Spirit of Ecstasy - it automatically withdrew into the safety of the radiator shell if dislodged from its standard position. There were a total of four iterations of the Silver Spirit, via which it remained in production until 1998, by which time BMW had obtained an interest in the manufacturer and the Spirit was replaced by the BMW V12-powered Silver Seraph. This utterly immaculate Silver Spirit II has had a total of six owners, who between them have apparently amassed no more than 15,800 miles over 31 years. Totally unrestored, it is finished in the striking combination of Acrylic Georgian Silver over a Dark Metallic Blue, while the interior is trimmed in Blue-piped Parchment-coloured hide. The Rolls was supplied new by Mann Egerton of Norwich and is considered by the vendor to have nothing less than ‘excellent’ bodywork, two-tone paintwork, interior trim, V8 engine and automatic transmission. Apparently once a show car, ‘H9 ORP’ is well known to the Rolls-Royce Enthusiasts’ Club and is now being offered complete with; upgraded, Bluetooth-enabled radio as well as the original audio system; factory build sheets and inspection records; comprehensive history file; the original bill of sale dated 8/6/1990; the original factory pack of owner’s manuals and service book; and a pair of Rolls-Royce blankets and umbrella and an MOT certificate into July 2021. A unique opportunity.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1975 Lincoln Continental MKIV Versailles Edition

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Highly original and just 45,000 miles from new ESTIMATE: £12,000 - £15,000* REG NO:

KKH 914N

CHASSIS:

5Y89A890077

Introduced in 1972, the Lincoln Continental Mark IV was a personal luxury coupe and Ford’s answer to the Cadillac Eldorado. Styled both inside and out by Wes Dahlberg, the newcomer was longer, lower and lighter than its predecessor. Still very much a neoclassical design, its vertical Rolls-Royce-esque radiator grille and faux spare wheel housing trunk lid were augmented by opera windows let into the C-pillars. The interior featured a ‘Twin Comfort Lounge’ bench front seat with 6-way power adjustment, airconditioning, Cartier clock, electric windows and plentiful sound deadening. Supremely comfortable thanks to its soft-riding coilsprung suspension complete with four-link STABUL rear end, the Lincoln featured an early form of ABS called ‘Sure-Track’. Powered by a 460 cu in (7.5 litre) V8 engine allied to three-speed automatic transmission, the Mark IV was reputedly capable of 120mph. The last luxury group announced for the 1975 model-year was the Versailles Edition. Upholstered with ‘Pillow Style’ seats in ‘Crushed Majestic Cloth’, it would probably have horrified Louis XIV but was very much in keeping with the Lincoln’s ultimate land yacht ethos. Finished in Dark Red with matching Crushed Majestic Cloth upholstery, this rare surviving 1975 Lincoln Continental Mark IV is said to have been in single family ownership before arriving in the UK during December 2018. Warranted to have covered just 45,000 miles from new (a figure substantiated by an Actual Mileage declaration on an old US Certificate of Title), the personal luxury Coupe is the best-preserved example we have encountered. Starting readily upon inspection and running notably well, ‘KKH 914N’ boasts a fabulously decadent and seemingly completely original interior. Factory stickers remain affixed to the underside of the trunk lid as well as on the engine’s rocker covers, while equipment includes cruise control, auto dimming headlights and a Gold moonroof. Wonderfully evocative of the 1970s and great value on a £ per lb basis, this exceptional Lincoln is offered for sale with handbook, V5C Registration Document, sundry paperwork and fresh MOT certificate.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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1950 Bentley MKVI Saloon

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Bodied by H.J Mulliner & Co ESTIMATE: £45,000 - £55,000* REG NO:

LGJ 90

CHASSIS:

B295FU

Introduced in 1946, the MKVI was Bentley’s first post-war model. Built around a massive cruciform-braced chassis with independent front suspension and a leaf-sprung ‘live’ rear axle, it was fitted with a freshly developed 4257cc OISE (overhead inlet side exhaust valve) straight-six engine mated to a four-speed manual gearbox. Capable of over 100mph when clad in the factory’s understated ‘standard steel saloon’ coachwork, the MKVI quickly developed a reputation for being a refined yet responsive drive. However, despite the excellence of the ‘basic’ car, there remained a core of marque enthusiasts who found its styling too anonymous. Despatched to coachbuilder H.J Mulliner & Co in 1950, chassis B295FU was supplied new to the Monegasque residence of shipping magnate, M. Georgandris. Having had just two further French keepers ‘LGJ 90’ was offered for auction by Brooks of Europe in 1997 and the vendor tells us he became only the fifth keeper in 2007. Previously subject to a complete engine overhaul by marque specialist Ristes, other expenditure has comprised re-chroming by Derby plating, all the interior wood being re-polished and the fitment of overdrive. Subject to an oil filter conversion kit plus radiator repair in 2014, more recent work has seen the Bentley benefit from mechanical fettling including new front springs and rear wheel bearings. Offered with very rare sales brochure and Mulliner maintenance instruction book, workshop manual, spares catalogue, large collection of invoices (which include Fiennes Restoration ones), chassis card records and a collection of MOT certificates ‘LGJ 90’ also boasts a full set of chrome plated tools located in the dashboard tray, oil cans in the engine bay, original handbook under the dashboard, Bentley umbrella in the nearside compartment and working clock plus valve radio. The vendor informs us the approximate spend by the first UK owner was in excess of £29,000 and that he has invested a further £30,000 himself. As such, he currently grades its engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘very good’.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1981 Mercedes-Benz 280 SLC

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Former MBOC Woodruff Trophy Winner ESTIMATE: £18,000 - £22,000* REG NO:

JRX 439W

CHASSIS:

WDB1070222209912

The impressive history file which accompanies this multiple awardwinning Mercedes-Benz 280 SLC even includes the Pre-Delivery Check Sheet and a carbon copy of its New Vehicle Order Form. The latter reveals that the four-seater was to be finished in Champagne Metallic with Brazil Brown velour upholstery and to feature an electric sunroof, central locking, air-conditioning, electric windows and alloy wheels. Supplied new by Rivervale Motors Ltd on 6th May 1981 at a cost of £20,000 (about the same as Porsche was charging for a 928 at the time), ‘JRX 439W’ was to remain with its first owner – Mrs Felicitas Shaw – for fifteen years. Thereafter, it belonged to Eric Catchpole and Dominic Smith before entering the current (fourth) ownership via dealer Robert Hughes in late November 2014. Reading through the accompanying original service book and numerous invoices indicates that the Mercedes-Benz has received maintenance at 1,161, 6,262, 10,571, 13,124, 14,197, 17,115, 19,483, 25,403, 26,824, 29,938, 33,985, 48,563, 49,176, 52,084 and 52,457 miles. Renowned marque specialist The SL SHOP was responsible for issuing the last two bills (totalling over £2,400 between them) as well as supplying a variety of replacement trim pieces over the past seven years. No stranger to concours competitions, the seller treated the 280 SLC to a sympathetic bodywork renovation during July 2015 which encompassed the fitting of new sills and repairs to the rear wings and all four inner wheel arches. He then went through the car bringing it up to his exacting standards. Awarded the MercedesBenz Owners’ Club’s Woodruff Trophy for the best 107-Series Car (SL and SLC) at their 2017 Annual Rally and the People’s Choice Trophy at the same meeting, ‘JRX 439W’ has since accumulated more ‘silverware’ at local shows. Warranted to have covered less than 53,000 miles from new, this exceptional C107 is offered for sale with V5C registration document, history file and MOT certificate valid until April 2022.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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1935 MG PB ‘Midget’

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Supercharged 939cc Engine and Lightweight ‘Q-Type’ Style Coachwork ESTIMATE:

£48,000 - £55,000*

REG NO:

MXS 707

CHASSIS:

PB 0660

MG factory records show that PB 0660 was completed on the 18th December 1935 for despatch overseas and was later purchased in 2004 as a ‘kit of parts’ comprising the original chassis frame, front and rear axles, a complete set of brakes, steering components, a rebuilt radiator, a rebuilt differential and sundry minor engine and gearbox parts from the late Peter Green, long time Chairman of the MG Car Club’s Triple-M Register and a renowned authority on all things ‘Triple-M’. There was no engine block supplied, however our vendor was able to source a new one, also from Peter Green and for which, as per the requirements of the Triple-M Register, now features the original engine number ‘888 APB’ with the suffix ‘2’ to indicate a replacement block. A lifetime VSCC member and prolific collector of all things Vintage, the vendor set out to rebuild chassis PB 0660 as a quick, lightweight road car with the potential for competition if required. Work commenced in October 2005 and was completed in the Spring of 2020; The chassis frame was in good condition and only needed shot-blasting and powder coating, as did the front and rear axles. The front axle was refurbished professionally by Mike Dowley of Sports and Vintage Motors with new king-pins and bushes. Mike Dowley also rebuilt the steering box with a new steering drop-arm as the original failed its crack-test. The two steering arms also failed their crack-test so were replaced by new ones. The track rods were in good condition and were fitted with new track rod ends and ball joints. The rear axle with the refurbished differential was fitted with new racing-grade hardened steel half shafts and new bearing carriers, bearings and seals. All four brake drums were skimmed and all the brake shoes were relined. The brake activating levers and cams were all in good condition and were fitted to the back plates with new return springs. New brake cables, hubs and seals were fitted all round. The axles are attached to the chassis with new road springs and

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shackles, and she sits on four new 19” wire road wheels supplied by Motor Wheel Services, fitted with new Blockley 4.00-4.50 tyres. The engine was professionally refurbished by Ken Robinson, using the aforementioned new block, a new solid steel Phoenix crank, new Carillo conrods and a new set of forged alloy Venolia pistons. A new correct-specification cylinder head was obtained from Mike Dowley (refurbished by Ken Robinson) and fitted with a new sports camshaft, new valves and springs etc. An original flywheel was lightened, and then balanced together with the crank, rods and pistons - A new plate clutch was also fitted. The original 3 brush dynamo was replaced by a new 2-brush example, generally accepted as more reliable especially for night driving and a new lip seal has been fitted at the top of the vertical drive to replace the original one which was prone to leaking. A very good, used Volumex supercharger was sourced from Richard Hardy of ‘Vintage MG Parts’, who also supplied all the correct manifolds for

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

it. A correct, new 2 ¼” SU/Burlen was supplied by Barry Walker and Ken Robinson rebuilt the supercharger. Mike Dowley supplied a new set of close-ratio gears which were built into an original PA gearbox. Ray Pettit of Compound Curvatures supplied a Q-type aluminium body, as often fitted to early ‘T’ Type chassis (which are actually a few inches longer than the ‘P’ Type chassis). Alan Floyd of Classic Car Panel Repairs was tasked with shortening the body - he also made the bonnet, side valances, supercharger cover and other fittings. The result of the above is an attractive, very light open 2 seater with a powerful supercharged engine and a close-ratio gearbox. Offered with a box file of receipts, certificates and endorsements from the Triple-M Register of the MG Car Club along with copies of factory build records.


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2005 Porsche 911 Carrera 2S

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ESTIMATE: £18,000 - £22,000* REG NO: M200 POR

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NO RESERVE CHASSIS: WP0ZZZ99Z5S738835

Introduced in 2004, the 997-series of Porsche’s iconic 911 allied all the technological improvements of its 996-series predecessor – a lighter / stiffer bodyshell, better suspension / brakes, four-valve cylinder heads and a superior HVAC system – to more classical styling. Available in Carrera or Carrera S guises when launched, the latter boasted a more powerful 3.8 litre engine (rated at 350bhp/295lbft), sports exhaust, Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) and 19-inch wheels as standard. Reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 4.6 seconds and 182mph, it soon became a driver’s favourite. Finished in Silver with Black leather upholstery, this particular example is described by the vendor as being in ‘very good overall’ condition with regard to its engine, six-speed manual gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork. The water-cooled flat-six was checked for bore scoring at 60,000 miles (35,000 miles ago) and the 2+2-seater has also benefited from new coil springs all-round and an overhaul of its front suspension. Well maintained by main dealers and (more recently) marque specialists, ‘M200 POR’ boasts a sunroof and the desirable ‘Sports Chrono’ pack which comprised a dashboard-mounted stopwatch and a sport button that simultaneously stiffened the suspension, taughtened the throttle response and slackened the traction control. Offered for sale with history file, fresh MOT and Parrot Asteroid system.

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1924 Austin Seven ‘Pram Hood’ Chummy

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

REG NO: BS 9252

CHASSIS: A6056

Spurred on by the introduction of the Horsepower Tax in 1921, Sir Herbert Austin began working on the concept of a small family car despite opposition from the company’s board due to their being in receivership at the time. Undaunted, Sir Herbert engaged the services of a young draftsman from the Longbridge Plant, eighteen-year old Stanley Edge, and plans were drawn up in the billiard room of his house, Lickey Grange. Having invested a large amount of his personal money into the project and being responsible for much of the car’s styling, Sir Herbert was able to claim a royalty of two Guineas on each car built. Initially powered by a side valve four-cylinder engine of 696cc (subsequently enlarged to 747cc / 10.5hp) and featuring a detachable cylinder head, the new model was rated at 7.2 horsepower. Some 2,500 examples were produced in 1923 and just a few years later the little Austin had transformed the fortunes of the parent company. By the time production ceased with the advent of war in 1939 some 290,000 cars and vans had been produced. Formerly the property of newspaper and radio entrepreneur Sir Ray Stanley Tindle CBE DL, this notably early and charming ‘pram hood’ example is finished in Light Blue with Black wings and interior. First registered in Wiltshire as ‘MR 1972’ on 30th September 1924, it was featured in the ‘Shellarama’ documentary film some forty-one years later. A non-runner requiring recommissioning due to lack of use in recent years, ‘BS 9252’ is offered with a quantity of expired MOT certificates, weather gear including side screens and a Swansea V5 registration document.


1968 Sunbeam Alpine Mark V

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ESTIMATE: £10,000 - £14,000* REG NO: TJD 709F

1956 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud

90

ESTIMATE: £18,000 - £22,000* CHASSIS: B3950185930DHR0

Unveiled in 1965, the final MKV variant of Sunbeam’s popular Alpine sportscar was equipped with the Rootes Group’s latest four-cylinder engine - a five-bearing 1725cc unit rated at 92.5bhp - which proved notably more powerful and refined than its predecessors. Further benefiting from the adoption of negative earth electrics and an alternator, the newcomer was reputedly capable of over 100mph. Treated to some subtle internal / external cosmetic tweaks as well, it emerged boasting a crisper, more modern look. Only produced for three years, the Alpine MKV was quietly dropped from the Sunbeam range in 1968. Finished in Polar White with Red upholstery, ‘TJD 709F’ was acquired by its previous keeper in 1986 and treated to a photographically documented restoration. Said to have been ‘regularly serviced and maintained’ since entering the current ownership twenty-eight years ago, the Sunbeam’s current odometer reading of 48,200 miles is believed but not warranted to represent the total covered from new. Described by the vendor as being in ‘good’ (bodywork, paintwork, electrical equipment) or ‘very good’ (engine, four-speed manual plus overdrive gearbox, interior trim) condition, this appealing Alpine is offered for sale with the aforementioned restoration images, sundry paperwork and MOT certificate valid until April 2022.

REG NO: 936 XUG

CHASSIS: SBC108

Launched in April 1955, the Silver Cloud’s elegant Standard Steel Saloon body was penned by inhouse designer John Polwhele Blatchley. Although, the retention of a separate chassis allowed for the fitment of bespoke coachwork, all but 157 of the 2,360 Cloud Is produced featured the in-house offering. Powered by a 4887cc straight-six engine mated to 4-speed automatic transmission, the model was capable of over 100mph. Supplied new by the Castles Motor Co of Leicester to J.W. Kempton Esq on 5th October 1956, chassis SBC108 was initially finished in Sage over Smoke Green with Beige leather upholstery. Treated to over £30,000 worth of work at the hands of marque specialist Hillier Hill in 2010, the Rolls-Royce had a further £16,000 spent on it with NRT Motors during 2014-2015 including a full respray. Entering the current ownership via our October 14th 2015 IWM Duxford auction, and thus sold alongside Richard Colton’s 1960 Ferrari 250GT SWB, ‘936 XUG’ has since been re-liveried in its current colours. Benefiting from power steering, the Silver Cloud also boasts its original handbook, lamp and boot tools. Understood to have covered some 102,000 miles from new, the luxury saloon is described by the vendor as being in ‘good’ (bodywork, paintwork, electrical equipment, automatic transmission, interior trim) or ‘very good’ (engine) condition.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

91


1977 Ferrari 308 GTB ‘Vetroresina’

91

1 of just 154 UK-supplied examples ESTIMATE: £85,000 - £95,000* REG NO:

1985 CT

CHASSIS:

20555

Introduced at the 1975 Paris Salon, the Ferrari 308 GTB was styled by Leonardo Fioravanti of Pininfarina whose other credits included the Dino, Daytona and Berlinetta Boxer. Based around a tubular spaceframe chassis equipped with independent double-wishbone suspension, four-wheel disc brakes and rack and pinion steering, the first 808 examples wore glass-reinforced plastic (or Vetroresina in Italian) bodywork which was some 150kg lighter than the cheaper-to-produce steel skin that supplanted it. Europeanspecification cars were fitted with a dry-sump version of Ferrari’s free-revving Tipo F106 AB 2.9-litre V8 engine, whereas those destined for America and Australia utilised a less powerful wetsump unit (240bhp vs. 255bhp). Reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 6.7 seconds and 155mph, the Vetroresina represents the 308 GTB in its earliest and most desirable form. A real rarity, just 154 of the GRP-bodied projectiles were supplied new to the UK. First UK registered on 9th May 1977, chassis 20555 changed hands frequently before being acquired by Jon Scott-Nelson in 1986. The proprietor of renowned Austin-Healey and Jaguar restorers Murray Scott-Nelson, he undertook a good deal of refurbishment work on the Ferrari himself but entrusted the overhaul of its original engine to marque specialist Nick Cartwright at 80,175 miles. Purchased by its previous keeper from Mr ScottNelson in 2002, the 308 GTB entered the current ownership eight years ago. Reportedly ‘always serviced by Ferrari specialists’, the two-seater passed its last MOT test with no advisories on 7th May 2021. Treated to a cambelt change at the same time, it is variously described by the vendor as being in ‘very good’ (engine, gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim) or ‘excellent’ (bodywork, paintwork) condition. Currently showing some 92,400 miles to its odometer, this gorgeous Vetroresina is worthy of close inspection.

92

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


2008 Jaguar XKR 4.2 Auto

92

ESTIMATE: £24,000 - £26,000* REG NO:

NH58 VY8

CHASSIS:

SAJAC43R899B30411

Introduced at the 2005 Frankfurt Motor Show, the secondgeneration Jaguar XK range (codenamed X150) was styled by Ian Callum. Deliberately evoking the E-Type via its oval grille, speeding teardrop glasshouse and muscular haunches, the newcomer featured bonded / riveted aluminium construction, all-round independent suspension, power steering and four-wheel disc brakes. Powered by a supercharged 4.2 litre V8 engine developing some 420bhp and 413lbft of torque, the range topping XKR variant was reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 4.9 seconds and 155mph (limited). The standard fit six-speed automatic transmission could either be left to its own devices or made to swap cogs by the steering wheel mounted paddle shifts. A rival to the Porsche 911 (997) and Mercedes-Benz SL (R230), the Jaguar (X150) XK / XKR remained in production until 2014 by which time a mere 54,000 had been sold (compared to 212,704 Porsche 997s and 169,443 Mercedes-Benz R230s). Finished in Black with Ivory leather upholstery, this particular example is variously described by the vendor as being in ‘very good’ (paintwork, interior trim) or ‘excellent’ (engine, automatic transmission, electrical equipment, bodywork) condition. Entering the current, third ownership in 2015, ‘NH58 VYB’ is warranted to have covered just 14,600 miles from new (at the time of cataloguing). Accompanied by a service book with five main dealer and three subsequent stamps in it, this low mileage modern classic is offered for sale with book pack and MOT certificate valid until October 2021.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

93


1968 Jaguar E-Type 4.2 2+2

93

Recently the Subject of over £23,000 in Expenditure ESTIMATE: £30,000 - £40,000* REG NO:

EUG 144F

CHASSIS:

1E78960BW

For many, the Series II Jaguar E-Type represents a great combination of design, practicality and value for money. Unveiled in October 1968, the model included improvements in safety and emissions standards to comply with US market regulations, providing such practicalities as fully-reclining seats with headrests, recessed door handles and one-piece bumpers. Under the bonnet, the 4235cc 6-cylinder DOHC was carried over from the previous series but benefitted from improved cooling. The result was a purposeful and practical sports car, especially in the four-seater layout of the 2+2 Coupe. One of just 1577 examples produced, this rare ‘Series 1.5’ shares many of the advanced characteristics of the later Series 2 cars. Finished in gleaming Signal Red and complemented by a black leather interior, ‘EUG 144F’ is understood to have received over £23,000 in improvements over the past twelve or so months. This work included a full respray to the exterior, fitment of new chrome wire wheels / tyres and much attention to the interior using quality ‘Aldridge’ trim components. Stylish yet practical and ideal for family fun, this true British grand tourer also benefits from a credible recorded low mileage of just 76,000. ‘EUG 144F’ is offered for sale with a UK V5c registration document and a large selection of photographs showing the various stages of the recent refurbishment work.

94

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1960 Austin Healey 3000 Mk1 BT7

94

ESTIMATE: £40,000 - £50,000 * REG NO:

GSK 149

CHASSIS:

HBT7L/13501

The star of the 1952 London Motor Show, the ‘Big Healey’ enjoyed steady development, with the early four-cylinder cars giving way to the 100-Six in 1956, which in turn was replaced by the first of the 3000s in 1959. By now the engine capacity had risen to 2912cc and the power output to 124bhp - sufficient to grace the standard car with a 0-60mph time of 11.4 seconds and a top speed of 114mph. There was the option of Laycock de Normanville overdrive for the four-speed gearbox and braking had been improved by the adoption of discs at the front. There were two body options - a two-seater (BN7) or an occasional four-seater (BT7). By the time the MKI 3000 was superseded by the MKII in 1961, a total of 2,825 BN7s and 10,825 BT7s had been produced. Leaving the factory on 9th March 1961 equipped with a heater, adjustable steering wheel, overdrive and laminated windscreen, chassis HBT7L/13501 was reportedly supplied new to an American serviceman / diplomat stationed in Dusseldorf. Subsequently accompanying him back to America, the Big Healey was repatriated to the UK in 1990. Converted to right-hand drive during a past restoration, ‘GSK 149’ still presents very nicely in Ice Blue over Ivory with white-piped Blue leather upholstery. Entering the current ownership in 2007, the 3000 Mk1 has had just three former UK keepers. Fitted with the four-speed manual gearbox with overdrive, the 2+2-seater features a Moto Lita steering wheel. Offered with a current V5C, history file comprising past MOTs and invoices and a BMIHT Heritage Certificate, the Austin-Healey also has its weather equipment including tonneau cover.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

95


1974 Mercedes-Benz 450 SL

95

Highly original and just 54,000 miles from new ESTIMATE: £25,000 - £30,000* REG NO:

FVL 120M

CHASSIS:

10704422018934

Nicknamed ‘der Panzerwagen’ by Mercedes-Benz’s own development engineers, the R107-series was more structurally rigid than some contemporary saloons! Introduced in 1971, the Convertible was styled by Friedrich Geiger whose other credits included the 540K, 300SL (W198) Gullwing and W113 Pagoda. Always more of a grand tourer than an out and out sports car, the vast majority were specified with automatic transmission. Powered by a 4520cc SOHC V8 engine, the 450SL model was quoted as developing some 225bhp and 278lbft of torque. A strong 120mphplus performer, it remained in production until 1980. A seemingly strange choice for a chauffeur-driven vehicle, an accompanying handwritten log indicates that chassis 018934 was used as just that by its first owner, John Roberts. A successful architect with offices in Lincoln and London, one of the journal’s entries reads: ‘Mrs Roberts to Harrods and Wimpole Street’. Main dealer serviced up until 1986 at 37,000 miles, the Mercedes-Benz remained part of the Roberts’ family for twenty-six years. Changing hands a further three times since then, this remarkable 450SL has covered a mere 54,000 miles from new (with less than 3,000 of those being accrued over the last sixteen years). Remarkably well preserved, the Mercedes-Benz has had some minor remedial paintwork but retains its original interior, radio and tool roll. A testament to the Stuttgart marque’s legendary build quality, ‘FVL 120M’ is said to ‘drive very, very well’. Recently recommissioned and serviced, it is described by the vendor as being in ‘very good / excellent’ (bodywork) or ‘excellent overall’ (engine, automatic gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, paintwork) condition. Decidedly handsome with its White paintwork offset by Black Cloth upholstery and Black hard- / soft-tops (plus matching hub cap centres), this delightful 450SL is worthy of a close inspection and a great way to celebrate the R107’s 50th Anniversary. Offered for sale with V5C Registration Document, handbooks, stamped service book, journey log and fresh MOT.

96

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1939 Rolls-Royce Wraith Limousine

96

Park Ward coachwork ESTIMATE: £30,000 - £35,000* REG NO:

FLX 883

CHASSIS:

WLB 30

Records indicate that this Wraith Limousine enjoyed four owners in the UK before being shipped to the USA, probably in the early 1970s. Chassis ‘WLB 30’ left Park Ward’s coachworks finished in Black with a fine Blue coach line; its first owner was Mrs L Emmett, of Grosvenor Square, London, who placed a special order for a Clayton heater to be fitted in the rear compartment. The Rolls-Royce’s first American owner was Mr W. Moreland-Brown, of Las Vegas, Nevada, who registered it in 1972. The car was discovered, abandoned in the Nevada Desert eleven years later by an American songwriter who consigned it to the Vintage Vehicle Restoration Company for rejuvenation. Wonderfully detailed and necessarily expensive, the refurbishment of ‘WLB 30’ occupied the next eight years, helping to bankrupt its owner, who had spent $85,000 on what was a work in progress. The Wraith was eventually sold in 1992 by Speciality Sales of Rancho Cordova, California to an Englishman, Tom Young, who shipped it back to the UK for completion. This involved re-fitting the body to the chassis and a total interior re-trim. Beige West of England cloth was used for the rear compartment with matching Wilton carpeting, while the front seats and door panels were covered with tan leather. The coachwork was later repainted in Burgundy with Pale Sand side and rear panels and the original registration mark ‘FLX 883’ was reinstated, courtesy of the DVLA. More recently treated to £3,000 worth of mechanical fettling in 2015 and some light recommissioning in 2019, the Wraith is offered with factory chassis card records, collection of old invoices / MOT certificates, diagrams, photograph negatives and an assortment of tools. Displaying 49,500 unwarranted miles, the vendor currently grades the Rolls-Royce’s engine, gearbox, electrical equipment and interior trim as ‘very good’, while he rates the bodywork and paintwork as ‘good’.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

97


1966 Volvo P1800 S ESTIMATE:

£25,000 - £30,000*

REG NO:

HKT 69D

CHASSIS:

20657

97

Based on a design exercise by the Swedish-born Pelle Petterson whilst working at Frua, the Volvo P1800 sports car was officially unveiled at the January 1960 Brussels Salon. Not entering production for a year, the newcomer’s sleek two-door monocoque bodyshell was equipped with independent front suspension, a coil-sprung ‘live’ rear axle and disc / drum brakes. Powered by a 1782cc OHV four-cylinder engine breathing through twin SU carburettors, allied to a four-speed manual gearbox, it was capable of over 100mph. The P1800 was immortalised in the 1960s TV series ‘The Saint’ starring the late Roger Moore. Finished in Metallic Grey with Red upholstery, this lovely righthand drive UK example displays a credible but unwarranted 79,000 miles. Treated to an extensive cosmetic restoration in 2016 which included a respray and complete interior retrim, ‘HKT 69D’ has benefited from an additional £9,000 worth of expenditure over the past twelve months. The work was mechanical and electrical in nature and saw numerous parts being sourced from marque specialists Amazon Cars and Brookhouse Parts Ltd. Boasting a heated rear windscreen and retro-styled stereo with USB connectivity, the Volvo is accompanied by an original service manual, reproduction instruction book and collection of invoices / old MOTs. Riding on correct-type steel wheels, this appealing P1800S is described by the vendor as being in ‘very good’ condition with regards to its engine, electrical equipment, interior trim and bodywork, while he rates the gearbox and paintwork as ‘excellent’.

98

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1967 Chevrolet El Camino Custom

98

Retains its original ‘Protect-O-Plate’ and 283ci V8 engine ESTIMATE: £15,000 - £18,000* REG NO:

BNH 101E

CHASSIS:

136807Z158183

Produced in various guises from 1959 until 1987, Chevrolet’s El Camino arguably hit its sweet spot with the second generation. A capable workhorse despite its stylish appearance, the Pick-Up featured a fully boxed chassis frame and air rear shock absorbers. Available in Standard or Custom trims (the latter aligned with the Chevelle Malibu), it was facelifted alongside the rest of the Chevy range for the 1967 model year. Supplied new by Bud Clary Chevrolet Inc of Longview, Washington to Sam Patching on August 7th 1967, chassis 136807Z158183 was specified with a ‘TurboFire’ 283 cu in (4.6 litre) V8 engine allied to ‘Powerglide’ automatic transmission. A more luxuriously equipped Custom model, the El Camino is understood to have belonged to a master mechanic in the Seattle area for some twenty-five years during which time he treated it to an extensive restoration. Said to have been to ‘competition standard’ when acquired by its last American keeper during 2004, the Pick-Up remains highly presentable today. Finished in Granada Gold metallic with a matching faux leather bench seat, the Chevy sports a correct three-spoke steering wheel, Motorola Solid State radio, Malibu glove box badge and ‘bow tie’ wheel centre caps. It also pleasingly retains its original engine. The Fisher bodywork looks to be in very good order and the Matt Black painted underside is commensurately smart. Believed but not warranted to have covered some 48,000 miles from new, the El Camino started readily upon inspection and burbled away quite happily via its dual exhaust system. Imported to the UK by an American car specialist and road registered as ‘BNH 101E’ on June 1st 2017, this decidedly cool Pick-Up is offered for sale with V5C registration document, fresh MOT certificate, period service invoice (from Bud Clary Inc @ 2,078 miles), Chevelle Owner’s Manual, original ‘Protect-OPlate’ booklet, jacking instructions, period accessories brochure, Washington State licensing certificate and letter from its last American owner.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

99


1940 Daimler EL24 Limousine

99

ESTIMATE: £16,000 - £20,000* REG NO: EWK 959

100

ESTIMATE: £17,000 - £19,000* CHASSIS: 48053

Introduced in 1937, the Daimler EL24 featured a 10ft 4in wheelbase and more interior space than many rivals thanks to the forward positioning of its 3.3-litre straight-six OHV engine. Based around a cruciform-braced, box-section chassis equipped with all-round leaf-sprung suspension, Luvax shock absorbers and Dewandre servo-assisted Girling drum brakes, the newcomer was available with a choice of open and closed coachwork some of which was crafted in-house. The four-speed preselector gearbox was allied to the marque’s fluid flywheel and employed a direct drive top gear. Circa 710 examples were made up until 1940. Extensively restored by its previous keeper of thirty-three years, the Daimler is understood to have been treated to a new ash frame, respray, rewiring and much re-chroming not to mention the installation of a new electric fuel pump and stainless-steel exhaust. Further benefiting from attention to its carburettor, steering box, dynamo, starter motor, suspension and brakes, the EL24 sports Black leather up front and a Grey cloth re-trimmed rear upholstery which also boasts a sliding glass division and occasional seats. Currently graded by the vendor as ‘very good’ with regards to its engine, pre-selector transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork, ‘EWK 959’ is accompanied by details of the aforementioned restoration and a collection of old MOTs etc.

100

1950 Land Rover Series 1

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

REG NO: LTJ 714

CHASSIS: 0612432

Registered 10.06.1950. The current owner purchased the car 18 years ago from an enthusiast in Halesowen who had been carrying out a running mechanical restoration. In 2014 the vehicle was stripped to a rolling chassis and a sympathetic restoration was carried out over the next two years. The intention was not to restore the car to concours condition but to a state that reflected the history of the vehicle. The chassis was stripped, checked, red oxided and painted dark green. The body was bead blasted, repaired as necessary and repainted in the original land rover light green. The bulkhead is rust-free and solid although it has been patched in places. The whole car was then carefully reassembled with many new parts. The car was previously owned by Fuzz Townshend of CarSOS when in 1992 he was the drummer of a grebo band, Pop Will Eat Itself! He blew up the original 1595cc engine and it was then fitted with the preferable 2 litre engine from 1951. The car has done less than 1,000 miles in the last 18 years and as it deserves to be used it is now for sale. After having sat idle for the last three years it recently started easily and drove well, but obviously will need checking over before serious use. Comes with a spare block, head, crank, flywheel of unknown condition that were with the car when purchased by the current owner. The pre-August 1950 series 1 cars did not have weather seals fitted to the doors but these are supplied in case the new owner wants to fit them. Overall a good solid example of an early Land Rover, not ridiculously overly restored but retaining its character of 71 years.


2010 PGO Bug Rider BR-150

101

NO RESERVE REG NO: EU-REG

1915 Ford Model T Runabout

102

ESTIMATE: £15,000 - £17,000* CHASSIS: RFVBR2C52A1001651

Founded in 1964, the Taiwanese scooter manufacturer Motive Power Industry (MPI) forged a design and technological partnership with its Italian counterpart Piaggio eight years later. The tie-up lasted a decade and, as well as influencing MPI products, resulted in the subsidiary PGO brand (a contraction of PiaGgiO) which has been going ever since. Well known for its scooters and quadbikes, PGO launched its first All-Terrain Vehicle or ATV in February 2003. A neat design, its tubular steel chassis frame featured an integral roll cage, coil-over suspension and triple disc brakes (two up front and a single on the solid back axle). Rear-mounted for better traction, the four-stroke petrol engine was available in different capacities and allied to CVT automatic transmission. Great fun cross-country, certain PGO ATVs were also road legal in different countries. Purchased new in The Netherlands by the vendor for €3,800 and road registered there as ’52-LKL-8’, this PGO Bug Rider BR-150 had covered just 62.5 km (39 miles) at the time of cataloguing. Uprated with a Perspex windscreen but otherwise to standard specification, its 150cc engine is rated at 11PS and reputedly good for a top speed of over 40mph. Potential purchasers should note that UK road registration would involve a NOVA declaration, import duty and perhaps an IVA test.

REG NO: UN-REG

CHASSIS: 878728

With the introduction of a moving assembly line in 1913, Henry Ford famously turned his Model T into the world’s first mass made car. A year later, Model Ts represented 56% of all automobile manufacture in the USA. However, it was not just the sheer volume of Model Ts rolling off the production line that motorised America, it was the inherent quality of the design. Launched in 1908, the T’s chassis and mechanical components were made from exceptionally durable, high-grade vanadium steel. The Ford also featured a compact 2890cc, sidevalve, four-cylinder engine that pioneered the use of a detachable cylinder head. Mounted in unit with the clutch and two-speed epicyclic gearbox assembly, it developed some 23hp at a leisurely 1,600rpm and 80lbft of torque. Top speed was limited to around 45mph depending upon bodywork, whilst brakes operated on both the transmission and rear wheels. Echoing the famous Henry Ford quote, this late ‘brass era’ Model T is finished in Black inside and out and has been in the current ownership since its arrival on these shores some 25 years ago. Having been used for film and promotional work, making appearances in ‘Mr Selfridge’ and ‘Suffragette’ with Meryl Streep, the Ford has recently been recommissioned and is in running order with the vendor currently grading its engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘good’.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

101


1964 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray Convertible ESTIMATE:

£40,000 - £50,000*

REG NO:

PTU582B

CHASSIS:

40867S110811

103

Growing up from its first foray as an anaemic six-cylinder roadster in 1953, the Corvette matured fast, gaining V8 power in 1955 and packing more muscle (such as a fuel-injected 283 cu in V8 in 1957), options and ornate styling cues with every year. Arguably the most iconic Corvette, the `Sting Ray’ (or C2) variant was introduced for the 1963 model year. Heavily influenced by GM Design Chief Bill Mitchell’s XP-87 `Sting Ray’ racer not to mention Chevrolet’s striking XP-720 fastback prototype, the newcomer’s styling was primarily credited to Larry Shinoda. A clean sheet design, the C2’s ladder-frame chassis sat on an 8ft 2in wheelbase and featured five cross members, all-round independent suspension (a Corvette first) and large-diameter drum brakes before disc brakes were introduced for the 1965 model year. Initially powered by a ‘small block’ 327ci V8, the Sting Ray was later available with 396ci and 427ci ‘big block’ engines but even the base 327 ci powerplant was rated at 300hp. This smart looking, 327 ci (5.3 litre) ‘small block’ C2 resided in Fordland, Missouri before being imported to the UK and road registered as ‘PTU 582B’ on November 1st 2016. Understood to have benefited from a previous restoration, it currently displays 65,000 miles and is finished in Red with Red upholstery and a White soft top. Offered with a collection of invoices, V5C and Corvette owners guide, the vendor currently grades its engine, four-speed manual transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘good’.

102

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1979/1992 Mercedes 500K Spezial-Roadster Evocation

104

ESTIMATE: £18,000 - £22,000* REG NO:

SIB 2960

CHASSIS:

1Q87G9N582287

Among the most stylish and technologically advanced cars of the 1930s, each Mercedes-Benz 500K Spezial Roadster took five months to build. An Art Deco masterpiece with Streamline Moderne overtones, the two-seater was penned by Hermann Ahrens and proof that Mercedes-Benz’s in-house coachbuilder, Karrosserie Sindelfingen, could hold its own against the likes of Italy’s Touring or France’s Figoni & Falaschi. With a supercharged 5-litre straight-eight engine under the bonnet and independent suspension at each corner, the Mercedes-Benz had the speed and poise to match its looks. Fearsomely expensive when new and rare as hen’s teeth, surviving 500K Spezial Roadsters can command upwards of $10 million today. Accompanied by a V5C Registration Document that lists it as a Mercedes Sports, this eye-catching 500K Spezial Roadster Evocation is underpinned by a substantial box-section steel chassis featuring independent front suspension, a ‘live’ rear axle, power brakes and power steering. A 350 cu in (5.7 litre) Chevy V8 engine is allied to manual transmission and provides performance that is at least a match for one of the original cars. Declared manufactured in 1979 and UK road registered since 1992, the twoseater is warranted to have covered just 8,200 post-completion miles. Finished in Light Metallic Blue with Cream leather upholstery and Blue carpets, ‘SIB 2960’ was valued at £60,000 twenty-nine years ago. Sparingly used after entering the current ownership during 2011, the Evocation is described by the vendor as being in ‘good overall’ condition with regard to its engine, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork (while, he rates the transmission as ‘average’). Due to be freshly serviced and MOT tested ahead of the auction, this very ‘Spezial’ roadster is bound to turn heads wherever it goes.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

103


1954 MG TF

105

Desirable ‘home market’ example ESTIMATE: £18,000 - £22,000* REG NO:

JSK 858

CHASSIS:

HDA16/2615

The TF was the last iteration of the iconic T-Series MGs. To many it is the best version, but others were not fans of the “modern” styling. Due to various developments such as rack and pinion steering and independent front suspension (like the TD) it certainly drives much better than the earlier PA through to TC models and is great fun. As with all British sportscars during the ‘export or die’ era, the vast majority of TFs were sold to North America in Left Hand Drive. This is an original UK-supplied, Right Hand Drive example which is fairly rare. It has some decent history going back to the 1980s along with a Heritage Certificate. There are some seventy old invoices on file and around twenty-four previous MOTs. It is in fact MOT’d to 30/09/2021. The car drives well and appears in entirely standard mechanical specification. It has a very decent black leather trim and excellent complete weather equipment in beige plus a smart split tonneau cover in black. The paintwork is smart and bright but not perfect. There is some light micro blistering on the wings and the odd mark. The chrome is very presentable. Really it is a car to use and enjoy without having to be too precious. The engine has been converted to un-leaded fuel. There is a smart badge bar up front and the car comes with a chrome luggage rack (not currently installed) and a few spares. Supported as all MGs by an excellent car club and unrivalled spares back up these are very easy classics to own and enjoy.

104

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1959 Mercedes 219 Ponton

106

ESTIMATE: £16,000 - £20,000* REG NO:

PXP 63

CHASSIS:

105010609503011

Part of Mercedes-Benz’s ‘Ponton’ family, so-called because of the Pontoon-esque shape of their bodywork, the W105 variant combined the passenger cell of the four-cylinder W120 and the engine bay of the six-cylinder W180. Introduced in March 1956 and marketed as the Type 219, Stuttgart’s newcomer featured a monocoque bodyshell equipped with all-round independent suspension (double-wishbone front / swing-axle rear), four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes and recirculating ball steering. Powered by a 2195cc straight-six engine allied to four-speed manual transmission, the W105 was reputedly capable of 92mph. Only in production for three years, just 27,845 were made with survivors being a rare sight today. Supplied new to South Africa in kit form and assembled to righthand drive specification by Car Distributors Assembly of East London (now known as Mercedes-Benz South Africa), chassis 9503011 is known to have migrated to Ireland by 2002. Selfevidently the subject of an extensive restoration, the Type 219 is described by the vendor as being in ‘excellent overall’ condition with regards to its engine, gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork. Indeed, he tells us that: ‘It is a superbly presented car that must be seen and inspected by any potential purchaser as its condition is superb in all respects, bodily, internally and mechanically with only a couple of minor trim blemishes ….. a written description does not do this car justice. There is no structural corrosion, no indication of filler and it would appear that many of the panels, including the wings, are new. This car is of collector/museum quality. With a manual column shift gearbox providing smooth changes and the bigger six-cylinder engine, which also appears to have been overhauled as all visible gaskets seem recent and it runs just as it should showing less than 75,000 miles. Original handbook/service book and original brochure along with current V5C are provided with the car’.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

105


1948 Bentley MKVI Saloon

107

First owned by Sir Joseph Nickerson ESTIMATE:

£25,000 - £30,000*

REG NO:

AJV 816

CHASSIS:

B69DZ

Introduced in 1946, the MKVI was Bentley’s first post-war model. Built around a massive cruciform-braced chassis with independent front suspension and a leaf-sprung ‘live’ rear axle, it was fitted with a freshly developed 4257cc OISE (overhead inlet side exhaust valve) straight-six engine mated to a four-speed manual gearbox. Capable of over 100mph when clad in the factory’s understated but stylish ‘standard steel saloon’ coachwork, the MKVI quickly developed a reputation for being a refined yet responsive drive. Supplied new to the renowned farmer, entrepreneur and marksman Sir Joseph Nickerson (aka ‘Partridge Joe’) whose Wemmergill Moor shoots played host to the likes of HRH The Prince of Wales, President John F Kennedy and King Juan Carlos of Spain, chassis B69DZ was road registered as ‘AJV 816’ on 29th December 1948. Known to have subsequently belonged to G.V. Clark, F. Rutter, David W. Burges, Stanley Norwood Page and Kenneth Roy Egginton before being bought by a time-served Rolls-Royce engineer in 1978, the Bentley was to remain in his care for the next twenty-four years. Benefiting from an engine overhaul at a credible but unwarranted 48,000 miles, the MKVI was still showing less than 55,000 miles to its odometer when Glen Waddington road tested it for the March 2003 issue of Classic Cars magazine concluding that at £19,950: ‘You’re paying for quality – it would take a long time to find another as good as this’. Next keeper, John Gout, maintained a handwritten log of every journey taken aboard the Sports Saloon, while his successor, John Spencer, treated it to an extensive bodywork restoration and sundry mechanical fettling during 2007-2008. Subsequent owner, Michael Carey, improved the Bentley further with a new fuel pump, rejuvenated starter motor and fresh valve stem oil seals. Professionally valued at £35,000 weeks after the last registered custodian acquired it in March 2015, the associated letter on file notes that: ‘A comprehensive restoration including some upholstery repairs and a professional respray have been carried out over recent years resulting in a near concours appearance’.

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Running well during our recent photography session, this smart MKVI pleasingly retains its original under bonnet torch, Trico Solvent washer fluid bottle and sliding sunroof etc.

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Now showing some 67,500 recorded miles and worthy of close inspection, it is offered for sale with V5C registration document, RREC copy build records and history file.


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1924 Marmon ‘Six’ Single-Seater ESTIMATE:

£20,000 - £30,000*

REG NO:

N/A

CHASSIS:

7231

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This intriguing single-seater comes with a back story so convoluted that it would be a shame if it were not true. Franklin Hall Marmon, chief test engineer for the company which bore his surname, was killed on October 11th 1924 when the two-seater roadster he was driving hit some loose gravel and overturned. Equipped with a new braking system developed by his uncle Howard Marmon (the man responsible for the marque’s Indy 500 winning ‘Wasp’ racer and fabulous V16 luxury express), the damaged prototype was duly recovered to the Works. However, its fate thereafter remains uncertain. While some maintain the Roadster was scrapped (apart from its unique engine), others believe that it was sold to Ernie Endler of Kankakee, Illinois and converted into a single-seater racer around 1928-9. Alleged to have competed at various Illinois circuits (Champaign, Winchester and Duquoisne are all mentioned as possibilities), it then apparently disappeared for forty years or so. Purchased by Don Lewis from the Art Lieberman collection in 1973, the Endler car was subjected to an eight-year restoration. Supposedly in attendance at the 1981 Marmon Muster, it is also reputed to have won a first prize ‘Restored Vintage Racer’ award that same year. Acquired by its penultimate owner Brian Nelson Jones in June 1991, he states in the car’s accompanying history file that “on September 27th 1993 we learned, while attending the Mighty Marmon Muster at the Indianapolis Speedway Hotel, that this chassis is indeed the only one built; that it is the largest Marmon-6 ever produced. It features a single, in-line block, and incorporates the water jacket into the head - both items that would not be seen in Marmon production cars for years to come. Gordon Handley, author of ‘The Marmon Heritage’, verified that it is a prototype”. However, these claims have been challenged by Chic Kleptz of the Marmon Owners’ Club, who recalled inspecting the car with Handley at the 1993 event to the effect that “we both decided we couldn’t find anything on the car to identify it as a Marmon”. Furthermore, he added that there is second single-seater in the US which claims to be descended from the fateful 1924 Roadster.

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A further school of thought suggests that the single-seater is derived from another Marmon prototype, the Little 6, development of which was ended in favour of the Little 8 production model. Whatever the truth is, the engine fitted to the car is a large capacity straight-six featuring an aluminium block (a Marmon trademark) and overhead valves yet it differs in layout from the Model 34’s ostensibly similar 340 cu in (5.6 litre) unit. Suitably convinced by Brian Nelson Jones’s tale of events, Dick Van Dijk paid $40,650 to acquire the Marmon in 1995. Forming part of his private museum collection since then, the single-seater has benefited from mechanical fettling at the hands of Rod Jolley including

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the replacement of a steering arm (the original component had been crash damaged and badly welded in the past) and even passed a MOT test during December 1999. Not driven on the public road since a quick trip around his surrounding country lanes earned Mr Van Dijk a police escort home, the Marmon will require recommissioning before use. The chassis and engine are both stamped with the number ‘7231’ and paperwork on file even encompasses an expired US Certificate of Title. No matter its true origins, the single-seater could not be replicated at the guide price and promises to be great fun in the right environment.


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1939 Mercury Eight Series 99A Estate Car

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Commissioned by Sir Malcolm Campbell and later owned by George Formby

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ESTIMATE:

£25,000 - £35,000*

REG NO:

GVM 926

CHASSIS:

99AF98810

An upmarket derivative of the Ford V8 Deluxe, the Mercury Eight was targeted by Ford at Oldsmobile, Dodge and Hudson owners. Launched in 1939, the first series was replaced in 1941 with the second series Mercury Eight. Three series of Mercury Eight in total were offered until the model’s replacement with the Monterey in 1952.

could take it in turns to get some rest while burning the midnight oil during one of his record-breaking adventures. Ever one to pursue an advantage, Campbell also had the Mercury Eight’s front suspension modified by Leslie Ballamy. Unfortunately, World War Two intervened before Campbell could use his bespoke Series 99A as intended.

A ‘hands on’ director of Lincoln Cars Ltd, Sir Malcolm Campbell MBE kept Blue Bird K4 (his World Water Speed Record achieving boat) at the company’s Brentford premises on London’s Great West Road. Well known to the senior Ford hierarchy on both sides of the Atlantic, he was able to secure a brand new, ‘overseas market’ example of the Mercury Eight Series 99A upon its 1939 launch (Lincoln and Mercury were both Ford subsidiaries). Intending it to serve as a Crew Bus for his Blue Bird escapades, Campbell despatched the Mercury to Windovers of The Hyde, Hendon. As well as fitting a voluminous Estate Car body, the famous coachbuilder ensured the rear seats folded into the floor to provide a sleeping area. That way, Campbell’s mechanics

A ferry pilot for the Royal Flying Corps in World War One, Campbell was deemed too old for frontline service when global hostilities resumed during September 1939. He nevertheless remained committed to the Armed Forces serving with both the Military Police and General Service Corps. Introduced to George Formby, then the UK’s best paid star, and learning of his promised trip to North Africa with the Entertainments National Service Association (ENSA), Campbell soon convinced him of the Mercury’s merits. Entrusted to REME (Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers), the Estate Car was modified for desert work with a new livery, larger wheels / tyres and partially painted-out windows to lessen the sun’s glare.

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Formby took pains to familiarise himself with the Series 99A and was seen driving around Singleton for weeks before embarking upon a massive 53-day ENSA tour in August 1943 that encompassed Italy, Sicily, Malta, Gibraltar, Libya, Tunisia, Egypt, Lebanon and Palestine. As well as providing accommodation for Formby and his wife Beryl, the Mercury was equipped with a ‘lean to’ tent for his pianist and valet or the occasional show girl to shelter in. By the time the ukulele-strumming star returned to England in October, he had entertained 750,000 troops, traversed a minefield, dined with Field Marshall Bernard Law Montgomery (‘Monty’) and been named the Eighth Army’s mascot. A serial Rolls-Royce and Bentley owner, Formby sold the Estate Car to Earl Peel of Hyning Hall, Lancaster in 1946 who promptly had it road registered as ‘GVM 926’. A fixture on the Peel Estate up until the Earl’s death twenty-three years later, the Series 99A primarily served as transport for grouse shooting parties. Briefly belonging to William Logan – the first president of the George Formby Society – the Mercury then spent much of the 1970s ferrying guests around for Mr Deakin, a Lake District hotelier. Joining the burgeoning Sorn Castle collection in 1977 - which housed everything from a Sherman Tank to a De Tomaso Pantera Gp4 racer via Aston Martins, Bentleys, Ferraris, Lamborghinis, Lancias and some wild American Muscle Cars – the Estate Car underwent a degree of restoration such as the fitment of a correcttype replacement 3.9 litre V8 engine. Continues overleaf


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Participating in a variety of historic military vehicle events including a sortie to Holland during 1986, the Series 99A was offered for sale by Sotheby’s two years later when the premature death of Bobby McIntyre, Lord Sorn’s son, prompted the collection’s dispersal. The Mercury’s next owner was British businessman Keith Schellenberg who was variously known to the public for participating in the 1956 and 1964 Winter Olympics, rolling a Vintage Bentley on the 1968 London to Sydney Marathon and his contentious ownership of the Scottish Isle of Eigg. After five years of polite refusal, collector Graham Greenwell finally convinced Schellenberg to part with the Estate Car during 1995. The subject of a two-page article in Classic Car Weekly the following year, ‘GVM 926’ was enthusiastically used and improved by Mr Greenwell until 2008 when it was sold to the vendors’ late father, Mike Ebeling, for £30,000. Renowned in historic military vehicle circles for the quality and accuracy of his restoration work, the late Mr Ebeling decided that the Series 99A was not to his exacting standards. Dry stored awaiting a ground-up refurbishment that never happened, he had got as far as stripping ancillaries and minor parts off the Mercury before ill health intervened. There can be few cars with such a rich back story. Unique in so many ways, not the least of which is its bespoke Windovers coachwork, this historic Mercury is surely worthy of a return to its former glory and a place in a museum or major collection. Offered for sale with history file including copy correspondence between Sir Malcolm Campbell and Leslie Ballamy, a wealth of George Formby related literature and Sotheby’s Sorn Castle catalogue etc.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


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1933 Sunbeam 25hp Limousine

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ESTIMATE: £16,000 - £18,000* REG NO: HS 7263

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ESTIMATE: £18,000 - £22,000* CHASSIS: 8014S

Introduced in 1933, the Sunbeam Twenty Five was beyond the reach of all but the wealthiest motorists. Noted for its smoothness and excellent power, the model boasted a top speed of almost 80mph. Powered by 3.3 litre OHV straight-six engine, it was rival in period to the likes of the RollsRoyce 20/25, Bentley 3.5 Litre and Alvis Speed 20. Understood to be the only example fitted with “Governess” Four Light Limousine coachwork, ‘HS 7263’ was reportedly exhibited at the 1933 Glasgow Motor Show and supplied new that October by the Clyde Auto Co Ltd of Glasgow to first owners Campbell Bros & Irvine of Kirriemuir. Reputed to have conveyed Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother to Glamis Castle from the local station on many occasions and to have hosted her daughters Princesses Margaret and Elizabeth too, ‘HS 7263’ is offered with a detailed list of expenditure including many invoices from marque specialists J C engineering of Spalding plus an assortment of other bills and MOT certificates. Finished in Red over Black with Brown leather upholstery, this historic Sunbeam is described by the vendor as being in ‘good’ condition with regard to its engine, gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork.

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1960 Ford Thunderbird

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REG NO: JAS 821

CHASSIS: 0Y71Y149423

Having struggled to make its mark against the sportier Chevrolet Corvette, the Ford Thunderbird was reinvented for its second generation as a ‘personal luxury car’. The inaugural winner of Trend magazine’s ‘Car of the Year’ award, the so-called ‘Square Bird’ was only in production from 19581960. A true four-seater with a ‘jet age’ interior, glitzy styling and lazy V8 power, it comfortably outsold the ‘Vette. Facelifted for 1960, the Ford gained a revised grille, six taillights and the option, for the first time, of a factory-fitted sunroof. Built at Ford’s Wixom Assembly Plant in Michigan, chassis 0Y71Y149423 was fitted with a 352 cu in (5.8 litre) V8 engine allied to automatic transmission. Finished in Palm Springs Rose with Black upholstery, the T-Bird is notable for being 1 of only 2,536 1960-model year to feature a factory sunroof. Imported to the UK in 2002 and road registered as ‘JAS 821’, this decidedly rare ‘Square Bird’ is described by the vendor as being in ‘good’ condition with regard to its engine, automatic gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork. Offered for sale with a collection of old invoices and MOT certificates, electrical assembly manual, original build document plus V5C registration document.


1930 Austin 7 RK Saloon

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NO RESERVE REG NO: OG 910

1953 MG TD

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ESTIMATE: £15,000 - £17,000* CHASSIS: 8112555

Brainchild of Herbert Austin and Stanley Edge, the Austin Seven looked almost impossibly small when launched in 1922. Occupying the same ‘footprint’ as a motorcycle and sidecar combination, it nevertheless boasted all the advantages of a ‘full-size’ motor car. Responsible for helping motorise Britain while simultaneously sounding the cyclecar industry’s death knell, the baby Austin was brilliantly yet simply engineered. A Vintage car enthusiast, the vendor purchased ‘OG 910’ in Summer 2019 and has since treated it to a new steering arm, new battery, refurbished rear axle and five Longstone tyres (for which bills are available). Unusually, the RK had a factory-fitted aluminium body over an ash frame making it far more durable than the fabric-type most models received and effectively results in a Chummy with a hard top. Having had just four previous keepers, ‘Bluebell’ has an almost fully documented life since new and has eight old logbooks including the original. One owner kept the car from 1937-1961 and another retained it from 1980-2003. The engine is the original as is the number plate. Offered with a full box folder, which includes letters and bills from previous owners together with a certain amount of old history and original bills, this charming aluminium-bodied Seven is worthy of close inspection.

REG NO: 207 XVH

CHASSIS: TD23533

Although, instantly recognisable as a T-series model thanks to its perpendicular radiator shell, flowing wings and rear-mounted spare wheel, the TD broke important new ground for the Abingdon marque. Powered by the proven 1250cc XPAG engine allied to four-speed manual transmission, it was reputedly capable of 82mph. Riding on fifteen-inch steel wheels as standard, the TD also sported a mirror-image dashboard (thus facilitating either LHD or RHD production) and chrome-plated bumpers. A great success story, the vast majority of the 29,665 cars produced were sold overseas. A 1953 export example, this particular TD resided in sunny California from 1953 until her return to UK shores in 2017 whereupon she underwent a ‘chassis up’ renovation which was completed last year. ‘207 XVH’ is presented in exceptional order throughout finished with stunning British Racing Green over Black coachwork and has the added benefit of a thoroughly overhauled engine and running gear. Said to ‘drive as it should’ and fitted with a new hood and tyres, the vendor currently grades the MG’s engine, paintwork and bodywork as ‘excellent’ and its transmission, electrical equipment and interior trim as ‘very good’. This is a fabulous example of this highly popular sporting model that will hopefully bring much pleasure to its new owner for many years to come.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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1960 Jaguar Mk2 ESTIMATE:

£24,000 - £28,000*

REG NO:

155 AUL

CHASSIS:

105172

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Introduced in 1959 to replace the 2.4 and 3.4 litre “Mk1” saloons, the Mk2 took an already successful concept and refined it. A larger glass area, improved rear track, more power and a new 3.8 litre option make the small sports saloon into one of the most iconic four seaters of its generation. Beloved by cops, robbers, villains and the middle classes, the Mk2 is as much a symbol of 1960s Britain as the Routemaster and the Mini. Manufactured on 24th November 1960 and despatched to dealer Henlys Ltd of London a few days later, this Mk2 was first registered as ‘155 AUL’ on 8th December. Beginning life with a 2.4 litre engine, the Jaguar had already been uprated with a 3.4 litre unit by the time the vendor acquired it during November 1986. Used as a family car for the next nine years, the saloon was subsequently treated to an extensive restoration. Stripped of paint, the bodyshell was repaired as necessary and fitted with a louvered bonnet and two new doors, all work being lead loaded. Coombs-style rear arches were fabricated using steel tube and lead filling before the Mk2 was resprayed in Red using baked-on, two-pack paint. The engine was overhauled with a reground crankshaft, rebored block, straight-port cylinder head and two-inch SU carburettors. The overdrive was refurbished and a limited slip differential added at the same time. The braking system was improved via a more modern servo, Coopercraft fronts and new rear discs / pads. The interior was treated to a new headlining, the seats recovered in Cream leather and the door covers remade in marine ply with leather covers. The work was completed in 2010 and since then the Jaguar has seen little use. Even though not legally required ‘155AUL’ has been MOT’d a few times since its restoration and is offered with a current one into October 2021.

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1966 Alvis TE21

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1 of just 178 examples made ESTIMATE: £20,000 - £24,000* REG NO:

KJJ 717D

CHASSIS:

27362

Introduced in 1963, the Alvis TE21 was visually distinguished from its predecessor by ‘over and under’ quad headlights and a revised interior. Based around a rigid box-section chassis equipped with independent coil-and-wishbone front suspension, a well-located ‘live’ rear axle and four-wheel disc brakes, the newcomer boasted a revised, more user-friendly steering box (and the option of power steering from 1964 onwards). Reworked with a ‘bigger valve’ cylinder head and more efficient exhaust manifold, the refined four-seater’s 2993cc OHV straight-six engine was quoted as developing some 130bhp and 172lbft of torque. Available with a choice of either ZF five-speed manual or Borg Warner three-speed automatic transmission, the model was reputedly capable of 110mph. Trimmed in Connolly leather, the Alvis’s cosseting interior featured a central armrest for the back seat and more accessible ashtrays. Available to special order until 1967, just 352 TE21s were made of which 178 were fixed-heads fitted with five-speed manual transmission. Finished in Maroon with nicely patinated Tan leather upholstery, chassis 27362 is described by the vendor as being in ‘good’ (paintwork, interior trim) or ‘very good’ (engine, five-speed manual gearbox, electrical equipment, bodywork) condition. Believed but not warranted to have covered just 74,000 or so miles from new, ‘KJJ 717D’ shows only two former keepers on its V5C Registration Document. An accompanying invoice shows that the rear bodywork was refurbished by marque specialist Red Triangle at not inconsiderable cost and the four-seater has been further improved since entering the current ownership in 2015. A longterm member of the Alvis Owners’ Club, the seller has smartened the TE21’s appearance by having it professionally resprayed and the brightwork replated. Little used after being shod with four new tyres during 2017, ‘KJJ 717D’ is said to ‘run smoothly with correct oil pressure’. Offered for sale with history file including renovation invoices and old MOTs.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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1936 Albion SPL 126 Van ESTIMATE:

£15,000 - £18,000*

REG NO:

DLB 485

CHASSIS:

36013K

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Introduced in September 1935, the Albion Model 126 boasted a lighter chassis and greater payload than its rivals. Powered by a choice of petrol or diesel engines, the former was a torquey 3.9 litre four-cylinder unit. Remaining in production until WW2, the Model 126 did much to reinforce Albion’s ‘Sure as the Sunrise’ marketing slogan. According to the accompanying buff logbook, chassis 36013K was first registered as ‘DLB 485’ to J. Lyons & Co Ltd at its Cadby Hall factory in Kensington. The commercial’s beautifully applied livery includes a logo for Normand Garages which was effectively Lyons’ engineering department and responsible for not only servicing its fleet but also making van and lorry bodies. Acquired by its previous keeper in 2005, the Albion was treated to an exhaustive three-year restoration (the intricacies of which are detailed in a 2,700-word report on file) using a host of original spare parts. Subsequently featured in various magazines, the Model 126 finished runner-up at the Historic Commercial Vehicle Society’s London to Brighton Run in 2008 and won the ‘Best Vehicle’ award at the HCVS’s Trans-Pennine and Tyne-Tees runs in 2009. A former Lyons & Co Ltd employee whose connection with the company thus ran deeper than fond memories of their famous tea shops or even Swiss rolls, the vendor purchased ‘DLB 485’ via a Bonhams’ Harrogate sale for £18,975 in 2013. Since then, the Albion has gone onto claim ‘Best in Show’ at the 2015 Sprat & Winkle Run from Sevenoaks to Hastings and been entered for the HCVS’s aborted 2018 London to Brighton Run. The seller has also used the Model 126 to transport his Veteran trikes around; a task made significantly easier after renowned Veteran and Vintage specialist Jonathan Wood completely overhauled the engine and Tim Payne installed an overdrive. Reportedly able to hold 55mph with ease, this wonderful Model 126 is capable of turning heads for more reasons than one! A genuinely lovely Post-Vintage commercial that is worthy of close inspection.

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1985 Mercedes-Benz 500 SL

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ESTIMATE: £28,000 - £32,000* REG NO:

B677 BJO

CHASSIS:

1070462A026462

The Mercedes R107-series SL was launched in 1971 to replace the long-lived W113 ‘Pagoda’ SL that first appeared in 1963. Though dispensing with Mercedes’ usual model identification, it was based on the suspension of the W114 saloon and ran until 1989 with more than 237,000 examples built, being the longest single series ever produced by Mercedes-Benz except the G-Wagen. The Bruno Sacco-designed car was bigger, heavier and softer-riding than its predecessor, but can still handle and won the plaudits from distinguished motoring writers including LJK Setright. The 245bhp 500SL made from 1980 had an all-alloy fuel-injected V8 and was made for Europe only and with 60mph available in 7.4 secs the top speed was 140mph, faster even than the US, Japan and Australian 560SL. Plenty of R107s (and SLC’s) come to market but 500SLs are still a rarity, with only 11,812 built. Finished in Silver with Red upholstery, ‘B677 BJO’ has covered just 77,167 miles (atoc) from new. The accompanying service book contains sixteen entries (nine main dealer, one marque specialist and six others). Covering a mere 7,000 miles over the last twelve years or so, the 500SL entered the current ownership in 2014. Entrusted to Mercedes-Benz specialist SS Motors of Surrey during 2016, the Convertible received a service, replacement steering shock absorber and new front brake pads / hoses at a cost of c.£1,000. Last serviced by Classic Mercedes Restoration in November 2020, this elegant low mileage 500SL is offered for sale with a large history file containing numerous past invoices, tax discs and old MOTs plus its original handbook / service book and a current ‘no advisories’ MOT certificate valid until October 2021.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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1952 Morgan Plus 4 Roadster ESTIMATE:

£25,000 - £30,000*

REG NO:

PKN 28

CHASSIS:

P2459

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First seen in 1950, the Morgan Plus 4 was a larger and more powerful derivative of the company’s 4/4 and remained in production on and off for seventy years. Up until 1969, it was powered by the four-cylinder engines found in the Triumph TR range, which were mated to a four-speed manual gearbox with well-spaced ratios. The rakish body was mounted on a variant of Morgan’s familiar Z-section chassis, underslung at the rear. The suspension was independent by sliding pillars and coil springs at the front and a live axle on semi-elliptic springs at the rear. Braking was by drums all-round and steering by a Burman cam and sector system. As tested by Autosport’s John Bolster, the 100bhp 1991cc Triumph-engined Plus Four would accelerate to 60mph in 9.6 seconds and on to a top speed of a whisker under 105mph. First registered on 5th December 1952, this late ‘Flat Rad’ example was acquired by its previous keeper in 2000. Treated to an engine overhaul at a cost of c.£2,000 shortly thereafter, the Morgan was entrusted to TT Workshops Ltd of Westbury, Wiltshire during 2008 for an extensive ‘body off’ restoration. Documented via numerous bills and photographs on file, the work totalled approximately £26,000. Benefiting from servicing and brake system checks earlier this year in preparation for sale, ‘PKN 28’ is accompanied by a V5C Registration Certificate, instruction book, some past MOT certificates and the aforementioned restoration photographs / invoices.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


1988 Ford Sierra Sapphire RS Cosworth

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ESTIMATE: £25,000 - £30,000* REG NO:

T.B.A.

CHASSIS:

WFOFXXGBBFJR45285

Supplied new to DRP Transport Services of Windsor on 15th April 1988, chassis JR4528R passed to Malcolm Pickess twelve months later who had it main dealer serviced by Dees of Croydon, Bristol Street Motors and Hartwell Ford from 6,213 miles (19/9/89) to 66,978 miles (7/12/98). Thereafter, he entrusted the Cosworth to Homedale Motor Traders Ltd at 68,147 miles. Next owner, Paul Carter, entrusted it to the St Albans Car Clinic and Performance Turbo Systems at 71,116, 71,719, 72,124 and 73,101 miles, while his successor, Andy Hoskins embarked upon a series of upgrades with Alan Jeffrey Engine Tuner Ltd of Plympton. The latter, using parts supplied by Woodford Garage Motorsport, thoroughly overhauled the original engine during July 2003 with a brand-new block assembly, Motorcraft clutch, higher capacity radiator, Bosch 803 DK Green injectors, Cosworth pistons and new bearings etc. A Pro Alloy RS500 Intercooler followed in 2004 with a T34.48 Turbocharger and new water pump being added during 2006 at 78,234 miles. Mr Hoskins had four Ahmed Bayjoo uprated ‘Fast Road’ springs and various Powerflex bushes fitted in 2008 with new brake callipers / discs / pads plus a new Group A cambelt and tensioner being installed during 2009. Treated to a smart boost controller for its turbo in 2010, the Ford recorded 311bhp on Alan Jeffrey’s dynamometer that same year. Shown to still develop 311bhp / 345lbft aboard The Tipton Garage’s rolling road on 24th July 2013 at 80,337 miles, the Cossie the belonged to Alan Morcombe for just over twelve months before entering the current ownership in August 2015. Lightly used as part of twenty-strong car collection since then, chassis JR4528R is warranted to have covered 82,000 miles from new (albeit c.9,000 on its refreshed engine). Self-evidently cherished over the years, the vendor tells us that subjectively speaking the Cossie feels as quick as his Audi R8 and Lexus RCF! Offered for sale with book pack, spare key, large history file and fresh MOT.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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1998 Aston Martin DB7 Manual i6 Volante ESTIMATE:

£20,000 - £24,000*

REG NO:

C2 LAG

CHASSIS:

SCFAA3116WK202222

120

Although Victor Gauntlett had long mooted the idea, it took the arrival of Ford money and TWR Group know-how for a new generation, `small’ Aston Martin to become reality. Unveiled at the March 1993 Geneva Salon, the DB7 utilised a steel semimonocoque chassis equipped with all-round independent suspension, four-wheel disc brakes and power assisted rackand-pinion steering. Derived from a proven Jaguar unit, the 2+2-seater’s 3239cc DOHC straight-six engine boasted four valves per cylinder, Zytec multi-point fuel injection and an Eaton supercharger. Credited with developing 335bhp and 360lbft, it was allied to either five-speed manual or automatic transmission and reputedly enabled the Aston Martin to sprint from 0-60mph in 5.8 seconds and reach 161mph. However, it was the way the DB7 looked, rather than its performance potential, which wowed the public. Penned by Ian Callum at the same time as the Coupe, the convertible Volante version was unveiled at the LA and Detroit motor shows of early 1996 - America being the chief market for the company’s soft-tops. Just 879 straight-six powered DB7 Volantes were produced with a mere 150 of those featuring manual transmission. One of the increasingly sought-after manual gearbox cars, ‘C2 LAG’ is warranted to have covered just 47,000 miles from new in the hands of four owners. Finished in Antrim Blue with Grey leather upholstery and Blue interior accents, the 2+2-seater is variously described by the vendor as being in ‘good’ (paintwork), ‘good/very good’ (bodywork, interior trim) or ‘very good’ (engine, transmission, electrical equipment) condition. Riding on correcttype alloys shod with Michelin Pilot Sport 4 tyres, the Aston Martin pleasingly retains its original book pack (with an extended service section to allow for stamps up until the most recent in July 2020) and manufacturer’s Certificate of Conformity. It also comes with some £25,500 worth of invoices and a MOT certificate valid until April 2022.

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*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)


2005 Maserati Quattroporte V

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35,000 miles from new ESTIMATE: £12,000 - £14,000* REG NO:

LJ05 HXW

CHASSIS:

017954

Introduced at the 2003 Frankfurt Motor Show, the fifth-generation (M139) Quattroporte was styled by Ken Okuyama of Pininfarina whose other credits included the Honda NSX and Enzo Ferrari. More driver orientated than a Bentley Flying Spur or range-topping Mercedes-Benz S-Class, the Maserati had a firmer ride and, in early cars at least, a ‘Duo Select’ paddle-shift transmission that was not at its best in fully automatic mode. Powered by a Ferrariderived 4.2 litre ‘quad cam’ V8 engine developing 395bhp/333lbft and reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 5.4 seconds and 171mph, the Quattroporte featured a truly sumptuous interior. For the money there are very few cars that can imbue occupants with the same sense of occasion as a M139. First registered to H.R. Owen of South Kensington on 16th March 2005, ‘LJ05 HXW’ was bought by a prominent surgeon and senior Oxford University Polo Team member the following month who sent it back to the Maserati concessionaire for servicing in 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009. Finished in striking Verde Goodwood with Beige leather upholstery, the Quattroporte also boasted a Bose upgraded stereo with CD changer, factory 6.5-in screen, Satnav/ TV/handsfree, cruise control and heated/memory front seats. Warranted to have covered just 27,949 miles when purchased by the vendor’s later father from DK Engineering on 26th August 2010, the super saloon was treated to a full service and new clutch as part of the sale. Returning to the renowned Hertfordshirebased dealer for maintenance in 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020, the last of these trips included the installation of four new brake discs / pads as well as a full mechanical inspection and service at a cost of £4,365.09. Fitted with replacement rear tie rods by Maranello Sales as per the factory recall in 2015, ‘LJ05 HXW’ was last serviced by Barr-Tech Specialist Cars of Cambridge at a warranted 34,815 miles on 24th March 2021. Offered for sale with book pack, history file, two keys and MOT valid until March 2022.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

123


1978 Mercedes 450 SLC

122

NO RESERVE* REG NO: KGT 619T

123

ESTIMATE: £10,000 - £14,000* CHASSIS: 10702412022206

Built in May 1978 to left-hand drive, automatic specification and reportedly supplied new to France. Three owners since being UK road registered in October 1978 as ‘MER 26’. Laid up following the death of its previous registered keeper, the BAFTA award-winning TV Film Producer Tim Graham. A worthwhile restoration project. Sharing the same basic platform architecture as its convertible R107-series sibling, the MercedesBenz 450SLC fixed-head coupe was introduced in 1972. A full four-seater, the model’s stretched wheelbase was disguised by various ingenious styling cues. Equipped with all round coil-sprung independent suspension, power steering and four-wheel disc brakes, it proved a comfortable and refined grand tourer. Predominantly allied to automatic transmission, its 4520cc SOHC V8 engine developed a quoted 217bhp and 265lbft of torque. Reputedly capable of over 130mph in standard tune, Mercedes’ flagship coupe enjoyed a highly successful second career as a rally car. Built to left-hand drive specification in May 1978, chassis 022206 was reputedly just five months old when it was imported to the UK from France. Sporting the number plate ‘MER 26’ until late February 1993 and re-registered as ‘KGT 619T’ thereafter, it was acquired by a BAFTA award-winning TV producer during 2002 who apparently ‘fell in love as soon as he clapped eyes on the MercedesBenz’. Reportedly ‘driven around London town and all over the English countryside for the next thirteen joyous years’, the 450 SLC has been dry stored ever since. Now in need of restoration, this handsome Coupe has the makings of a worthwhile project.

124

1951 Riley RMB Saloon

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

REG NO: PPA 893

CHASSIS: 60S7760

Introduced in 1946 as a ‘big brother’ to the 1.5 litre RMA, the Riley RMB featured a larger 2.5 litre engine (actually 2443cc) and longer wheelbase but was underpinned by the same advanced chassis design complete with independent torsion bar front suspension, rack and pinion steering and hydromechanical four-wheel drum brakes. With some 90bhp and 134lbft of torque on tap, it was reputedly capable of 95mph. Production ceased in 1952 after 6,900 examples had been made. Entering the current family ownership in July 1983 – that of the famous jazz pianist, bandleader and composer Keith Nichols who sadly died earlier this year – ‘PPA 893’ is said to be ‘patinated but far from scruffy’. In regular usage by the late Mr Nichols, the Riley is understood to be in ‘good overall’ condition with regards its 2443cc engine, four-speed manual gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork. Indeed, the seller judges that ‘repairing a small section of the driver’s seat and carrying out some minor exterior detailing would go a long way towards returning this very attractive car to its former glory’. Kept garaged for the past thirty-eight years and fitted with a period radio and heater, this much-loved RMB is now looking for its next long-term custodian.


1929 Austin Seven Van

124

NO RESERVE* REG NO: DV 437

1958 Cadillac Sedan DeVille

125

ESTIMATE: £16,000 - £20,000* CHASSIS: NOT STATED

The success of the Austin Seven saloon and tourer meant a commercial version was soon available in the form of the light delivery van with early examples being based on converted tourers and later ones on converted saloons. Introduced in 1923, original examples featured coachwork by Thomas Startin of Birmingham and came fully equipped with CAV electrics and a self-starter for the price of £180. A number of cars have subsequently been converted into vans over the years. A sought-after derivative of the ubiquitous Seven due to its rarity and practicality for shows and events, an Austin Seven Van offers owners a delightful insight into a bygone era when small truly was beautiful. Formerly the property of newspaper and radio entrepreneur, Sir Ray Stanley Tindle CBE DL, ‘DV 437’ is currently liveried as a Herald newspaper van complete with ‘Noli Cedere’ (Do Not Give Up) insignia. Finished in Brown with Black wings and Tan seats it is presumed to have been re-bodied later in life and is nicely detailed with a wood-lined cargo area and oval windows etc. ‘DV’ registration numbers were issued in Devon but the Austin’s early history is unknown. Running and driving but little used in recent years, it would benefit from recommissioning and is accompanied by an expired MOT certificate for 2010/11 and a Swansea V5C registration document.

REG NO: 732 XUR

CHASSIS: 58L098228

Updated for 1958 with a new grille and quad headlamps, the Cadillac Series Sixty-Two Sedan De Ville was powered by a 365 cu in (6.0 litre) V8 engine allied to three-speed automatic transmission. Overseen by the legendary Harley Earl, everything from the rubber guards on the front bumpers to the chrome caps on the rear wings was styled to the max. Imported from Colorado in 1987, ‘732 XUR’ has had just three UK keepers over the past thirty-four years. Showing a credible but unwarranted 61,500 miles to its odometer, the Cadillac has benefited from an extensive brake overhaul within the last two years including the fitment of new brake shoes, master cylinders, front cylinders, brake servos and hoses. Finished in Light Green with White / Green upholstery, the Sedan de Ville does not want for road presence! A fabulous piece of Americana, the be-finned behemoth features such niceties as power steering, power brakes, automatic transmission and power windows (though, the power central locking is currently inoperative). Regularly MOT tested up until June 2019, the Series 62 is offered for sale with a large history file comprising the original workshop manual, Colorado State title document, numerous invoices / old MOTs and a quantity of spare parts.

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

125


Motor Cars in today’s Auction

126

LOT MODEL

LOT MODEL

LOT MODEL

LOT MODEL

116

1936 Albion SPL126 Van

76

1952 Daimler DB18 DHC

100

1950 Land Rover 80

36

1989/10 Porsche 550 RS Evo

62

1951 Allard K2 Roadster

99

1940 Daimler EL24

83

1975 Lincoln Continental MKIV

87

2005 Porsche 997

68

1948 Allard M1 DHC

24

1960 Daimler Majestic

1

1973 Lotus Elan +2

3

1932 Riley 9 Gamecock

74

1932 Alvis Firefly Tourer

73

1975 Ferrari 208 GT4

28

1998 Lotus Elise S1

11

1934 Riley 9 Monaco

115

1966 Alvis TE21

91

1977 Ferrari 308 GTB GRP

15

2001 Lotus Elise S2

123

1951 Riley RMB

120

1998 Aston Martin DB7 i6 Volante

59

2000 Ferrari 360 Modena

55

1961 Lotus Elite

71

1929 Rolls-Royce 20/25 Tourer

12

1998 Aston Martin DB7 Volante

44

1983 Ferrari 400i

70

1928 Marmon Model 68

90

1956 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud

53

1952 Austin A90 Atlantic

25

1977 Ford Capri 2.0S MKII

108

1924 Marmon Six Single-Seater

57

1958 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud

34

1934 Austin 7 Box Saloon

7

1981 Ford Capri 3.0S

121

2005 Maserati Quattroporte

38

1960 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud II

88

1924 Austin 7 Chummy

27

1929 Ford Model A

106

1959 Mercedes-Benz 219

46

1975 Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow

17

1927 Austin 7 Chummy

9

1930 Ford Model A

60

1966 Mercedes-Benz 230SL

82

1990 Rolls-Royce Silver Spirit II

66

1930 Austin 7 Chummy

49

1919 Ford Model T Speedster

85

1981 Mercedes-Benz 280 SLC

5

1991 Rolls-Royce Silver Spirit II

112

1930 Austin 7 RK Saloon

102

1915 Ford Model T Runabout

30

1985 Mercedes-Benz 280SL

32

1980 Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith II

124

1929 Austin 7 Van

119

1988 Ford Sierra Sapphire RS Cosworth

35

1987 Mercedes-Benz 300SL

96

1939 Rolls-Royce Wraith

13

1958 Austin-Healey 100/6

111

1960 Ford Thunderbird

40

1989 Mercedes-Benz 300SL

6

1947 Rover P2

94

1960 Austin-Healey 3000

54

c.1942 Ford WOA2

95

1974 Mercedes-Benz 450SL

39

1971 Rover P5B Coupe

4

1928 Austin Twelve / Four

22

1966 Ford Mustang 289 Fastback

122

1978 Mercedes-Benz 450 SLC

110

1933 Sunbeam 25HP

67

1952 Bentley MKVI DHC

48

1966 Ford Mustang V8 Notchback

104

1992 Mercedes-Benz 500K Evocation

89

1968 Sunbeam Alpine MKV

84

1950 Bentley MKVI HJM

61

1953 Humber Super Snipe MKIV

14

1981 Mercedes-Benz 500SL

75

1937 Talbot BD75 Special

42

1948 Bentley MKVI (Hooper)

72

1965 Jaguar E-Type

117

1985 Mercedes-Benz 500SL

10

1977 Triumph Stag

107

1948 Bentley MKVI Saloon

93

1968 Jaguar E-Type 4.2

79

2007 Mercedes-Benz SLK280

8

1958 Triumph TR3A

23

1951 Bentley MKVI Saloon

29

1970 Jaguar E-Type 2+2

109

1939 Mercury Eight DHC

45

1966 Triumph TR4A

51

1949 Bentley MKVI Pillarless Coupe

43

1972 Jaguar E-Type V12 FHC

20

1960 MG A Roadster

33

1971 Triumph TR6

19

1990 BMW 320i Convertible

114

1960 Jaguar MK2

80

1981 MG B LE Roadster

18

1997 TVR Chimaera

58

1952 Bristol 401

50

2002 Jaguar XJ8

64

1972 MG B Roadster

78

1957 Vauxhall Cresta E

41

1935 Brough Superior Eight DHC

47

1988 Jaguar XJS Convertible (LHD)

86

1935 MG PB Supercharged

97

1966 Volvo P1800 S

125

1958 Cadillac Sedan DeVille

37

1991 Jaguar XJ-S Convertible

113

1953 MG TD

26

1982 Chevrolet C10 Pick-Up

52

1953 Jaguar XK120

105

1954 MG TF

16

1960 Chevrolet C20 Apache

92

2008 Jaguar XKR

118

1952 Morgan Plus 4

103

c.1960 Chevrolet Corvette

77

1935 Lagonda M45 Rapide DHC

21

1935 Morris CS8

98

1967 Chevrolet El Camino

65

1934 Lagonda Rapier

69

1956 Morris J-Type Van

63

1942 Citroen Truck

81

1935 Lancia Belna Saloon

56

1948 Packard Special

2

1961 Daimler Dart

31

1978 Lancia Montecarlo

101

2010 PGO Bug Rider


Notes

127


Terms and Conditions of Auction Sale These conditions apply to all sales held by H&H Classics Limited in England and Wales to the exclusion of all other Terms and Conditions and no alteration or modification to these Conditions will be binding on H&H Classics Limited unless accepted in writing by them. Your attention is specifically drawn to the “Notes for Intending Purchasers” published in the catalogue. DEFINITIONS

per day storage (subject to change without notice).

In these Terms and Conditions the following words and expressions shall unless the context otherwise requires have the following meanings:

‘R’ - items needing to be ‘Referred’ for individual quotations marked ‘R’ in the sales catalogue (subject to change without notice).

Auctioneer means H&H Classics Limited whose Registered Office is at 8 Eastway, Sale, Cheshire UK M33 4DX; company number 02852199 and Auctioneer means its representative who actually conducts the sale. Bidders Registration Form means the form to be completed by each bidder pursuant to Condition 12.5. The Buyer is the only person whose bid is accepted by the Auctioneer to conclude the contract for the purchase of a Lot. Buyer’s Commission shall have the meaning given in Condition 14. Catalogue includes any advertisement, brochure, estimate, price list and other publication generated or published by or on behalf of the Auctioneer in relation to a sale. Contract means the contract formed pursuant to these Conditions between any of the Seller, the Buyer and the Auctioneer. Entry Form means the form to be completed by the Seller as to each separate Lot pursuant to Condition 1.1. Estimated Value means the value given by the Seller in the Entry Form as the Estimated Value of the vehicle and if more than one value is given, the higher of those values. Expenses in relation to a Lot means the Auctioneer’s charges and expenses for illustrations, special advertising, packing, freight, transport, storage and any other charges and expenses of that Lot (other than the commission) plus VAT on any of them. Purchasers are reminded that a Buyers’ Premium is payable on all lots and is subject to VAT at the prevailing rate. The rates are as follows: Motor Cars

Uplift from £175

Storage - £10 per day for the first fourteen days or part thereof and £30 per week or part thereof thereafter (subject to change without notice). Motorcycles

Uplift from £60

Storage - £5 per day for the first fourteen days or part thereof and £12 per week or part thereof thereafter (subject to change without notice). Bicycles

Uplift £20

Storage - £3 per day for the first fourteen days or part thereof and £8 per week of part thereof thereafter (subject to change without notice). Automobilia/Motobilia Charges for these items are determined by size and weight: ‘A’ - the standard charge and will not be marked in the sales catalogue £8 uplift and £1 per day storage (subject to change without notice). ‘B’ - larger items and marked * in the sales catalogue - £20 uplift, £2 per day storage (subject to change without notice). ‘C’ - the largest items marked ** in the sales catalogue - £50 uplift, £5

128

Usual Charges means the total of the Commissions, Entry Fees and any other reasonable costs and expenses plus VAT payable thereon. VAT means UK Value Added Tax at the prevailing rate from time to time.

Hammer Price means the price in £ sterling at which a Lot is knocked down by the Auctioneer to the Buyer at the fall of the hammer.

Vehicles includes, where appropriate, incomplete vehicles.

Lot means any item or items consigned with a view to its or their sale at auction.

CONDITIONS MAINLY CONCERNING SELLERS AND CONSIGNORS

Premises means the place at which the Auctioneer are conducting that particular sale. Reserve means the minimum Hammer Price (if any) agreed between the Auctioneer and the Seller at which the Lot may be sold. The Sale means the auction sale in respect of which the Lot is consigned for sale. Sale Proceeds means the net amount payable by the Auctioneer to the Seller being the Hammer Price less the sum of the commission, the expenses, the entry fee (if not already paid) and the VAT chargeable on any of them. Seller means the person who offers the Lot for sale whether or not he is the true owner. Seller’s Commission means commission payable by the Seller pursuant to Condition 6. Stated rates means the usual rates of Commission, Entry Fees and any other charges for the time being plus the VAT chargeable on any of them. The current rates are as follows: Motor Cars Entry Fee

12.5% to the Buyer, 5% to the Seller (minimum £150 to both parties) £100 for a standard catalogue entry £200 for a premium catalogue entry £400 for a deluxe catalogue entry

Motorcycles Entry Fee

15% to the Buyer, 10% to the Seller (minimum £50 to both parties) £50 for a standard catalogue entry £100 for a premium catalogue entry £150 for a deluxe catalogue entry

Registration Numbers 12.5% to the Buyer, 10% to the Seller (minimum £50 to both parties) Entry fee £50 Bicycles

15% to the Buyer (minimum of £10) Seller’s charges available on application

Automobilia/Motobilia 15% to the Buyer (minimum of £5) Seller’s charges available on application Total amount due means the Hammer Price in respect of the Lot sold plus the Buyer’s commission and additional charges and expenses due from a defaulting Buyer under these Conditions plus VAT chargeable on any of them expressed in £ sterling.

1.1  An Entry Form in respect of each Lot must be completed fully and accurately, with an honest description of the Lot, signed and dated by the Seller and accompanied by the Entry Fee, when the Lot is entered. The Auctioneer may at any time ratify an incomplete form. 1.2  Any documentation pertaining to the Lot must be sent with the Entry Form to the Auctioneer’s office, or in any event delivered with the Lot to the Premises. The Contract between the Seller and the Auctioneer will be formed when the Auctioneer receives a signed Entry Form for the Lot, whether by hand, post, fax, email or by any other means, and whether or not the Entry Fee for that Lot has been paid, and whether or not the Form has been signed by the Auctioneer. 1.3  All relevant matters pertaining to the Lot such as a financial encumbrance, serious accident damage or other factors affecting value which are known to the Seller must be stated on the Entry Form. If a sale is lost because of the failure of the Seller to disclose to the Auctioneer all information which may reasonably be expected to affect the provenance, title, value or any other aspect of the Lot, the Auctioneer will charge and the Seller must pay the stated rates (both to Seller and Buyer) plus VAT. 1.4  If the Seller wishes to retain the registration number of a Lot, it is the Seller’s responsibility to notify the Auctioneer in writing on the Entry Form. It is the Seller’s responsibility to take all necessary steps to ensure that the current registration number is retained and a new number allocated prior to the Lot being sold. If the Seller does not do so, the Auctioneer shall not be responsible for any loss or damage whatsoever and howsoever arising out of the Seller’s loss of the right to the registration number following the sale of the Lot. 2.1  The Auctioneer shall have absolute discretion whether or not to accept any Lot for sale and shall be entitled to select the auction place, date, catalogue placement and photographs for the Lot. 2.2  The Seller gives the Auctioneer full and absolute right to photograph and illustrate any Lot placed in its hands for sale, and to use such photographs and illustrations as are provided by the Seller at any time at its absolute discretion (whether or not in connection with the Sale), with indemnity against copyright infringement. 2.3  The Seller is wholly responsible for the factual accuracy of, and for any judgments or opinions expressed in, the catalogue description of each Lot entered by him, and for any error, misstatement or omission of information in that description. Whether the description has been prepared by the Auctioneer or the Seller, a copy of the typed text will be provided to the Seller within a reasonable time prior to the Auction, and unless the Seller reacts with comments or changes prior to the Auction, the Auctioneer may


treat that description as accepted by the Seller.

(c) the Auctioneer’s reasonable estimate of its value;

3.1  The Seller warrants to the Auctioneer and to the Buyer either that he is the true owner of the Lot or that he is duly authorised to sell the Lot by the true owner, and is able to transfer or procure transfer of good and marketable title to the Lot free from a third party claims or encumbrances.

(d) plus VAT on such fee in either case and expenses;

3.2  In the event of an unsettled hire purchase, finance agreement or any other charge or lien affecting the Lot, the Auctioneer reserves the right to settle the amount due of such charges not exceeding the Sale Proceeds and if the Sale Proceeds are less than the charges outstanding the Seller will be responsible for the settlement of the balance forthwith. There will be a charge of £75 plus VAT for this service. 3.3  Each Lot, in the condition as described on the Entry Form, and with all keys, spare or extra items and documents shall be delivered to the Premises at the expense of the Seller. The Seller of a Lot not held by the Auctioneer at the Premises or under its control warrants and undertakes to the Auctioneer that the Lot will be made available and in a deliverable state at the time stated by the Auctioneer. 3.4  The Seller shall indemnify both the Auctioneer, its Employees and Agents, and the Buyer separately, against all payments, costs, expenses, demands, or any loss or damage whatsoever and wheresoever incurred or suffered by any of them in respect of any breach of these Conditions on the part of the Seller. 4.1  The Seller shall be entitled, prior to the sale to place a Reserve on any Lot, this being the minimum Hammer Price at which the Auctioneer is authorised to sell that Lot and to make its usual charges. A Reserve once placed by the Seller shall not be changed without the consent of the Auctioneer. 4.2  The Auctioneer may, at its option, sell the Lot at a Hammer Price below the Reserve but in any such case the Sale Proceeds to which the Seller is entitled shall be the same as if the sale had been at Reserve. 4.3  Where no Reserve has been placed on the Lot the Auctioneer shall in no way be liable should the Lot be purchased for a price below the lowest estimated selling price. In any event, any written or oral estimate of likely selling price given by the Auctioneer is an expression of opinion only and may not be relied upon by the Seller nor give rise to any claim. 4.4  If a Reserve is placed by the Seller in a currency other than Pounds Sterling, such a Reserve shall be calculated and converted into Sterling at the spot rate of exchange quoted to the Auctioneer by the National Westminster Bank Plc at close of business on the last banking day prior to the date of the Sale. The certificate in writing of the Auctioneer as to such rate shall be conclusive. 4.5  Where a Reserve has been placed, only the Auctioneer may bid on that Lot on behalf of the Seller. Should the Seller buy in his own Lot, the Seller must pay to the Auctioneer its stated rates (both Seller and Buyer) before the Lot is removed. 5.1  The Seller may by notice to the Auctioneer withdraw the Lot from the Auction. If the Seller does so he shall be liable to pay the Auctioneer the stated rate of the Seller’s and Buyer’s commission calculated on the estimated value of the Lot that the Auctioneer would have received had the Lot been sold for the estimated value. For the purposes of this clause the estimated value shall be the higher of:(a) the Seller’s estimate of value as previously notified to the Auctioneer or if more than one figure the highest figure or if none; (b) the value estimated in the catalogue or if more than one figure is given the highest figure, or if none,

5.2  In the event that the Seller withdraws the Lot from the Auction the Seller shall arrange for the collection/removal of the Lot at his own expense within 2 working days after the date of withdrawal provided that the Seller may not collect the Lot unless or until any withdrawal fee payable under Conditions 5.1 shall have been paid in full and any storage charges have been met by the Seller. 6.  The Seller authorises the Auctioneer to deduct from the Hammer Price commission at the Stated Rate subject to the relevant minimum commission for each Lot, plus Expenses and VAT on both. The Seller acknowledges the Auctioneer’s right to charge and retain the Buyer’s Premium also in accordance with Condition 14. 7.  The Seller of a Lot which is a road going means of transport warrants and undertakes to the Auctioneer that, as at the date of the Sale, either: (a) the Lot will be VAT paid in the EU and registered in the UK, will be lawfully usable on the public road, complying with the provisions of current Road Traffic Legislation and all relevant regulations made thereunder and any statutory modifications thereof, and there is or will be in force an MOT Certificate required in relation to such use; or (alternatively) (b) the Seller has notified the Auctioneer that the Lot does not or will not meet these requirements, and cannot legally be used on the road. 8.  The Seller hereby agrees to indemnify the Auctioneer, its Agents and Employees against any and all claims, liability or damage and all related costs and expenses arising out of the proper execution by the Auctioneer of their obligations to the Seller under these Conditions, and in particular against any liability or claim which may be incurred by the Auctioneer as a result of any defect in the Lot, whether proving dangerous to human life or health or otherwise giving rise to a claim against the Auctioneer, or as a result of any default by the Seller or any breach of any of the warranties or undertakings herein by the Seller. 9.1  Where any Lot fails to sell, the Auctioneer shall notify the Seller accordingly. The Seller shall make arrangements either for the Auctioneer to re-offer that Lot for sale, or forthwith to collect the Lot and to pay the Expenses. If such arrangements are not made: (a) by 1pm on the day following the date of the Sale, the Seller shall be responsible for the costs of any removal, storage and other expenses related to that Lot; (b) within 3 months after formal notification by the Auctioneer to the Seller, the Auctioneer shall have the right (pursuant to the Torts (Interference with Goods) Act 1977 or any legislation that re-enacts or replaces it) to sell the Lot by private treaty or at public auction without reserve and to deduct from the Hammer Price or price received any sum owing to the Auctioneer including (without limitation) removal, storage and insurance expenses, the Expenses of both auctions, Commission at the Stated Rate on the sale and all other reasonable expenses, before remitting the balance to the Seller; or if he cannot be traced, placing it in a bank account in the name of the Auctioneer on behalf of the Seller. 9.2  If the Seller later sells the Lot as a result of its exposure at the auction the Auctioneer will be entitled to their normal commission. In any event the Auctioneer will be entitled to try and effect a sale as the Seller’s agent within 14 days after the date of the auction (that time limit does not apply to a sale by the Seller). If the Auctioneer does so sell the Lot, they will also be entitled to their normal commission. 10.1  Where a Lot is sold, the Auctioneer shall initiate payment, by bank

transfer, of the Sale Proceeds to the Seller 14 days after the Auctioneers have received in cleared funds the Total Amount Due from the Buyer. Should no bank details be provided by the seller, the Auctioneer will effect payment by sending its cheque, drawn in favour of the Seller, 14 days after receipt of cleared funds, by first class mail at the Seller’s risk. 10.2  If before the Total Amount Due is paid by the Buyer (whether or not because the Auctioneer has given credit terms to the Buyer) the Auctioneer pays to the Seller an amount equal to the net Sale Proceeds, title in the Lot shall pass from the Seller to the Auctioneer. 10.3 In the case of overseas Sellers, the Sale Proceeds will be paid to the Seller either in Sterling or in such other currency available to the Auctioneer as may have been agreed in writing between the Seller and the Auctioneer before the date of the Sale. The Auctioneer shall calculate the rate of exchange for the Sale Proceeds by reference to the spot rate of exchange quoted by the National Westminster Bank Plc at close of business on the date of the Sale, whichever is more favourable to the auctioneer. 10.4  If the Auctioneer receives notice of any dispute related to a sold Lot before the Sale Proceeds have been remitted to the Seller, the Auctioneer may withhold payment from the Seller until it thinks fit or until the Dispute is resolved, whichever is earlier. 10.5 The Auctioneer retains the right to withhold partial or total payment for any Lot if items committed to the Sale by the Seller and sold as part of the Lot, including any relevant documents, have not been delivered by the Seller. 10.6 The Seller shall maintain their insurance of the Lot until they are in receipt of the Sale Proceeds 11.1 If the Buyer fails to pay the Auctioneer the total Amount due within 21 days after the Sale, the Auctioneer will notify the Seller and take the Seller’s instructions as to the appropriate course of action. So far as in the Auctioneer’s opinion it is practicable, the Auctioneer will at the Seller’s expense assist the Seller to recover the Total Amount Due from the Buyer, but the Auctioneer shall be under no obligation to institute proceedings in its own name. 11.2  If circumstances outside the Auctioneer’s control do not permit the Auctioneer to take instructions from the Seller, the Seller hereby authorises the Auctioneer, at the Seller’s expense, to agree special terms for payment of the total Amount Due; to remove, store and insure the Lot sold; to settle claims made against the Buyer or the Seller on such terms as the Auctioneer shall in its absolute discretion think fit; to take such steps as are necessary to collect the monies due by the Buyer to the Seller; and if necessary to rescind the sale and refund money to the Buyer. CONDITIONS MAINLY CONCERNING THE BUYER 12.1  Any motor vehicle is sold as a collector’s item and not as a means of transport. Buyers are specifically warned that any vehicle sold as such may well have had parts replaced and paint renewed or be made up of parts from other vehicles the condition of which may be difficult to establish. The Auctioneer has to rely on information as to the date, condition and authenticity provided by the Seller and does not provide its own description, and does not and cannot undertake its own inspection of vehicles or other Lot and it is the responsibility of the Buyer to ensure that the Lot conforms to the description in the catalogue. The Auctioneer cannot check or verify the authenticity of the chassis or VIN number under which a vehicle is offered, but relies on the Seller’s description. Buyers should take particular care to verify in advance the authenticity of a vehicle that is claimed to have important racing, rallying or

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‘ex-works’ history as it was common in period for a competition vehicle of a single identity to have more than one chassis, body or other mechanical components. This may have happened several times, both in a vehicle’s ‘works’ career and thereafter in private owner hands. Sometimes ‘works’ vehicles were fitted with different registration plates, so that a vehicle could meet a particular event’s start date deadline. These historical factors may lead to there being in existence multiple and competing claimants to the same vehicle identity. 12.2  The Buyer shall be the person making the highest bid at or over Reserve (if any) that is accepted by the Auctioneer, and the Contract shall be concluded at the fall of the hammer. The Auctioneer shall have the absolute discretion to settle any dispute related to bidding at the Sale. All sales are deemed not to be sales in the course of a business, unless notified to the contrary. 12.3  Every bidder shall be deemed to act as a principal unless the Auctioneer has, prior to the auction date, acknowledged (either by acceptance of the Bidder’s Registration Form which discloses the true principal, or otherwise in writing) that the bidder is acting as agent on behalf of a disclosed principal. 12.4  The Auctioneer may in its absolute discretion refuse to accept any bid, advance the bidding as it may decide, withdraw or divide any Lot, combine any two or more Lots, and in the case of dispute may put up any Lot for auction again. 12.5  A prospective bidder should register his intention to bid for a Lot by completing fully and signing a Bidder’s Registration Form prior to executing his bid. If this has not been completed before the fall of the hammer, the Buyer shall forthwith complete the Bidder’s Registration Form. The Bidder shall also provide photographic identification. Failure to do so shall not invalidate the sale, unless the Auctioneer, in its absolute discretion, so decides. 12.6  Any bid which fails to reach the Reserve may be submitted by the Auctioneer to the Seller and if the Seller accepts that bid, the Lot will be deemed to have been sold to the Buyer at the sum bid at the fall of the hammer and the normal Terms and Conditions will apply to that sale. 13.1  Where a Lot is illustrated by a photograph, in the case of a vehicle with a registration number visible, that number will not be transferred with the vehicle to the Buyer unless the registration particulars appear in the written part of the description and the transfer has been authorised by the Seller. If the vehicle is sold to the Buyer before the formalities of the allocation of a different registration number to that vehicle are completed with the DVLA, the Buyer accepts that he will take all steps necessary to co-operate with either the Seller or the Auctioneer to have the number re-transferred to the Seller or as may be, and will take no steps to register the vehicle with the number in his name. 13.2  Whilst the interests of prospective Buyers are best served by personal attendance at the Sale, the Auctioneers will if so instructed execute bids on their behalf. Neither the Auctioneer nor its Employees or Agents will be responsible for any error or default in doing so or in failing altogether to do so. Where the Auctioneer executes bids on behalf of an absent bidder, each Lot will be bought as cheaply as is allowed by other bids and any relevant Reserve. 14.  The Buyer shall pay to the Auctioneer in respect of each Lot the Buyer’s Commission calculated on the Hammer Price at the stated rates as set out above. 15.  Where a Lot is described in the Catalogue or announced at the time of Sale as being subject to VAT on import, VAT will be payable in addition to the

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Hammer Price (which VAT may or may not be refundable by HM Customs & Excise on proof of export). 16.1  Upon the sale of a Lot, the Buyer shall: 16.2  Unless he has already done so, complete a Bidder’s Registration Form as in Condition 12.5 above; 16.3  Pay to the Auctioneer the total amount due, at latest by midday on the day after the Sale, notwithstanding that where the Buyer wishes to export the Lot, an export licence may be required which must be obtained by the Buyer at his own cost; 16.4  Accept that any payments received by the Auctioneer from a Buyer may be applied by the Auctioneer towards any sums owing from that Buyer to the Auctioneer on any account whatsoever, without regard to any directions of the Buyer or his agent, whether express or implied. 17.1  Until the total amount due has been received by the Auctioneer: (a) title in a Lot shall not pass to the Buyer but the risk shall; (b) no Lot may be taken away by or on behalf of the Buyer. 17.2  The Buyer shall be responsible for any removal, storage and insurance charges and any other Expenses on any Lot not paid for and taken away by 1pm on the day following the day of the sale. 18.1  If a Buyer fails either to pay for or to take away any Lot, the Auctioneer may without further notice to the Buyer, at its discretion and without prejudice to any other rights or remedies it may have, exercise one or more of the following rights or remedies, as may be relevant, in relation to any and all remedies for non-payment that the Auctioneer may choose to exercise. The Buyer will pay to the Auctioneer all legal and other costs borne by it on a full indemnity basis. 18.2 To charge interest at a rate not exceeding 3% per month over Natwest Bank’s base rate on so much of the total amount due as remains unpaid after the date and time referred to in condition 16.3 for the first two months. After that period of time to charge interest at a rate not exceeding 1.75% per month over Natwest Bank’s base rate on so much of the total amount due as remains unpaid after the date and time referred to in condition 16.3. 18.3  To issue proceedings against the Buyer for payment of the total amount due and/or for damages for breach of contract. If the Seller decides to sell the Lot elsewhere, the Auctioneer may proceed against the Buyer for the Commission which it would have earned both from the Seller and the Buyer together with VAT on both had the Buyer paid for the Lot in accordance with these Conditions. 18.4  To rescind the sale of that or any other Lots sold to the same Buyer at this or any other Sale, in respect of which title has not passed. 18.5  To resell the Lot or cause it to be resold by public or private sale, such that any deficiency in the total amount due resulting from such resale (after giving credit for any payment) together with the full costs incurred in connection with the Lots shall be paid to the Auctioneer by the Buyer; any surplus in excess of the Sale Proceeds of that resale shall belong to the Seller. 18.6  To store the Lot at the sole expense of the Buyer and to release the Lot only after payment in full of the total amount due, together with the accrued cost of the removal, storage and insurance and all other expenses incurred in connection with the Lot. 18.7  To retain that or any other Lot sold to the Buyer at the same or any other auction and to release the same only after payment of the total amount due. 18.8  To apply by way of set-off any Sale Proceeds of any Lot then due or

at any time thereafter becoming due to the Buyer towards settlement of the total amount due and expenses and the Auctioneer shall be entitled to a lien on any property of the Buyer which is in the Auctioneer’s possession for any purpose. 18.9  To reject or ignore any bids made by or on behalf of the defaulting Buyer at any future sales or insist upon a cash deposit before accepting any bids in future. 19.1  All Lots are offered as seen with all faults and defects without any guarantee or warranty attaching thereto as to condition, roadworthiness or otherwise and with all faults and defects whether apparent upon examination or not. 19.2  In any event, neither the Seller nor the Auctioneer shall be liable for any indirect or consequential loss whatsoever, and the maximum liability of the Auctioneer together with its Employees and Agents, in the event of any claim against them arising from the sale of any Lot shall be limited to the Hammer Price plus Buyer’s Premium in respect of that Lot. GENERAL CONDITIONS 20. The Auctioneer in all respects acts and will be treated as agent for the Seller (except where the Auctioneer is expressly stated to be selling as principal), and is not responsible for any default by the Seller or the Buyer to the other party. 21. The Auctioneer will not accept any liability for damage sustained to a Lot that is attributable to members of the public or non-Auctioneer operatives during the Sale or any removable items left within lots during the same period. Any claims for damage and / or lost items must be submitted to the Auctioneer in writing no later than 3 working days after the date of the Sale and include a valid quote for repair or replacement and digital photographs where applicable. 22. The Auctioneer shall be under no liability for any injury, damage or loss sustained by any person while on the Auctioneers premises (including any premises where a sale may be conducted or where a Lot, or a part of a Lot, may be on view from time to time) except for death or personal injury caused by the negligence of the Auctioneers or its employees and agents in the course of their duties to the Auctioneers. 23. The Auctioneer shall have the right, at its sole discretion, without assigning any reason, to refuse any person admission to its Premises or attendance at any of its Sales, or to view any Lot. 24. The Auctioneer shall keep and use any data relating to the Buyer and the Seller in accordance with the provisions of all relevant data protection legislation. The Buyer and the Seller consent to such data being kept and used for appropriate purposes, including informing the Buyer and the Seller of any offers or other matters of interest from time to time. 25. The copyright in all written matter and illustrations relating to Lots shall remain at all times the absolute property of the Auctioneer, and any person wishing to use such materials, or any part of them, shall require the prior written consent of the Auctioneer. 26. If any Condition or part of a condition in these Terms shall be held to be invalid or unenforceable, the validity or enforceability of the remaining Conditions will not thereby be affected. 27. These Conditions shall be governed by and construed in accordance with English Law. All transactions to which these Conditions apply and all matters connected therewith shall also be governed by English Law. Each of the Auctioneer, the Seller, the Buyer and any bidder hereby submits to nonexclusive jurisdiction of the courts of England and Wales.


Screen time Sometimes the best way to connect is to disconnect. And what better way to disconnect than getting behind the wheel? At Hagerty, everything we do - insurance, car values, entertainment - is focused on making it easier for you to enjoy buying, owning, driving and dreaming about the cars you love. Call our team of knowledgeable enthusiasts for exceptional service, competitive premiums, comprehensive insurance options and more.

INSURANCE CAR VALUES ENTERTAINMENT

+44 333 323 1383 | Hagerty.co.uk Hagerty International Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA Firm Reference Number 441417)

*All hammer prices are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 12.5% (+ VAT)

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Speak to us at the next H&H sale about the services we can provide, including: • UK and European door to door enclosed car transport • Secure, high quality indoor vehicle storage & HMRC approved bonded storage • Worldwide shipping and airfreight • Documentation, customs clearance, registration Established in 1945, E.M.Rogers are highly experienced in and transporting and securely storing prized prestige, classic all associated services and vintage vehicles.

Speak to us at the next H&H sale about the services we can provide, including:

Or at: door to door enclosed car transport • contact UK andus European

www.emrogerstransport.com carstore@emrogers.co.uk www.emrogerstransport.com Tel: 01604 755511 carstore@emrogers.co.uk • • •

Secure, high quality indoor vehicle storage & HMRC approved bonded storage Worldwide shipping and airfreight Documentation, customs clearance, registration and all associated services

Or contact us at:

Tel: 01604 755511

E.M. Rogers are proud partners E.M. Rogers are proud partners ofof H&H Classics Limited H&H Classics Limited

E.M. ROGERS


Holts Auctioneers are Europe’s leading auction house for fine modern and antique guns. We specialise in selling not just individual guns but also in the promotion and marketing of gun collections worldwide. For further information please contact us info@holtsauctioneers.com Holts Office: +44 (0)1485 542 822

w w w. h o l t s a u c t i o n e e r s . c o m


Already consigned: 1937 Indian Four 437 Estimate £45,000 - £50,000*

World Class Bikes in a World Class Venue 9th JUNE ‘21 - NATIONAL MOTORCYCLE MUSEUM

WATCH

IN PERSON*

ALL ENQUIRIES

ONLINE

YOUTUBE

BID

IN PERSON*

ONLINE

PHONE

COMMISSION

Mike Davis | 07718 584217 | mike.davis@HandH.co.uk Ian Cunningham | 07415 871189 | ian.cunningham@HandH.co.uk

Alternatively please contact our Head Office on 01925 210035 / info@HandH.co.uk or visit www.HandH.co.uk *All prices are subject to Buyers Premium of 15% plus VAT @ 20%. See website for terms and conditions.


2021 Auction Calendar JUNE

SEPTEMBER

NOVEMBER

Wednesday 9th June National Motorcycle Museum Classic & Collector Motorcycles

Sunday 5th September Sunday 12th September Automobilia Auction Online

Wednesday 17th November Imperial War Museum, Duxford Classic & Collector Cars

Sunday 13th June Sunday 20th June Automobilia Auction Online

Wednesday 8th September Imperial War Museum, Duxford Classic & Collector Cars

Wednesday 24th November A|B|C Live Auction Online Automobilia, Bikes and Cars

JULY

OCTOBER Wednesday 7th July Buxton Pavilion Gardens Classic & Collector Cars

AUGUST Wednesday 4th August National Motorcycle Museum Classic & Collector Motorcycles Wednesday 11th August A|B|C Live Auction Online Automobilia, Bikes and Cars

Wednesday 6th October Buxton Pavilion Gardens Classic & Collector Cars Wednesday 27th October National Motorcycle Museum Classic & Collector Motorcycles

Sunday 28th November Sunday 5th December Automobilia Auction Online

DECEMBER Wednesday 8th December Buxton Pavilion Gardens Classic & Collector Cars

To enquire about selling your classic motor cars, motorcycles or automobilia please visit:

www.HandH.co.uk


Head Office

The Motor House, Lyncastle Road, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4SN +44 (0)1925 210035 info@HandH.co.uk www.HandH.co.uk