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THE MAGAZINE • SUMMER 2016

GUILFOR D COLLEGE T H E MAGA ZIN E • SUMMER 2016

MAKING OUR MARK


CLASS OF 2019

FABULOUS FIRST IMPRESSIONS Our first-year class is a unique and colorful blend of

“THIS IS A COLLEGE THAT ENABLES YOU TO BE SELF-DRIVEN AS A STUDENT, IN ADDITION TO FINDING A UNIQUE POCKET IN THE WORLD, WHERE YOU CAN BE WHO YOU ARE ENTIRELY.” — GEORGIA FREMON, YARDLEY, PA. (FRONT RIGHT)

students from all over the country and globe. This year they pushed themselves to new heights academically and discovered new things about themselves and the world around them. Here’s a snapshot of the class of 2019 and their Guilford experience. #WeAreGuilford Learn more online at guilford.edu/magazine16

“GUILFORD IS A PLACE TO BE YOURSELF & EXPAND YOUR LIMITS. THE PRIMARY DEFINITION OF GUILFORD IS VARIETY.” — AUSTIN BRYLA, MIDDLESEX, N.C.

“LEARNING AT GUILFORD IS REALLY 30/70. THIRTY PERCENT IS WHAT YOU LEARNED IN THE CLASSROOM, WHILE 70 PERCENT IS EVERYTHING YOU’VE LEARNED OUTSIDE OF THE CLASSES. GUILFORD IS A PLACE THAT ALLOWS YOU TO EXPLORE WHO YOU ARE AND WHO YOU WANT TO BE.” — MALAIKA GEFFRARD, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI (RIGHT)


“EVERY TIME I GO TO CLASS, I LEARN SOMETHING NEW & I THINK THAT I HAVE GROWN EXPONENTIALLY AS A STUDENT DUE TO MY TEACHERS. THEY REALLY DO WANT WHAT IS BEST FOR THEIR STUDENTS & THEY KNOW EACH ONE BY NAME.” — KATHERINE KANE, GREENSBORO, N.C. (LEFT)

“GUILFORD HAS MORE COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT OPPORTUNITIES THAN I CAN COUNT. THE BONNER SCHOLARS PROGRAM IS FANTASTIC AND HAS A HOST OF PROJECTS FOR ANY STUDENT WHO IS LOOKING TO VOLUNTEER.”

— KATHERINE KANE, GREENSBORO, N.C.

— CHRIS COLLINS, CHIANG MAI, THAILAND

“I LIKE HOW MANY PEOPLE I’VE MET AND HOW MANY OF THEM ARE NOW MY GOOD FRIENDS. I ALSO LIKE THAT THERE ARE LOTS OF THINGS THAT THE SCHOOL PUTS TOGETHER WHERE YOU CAN GO AND MEET MORE PEOPLE & HAVE FUN WHILE DOING IT.”

“ONE THING THAT MAKES GUILFORD’S COMMUNITY STRONG IS HOW DIVERSE IT IS. FOR A SMALL SCHOOL THERE ARE SO MANY PEOPLE THAT COME FROM DIFFERENT BACKGROUNDS & CULTURES. I HAVE MET SO MANY GREAT PEOPLE HERE THAT MAKE UP THE WONDERFUL COMMUNITY AT GUILFORD.”

— JOE EGGLESTON, BLOOMINGTON, MN.

— HANNAH ROSSHEIM, PROVIDENCE, R.I. (MIDDLE)

“YOU’RE LITERALLY ACCEPTED FOR WHO YOU ARE IN EVERY WAY POSSIBLE. IF YOU WANT TO COME SOMEWHERE & FIT IN & FEEL WELCOMED, COME TO GUILFORD, SIMPLY PUT.” — MAHMOUD HENDERSON, RIYADH, SAUDI ARABIA (RIGHT)


Making Our Mark FRIENDS, What a privilege it is to serve as president of Guilford College. I am continually inspired to see the many remarkable ways in which our faculty, staff, students and alumni are living out the College’s mission and values. On campus, in our community and around the world, Guilfordians are making their mark as they commit themselves to changing lives — for good. In this issue of Guilford College Magazine, you will meet some of these incredible people. Alumni features include an emerging leader in creating greater educational equity and opportunity; a savvy diplomat pursuing democracy, human rights and good governance throughout the world; a cutting-edge environmentalist dedicated to building community in Baltimore; a fiercely determined community organizer and advocate for people who are homeless or in danger of becoming homeless; and a globally trusted expert in international trade relations. You will also get the inside story from the faculty member who earned national — and international — recognition for her groundbreaking Every Campus a Refuge movement in response to the humanitarian crisis facing refugees from Syria and other lands. And be sure to read the captivating stories of two standout students — one who overcame considerable odds to become an entrepreneurial leader and politically astute activist on campus and in the community, and another who rose to an unexpected challenge and turned it into unforgettable teachable moments. And, finally, this issue of the magazine pays tribute to those who have invested so much of themselves in profoundly shaping the lives of our students and advancing the critically important cause of the College.

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IN THIS ISSUE Summer ’16 Rosalind Akpaidem ’09: Exceeding Expectations P. 4

These stories offer heartening encouragement for our continued work together in moving Guilford forward, recognizing the difficult realities still ahead of us. Restoring a robust enrollment and full financial health will take some time. I know we are more than up to the challenge. As you will read in the pages that follow, tremendous change is underway throughout campus as we rally together to create the best possible future for this special place and the students we serve. I am invigorated by the depth and diversity of new ideas and possibilities springing to life. Like the spectacular magnolia trees that grace our campus, we are blooming anew. Rejuvenated by a fresh awareness of Guilford’s mission, vision and values, our commitment to building an inclusive community of academic excellence grows ever stronger. We are exploring our assumptions, questioning our systems, and understanding better how the changing dynamics of technology and innovation influence students’ relationships to learning and the liberal arts. Tangible signs of progress are already evident, elevating my confidence that we are taking all the right steps to further enhance and distinguish the value of a Guilford degree. I am honored to be your president and to play a part in this remarkable renaissance. And I’m exceedingly grateful for the leadership and support of our Board of Trustees, as well as our many devoted alumni and friends, who continue to faithfully invest in the College. Together, I trust that we will find the light to guide us along the right path. As Way opens, I look forward to enjoying the journey with you.

Tess McEnery ’06: Fast Track to Democracy P. 6 Carl Simon ’07: Greenway to Restoration P. 9 Kristi Matthews ’06: Challenging the Status Quo P. 10 Sukham Kim ’77: More than Luck P. 12 News & Notes P. 14 Academic Innovation P. 18 Every Campus a Refuge: ’It’s Who We Are’ P. 20 José Oliva ’17: An Inspired Leader P. 22 Laura Hall ’16: Stepping Up to the Plate P. 26 Athletics P. 28 Philanthropy P. 29 Seth Macon ’40: Remembering a Guilford Giant P. 30 Alumni P. 37

Jane K. Fernandes

Class Notes P. 40

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ALUMNI FEATURE

EXCEEDING EXPECTATIONS ROSALIND AKPAIDEM | CLASS OF 2009

BY R O G E R D E G E R M A N

Fifth-grade students at Monarch Academy Charter School in

In particular, she is determined to ensure that all African-American

Baltimore know that anything less then their absolute best effort

boys thrive in a strong and equitable education system that helps

won’t fly with their teacher, Rosalind Fleming Akpaidem ’09.

them realize their full potential. Too many, she says, are up against

She sets the bar high for every single student.

extremely difficult circumstances in an unjust society.

“I don’t care where you are from, you can make it,” Rosalind says. “It’s not that I don’t have empathy, but I don’t want you to make excuses.” The decision to teach in Baltimore’s inner city was a “no-brainer” for her. She says it’s the ideal venue for feeding her desire to serve and inspire marginalized students as she helps them to dream bigger.

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“Some of them have to take on the responsibilities of being the man of the house at 10 years old,” she says. “On top of that, the real world looks at them as a threat, as hostile. I don’t want that environment to determine what their future is going to be. I want to see more African-American boys in leadership — in the forefront of doing important things.”


EXCEEDING EXPECTATIONS ROSALIND AKPAIDEM

MEASURING WHAT REALLY MATTERS Creating a more promising future, she believes, begins with transforming the quality and focus of education. As a multi-talented teacher and administrator, Rosalind has been instrumental in the formation and curricular development of two charter schools in her young career as an educator. Her many roles at Monarch include overseeing development of a project-based curriculum that essentially involves developing course content based on the questions that need to be answered for successfully completing a learning project. She also mentors new teachers and serves on the leadership team that keeps more than 1,000 K-8 students on the right track. Rosalind is a frequent presenter on project-based learning and teacher development, including most recently at the National At-Risk Education Network Conference held by the Children’s Guild. She asserts that a new brand of curricular innovation and faculty growth is imperative to improve the fortunes of education. Her standards for measuring success go much deeper than getting good marks in reading, writing and arithmetic. Instead, she says, the biggest impact she can make involves changing mindsets. “I can tell you my numbers of getting kids to read,” she says. “That doesn’t matter to me. What matters is that when you leave this room you believe you can do anything you want to do.” Rosalind says it is imperative that teachers consistently demonstrate belief in their students, especially those who struggle. To do that effectively, teachers must first develop a healthy mindset about their own abilities and what they can achieve in the classroom. “Teaching efficacy really starts with self,” she says. “If you don’t believe in yourself and you don’t have a growth mindset, you’re not going to have such a mindset about the child, either. When I’m able to help create a growth mindset in the teachers I mentor, I feel like my work has been done.”

MOTIVATED BY MENTORS Raising the bar of expectations is a mindset Rosalind developed under the tutelage of her many mentors at Guilford. Ask her about her professors in the Education Studies Department and watch her eyes light up. She offers praise for the entire department, including Julie Burke, David Hildreth, Anna Pennell and Caryl Schunk. From the start, her professors challenged her to bring her “A” game — to never settle and always aspire to her absolute best. “They all pushed me,” she says. “I knew what they valued in me, and they showed me my passion for unlocking the equity in education. They urged me to walk in this truth and passion, no matter who or what is trying to persuade me otherwise.”

In addition to the motivating wisdom of her education studies professors, Rosalind remains especially grateful for the close friendship she formed with DeeDee Pearman ’03, the department’s longtime administrative assistant and Rosalind’s work-study supervisor. What started as rather routine, light office work became something much more profound. “She saw something in me,” Rosalind says. “She challenged me to think critically about everything that was coming at me. We would have these deep conversations and she would teach me to examine who I was as a woman and who I was as an AfricanAmerican woman.”

GOING PLACES, REACHING FOR THE TOP A Guilford study-abroad experience in Ghana, West Africa, deepened Rosalind’s understanding of her African-American identity and its impact on her aspiring career as an educator. There she taught middle school and studied the disparity in educational accessibility. She continued her scholarly emphasis on issues of marginalization at Loyola University in Maryland, where she earned her education master’s degree in curriculum and instruction. Her capstone work examined the inequitable disciplinary treatment of AfricanAmerican males versus other races. Rosalind intends to leverage her research to help develop policies that will “promote cultural sensitivity toward students and educators of color.” She recognizes it won’t happen overnight. Her ascension as a difference-making educator is really just beginning. Next year, she anticipates assuming a role as an assistant principal. From there, as you now might expect, her bar of career expectations goes higher.

“My ultimate aspiration is to become the secretary of education for the United States of America.” “I’ve always been interested in the political portion of education. I’ve chosen not to teach in affluent areas, and I feel like the political policies that are created often do not necessarily benefit my reality and my context. I want to go there with all of my knowledge and all of my experience to fight for this arena. “That’s my dream, that’s my affirmation; and I say it every day.” You can bet her fifth-graders believe it will happen. After all, as Rosalind has taught them — you should believe that anything is possible. • Watch a video about Rosalind’s passion for education online at guilford.edu/magazine16

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ALUMNI FEATURE

FAST TRACK TO DEMOCRACY TESS MCENERY | CLASS OF 2006

BY R O G E R D E G E R M A N

Tess McEnery ’06 has always been well ahead of the curve. Completing high school at Guilford’s Early College at age 17, she needed just two more years to receive her political science degree from Guilford.


FAST TRACK TO DEMOCRACY TESS MCENERY

At age 20, Tess earned her master’s

REMARKABLE ROOKIE

degree in public administration from The

Soon after getting hired, Tess volunteered for a Christmas assignment to the Republic of Georgia to observe the country’s January 2008 presidential elections. She made such a strong first impression that her scheduled three-week trip turned into a six-month assignment that ultimately proved to be the perfect orientation program.

Maxwell School at Syracuse University and then promptly secured a prestigious position with the U.S. Agency for International Development. Today, as a senior democracy specialist for USAID, she relishes the opportunity to make a global impact every day. “I go around the world, mostly to sub-Saharan Africa, working with local partners to form programs that support the development of democracy, human rights and good governance,” Tess says. Her work focuses on electoral and political processes and the violence, intimidation and oppression that can accompany them. Tess earned her role at USAID after receiving a prestigious Presidential Management Fellowship fresh out of graduate school. The federal government uses the highly competitive PMF hiring program to identify the best young talent to bring “new blood and new ideas” into its agencies.

“The key is to get outside of the capital — to get outside of your comfort zone — to meet people who aren’t in the mainstream.”

Her extended posting included trekking across the country of Georgia twice for development and diplomacy initiatives, and it culminated with her appointment as the U.S. Government’s elections assistance coordinator. She gained invaluable experience coordinating multimillion-dollar elections assistance programs, meeting with donors and diplomats, and training dozens of U.S. and UK embassy employees on election monitoring. “It was a massive trial by fire,” Tess says. “By the end of the trip, I was briefing ambassadors and heading up working groups on elections, leading observation missions and constructing a post-election programming plan. It was the best step I could have taken for my career.” Nearly a decade later, the savvy diplomat journeys to Africa three or four times a year for weeks at a time to take on a variety of projects. She works with local actors to assess a country’s democracy, governance and human rights environment and design responsive programming, and she serves as a liaison to the embassy and other governments to provide assistance and set foreign policy strategy. “The best part about those trips is meeting with local stakeholders and activists who are pushing for change,” Tess says. “The key is to get outside of the capital — to get outside of your comfort zone — to meet people who aren’t in the mainstream. It’s not just civil society that we’re concerned about; it’s citizens. A lot of citizens are not represented in organized movements.”

FINDING PEACE IN CHAOS Tess’ evolving work in the Central African Republic has encountered plenty of turmoil. Major trouble erupted there in 2012, when she says Muslim Seleka rebels staged a coup, attacking largely Christian civilians. “Reprisal killings” followed with Christian militias attacking Muslims, prompting most of the Muslim population to flee the country. Tess says the conflict “decimated an already desperate economy.” The chaos prompted intensified efforts by the U.S. and others to support peace building and reconciliation in the region. And Tess has been right in the middle of it — both on the ground in Africa and back home in Washington, D.C. Since the beginning, she has participated in interagency policy discussions and decision-making, where she has urged the U.S. government to “do the right thing.” “Oftentimes, I found myself as a sole dissenter or an activist voice,” Tess says. “I worked with a lot of smart colleagues in order to prioritize peace building, conflict mitigation and citizen dialogue programs over other options.” In the summer of 2015, with the country moving swiftly from a “negotiated government to a duly elected one,” Tess returned to lead an interagency electoral assessment. She spent two weeks interviewing scores of government officials, political party members, civil society members and the media to gain an understanding of electoral needs, potential partners and the political landscape. Her extensive homework contributed to the design of an electoral support program leveraging existing opportunities in the nation. From there, Tess’ team provided consultations on its findings and planned programming directly to the European Union and the United Nations Development Program in Belgium, as well as stakeholders in Washington.

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ALUMNI FEATURE

REROUTING HER THINKING Tackling the many challenges of her work, including the varied political complexities, is something Tess finds exceptionally rewarding. It’s a bit ironic, to be sure. Embracing a career in the federal government is not exactly the path she envisioned while studying at Guilford. In fact, to the contrary, Tess says she and many of her political science classmates at Guilford completed a survey that revealed many were not well suited for a career path like the U.S. Foreign Service. Questions such as, “Will you support the U.S. government, regardless of leadership or political party affiliation?” were met with resistance, if not flat-out rejection. “A lot of us, especially when we’re young, say, ’That’s impossible because I have radical, game-changing ideas. I want to work outside the system,’ ” Tess explains.

“That’s great, and it’s a critical part of a civil and political society for people to work outside the system. But what I realized was that working inside the system and in the government, precisely where budgets and policies are formed, can also effect great change. I’ve done a lot of things like voicing dissent and proposing new ideas that have been adopted and championed. That, to me, has been very special.” Tess’ voice is heard and respected, in large part, because Guilford taught her a great deal about what it means to be a well-informed activist. She recalls the time students wanted to leave class to participate in an Iraq war protest. Her political science professor told students they were not allowed to leave unless they could locate Iraq on a map. Tess remembers the professor’s message: If you want to be civically engaged, you need to be educated. You can’t just be passionate; you have to know the facts and hone your arguments.

MAINTAINING HER GUILFORD EDGE Those lessons serve as constant reinforcement that Guilford was the right choice for Tess. Coming out of high school, courted by the best of the best, she could have gone most anywhere. Guilford easily won her over. “When deciding between some Ivy League schools, some state schools in North Carolina and Guilford College, there was no contest,” she says. “By staying at Guilford, I got a personal, hands-on, supportive, highquality education. And I entered the adult world with an edge, at a younger age, with much more experience, perspective and social consciousness than most of my peers. It was a no-brainer.” Tess has maintained that edge while building an impressive portfolio of accomplishments with USAID. She admits that progress in advancing global democracy and human rights is difficult to quantify and that it rarely comes quickly. She says incremental change is constant, but transformative change will take decades — perhaps generations. She gladly presses on, taking heart in what she finds on every return trip to Africa.

T ES S M C E N E RY ’ 0 6 F R EQ U E N T LY T R AV E LS TO S U B - SA H A R A N A F R I CA , W H E R E S H E PA RT N E R S W I T H G OV E R N M E N T L E A D E R S , ACT I V I STS A N D OT H E R C I T I Z E N S TO B R I N G A B O U T P O S I T I V E C H A N G E I N H U M A N R I G H TS A N D D E M O C R ACY.

“I see the fight continued; people have not given up, despite all the struggles and oppression — the assaults on civic, political and human rights. What keeps me coming back again and again are the people you meet who want to make their countries better.” • Watch a video about Tess’ commitment to democracy online at guilford.edu/magazine16

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GREENWAY TO RESTORATION CARL SIMON | CLASS OF 2007

“We are a spirited city of neighborhoods with genuine relationships at the block-to-block level. The city is creative, dynamic and edgy — in a fun and exciting way. That’s why I love working here.”

BY R O G E R D E G E R M A N

Deeply scarred by the tumultuous and violent events of 2015, Baltimore is a city in need of healing. Carl Simon ’07 is doing his part to rally people, restoring community in healthy and green ways. Carl is director of programs for Bluewater Baltimore, a leading environmental restoration nonprofit. He manages and supports stormwater and forestry programs, playing a leading role in community outreach, government partnerships and fundraising.

“It is very rewarding to work at a small, innovative nonprofit organization working to improve the environmental health of Baltimore’s underserved communities,” Carl says. “The way we are approaching this important effort is critical, by investing in a bottom-up approach that puts the residents and communities we are serving first.” Carl is especially enthused about his most recent partnership, the Library Square Project. The $500,000 initiative will treat more than half an acre of stormwater through three large rain gardens, permeable pavement and other sustainable features. Culminating

this spring, it will result in a revitalized and beautiful public space for children’s recreation, library programming, and use by churches and other nonprofits. This is precisely the kind of community project that reveals the beauty of Baltimore and its people. “Living in Baltimore is a real inspiration,” Carl says. “We are a spirited city of neighborhoods with genuine relationships at the block-to-block level. The city is creative, dynamic and edgy — in a fun and exciting way. That’s why I love working here.” Prior to joining Bluewater, Carl worked six years for the State of Maryland in the Chesapeake Bay restoration field following a year of AmeriCorps service with Habitat for Humanity. Holder of a master’s degree in public administration from Syracuse University, Carl is grateful to Guilford for providing strong preparation in environmental studies and political science, teaching him how to write exceptionally well and strengthening the values that drive his life. “I firmly believe in pushing forward and not accepting things just as they are now,” Carl says. “That is a critical mindset to get anything significant done, and Guilford helped inspire this way of thinking.” •

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ALUMNI FEATURE

Kristi Matthews ’06 knew she wanted to attend Guilford College years before she graduated from Greensboro’s Dudley High School. When her sister Sunny Matthews ’04, older by two years, toured colleges, Kristi joined her. And when they visited Guilford, Kristi knew it was the place for her. They visited the community center in the basement of Founders Hall and talked to staff member Judy Harvey. “I really just loved the sense of community,” Kristi says. “It felt like family.” Sunny enrolled. Two years later, Kristi applied to only one college: Guilford. As a student, Kristi worked to strengthen and expand the sense of community that called her to the College. And since graduating in 2006, she’s worked to make other communities more inclusive. She lives in Washington, D.C., where for the past nine years she has stood with and advocated for individuals struggling with homelessness.

CHALLENGING THE STATUS QUO KRISTI MATTHEWS | CLASS OF 2006

OPENING DOORS While at Guilford, Kristi volunteered in a variety of ways as a Bonner Scholar. The Bonner Scholars Program provides needbased scholarships to 15 students in each class and requires 140 hours of community service each semester. Although she had grown up in Greensboro, Kristi learned much more about the city through her service. She was aware of homelessness before coming to Guilford, but an Avanti program during first-year orientation helped her understand the issue more fully. Bonner Center Director James Shields ’00 and Claire Dixon ’98, the Bonner Scholars coordinator while Kristi was a student, taught her, too.

Kristi is committed to making communities more inclusive. It’s what she did at Guilford, and it’s what she’s doing in Washington.

“James, Claire and the Bonner program not only gave me the skills to fight for these communities every day,” Kristi says, “they laid the foundation for me to understand that we must dismantle systems of oppression.” James pushed Kristi to excel. “Kristi inherited her passion for making a difference from her sister, Sunny, who was also a Bonner Scholar,” James says. “We used that passion as a starting point to challenge Kristi to develop the skills and knowledge needed to have a real impact on the community now. Our philosophy is that students are the leaders of today, not tomorrow.”


CHALLENGING THE STATUS QUO KRISTI MATTHEWS

As one of her service projects, Kristi volunteered up to 20 hours a week at an after-school program for children of refugees, including many children of Montagnard refugees who came to Greensboro from the Central Highlands of Vietnam. Kristi’s parents would visit the afterschool program, giving the children toys and games. The boys and girls would squeeze into the Matthews family’s car to attend cookouts and other family events. One of the children, Y’Dem Adrong ’15, the son of Montagnard refugees, would attend Guilford himself. “In May of 2015, I graduated with a degree in criminal justice with a minor in psychology because of the Matthews family and because of Bonners and because of the impact they had on me from decades ago,” Y’Dem says. Kristi remembers Y’Dem and is inspired by his story. “You hardly ever hear those outcome stories,” she says, “and it gave me the strength I needed to continue in this work.”

THE POWER OF DIALOGUE As a student, Kristi also worked to strengthen the campus community. During her senior year, she and her friend, Kyri Murdough ’06, tried to engage community members in a conversation about race. They organized bi-monthly meetings as a safe space to talk, and they spread the word. The campus was silent. “Four months of having nobody show up really made us angry,” Kristi says. “Kyri and I are very passionate and opinionated. So we were sitting there in our empty room angry, and we decided we should just force people to have this conversation. “And one of us said, ’Why don’t we just take over the cafeteria and make this conversation happen?’ We said it as a joke.” They shared their joke with James. “It’s not a bad idea,” he told them. The manager of the cafeteria agreed to their plan for Table Talks. Many faculty and

staff, including coaches, supported the idea. The two women came up with a list of people they trusted to facilitate conversations at each table. When people came into the cafeteria, they took a number directing them where to sit. “The whole community of Guilford changed for a few days,” Kristi says. “It’s what we wanted. We wanted people to have a space to talk about race in an honest way, to have a conversation rather than hiding it. “It was a beautiful moment for us, and it really set the tone for what Kyri and I wanted to do, which we’re doing now, 10 years later. We really wanted to be creating moments for people to reevaluate their lives and what they’re doing in this world.” Table Talks returned to campus this year. Kristi and Kyri came back to campus to facilitate another round of Table Talks on Feb. 19, the day of the All Black Everything Symposium, part of the College’s observance of Black History Month. Kristi gave the symposium’s keynote address, and the two women jointly led a workshop, Creating Movements Instead of Moments: How to Have a Successful Advocacy Campaign Against Oppression. Both a decade ago and this year, some people at the Dining Hall declined to participate in Table Talks. Nevertheless, there seems to be greater acceptance that institutional racism exists at Guilford, Kristi says. “Last time we were really just trying to open up the door so the conversation could happen,” she says. “These Table Talks were more about exploring what we do about the institutional racism we know is here.” Kristi and Kyri led a group reflection after this year’s Table Talks. Participants discussed racism’s connection to bias based on gender, sexuality and class. “This year we were able to have dialogue on race with members of the Guilford community who normally would be uncomfortable having these conversations,” James says. “Most of the senior staff participated, which is a change from 10 years ago.

“Guilford College has a long way to go, but we should be proud of our efforts thus far. The current administration wants to be proactive. The leadership of President Fernandes has emboldened our students to speak out and play a role in making Guilford an anti-oppressive institution.”

A VOICE FOR JUSTICE When she first came to Washington after graduation, Kristi worked for a government agency in a program that taught office job skills to at-risk youth. She had a growing sense, however, that chronic poverty needed to be attacked at a more fundamental level. Working for the government wasn’t a good fit. She took a job at The Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless. In addition to providing pro bono legal services for those who are homeless or in danger of becoming homeless, the nonprofit encourages community members to advocate for more just public policies and budgets. The clinic’s Kressley Fellow for Grassroots Advocacy, Kristi empowers vulnerable individuals and families to have a greater voice. “There was an instant connection for me between what I did at Guilford and what I do here,” she says. “Guilford taught me how to challenge the status quo, and that’s what I do constantly in my work here.” She’s been working at the Legal Clinic for almost a decade now. There have been victories, but much more remains to be done. She’s in the right place. “It’s great to talk about what needs to happen in the world, it’s powerful to share videos of others doing the right thing, but true change comes when you give your life to dismantling systems of oppression and trying to work every single day to make this world a better place,” she says. “That’s what justice work is. That’s what organizing is. And that’s what I do.” • Learn more about Kristi Matthews at guilford.edu/magazine16 GUI LFOR D.EDU | 11


ALUMNI FEATURE

MORE THAN LUCK

Mr. Kentucky. International envoy. Little brother to a world leader. Guilford College graduate. It sounds like the start of a joke about a group walking into a bar. Instead it’s a true story, the story of just one man: Sukhan Kim ’77.

I N T E R N AT I O N A L T R A D E AT TO R N E Y S U K H A N K I M ’ 7 7 I S FA R F R O M J U ST A N OT H E R BA R R I ST E R .

The story reflects his times and his personal character, and it reflects the profound impacts of certain professors, certain jobs and a certain education at a small liberal arts college in North Carolina.

BY K Y L E D E L L

He arrived on Guilford’s campus in the middle of fall semester 1974. Academics were a challenge, but he’d been challenged before, having served in the South Korean army. “Compared to the Korean army, studying at Guilford was heaven!” he recalls. Sukhan was no ordinary international student. With the help of his family and several “big brothers” among the political leaders in South Korea, he had completed high school at Millersburg Military Institute outside Lexington, Ky. Then his muscular physique had landed him work as a bouncer and, eventually, the title of Mr. Kentucky. He quickly settled into a simple routine at Guilford. “I left campus only twice for social activities during my first year. Otherwise, I was studying or working.” Although he arrived late that semester, he still completed four classes while working a job on campus.

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Early on, two individuals helped Sukhan with his new life: Security Chief Bob White and Professor of Political Science Bill Carroll. Bob gave the new student a job writing parking tickets and was impressed with his work ethic. “Those kids must have hated me,” Sukhan says, remembering how quickly he wrote dozens of tickets. Bill also admired Sukhan’s incredible work ethic. “I took U.S. government and he was so hard,” Sukhan says. “He gave me a special lesson in the evenings because I couldn’t keep up.” Soon Sukhan was earning the highest grades in his classes while taking more than the average number of courses. Sukhan’s accomplishments weren’t confined to the classroom. In 1975 he became the first student to serve as a dorm coordinator, now known as a resident assistant, for the first-year students of Milner Hall. “Dealing with 300 kids for three years, that taught me a lot in terms of dealing with human affairs, problems and arguments,” Sukhan says. Looking back, he appreciates Guilford’s trust in him. “For the school to put an Asian in charge of a freshman dorm speaks volumes about Guilford College and its forward-looking principles.” Sukhan’s bodybuilding continued at Guilford, where he competed with Steve Musulin ’76, Mike McClune ’79 and other self-coached students. Only 165 pounds himself, Sukhan could bench press 395 pounds. During his final semester at Guilford, Sukhan took 24 credit hours and still made good grades. He graduated third in his class with majors in political science and economics. Bill and Sukhan’s Korean big brothers encouraged him to go to law school. After earning a master’s degree from Columbia University in eight months, Sukhan did, graduating from law school at Georgetown University in 1981. He attributes much of his later success to the preparation he received at Guilford.

“The liberal arts education at Guilford was crucial. After Guilford, Columbia was easy. I talk to so many young lawyers and I always tell them to go for a broad based foundation in college. Once you have a foundation, you can pivot any time and do something else. In so many ways, I owe a lot to Guilford.” His work as a young lawyer at Akin Gump in Washington caught the eye not only of his big brothers back in Korea, but also renowned attorney and adviser to U.S. presidents Bob Strauss. Before long Sukhan began working in the highest circles of politics and trade between the U.S. and the Republic of Korea. Now a partner at Arnold & Porter, Sukhan has represented the Samsung companies, and he has served as the first vice chairman of the U.S.-Asia Foreign Policy Council, special counsel to the Government of Korea during its IMF financial crisis, honorary vice president of the Korean War Memorial Museum, member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and director of the Korea Society and the Korea Economic Institute. He even traveled to North Korea in 1997 with Sen. Sam Nunn and Ambassador Jim Laney to deliver a message on behalf of the White House. Modest beginnings continue to inform Sukhan’s work. Quoting his mentor, Bob Strauss, he shares the way in which his success can lift up others: “We make a living by what we take. We make a life by what we give.” Sukhan has worked to establish opportunities for others less fortunate to realize their dreams. He worked with the leadership of the Samsung Group and the American Legion to establish the Samsung American Legion Scholarship to financially help deserving descendants of U.S. soldiers, including those who fought in the Korean War from 1950 to 1953. He created his own foundation, the Korean-American Youth Service Organization, to aid troubled high school students in the Washington area. Success, he says, flows from three simple sources, “hard work, good human relations and some amount of luck.” Through his

“I TALK TO SO MANY YOUNG LAWYERS AND I ALWAYS TELL THEM TO GO FOR A BROAD BASED FOUNDATION IN COLLEGE. ONCE YOU HAVE A FOUNDATION, YOU CAN PIVOT ANY TIME AND DO SOMETHING ELSE.” philanthropy, Sukhan hopes to provide some support and luck to others. His generosity has benefited the Guilford community as well. Sukhan’s memberships in the Scholarship Society, Millennium Club, Fellow Society, Nathan Hunt Society, Black Oak Society and New Garden Society are only a beginning. In 2011, he established the William Carroll Fund for Faculty Growth & Professional Education for the Political Science Department in honor of his mentor. These funds honor Bill’s legacy by strengthening faculty members’ research and teaching, which in turn enriches the experience of current and future students. As if nuclear negotiator, Washington lawyer and bodybuilder were not interesting enough, Sukhan’s favorite story adds further detail to a full and diverse life. Back in his days as a bouncer at Speck’s Club in Kentucky, he took great delight in visits by a five-brother band from Gary, Ind., The Jackson 5. A young Michael Jackson would beg to hang from Sukhan’s flexed arms and be carried around the club. In many ways, Guilford too has benefited from Sukhan’s strength. • Kyle Dell is an associate professor of political science and co-chair of the Environmental Studies Program.

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NEWS & NOTES

INAUGURATION Jane K. Fernandes Inaugurated Guilford inaugurated Jane Fernandes as its ninth president Aug. 26 in Dana Auditorium. The first woman to lead Guilford, Jane is the first deaf woman to lead a U.S. college. “So, what is the future I envision?” Jane asked during her Inaugural Address. “Guilford’s vibrant future relies on our becoming a small liberal arts college of distinction doing a few things splendidly.” Jane, who began work as president on July 1, 2014, described three sources of inspiration that fuel pursuit of that vision: the College’s world-class faculty, its powerful Quaker heritage and its unique spirit of community. “Today marks the inauguration of the next phase of Guilford College’s evolving path toward inspired distinction,” Jane said in conclusion. “Let us continue to walk there together.” A celebration in front of Founders Hall followed the inauguration. Kicked off by the planting of an oak tree, a showcase featured performances and interactive demonstrations related to academics, the arts, clubs, athletics, service, student-led media and study abroad programs. •

G U I L FO R D C O L L EG E I N AU G U R AT ES JA N E F E R N A N D ES AS I TS N I N T H P R ES I D E N T AU G. 2 6 .

For more inauguration coverage, visit guilford.edu/magazine16

M O R GA N K E E N E ’ 1 7 A N D V I N C E S C H EU R E N ’ 1 6 P E R FO R M T H E H Y M N " M O R N I N G H AS B R O K E N " FO L LO W I N G JA N E ’ S I N AU G U R A L A D D R ES S .

M A L L A RY W ES E M A N ’ 1 9 A N D OT H E R M E M B E R S O F T H E EX P R ES S I O N S I N DA N C E C LU B P E R FO R M A DA N C E I N S P I R E D BY T H E C O R E VA LU ES AT T H E G U I L FO R D C O L L EG E S H O WCAS E A F T E R I N AU G U R AT I O N .

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CELEBRATION “SISTER PRESIDENT JANE FERNANDES HAS A LONG

K E Y N OT E I N AU G U R AT I O N S P E A K E R D R . J O H N N E T TA C O L E , D I R ECTO R O F T H E S M I T H S O N I A N N AT I O N A L M U S EU M O F A F R I CA N A RT I N WAS H I N GTO N , D. C. , S P E A KS A B O U T JA N E ’ S D I ST I N G U I S H E D L E A D E R S H I P I N H I G H E R E D U CAT I O N , I N C LU D I N G H E R C O M M I T M E N T TO A D D R ES S I N G I N EQ UA L I T Y.

AND STELLAR RECORD OF ADVOCATING FOR FAR GREATER DIVERSITY AND THE CREATION OF A MORE INCLUSIVE CULTURE IN HIGHER EDUCATION AND IN EVERY SECTOR OF OUR COUNTRY AND OUR WORLD.” — J O HN N E TTA B. CO LE

P R ES I D E N T JA N E J O I N S C O M M U N I T Y M E M B E R S I N P L A N T I N G A N OA K T R E E , ESTA B L I S H I N G R O OTS FO R A PROMISING NEW ERA IN THE RICH H I STO RY O F G U I L FO R D C O L L EG E .

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NEWS & NOTES

Black Lives Matter Student leaders Teresa Bedzigui ’16 and Brandee Craig ’17, planned and hosted a watershed series of events in October celebrating Black Lives Matter. An evening with Patrisse Cullors, #BlackLivesMatter cofounder, filled Dana Auditorium and was among the highlights. Patrisse encouraged the audience to pursue strategic community organizing to combat racism and police brutality, and she emphasized the importance of local government as a mechanism to bring about change.

PAT R I S S E C U L LO R S , C O - FO U N D E R O F T H E # B L AC K L I V ES M AT T E R M OV E M E N T D E L I V E R S A P O W E R F U L S P E EC H TO T H E G U I L FO R D C O M M U N I T Y I N DA N A AU D I TO R I U M . P H OTO BY J U L I E T M AG O O N ’ 1 6 .

Teresa and Brandee were inspired to organize the Integrity for Guilford student coalition leading to ongoing strategic plans to examine and transform racism on campus. The events were sponsored by Blacks Unifying Society, the Center for Continuing Education, the Multicultural Education Department, the Community AIDS Awareness Project, the Bayard Rustin Center for LGBTQ Activism, Education & Reconciliation, the Office of Student Leadership & Engagement, Campus Activities Board and Hispanos Unidos de Guilford. • Learn more about Black Lives Matter at guilford.edu/magazine16

C O - O R GA N I Z E R S O F B L AC K L I V ES M AT T E R W E E K , T E R ESA B E D Z I G U I ’ 1 6 ( L E F T ) A N D B R A N D E E C R A I G ’ 1 7 ( R I G H T ) P O S E W I T H G U EST S P E A K E R PAT R I S S E C U L LO R S . P H OTO P R OV I D E D BY T E R ESA B E D Z I G U I .

President Fernandes Receives Contract Extension Guilford’s trustees have extended Jane’s contract until June 30, 2022. “Our trustees are united and enthusiastic in support of Jane’s leadership for our College,” said Ed Winslow, Board of Trustees chair. “We have observed with appreciation how, during her initial tenure, Jane has confronted one challenge after the next — with fortitude, resilience and compassion. “She is an inspiring leader who embodies Guilford’s values and is enlivening our vision. At the same time, she is a no-nonsense manager who does not shrink from hard realities.” Jane’s initial contract would have run through June 30, 2017. “By putting Guilford first and pulling together we are quickly making big strides to move the College forward,” Jane said. “I am humbled by the trustees’ commitment and support and am honored to help lead Guilford into a promising future.” •

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Bryan Series Lives Long, Prospers

EARLY COLLEGE RANKED NO. 1 IN NC

2016-17 Schedule Announced

The Early College at Guilford has been named the best public high school in North Carolina by Niche, a school research company.

The 2016-17 Bryan Series will celebrate two decades of great speakers with five fascinating lectures: • Michael Pollan, Sept. 30 — Food sustainability advocate and bestselling author • Mark and Scott Kelly, Oct. 18 — Astronauts

The Early College is excelling according to other measures, too. It is the top public school in the state based on the mean total SAT scores for critical reading, mathematics and writing.

• Amal Clooney, Nov. 13 — International human rights attorney • Brian Stevenson, Feb. 21 — Author and founder of the Equal Justice Initiative • Alan Alda, April 6 — Emmy Award-winning actor and author

GUILFORD, ELON LAW CREATE ACCELERATED PATH TO LAW DEGREE A new agreement between Guilford and Elon University School of Law provides motivated, talented students an opportunity to start law school at Elon after their junior year at Guilford, potentially saving a year’s worth of the time and tuition ordinarily required to earn a bachelor’s and a law degree. Elon Law will consider applications from exceptionally well-qualified Guilford students who have completed all required courses but still need more credits to graduate. Appropriate credits earned at Elon Law can be transferred to Guilford to complete students’ bachelor degrees.

FARM RECOGNIZED FOR SUSTAINABILITY

ACTO R A N D ACT I V I ST G EO R G E TA K E I A N D C O L I N T R I P P ’ 1 6 G I V E T H E

The Guilford College Farm, a learning laboratory as well as a source of more than 10,000 pounds of produce each year, earned a place on College Values Online website’s Top 30 Sustainable College-Run Farms list.

V U LCA N SA LU T E FO L LO W I N G A ST U D E N T S ES S I O N M A R C H 2 1 I N FO U N D E R S H A L L . TA K E I WAS O N E O F T H E F E AT U R E D S P E A K E R S FO R T H E 2 0 1 5 - 1 6 B RYA N S E R I ES S E AS O N . I N H I S TA L K T H AT E V E N I N G,

P H OTO BY M A L A I K A G E F F R A R D ’ 1 9 .

G EO R G E T H A N K E D G U I L FO R D FO R A D M I T T I N G JA PA N ES E -A M E R I CA N ST U D E N TS D U R I N G WO R L D WA R I I , A T I M E W H E N M A N Y JA PA N ES E A M E R I CA N S , I N C LU D I N G G EO R G E A N D H I S FA M I LY, W E R E C O N F I N E D TO A M E R I CA N I N T E R N M E N T CA M P S .

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NEWS & NOTES

ACADEMIC INNOVATION N E W M A J O R I N CY B E R A N D N E T W O R K S EC U R I T Y

None of the nation’s top 10 computer science programs requires students to take even one cyber security course, according to a new study. This contributes to a vulnerable digital environment in

BY DA N N O N T E

which cybercrime costs the world economy hundreds of billions of dollars every year. To help meet this challenge, Guilford launched a cyber and network security major this semester, becoming the first institution in North Carolina to offer the degree through face-to-face classes.


ACADEMIC INNOVATION NEW MAJOR IN CYBER AND NETWORK SECURITY

More new degrees are on the way. Under the leadership of President Jane K. Fernandes, the College is aggressively pursuing academic advances designed to resonate with a new generation of students.

“The digital age completely revolutionized the tools used in the criminal justice trade,” R.J. says. “Today’s NCIS special agents can process cases with greater depth and greater sophistication in a fraction of the time it took my generation.”

Other major academic developments include faculty approval of a master’s degree in criminal justice and a major in sustainable food systems. At the same time, Guilford is launching new hybrid and online courses, creating a program in user experience and design and preparing to expand its post-baccalaureate program in health professions.

Just as technology changed the tools available to investigators, it changed the tools available to criminals. For decades NCIS has investigated sophisticated hacking and phishing cases involving the nation’s most guarded technologies. That’s why R.J. was eager to support the cyber and network security major at Guilford.

In the case of the cyber and network security major, the new program will combat a rapidly growing problem. “Nonstop cyber attacks and persistent threats are affecting our way of life. The number of detected security incidents soared 38 percent in 2015,” says Chafic Bou-Saba, assistant professor of computing technology and information systems. “Cyber criminals are targeting all sectors of the economy, including energy, retail, insurance, medical and entertainment companies. There is an extremely high demand for skilled professionals in the area of cyber and network security.” Like other majors, cyber and network security will require the exploration of multiple disciplines. The Accounting, Justice and Policy Studies, Philosophy and Political Science departments offer elective courses that count toward the major, including Introduction to Fraud Examinations, Criminal Procedure, Ethics in a Digital World and Homeland Security. “Students majoring in cyber and network security at Guilford will have the same high level of face-to-face interaction with faculty as our students in other disciplines,” says Will Pizio, associate professor of justice and policy studies. “In addition to an understanding of cyber security systems and information assurance, they’ll gain the ability to collect, analyze and interpret technical data through network forensics.” Chafic and Will planned the 10-course, 38-credit major, which is housed in the Department of Computing Technology & Information Systems. R.J. Blincoe ’81, who worked for the Naval Criminal Investigative Service for 28 years, shared his expertise during the design process. While at Guilford, R.J. majored in administration of justice. In addition to fueling R.J.’s passion for criminal justice through his teaching, Professor John Grice introduced R.J. to an NCIS recruiter at a career fair. When R.J. joined NCIS in 1982, agents used typewriters to compile their reports. Long before he rose to the position of deputy director, technology had brought changes.

“During my time in government and now as a consultant to several federal law enforcement agencies, I see the significant demand for well-educated and motivated individuals in the cyber and network security arena,” R.J. says. “Not only are these skill sets needed in government, they are also needed in so many other areas.” Despite strong demand for individuals with cyber and network security expertise, much of higher education has not responded, according to research from CloudPassage, a provider of security platforms for servers. Released April 7, the study found that only one of the top 36 computer science programs (according to 2015 rankings by U.S. News & World Report) requires a security course for graduation. “I wish I could say these results are shocking, but they’re not,” CloudPassage CEO Robert Thomas says. “With more than 200,000 open cyber security jobs in 2015 in the U.S. alone and the number of threat surfaces exponentially increasing, there’s a growing skills gap between the bad actors and the good guys.” The education system is failing students by neglecting cyber security training, the study concludes. “Our research reinforces what many have been saying: There is an incredible IT security skills gap,” Robert says. “But what we’ve revealed is that a major root cause is a lack of education and training at accredited schools.” The College is doing its part to shrink that gap and doing so in a distinctly Guilford way. The new major combines the latest technology and timeless Guilford values. R.J. congratulates students pursuing the new major on both counts: “Bravo for choosing a major that is critically needed in our country right now. Upon graduation you’ll be incredibly marketable and able to get a very good job. “And bravo for choosing Guilford because not only are you going to get an excellent education, you are going to undergo a significant personal transformation, one in which you’ll develop an overwhelming desire to pursue justice and further develop your acceptance and appreciation for the great strength that diversity brings to our globally connected society. “This is precisely the transformation I underwent at Guilford.” •

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NEWS & NOTES

P H OTO BY K AT M I L L E R ’ 1 6 .

EVERY CAMPUS A REFUGE: ‘IT’S WHO WE ARE’ BY D I YA A B D O

Every Campus a Refuge was born out of a double impulse — a deep despair for the plight of the millions of refugees daily risking their lives and their children’s lives to escape violence and a deep dedication to the possibilities of Guilford College’s impact on the world. The image of little Alan Kurdi’s body resting on the surf and the sight of thousands of dispossessed human beings, journeying countless dangerous miles on foot only to be trapped in trains, in holding camps no better than prisons and on the borders of inhospitable nations, made me question what it is we do here at Guilford and why we do it. How useful in the world are we really? Thankfully, this question very quickly found an answer. And the answer came from the likeliest of places: Guilford’s own tradition of “radical hospitality.” When, in September 2015, Pope Francis called on every parish in Europe to host a refugee family, I was immediately struck by the similarity between parishes (small cities or towns) and university and college campuses which, given the nature of their material and human resources, are very much like small cities. In my native Arabic, the word for university campus, a word important in Islamic discourse, is “haram” — sanctuary, refuge. I had to do no more than look at the history of Guilford, its Quaker founders, and the ground on which it stood, to see that it had already been a city sanctuary, a campus refuge for those fleeing injustices, those forcibly displaced and dispossessed.

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EVERY CAMPUS A REFUGE ’IT’S WHO WE ARE’

Guilford’s woods were part of the Underground Railroad, Japanese-Americans found a safe haven here during World War II and Montagnard refugees stayed in Mary Hobbs Hall one summer in the early 2000s. Every Campus A Refuge is the 21st-century manifestation of what Guilford has always been and I hope always will be: a physical space animated by the spirit of the justice-driven and hospitable people who inhabit it — both within its borders proper (its students, faculty and staff) and beyond (its alumni, friends, partners, local community and global family). So it is no surprise that President Jane K. Fernandes readily agreed to my request when I asked her if Guilford could provide temporary, on-campus accommodations and assist in the resettlement of a refugee family coming to Greensboro. And it is no surprise that her “yes” was unsurprised — as if I had asked her the most commonsense question in the world.

"Of course Guilford should house refugees. It’s who we are; it’s who we have always been." from Maine to Oregon, college and university campuses have begun initiating their own Every Campus A Refuge programs. During this humanitarian crisis of astronomical proportions, Guilford hopes to serve as a model-leader for campuses around the globe by stewarding its resources for good and shaping a more compassionate public discourse about refugees and immigrants. To learn more about Every Campus A Refuge and how to support the initiative, please visit www.everycampusarefuge.org. For the most recent updates, please visit our Facebook page, Every Campus A Refuge. •

"Of course Guilford should house refugees. It’s who we are; it’s who we have always been." Every Campus A Refuge quickly became a Center for Principled Problem Solving initiative, and the fall semester was spent educating our community through panels, informational sessions and a film screening; establishing partnerships with local refugee resettlement agencies; and generating support in the larger Greensboro community. In January, we received our first newcomer; since then, we have also received a family. Our partnering resettlement agency trained more than 40 student, faculty and staff volunteers who are assisting our newcomers in a myriad of ways. We are setting up housing, welcoming at the airport, providing transportation to health and government appointments, collecting donations, providing translation services and sharing meals. In the process of volunteering, our students are learning about forced displacement, refugee resettlement and the lives of immigrants in Greensboro. "This invaluable, one-of-a-kind, place-based educational experience, connected as it is to real rather than theoretical people, will transform our students’ lives and, through their efforts, will make a positive impact on these issues." Students also are involved in other powerful educational components of Every Campus a Refuge — they have researched and crafted content for a website, produced original artwork for promotional material, are learning to create podcasts about the process, and are designing and implementing assessment instruments and research methods to track and evaluate the program’s work. Every Campus A Refuge is a truly unique initiative, and Guilford is happy to be the first of many other campuses to embark on this very necessary “radical hospitality.” From Florida to Canada, and

AS S O C I AT E P R O F ES S O R D I YA A B D O ( L E F T ) , C H A I R O F T H E E N G L I S H A N D C R E AT I V E W R I T I N G D E PA RT M E N T, I S T H E FO U N D E R A N D D I R ECTO R O F E V E RY CA M P U S A R E F U G E .

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STUDENT FEATURE

AN INSPIRED LEADER JOSÉ OLIVA | CLASS OF 2017

BY DA N N O N T E


AN INSPIRED LEADER JOSÉ OLIVA

Less than six years ago, José Oliva ’17 lived with his

hundreds of high school students — immigrants and the

grandparents in Tiucal, a rural village in Guatemala.

children of immigrants — about the college application process.

His mother had moved to the U.S. to work in the textile industry

José has been able to help others because Guilford helped

when he was a baby. Few people in his hometown attended high

him, he says.

school, and fewer still had the opportunity to go to college. He didn’t speak English.

“When no one else believed in me, Guilford believed in me,” he says. "Guilford provided an opportunity that no one else

Today, José thrives at Guilford. He served the College as the

was providing. It didn’t put limits on what I could do, and

first Latino president of Community Senate during his sophomore

it opened the doors that needed to be opened.”

year, and he has served the wider community by educating

A NEW WORLD José and his grandparents flew from Guatemala to North Carolina to join his mother on Jan. 16, 2011. His grandparents were coming for a visit; José, 15, was coming to stay. Soon after arriving in Greensboro, José started attending Doris Henderson Newcomers School, two miles west of Guilford on Friendly Avenue. Newcomers School serves students born outside the U.S. who are not English speakers. José struggled to adjust. He was behind many students his age, and he didn’t know anyone. After they had been in the U.S. a few months, his grandfather became sick. Worrying about his grandfather, the only father José had ever known, made things harder. His grandparents returned to Guatemala after three months, sooner than they had planned. His grandfather’s health continued to worsen. In the fall, Newcomers named José to the superintendent’s advisory council, a group with one student from each high school in the county to provide feedback and advice to the superintendent of Guilford County Schools. The other students, academically gifted and engaged in their communities, inspired José.

José has made the most of that opportunity.

“Everybody in that room was the best of the best that you could imagine, and that’s when I first started hearing about Guilford College and the Early College,” José says. “A lot of people were doing work on interfaith issues, bringing different religions together, and some people were working on homelessness. Other people were working with refugees.” José started to dream that he, too, could change the world. Then came Oct. 18, 2011, one of the best and one of the worst days of his life. As a member of the advisory council, he was invited to attend an Oct. 18 appearance by President Barack Obama in Jamestown. The president spoke about daring to take risks and overcoming obstacles, José remembers. The high school students made their way to the front of the crowd and were able to shake hands with the president. Later the same day, José attended a summit organized by the City of Greensboro’s Human Relations Commission. The last workshop, led by Andrew Young, focused on the city’s immigrants, housing patterns and changing demographics.

“I thought, this is a huge opportunity,” José says. “One, I just learned that nothing is impossible. Two, this guy is teaching me that there is a lot of room and opportunity to do something big.” Back home, the words flooded out of José as he told his mom about his day. Then the phone rang. It was his uncle in Guatemala. His grandfather had died. José felt as though he’d been in a car crash, smashing into a wall at full speed. His enthusiasm and optimism vanished. The months that followed became a blur. José knew he should be focused on academics, but he didn’t care. One of the few things he remembers from that time is Soy un Líder, “I am a Leader,” a daylong conference at Guilford for high school students and their parents focused on empowering and preparing students to pursue higher education. Irving Zavaleta ’08 and Yazmin Garcia ’11 founded the annual conference in 2007. Irving, now Guilford’s assistant director for multicultural education and Latino community coordinator, spoke at the 2011 conference and met José.

Andrew, who is now the Bonner Center’s volunteer training coordinator, spoke about the city’s need to more fully engage all of its residents, including immigrants. The president’s speech and the human relations summit moved José.

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STUDENT FEATURE

A DREAM COMES TRUE In January 2012, José left Newcomers for Greensboro College Middle College. One teacher was especially supportive. Joshua Brethauer ’96, who had been a Bonner Scholar at Guilford, provided encouragement that helped José rekindle his drive. José took the ACT and the SAT, but with only two years of English, his scores weren’t high enough to help him win scholarships. “My test scores didn’t represent who I am,” he says. His frustration grew as he kept filling out scholarship applications and kept being denied. As the months went by, he worried that he wouldn’t be able to attend college. In February 2013, the winter of his senior year of high school, he called Irving for advice. The two met for lunch, and Irving told him about the Bonner Program and encouraged him to apply to Guilford. Josh suggested the same thing and wrote José a recommendation that predicted he would become president of Community Senate. Guilford accepted José, and so did the Bonner Program. When he enrolled at Guilford, José became the first person in his family to attend college. One of his dreams had come true. José coming to Guilford wasn’t an accident, according to James Shields ’00, director of the Bonner Center. “His presence here is an outcome of the way we intentionally engage the community,” James says. “We engage the community in ways that other schools don’t, and we should be really proud of that.” Once on campus, José reconnected with Andrew Young. José says Andrew helped channel his enthusiasm into action, challenging him to figure out what was needed to turn his grand ideas into reality. “By disposition and by his own passions, José is a community builder,” Andrew says. “He was and he is a natural fit for Guilford College.”

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Inspired by Soy un Líder, José wanted to create another conference to help prepare immigrants for college. During his first year at the College, he spent countless hours doing just that with assistance from Guilfordians and his network of contacts in the wider community. Almost 40 families attended the Roads to College conference in March 2014, which included remarks from President Kent Chabotar and leaders from other local colleges. Following the conference, Roads to College held workshops at eight local high schools and coordinated visits by mentors to students’ houses. All told, Roads to College reached 300 people. “We had three main goals,” José says. “We wanted to inspire people, to inform them and to connect them.” “I was not inspired when I was applying to college after being denied so many times. And I didn’t really understand the application process, so we wanted to inform people. Then we wanted to connect people, because I honestly believe that if it hadn’t been for Irving and Josh, I wouldn’t have made it.” In addition to performing service, José found inspiration and made connections in the classroom. In a course taught by Maria Rosales, José and the other students read Borderlands, a semi-autobiographical book by Gloria E. Anzaldúa. José identified with the challenges faced by the narrator, who speaks English at school and Spanish at home, never feeling American enough or Mexican enough. Maria, an associate professor of political science, and the course had a powerful impact on José. “She really guided me to better understand questions of identity,” José says of Maria, who became his academic advisor. “You don’t have to be this or that, but you can embrace everything you are. That was really eye-opening.” José took his first economics course with Professor of Economics Robert G. Williams. He looked forward to each class but questioned whether he could keep up

with the unfamiliar subject matter. Robert encouraged him to keep trying. “He took me from where I was and pushed me to be who I wanted to be,” José says. “He told me, ’If this is your passion, if this is what you want to be, we’re going to work through it. It’s going to be hard, but we’re going to make it.’ I’ve become a better student just by being so encouraged.

SOY UN LÍDER During the spring of his first year at Guilford, while he was running for president of Community Senate, José met a candidate for another presidency. He was studying outside Hege Library but also being friendly to everyone who passed. Among those walking by were trustee Kathy Coe and Jane K. Fernandes, the provost at UNC Asheville and one of three finalists to become Guilford’s next president. José chatted with Jane and attended her next campus forum. Afterward they exchanged contact information and posed for a photo. “She was applying for her job and I was running for office, so neither of us really had a position,” José says. “We didn’t know what was going to happen, but we started building a good relationship.” José made another important connection that spring. After being elected president, he attended the Board of Trustees meeting in May, where he met trustee Lionel Johnson. Lionel gave José his phone number and told him to call anytime. Lionel became another source of advice and encouragement. Lionel’s generosity and commitment to Guilford inspired José. “Really that gave me a lot of hope for Guilford, this idea that we’re a family, we’re a community, and we work together,” José says. “It really changed my perspective on what can be accomplished at Guilford.” When the College had to make difficult budget decisions, José knew he could always reach Jane and Lionel by phone


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“I want other students to know things might not be easy, but they will overcome the challenges. I want them to know they are not alone.” or email to discuss how to bring the community together and how to promote better communication. As president, José worked to provide financial support from Community Senate to social justice, diversity and student development programs. Along with his predecessor, Samir Hazboun ’14, and his successor, Molly Anne Marcotte ’17, he tried to focus resources on sexual assault prevention. He’s proud of helping to organize a forum of the Board of Trustees and students on

Feb. 25, 2015. “There were 150 people there,” José says. “Students got to share their stories, and the board was really receptive. That forum was important. I felt like Guilford would be a stronger community if there was a better relationship between students and the board.” During his year as president and since, José has continued to serve the immigrant community. He helped raise money for the ninth-annual Soy un Líder conference, a Nov. 7 event attended by more than 350 high school students and their parents. He interned during the spring semester with the American Friends Service Committee, supporting a program of workshops to train community members how to aid and advocate for undocumented immigrants. Also during the spring semester, José and fellow students Yves Dusenge ’17 and Ayellor Karbah ’17 spent a Saturday morning at Newcomers School. Yves is from Rwanda, Ayellor from Liberia. They made the short drive from Guilford to speak to high school students who are

immigrants. They spoke, sometimes with the help of interpreters, to students who are native speakers of Spanish, Vietnamese, Nepali, Urdu, Arabic, Swahili and French. Regardless of the language, the message was the same: Keep up your grades. Never give up. You can go to college. You can accomplish anything. It’s a message the students need to hear, José says. “As a student in high school, I was always told I couldn’t go to college because of the high cost and my English,” he says. “But here I am, only a year away from graduation.” Visiting Newcomers inspires José, and José hopes to inspire newcomers by his visits. “The students remind me a lot of myself, because I had to go through similar things,” he says. “I know everybody at Newcomers has the potential to do something big. “I want other students to know things might not be easy, but they will overcome the challenges. I want them to know they are not alone.” •

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STUDENT FEATURE

STEPPING UP TO THE PLATE LAURA HALL | CLASS OF 2016 BY B E TS I R O B I N S O N

Just three weeks into her student teaching rotation at Guilford Elementary School last fall, Laura Hall ’16 got summoned to the principal’s office. “The principal sat me down,” recalled Laura, who believed everything was going well in the kindergarten class she had been assigned to work with. “I thought — what did I do wrong?” Turns out, the school had a big problem. A teacher on the fourthgrade team had left unexpectedly. The principal needed to fill the position as quickly as possible. And none other than Laura Hall, a softball standout majoring in elementary education and English, had come highly recommended for the job. “They gave me 24 hours to decide. I remember not sleeping at all and talking to my family. I was terrified,” she said. “I was mostly nervous for the kids. I wanted to make sure they had the most qualified person teaching them. Why would they trust a 21-year-old student teacher coming in?” Despite her doubts, Laura accepted the challenge and never looked back. “I said yes, and it became the most rewarding experience of my life. Those kids, I think I learned more from them in those couple of months than I ever could have taught them. As much as I was

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"AS MUCH AS I WAS TEACHING THEM, THEY WERE TEACHING ME — ABOUT MYSELF, ABOUT TEACHING STRATEGIES, ABOUT HOW TO OVERCOME DIFFICULTIES AND CHALLENGES." L AU R A H A L L CA P P E D A G R E AT S O F T BA L L CA R E E R BY H I T T I N G . 3 6 8 A N D ST E A L I N G 2 0 BAS ES I N H E R F I N A L S E AS O N W I T H T H E Q UA K E R S .

teaching them, they were teaching me — about myself, about teaching strategies, about how to overcome difficulties and challenges.” Julie Burke, an assistant professor and chair of the Department of Education Studies, watched in awe as the class came together under Laura’s leadership. The young teacher worked days, nights and weekends, doing whatever it took to support, encourage and engage every student. And she never stopped asking questions. “Laura was working with kids who hadn’t had a teacher for weeks — the whole first part of their semester was disrupted,” Julie said. "She just took that on like gangbusters. I think it would have destroyed a lesser student." “Laura was able to see past her own challenges to what was best for the children. In everything she did, she put them first.” That’s the same way the star center fielder from Pittsburgh treats her teammates on the softball field. Head Softball Coach Dennis Shores calls her “the definition of a team player.” “In the four years that I’ve known her at Guilford, she has always been one of the program’s leaders. I don’t think I’ve ever heard her say anything negative,” the coach said. “If we are on the field, either at practice or at a game, she is willing to take on any role that’s given to her, whether it’s playing in the outfield or being a pinchhitter or sitting on the bench. You can’t tell any difference in her demeanor, which is a rarity among athletes these days.”

But you won’t find Laura warming the Quaker bench very often. A starter on the softball team since the day she stepped on campus, she was named the 2015 Old Dominion Athletic Conference Softball Scholar-Athlete of the Year, Guilford’s first recipient of the league’s top academic honor. And don’t let her small stature or shy demeanor fool you: She’s fast and sneaky, too, holder of the all-time Quaker record for stolen base percentage. Laura converted 19 of 20 attempted thefts just last year. “She’s a spark plug,” Dennis said with a laugh. “She’s as quiet as a mouse, but when she speaks everyone stops and listens. She’s stepped up so many times in the past three years — I couldn’t name just one example. No matter what she does, she gives it 110 percent.” Laura is not one to take credit, even when it’s due. She keeps her focus on the team. “It is nice being recognized for things, but it’s not really about me, to be honest. I just love playing the game and I love my teammates. That is what I am thinking about in the game,” she said. “Being a team player is supporting your teammates and leading with confidence and by example, rather than brow-beating. The biggest thing is just showing support and caring about the people you are playing with.” Equally as impressive as her achievements on the softball field or in Guilford’s Honors Program — she holds a 3.9 GPA — is Laura’s dedication to the community beyond the borders of the school. A class she took her sophomore year about cross-cultural

education inspired her to work for the past two summers with AmeriCorps, teaching English to children of local refugees and immigrants. She also has tutored the children of two Montagnard families. “It inspired me to want to make a difference. I realized that what I care about most is helping people. And I love kids,” she said. “At one apartment complex I worked in, a lot of them were from Nepal. They were constantly engaged and wanted to learn and they would help each other. If a new child moved in, the other kids would automatically form a kind of buddy system and take them in. That was amazing for me to be a part of and see.” Such opportunities are one of the many reasons Laura chose to attend Guilford. And why she would like to stay connected to the community she has built here after she graduates. Recently tapped by Teach for America, she will begin her teaching career this fall at an elementary school in eastern North Carolina. “I thought I would go to college and learn exactly what I needed for the professional world. Instead I gained so many more life experiences than I could even imagine,” she said. “I love the school — there is no hiding that. It’s been an amazing four years. It has a special place in my heart. That is part of the reason I want to stay close by even after college. I have connected so much with the community and want to make it a part of my life now.” • Betsi Robinson is a freelance writer and editor who lives in Greensboro. GUI LFOR D.EDU | 27


ATHLETICS

Women’s Lacrosse Signs 8-Year-Old Brooke Austin The women’s lacrosse team held a signing-day ceremony Oct. 7 for 8-year-old Brooke Austin of nearby Summerfield. Brooke, who was diagnosed with a brain tumor when she was 8 months old, comes to the Quakers through Team IMPACT, a nonprofit that matches children facing life-threatening and chronic illnesses with college athletics teams. •

Matt Pawlowski Named Gagliardi Finalist Quarterback Matt Pawlowski ’16 in December was named one of four finalists for the Gagliardi Trophy, NCAA Division III football’s highest honor. Matt also won his second straight J. Stokely Fulton Old Dominion Athletic Conference (ODAC) Offensive Football Player of the Year Award, becoming the first player to win the honor in successive seasons. Coach Chris Rusiewicz’s Quakers broke at least 29 Guilford records in 2015, the best football season in school history. The team’s nine wins and six league victories both set school standards. •

Stephanie Flamini Sets Wins Record Coach Stephanie Flamini reached two coaching milestones this season, her 13th leading the women’s basketball team. On Nov. 24, the Quakers defeated N.C. Wesleyan College, giving Stephanie her 188th win at Guilford, a program record. Previous record holder Barb Bausch coached the women’s basketball team to 187 wins from 1993 to 2003. Stephanie reached her 200th Guilford victory on Jan. 30 with a win over Washington and Lee University.

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For the season, Stephanie guided the team to a 22-6 overall record and the second round of the Division III playoffs.

She received her first Old Dominion Athletic Conference Women’s Basketball Coach of the Year Award in February and was named the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association’s Region 5 Coach of the Year in March. Forward Anais Weatherly ’17 also received accolades for her performance. Anais was recognized with honorable mention NCAA Division III All-America honors. She also was named a Second Team All-South pick and a First Team All-ODAC selection. With no seniors on this year’s roster, the team could return all 14 letter winners in 2016-17. •


THANK YOU TO ALL THE DONORS WHO HELP GUILFORD STUDENTS, LIKE ME, STUDY AT THIS WONDERFUL COLLEGE. I’m only a sophomore, but I feel like I’ve done a lot already for our campus and for myself as a student. I’m currently the social justice editor and diversity coordinator of the award-winning Guilfordian newspaper, an office assistant in the Career Development Center, secretary of our Cheer and Dance Team,and an Honors Program Scholar. My Guilford experience has helped me grow as a writer and as a person. I’ve learned so much about different cultures and felt embraced by this community. Without your help, I wouldn’t be here having this amazing experience. I am forever grateful.

BEATRIZ CALDAS ’18 English Major French & Communications Minors Recife, Brazil

To hear Beatriz’s story, visit guilford.edu/magazine16

YOUR GIFT MATTERS! To make a gift to Guilford, visit guilford.edu/makeagift. To learn more about opportunities to support scholarships, contact Senior Director of Annual Giving Jaclyn Day at 336.316.2261.


ALUMNI FEATURE

REMEMBERING A GUILFORD GIANT S E T H M AC O N | 1 9 1 9 – 2 0 1 6

BY T Y B U C K N E R

Seth C. Macon ’40, one of Guilford’s most dedicated alumni and ardent supporters, rose from humble beginnings on a farm in rural Randolph County to a position of leadership with the College and in the Greensboro community. When he died Feb. 17 at the age of 96, President Emeritus Bill Rogers, during whose tenure Seth became trustee chair, said, “We have lost one of the remaining giants of community responsibility, religious and social insight, and meaningful leadership.” President Jane K. Fernandes called it the end of “a 70-plus-year love affair” between Seth, his late wife Hazel Monsees Macon ’41 and their alma mater. Seth was born in 1919 about 20 miles south of Greensboro. World War I had just ended. A flu epidemic had killed more than 20 million people worldwide. Women were not yet eligible to vote. Movies were silent, and radio had just been invented.

“At the end of the day I went home, had a badly needed bath, loaded the trunk, and someone drove me to Guilford College. I was seventeen years old and had a total of eight dollars in my pocket. I moved into a room in Cox Hall, which was prearranged for me by Bill Isley, had breakfast in the College kitchen the next morning, and reported for work.” — S ET H M ACO N, U PH I LL BOTH WAYS

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His parents were Quakers, Oran Thomas “O.T.” Macon and Kate Craven Macon, and he grew up in the Providence Friends Meeting. The family had ties to Guilford through Eli Macon, Seth’s great-grandfather, who attended New Garden Boarding School in the 1800s. Seth’s half-brother Hershal and brother Leonard preceded him at Guilford. Leonard and Seth attended during the Great Depression. “Everybody knew what would be needed because the process had just been gone through with Leonard. He had paved the way for me,” Seth wrote in his 2006 memoir, Uphill Both Ways. Seth worked for a year after finishing high school and enrolled at Guilford in 1937. To help cover the cost of college, he took various jobs on campus as a maintenance man, coal shoveler, garbage


collector and boiler-room operator, all at 25 cents an hour. For spending money he cut hair in his room in Cox Hall (now Hege-Cox Hall). Football coach Block Smith saw Seth hauling trash at the end of his sophomore year and recruited him to play despite a complete lack of football experience. Seth played for two years, starting every game at left guard as a senior and helping the team to a 6-3 record. At Guilford he met Hazel, an outstanding student who was recruited from her Davidson County high school to the College by President Clyde Milner and Professor Garness Purdom. Seth and Hazel sat next to each other in compulsory chapel, as seating was assigned alphabetically.

The Alumni Association Board of Directors, of which Seth was once a member, presented him with its Distinguished Service Award in 1978. He was inducted into the Guilford College Athletics Hall of Fame in 2002. In Uphill Both Ways, Seth expressed the gratitude he and Hazel felt for Guilford College “for the help we have received to prepare us for, and help us have, a good life, which is much, much more than just making a good living.” •

Alumni and friends of the College are invited to celebrate Seth’s service by making a gift for the welcome center project at giving.guilford.edu.

“At first I walked behind her from chapel to our next classes at King Hall,” Seth wrote in Uphill Both Ways. “It wasn’t long before I started walking with her… I have frequently said, ’I didn’t make very good grades at college but I got a great wife.’ ” Seth took a job with Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Company after graduating and then served in the Army Air Corps Training Command for six years following the outbreak of World War II. Seth’s military service and first job with Jefferson Standard took the Macons to Tampa, Fla.; Ft. Worth, Texas; and Asheville, N.C., but they returned to Greensboro in 1946. He worked with Jefferson Standard for 44 years until his retirement as a senior vice president in 1984. Hazel and Seth had two children, both of whom attended Guilford. Carol graduated in 1969; Randall in 1974. Guilford called on Seth to serve on the presidential search committee that recommended hiring Grimsley Hobbs ’47 in 1966. As an alumnus, parent and community leader, Seth was invited to become an associate trustee of the College in 1969 — only Quakers were allowed on the board and Seth had joined the Baptist denomination. When the rules were changed later in 1969, Seth became a full-fledged trustee. He served on the presidential search committee that recommended hiring Bill Rogers in 1980 and became the first non-Quaker chair of the Board of Trustees the same year. He served as board chair for eight years and remained an active trustee until 1997. Seth and Hazel were longtime President’s Club members, supporting many College initiatives. For example, they established the Seth C. and Hazel M. Macon GOAL Student Loan Fund and the Seth and Hazel Macon Professorship. They made an estate gift to support the creation of a welcome center on campus.

S E T H A N D H A Z E L M AC O N R E L A X O N T H E T E R R AC E N A M E D I N T H E I R H O N O R , O U TS I D E T H E H EG E L I B R A RY.

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PHILANTHROPY

‘FAIRY GODMOTHERS’ WORK MAGIC ON MARY HOBBS HALL

A LU M N A E W H O R A I S E D M O N E Y TO R E N OVAT E M A RY H O B B S H A L L WAV E “ M AG I C WA N D S ” G I V E N

BY DA N N O N T E

By the time it turned 100, Mary Hobbs Hall was showing its age. Guilford built the brick structure in 1907 as a cooperative-living residence hall for women who might not have been able to afford college otherwise. Determined that their home at Guilford would be restored, a dozen alumnae — “Hobbs Girls” — began raising money. In the years that followed, 384 former residents and other supporters made gifts totaling $1.7 million. The work made possible by that generosity was completed over the summer. Scores of alumnae returned to campus Oct. 2 for a ribbon-cutting and open house to celebrate the newly renovated Mary Hobbs, the College’s oldest residence hall. “This is an amazing story of a dedicated group of alumnae and friends giving large and small gifts to make an important project a reality,” President Jane K. Fernandes told the crowd that braved a cold rain to gather in front of the building. “I can’t think of any better reflection of the spirit of Guilford College than the way this unfolded.” The six people who cut the ribbon stretched across the front porch included 99-year-old Margaret Barnes Budd ’37 and daughter Rosemary Budd Lenten ’64, a member of the fundraising committee. Beside them was Hobbs RA Stephanie Byer ’16. Carolyn Kirkman Harmon ’64, the chair of the fundraising committee, stood between her 15-year-old granddaughter Lauren Raiford and Jane. Lauren became the youngest donor to the renovation fund when she made a gift as a 9-year-old.

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TO T H E M BY T H E ST U D E N TS W H O L I V E I N T H E R E V I TA L I Z E D R ES I D E N C E H A L L .

After the ribbon-cutting, current residents of Hobbs presented the 12 members of the fundraising committee with “magic wands” because they consider the women to be fairy godmothers. In addition to raising money for the renovations, committee members picked out and purchased furniture for the hall’s lounges and kitchen. They found ice trays that make cubes small enough to fit in students’ water bottles. They baked cookies and served refreshments in August when a new generation of women moved in. Margaret Barnes Budd, the ribbon-cutter who lived in Hobbs 80 years ago and roomed with the mother of longtime faculty member Elwood Parker, sat in one of the front parlors during the open house. “It’s wonderful. It’s so pretty, so homey,” she said of Hobbs today. “The same spirit is here.” Heather Dukes ’16 agrees. The spirit of Hobbs, the strong sense of community that continues to inspire alumnae, is alive among current residents. Heather transferred to Guilford and lived in Hobbs as a sophomore. She quickly formed close bonds with the other residents. Now she’s living in Hobbs again for her senior year. “It’s even more special this year,” Heather said, “because there’s a feeling of coming home.” •

To view renovation images, visit guilford.edu/magazine16


FIRST BOOST AWARD PRESENTED AT JOURNEYS IN BLACKNESS As a student at Westtown, a Quaker boarding school in West Chester, Pa., Najha Zigbi-Johnson ’17 was particular about her choice of colleges. “I wanted to continue my education in a place with a clear values system,” she said. The lifelong resident of Central Harlem, New York City, decided that Guilford was that place, and she has distinguished herself academically and as a student leader over the past three years. On March 5, the Black Alumni of Guilford College Advisory Board presented Najha with the inaugural BOOST Award for academic excellence. The award was established by the Black Alumni of Guilford College Advisory Board and funded by alumni and friends. “It’s incredible that the BAGC is supportive of current students and have an active presence on campus,” she said. “It’s exciting to know that when I graduate that I will be a part of a community of black alums that are invested in the future and sustainability of Guilford.” Najha and 31 other students received awards at the annual Journeys in Blackness Banquet that celebrates black student

N A J H A Z I G B I - J O H N S O N ’ 1 7 I S T H E I N AU G U R A L R EC I P I E N T O F T H E B O O ST AWA R D ESTA B L I S H E D BY T H E B L AC K A LU M N I O F G U I L FO R D C O L L EG E . N A J H A W I L L U S E H E R S C H O L A R S H I P F U N D S TO C O N D U CT R ES E A R C H I N S PA I N T H I S S U M M E R . P H OTO BY AS H L E Y G I L M E R EC G ’ 0 8 .

excellence and black culture on campus. The Rev. Santes Beatty ’97 delivered the event’s keynote address. After graduating from Guilford, Santes served the College as Bonner Scholars coordinator, the first director of African American affairs, director of multicultural services, Africana Community coordinator and assistant football coach. He oversaw the Conflict Resolution Resource Center and helped develop the Multicultural Leadership Scholars Program. Since 2014, Santes has worked as director of multi-ethnic ministries within the Church Multiplication and Discipleship Division of The Wesleyan Church, headquartered in Indiana. In addition to receiving the BOOST Award, Najha was selected by the Multicultural Education Department to receive the Adrienne Israel Student Academic Excellence Award. A religious studies major with a minor in community studies, she expects to complete her degree requirements as soon as this December and is considering graduate programs. She is interested in finding ways to create more sustainable, equitable places in which people can live and thrive. “Part of being a

K E Y N OT E S P E A K E R R E V. SA N T ES B E AT T Y ’ 9 7 A N D JA M ES S H I E L D S ’ 0 0 , D I R ECTO R O F T H E B O N N E R C E N T E R FO R C O M M U N I T Y S E R V I C E & L E A R N I N G, S H A R E A S P EC I A L M O M E N T AT T H E J O U R N E YS I N B L AC K N ES S BA N Q U E T. P H OTO BY AS H L E Y G I L M E R EC G ’ 0 8 .

Guilford student is being a global citizen,” said Najha, who went to Cuba on a Collegeled study abroad program. She is active with Integrity for Guilford, a student group working with President Jane K. Fernandes and senior leaders to create a sustainable future for the College with attention to racism and the needs of marginalized students. Najha enjoys collaborating on projects with other college students in Greensboro. “A lot of my learning has been in engaging with other students from different backgrounds,” she said. “I’m humbled by others I’ve been around." • GUI LFOR D.EDU | 3 3


PHILANTHROPY

MURCHISON ESTATE GIFT SUPPORTS FRIENDS CENTER BY T Y B U C K N E R

Guilford has received a gift of $330,000 for Friends Center from the estate of long-time Greensboro residents and College supporters Marian Kirkman Murchison ’45 and her husband, Victor. “We deeply appreciate this generous gift from the Murchisons supporting Friends Center,” President Jane K. Fernandes said. “We thank Marian’s surviving triplet sister, Mary Kirkman Routh ’45, and her husband, Charlie, for their abiding interest in Guilford and for stewarding the gift as estate executors.” Friends Center at Guilford College nurtures servant-leaders on campus and in the wider community through activities informed by Friends’ faith and practice. It draws financial and relational support from Quakers regionally, including members of an advisory board. Marian attended Guilford along with her triplet sister, Mary, and brother, Stacy ’45, in the early 1940s. The sisters lived together in Mary Hobbs Hall and later earned their bachelor’s degrees in home economics at the Woman’s College of the University of North Carolina (now UNCG). In 1947, Marian married Victor Murchison, a Quaker pastor who had a 67-year ministry with Friends Meetings in Winston-Salem, Goldsboro, Asheboro and High Point. She worked for N.C. Cooperative Extension Services. Marian died in 2014; Victor in 2006. “Members of my wife’s family have had a strong commitment to education all their lives. They all earned advanced degrees and supported educational causes while they were living and in their estates,” Charlie Routh said. “Guilford College and Quaker beliefs mean so much to all of us, and we are pleased that the Murchison gift will benefit Friends Center.”

M A RY K I R K M A N R O U T H ’ 4 5 A N D H E R H U S BA N D, C H A R L I E , A R E F L A N K E D BY P R ES I D E N T JA N E K . F E R N A N D ES A N D W ES S DA N I E LS , T H E W I L L I A M R . R O G E R S D I R ECTO R O F F R I E N D S C E N T E R A N D Q UA K E R ST U D I ES .

Wess Daniels, the William R. Rogers director of Friends Center and Quaker studies, said, “Charlie and Mary Routh exemplifywith their lives the qualities of what it means to move through the world as Quakers. Both in gift and in action, they embody George Fox’s words, ’be patterns, be examples ... that your carriage and life may preach among all sorts of people.’ “With gratitude, Friends Center receives this gift and will put it to use in ways that reflect this calling.” •

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M E M B E R S O F T H E H EG E FA M I LY, I N C LU D I N G C U RT ’ 5 6 A N D PAT ’ 5 7, C E L E B R AT E T H E E VO LU T I O N O F T H E L I B R A RY T H AT B E A R S T H E I R N A M E AT A N A P R I L 2 0 1 5 GA L A .

The Collaboratory, on schedule to open this fall, is part of a plan for making Hege Library an “Academic Commons” — an incubator of thought and hive of activity on campus, according to Suzanne Bartels, director of library services and instructional technology.

HEGES EXTEND LEGACY OF GENEROSITY BY T Y B U C K N E R

Curt Hege ’56 remembers spending many hours studying in the library when he was a student at Guilford College, and the payoff for Curt — and the College — has been significant. “Admittedly, my high school was pretty lenient on academics, and when I got to Guilford I had to study like crazy,” says Curt, who became a successful Winston-Salem construction contractor after graduating 60 years ago. Curt, his wife, Pat ’57, and family have long supported student learning centered in the campus library. At an April 2015 gala, the College celebrated the 25th anniversary of the Hege-funded major addition to the library that now bears their name. The Heges and the Guilford College Friends of the Library announced at the gala their joint commitment to fund two annual $1,000 Hege Library Research Awards in recognition of exemplary senior research theses. Three generations of the Hege family have earned degrees from the College. Of Curt and Pat’s four children, two graduated from the College. A son-in-law and granddaughter are alumni, and a grandson currently is enrolled. Recently, the Heges extended their legacy of generosity by making possible the Teaching, Learning and Research Collaboratory on the second floor of the library through a gift-in-kind of construction by their company, Shields Inc.

As the plan is realized, new integrated learning spaces will advance teaching, learning and research, bringing together faculty, students, librarians, technologists and academic-support professionals to create a new synergy, to catalyze creativity and interdisciplinary activity. The Collaboratory holds special significance in light of a $100,000 grant to the College from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Awarded in 2014, the grant supports Digital Directions for the Arts and Humanities, an initiative to promote digital literacy and teaching. Faculty development made possible by the grant is helping professors creatively incorporate digital teaching into their courses. “Hege Library’s traditional role as knowledge repository is evolving in exciting ways to extend to one of interactive learning laboratory,” Suzanne says. “We will incorporate new integratedlearning spaces within a technology-enriched environment to advance teaching, learning and research.” The Collaboratory — the initial phase of the Academic Commons — will consist of two learning spaces of highly flexible design that will support collaboration and innovation for students and faculty across the curriculum. One will be a faculty-student collaboration space with offices for the director of faculty development and the director of undergraduate research and creative endeavors. The other space will be an experimental classroom. Existing adjoining space will accommodate the director of the Honors Program — a natural alignment and advantage for the prestigious program’s recruitment and retention efforts. “The Hege Library of the future has the potential for transforming Guilford College and revitalizing the liberal arts commitment that is at the core of its mission,” Suzanne says. The campus got a glimpse of the future when the former library reference area on the main level was redesigned as the Academic and Creative Suite last year. Café space was introduced in a unique partnership with the student-run Greenleaf Coffee Co-op. “The most important investment is in relationship building, in the commitment to collaboration and fostering a sense of community that aligns with Guilford’s strong legacy of Quaker values,” she says. Curt says he is able to support development of the Teaching, Learning and Research Collaboratory because the College impacted his life in a positive way more than six decades ago. “I probably would not have gone to college had it not been for the athletic scholarship I received at Guilford,” says the former Quaker football player. “Guilford has done more for me than I’ve ever done for Guilford.” •

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PHILANTHROPY

MORE THAN 700 DONATE ON ANNUAL DAY FOR GUILFORD View our thank you video online at guilford.edu/magazine16

ST U D E N TS A N D STA F F ST R I K E A P O S E AT T H E P H OTO B O OT H D U R I N G T H E 2 4 - H O U R DAY FO R G U I L FO R D G I V I N G C H A L L E N G E . P H OTO BY AS H L E Y G I L M E R EC G ’ 0 8 .

On the second-annual Day for Guilford, 748 people — including 174 first-time donors — gave $225,340 to the College. Chapters of the Alumni Association held celebratory meet-ups in Boston, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, Philadelphia, Raleigh and Washington on March 30, the day of the 24-hour giving challenge. Thank you to the alumni, trustees, students, parents, faculty, staff and students who gave! •

Vision for Excellence Raises $9.1 Million The College raised $9.1 million for student scholarships, faculty support, academic and co-curricular programs, and capital projects during its Vision for Excellence campaign that concluded in February. Vision for Excellence was a “bridge” campaign that began in July 2014 as Jane K. Fernandes assumed the College presidency and followed a $60 million Advancing Excellence campaign. College trustees led committees of volunteers, each focused on a specific VFE campaign initiative. “Vision for Excellence succeeded in keeping Guilford’s fundraising in high gear over the last 20 months,” Jane said. “We involved many new volunteers, increased faculty contact with potential donors, including

36 | SU MMER 2 01 6

alumni, and discovered many new opportunities for planned gifts. I am very grateful to the donors who contributed generously to our mission with their gifts.”

following the retirement of Vice President Mike Poston in February. A national search is underway for a new vice president and there are other vacancies on staff.

Of the $9.1 million raised in cash, pledges and planned gifts, $2.8 million was committed to programs, $2 million to scholarships and $744,000 to faculty support. Nearly $1 million was committed through unrestricted gifts, and more than $700,000 to capital projects.

“After close consultation with trustees, it was determined that we should lay down a structured campaign for now and focus our existing staff resources on general fundraising for current College needs,” Jane said. “For example, our Annual Funds momentum from VFE can continue without a campaign structure surrounding that work.”

More than $1.9 million was committed to Annual Funds that support operating expenses — exceeding the established goal. The trustees decided to conclude the VFE campaign as Guilford refocuses Advancement Division operations

In the Advancing Excellence and Vision for Excellence campaigns, Guilford raised more than $69 million in about 10 years. •


ALUMNI

G U I L FO R D S P I R I T WA R M S T H E H E A RTS O F FA M I L I ES AC R O S S G E N E R AT I O N S .

FA N TAST I C P H OTO O P P O RT U N I T I ES F I L L T H E W E E K E N D.

SUNNY CELEBRATION H O M EC O M I N G 2 0 1 5

Q UA K E TA L K P R ES E N T E R S W I L L I E R E P O L E Y ’ 0 0 , JA N I C E LY N C H S C H U ST E R ’ 8 5 , J O D I E G E D D ES ’ 1 4 , A N D D O U G B R I STO L ’ 9 0 D E L I G H T I N S H A R I N G STO R I ES .

Spectacular sunshine graced a weekend full of festivities during Homecoming 2015. Reunions, recognitions and remarkable events made for some magical memories. From captivating Quake Talks, inspiring alumni awards, timely honors for faculty icons, winning football, a picture-perfect day for a picnic at the lake and more, Guilfordians had much to celebrate.

JA M ES M C M I L L A N A N D T E D B E N F E Y R EU N I T E DURING A PROGRAM H O N O R I N G G E N E R AT I O N S O F FAC U LT Y G I A N TS .

G R E AT M U S I C AT T H E L A K E P I C N I C GAV E G U I L FO R D I A N S A C H A N C E TO B U ST A M OV E O R T WO.

GUI LFOR D.EDU | 3 7


ALUMNI D O U G G I L M E R P O S ES I N F R O N T O F FO U N D E R S H A L L W H E R E H E WO R K E D FO R 4 6 Y E A R S I N D I N I N G S E R V I C ES . D O U G, A H I G H LY R ES P ECT E D A N D B E LOV E D C O M M U N I T Y M E M B E R , WAS M A D E A N H O N O R A RY A LU M N U S D U R I N G H O M EC O M I N G 2 0 1 5 . H E W I L L B E AWA R D E D A N H O N O R A RY D EG R E E AT C O M M E N C E M E N T 2 0 1 6 . P H OTO BY AS H L E Y G I L M E R EC G ’ 0 8 .

RAISING A VILLAGE DOUG GILMER HONORED FOR T R A N S F O R M AT I V E M E N TO R S H I P

MINNETTE COLEMAN ’73 MADE THE F O L L O W I N G R E M A R K S AT T H E A LU M N I AS S O C I AT I O N AWA R D S C E R E M O N Y W H E R E D O U G WAS M A D E A N H O N O R A RY A LU M N U S .

Doug Gilmer raised a village at Guilford College. Since he joined the cafeteria staff during the 1962-63 academic year, he has been Saint Doug, a student advocate, a savior in time of need, a confidant in time of trouble and a wise elder in our village. Many of us were hired by him when we needed a job. Many of us were told by him not to give up, not to drop out. He told lots of us to get our acts together. Even though he never attended classes, even though he never taught classes, Doug has always been one of us. He is part of our history. You see, 50-plus years ago, Doug wasn’t sure he could make it on this campus. It was a turbulent time in our nation, and the young dishwasher who just wanted a job was often confronted with rocks being thrown at him and his fellow workers when they appeared on campus. One day they looked out the window of the room where 38 | SU MMER 2 016

Doug made sure they all had food and a place to stay. He helped a young man quit drinking before he ruined his life.

they washed dishes and saw several nooses hanging from a tree. This is not a story Doug readily shares with the village. I found this in the Friends Historical Collection’s The Listening Project, Guilford’s Integration, 1962 Before and After. Doug worked tirelessly to make sure he became an integral part of the community of Guilford. Like most young people, when I was a freshman I thought the wisdom he imparted was because he was old, closer to my father’s age. It was not until 15 years ago that I realized Doug Gilmer and I are less than 10 years apart. I should have known Saint Doug was ageless. He has a spirit that never tires. He has proven he embodies Guilford’s Core Values. I asked alums to share their memories of Doug and everyone who responded mentioned his dedication to the village he was raising. No one ever went hungry on his watch. He helped talk a student out of committing suicide. When a pregnant student thought she would have to leave, he gave her a job and counseled her on what to do next to achieve her goals to graduate and have her family. He was the campus father, looking out for the young women, letting the young men know when they were out of line. When a busload of workers led by a former student passed through on its way to Freedom Summer in Mississippi,

He made sure there were late-night snacks during finals week, very important for Guilford’s rising scholars. The vegetarians appreciated that he took an interest in making sure they had good food because they were in the minority. During a bad storm when roads were closed and the power was out, Doug came to campus and grilled food for the students so no one would go hungry and nothing would go to waste. I am grateful that I was part of the village Doug raised. Like a hard-working alumnus, he is always on campus whenever I return.

"He lives in every room. His name still rings in the halls. I have to smile every time I go to a function in the Douglas Gilmer Room." What qualifies Doug Gilmer to be an honorary alumnus? More than 45 years of working with students to help them graduate with the lessons he had to offer. We learned about life outside the classroom thanks to Doug. We are his accomplishments. Doug, this village known as Guilford College acknowledges your contributions, your love and your dedication to our Core Values. Thank you for sticking with us, for sharing your life with us and for being part of our history. • Minnette Coleman ’73, recipient of the Alumni Excellence Award in 2013, serves on the Guilford College Alumni Association Board and the Black Alumni of Guilford College Advisory Board.


THE HEART OF THE COLLEGE Sixty current and former faculty members with 1,913 years of service to Guilford — “the heart of the College, past and present,” in the words of President Jane K. Fernandes — have been honored with the new Exemplary Educator Award. The Homecoming event — Celebrating Our Past, Envisioning Our Future — was held on the second floor of Hege Library in a space that demonstrates the College’s ongoing commitment to transformative teaching. The area will become the Teaching, Learning and Research Collaboratory, the site of incubator classrooms and collaborative learning studios that will support innovative, technology-enriched approaches to teaching and scholarship.

2015 Alumni Association Awards The Alumni Association honored seven distinguished individuals and a group during a Saturday morning Homecoming ceremony in the Moon Room of Dana Auditorium. Jeff Thigpen ’93 and Kelly Dempster ’73 earned the Alumni Excellence Award, which has been given since 1980. Jeff is Guilford County Register of Deeds and a former admission staff member; Kelly, a College trustee, is a senior staff geologist for Chevron. Nicole Arnold ’11 and Deena Zaru ’10 received the Young Alumni Achievement Award, which was established in 2001. Nicole is a student success specialist at UNC Chapel Hill who worked in the Center for Continuing Education at Guilford. Deena is a digital producer for CNN Politics. John Bell ’58, former director of admission at Guilford, now retired, earned the Distinguished Service Award. The award originated in 1954 and in 2004 was named for Charles C. Hendricks ’40, who himself was once director of admission. The Mary Hobbs Hall Alumnae Committee was presented with the Community Cares Award. Carolyn Kirkman Harmon ’64 accepted for the committee, which raised $1.7 million from nearly 400 donors for renovation of the residence hall. The award was first presented in 2010. Beloved, long-time staff members Max Carter and Doug Gilmer were named honorary alumni. Max retired as William R. Rogers Director of Friends Center and Quaker Studies in 2015. Doug retired from dining services in 2009. Only four people have been recognized as honorary College alumni. •

EXEMPLARY EDUCATORS AWARD RECIPIENTS

Listed by years of service

Forty Years

Alexander R. Stoesen 33

William A. Grubbs 48

Maritza Almeida 32

Elwood G. Parker 47

Henry Garland Granger 32

Joyce P. Clark 43

Charles G. Smith 32

George Rudolph Gordh 41

Peter B. Bobko 31

Richard L. Zweigenhaft 41

Thomas P. Espinola 31

Frank Keegan 40

Carole Treadway 31 Kathleen A. Tritschler 31

Thirty Years

Sylvia Trelles 30

Jonathan W. Malino 39 John Stoneburner 39

Twenty Years

Martha H. Cooley 38

Vernie Davis 29

Adele Wayman 38

Jeff Jeske 29

Herbert T. Appenzeller 37

Rudolph S. Behar 29

David MacInnes 37

Timothy H. Lindeman 29

Lynn Moseley 37

Marlene McCauley 29

Roy H. Nydorf 37

Barton Parks 29

Carol Stoneburner 37

Dorothy Borei 28

Robert G. Williams 37

Robert B. Williams 28

Ann Deagon 36

Jerry Caris Godard 27

James B. Gutsell 36

John Zerbe 27

Beth Keiser 36

Timothy Kircher 26

Mel Keiser 36

Max L. Carter 25

Kathrynn A. Adams 35

Betty Turner Kane 25

Claire Morse 35

James C. McMillan 22

Rex Adelberger 34

Jacqueline Ludel 21

Sarah Malino 34

Carolyn Beard Whitlow 21

Claude Mourot-Hoffman 34

Lee Johnson 20

Gwen J. Reddeck 34 Paul Zopf 34

Ten Years

Louis B. Fike 33

William R. Rogers 19

Adrienne L. Israel 33

Carol M. Clark 18

Cyril Harvey 33

O. Theodor Benfey 15 Judith Weller Harvey 15

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CLASS NOTES

Remembering Howard Coble ’53 1931-2015 BY C L A I R E MASSAG E E LAN I E R ’1 2

“Where’d you go to high school?” Those were the first words Congressman Howard Coble ever spoke to me, the summer after my sophomore year when I interned in his Washington, D.C., office — and possibly the first words he spoke to many of you. “Well,” I said, tentatively, “I went to Greensboro Day School from kindergarten through 11th grade but graduated from High Point Middle College.” He smiled and said, “You’re a Bengal!” Surprised that a congressman would know my mascot, I perked up and said, “Yes, I am!” Next, he asked me about college. Thrilled to find out we were fellow Guilfordians, he wanted to hear about my experience there so far. How could a veteran congressman afford to spend time chatting with an intern? Surely he had more pressing matters to attend to. I didn’t yet realize that he’d been in Congress longer than I’d been alive for exactly that reason, because of his genuine interest in others.

R E P. H O WA R D C O B L E ’ 5 3 A N D C L A I R E M AS SAG E E L A N I E R ’ 1 2 ( S E AT E D ) A R E J O I N E D BY C L A I R E ’ S PA R E N TS , T E R RY A N D M A R GA R E T, A N D C L A I R E ’ S H U S BA N D, PAT R I C K L A N I E R ’ 1 2 , I N H O WA R D ’ S CA P I TO L H I L L O F F I C E . “AS WAS H I S ST Y L E , H O WA R D L E T M E S I T I N H I S C H A I R , C L A I R E SAYS .

As we grew closer and I became aware of the gem to which I had unparalleled access, I asked him for life advice, the secret to his success. He ignored the question and asked how my parents were doing. He answered whether he meant to or not. • Claire Massagee Lanier interned with Howard and other members of Congress while a student at Guilford. She worked for Howard from 2012 to 2015. She graduated in 2012 and is currently in Guilford’s post-baccalaureate program for health professionals.

It wasn’t a facade. He treated everyone that way. Whether he was talking with the speaker of the House, picking up his dry cleaning or answering questions for a fifth-grader’s school project, he was interested in the individual directly in front of him. He wanted to know how they were doing, how their family was doing and, if he had just met them, where they went to high school. He was a good interviewee, for the most part. His illustrious career provided him with great fodder for stories. Like the time violinists in Budapest played “The Blue Danube” for the visiting congressman. They had been asked to perform Howard’s favorite type of music: bluegrass. His story about having dinner with Nelson Mandala while on a trip to South Africa is one of my favorites. His staff had joked that his first question would be, “Well, Nelson, where’d you go to high school?” Howard had great comedic timing, and anyone who’s tried to tell the Ollie and Lars fisherman joke knows he’s the only one meant to tell it. Interviewers learned that the friendly congressman became less forthcoming when their questions turned to his strengths and accomplishments. He wouldn’t talk about himself.

In Memoriam Jan. 22, 2015

Lillie Griffin ’35

Margaret March ’41

Feb. 7, 2015

Feb. 3, 2015

Mary Tacy Allen Mann ’37

David R. Parker ’41

Jan. 24, 2015

Feb. 2, 2015

Gladys Draudt ’38

Luella Thomas ’41

Oct. 10, 2015

Oct. 15, 2015

Lois Smith ’39

Joseph M. Coltrane ’42

Dec. 13, 2015

March 28, 2015 William Rankin Crowder ’44

’40s Evelyn Coulson ’40 Jan. 12, 2015 Seth C. Macon ’40 Feb. 17, 2016

40 | SU MMER 2 01 6

Hazel Macon ’41

’30s

May 30, 2015 Doris Davis ’45 Nov. 23, 2015 Joseph Morgan Hutton ’45 Jan. 28, 2016


Marjorie Kerr ’45

Ralph Otis Welker ’51

Sept. 16, 2015

June 22, 2015

Leslie Brown White ’45

Wilda Mae Kearns ’52

Jan. 6, 2016

May 12, 2015

J. D. Garner ’47

Jane Reece ’52

July 6, 2015

June 28, 2015

William A. Lambert ’47

Andrea Jean Gravitt Rowan ’52

March 6, 2016

March 4, 2016

Elizabeth Hare Lasley ’47

William S. Ward ’52

Jan. 6, 2016

Oct. 25, 2015

Jeanne Van Leer Campbell ’48

Max Welborn ’52

March 19, 2016

Oct. 11, 2015

Naomi Lou Glassman ’48

Grady A. Williard ’52

Feb. 24, 2015

Oct. 18, 2015

Ersal Garner ’49

J. Howard Coble ’53

June 25, 2015

Nov. 3, 2015

David M. Hadley ’49

Robert F. Crews ’53

May 29, 2015

Dec. 26, 2015

Joan Hanson ’49

Robert Lyle Dough ’53

Nov. 18, 2015

Oct. 18, 2015

Dorothy Poole ’49

Charles Eugene Fetter ’53

April 2, 2015

Jan. 5, 2015

Jean G. Richardson ’49

Dudley Shannon MacKenzie ’53

Jan. 19, 2015

Dec. 26, 2015

’50s

May 6, 2015

Howard D. Bell ’50

Thomas LaRose ’54

Frank David Wyrick ’53

Nov. 16, 2015

Dec. 21, 2015

Ralph R. Hemphill ’50

Anne Paisley ’54

Oct. 21, 2015

July 19, 2015

John Charles Rush ’50

Virgil Leon Robertson ’54

Nov. 24, 2015

March 18, 2015

Arthur D. Garrison ’51

Jane Ott Ballus ’55

Aug. 21, 2015 Emma L. Moore ’51 Margaret Ann Rooks ’51

Charles A. Strider ’56

April 7, 2015 William L. Serog ’51 June 25, 2015

Jeanne funded the Dorothy Lloyd Gilbert Awards to provide financial assistance to deserving English majors for career planning and preparation. As national co-chairs of the Our Time in History campaign, the Campbells made a $1 million matching gift. Both served on the Board of Visitors, and Jeanne also served on the Alumni Board. In 1993, they received the Alumni Association’s Distinguished Service Award.

Jeannine Voss Fairly ’64 died Jan. 19 at the Adler Center for Caring hospice in Aldie, Va., following a long illness. She worked as a contract specialist for the Defense Department until retirement. Jeannine loved Guilford and had a yearly reunion with classmates from Mary Hobbs Hall, including Carolyn Kirkman Harmon, Priscilla Allen Smith, Leah Harris Edgerton, Mary Lou Drake Bell and Nancy Judd Moss. This group has remained close throughout the years. She is survived by husband Ali Farahani, brother Gwyn Voss, sister Libby Pittman ’66, and several nieces and nephews.

Kenneth E. Wallace ’55

Aug. 11, 2015

Chester A. Rose ’51

In her last week, she enjoyed “lots of YouTube concerts of classical, country and ’40s hits, a good portion of Pride and Prejudice, a variety of poetry (yes to Emily Dickinson and Mary Oliver, no to e.e. cummings),” according to her daughter, Jan. At Guilford, Jeanne tutored her future husband, Malcolm O. “Mo” Campbell ’50, in French. They were married 63 years until his death in 2014.

Feb. 18, 2015

March 15, 2015

July 11, 2015

Jeanne Van Leer Campbell ’48, an arts lover who had an abiding commitment to Guilford and its students, died March 19, 2016. A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. May 14 at the Featherstone Center for the Arts in Oak Bluffs on Martha’s Vineyard, Mass.

Dec. 12, 2015 Theodore James Thompson ’56 June 14, 2015 Ira Edmond Nance ’57 May 8, 2015 Charles William Newlin ’57 July 11, 2015

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CLASS NOTES

In Memoriam

Marcus D. Allred ’62

Marshall Lee Conrad ’67

John Dana Lamiman ’75

Sept. 9, 2015

Dec. 12, 2015

Oct. 14, 2015

Kemp W. Duncan ’62

Bert Gillespie ’67

Alison Pickrell ’75

June 5, 2015

Aug. 26, 2015

April 3, 2015

Sept. 7, 2015

R. Penn Truitt ’57

John E. Huffman ’63

Frederick Wilson Gray ’68

Andrew Fagan Cannady ’76

Oct. 29, 2015

March 6, 2016

May 11, 2015

George Thomas Taylor ’57

Jan. 10, 2015

Phyllis Ann Loflin ’63

Robert Alan Kauffman ’68

William Thomas Shore ’76

April 18, 2015

July 21, 2015

July 27, 2015

Nov. 19, 2015

Peggy Warren ’58

Sylvia Middleton ’63

Grady Lee Morgan ’69

Louis Doyle Moore ’77

Aug. 2, 2015

Jan. 19, 2015

Sept. 8, 2015

Ervin Dewitt Taylor ’63

Jesse Karl Rich ’69

Donna Louann Webb ’77

June 14, 2015

Sept. 24, 2015

Oct. 28, 2015

Feb. 8, 2016

Lyle Duane Dillon ’59

John C. Bailey ’64

Mary Ann Rudd ’69

William Bainster Wood ’78

Dec. 6, 2015

Oct. 28, 2015

Nov. 9, 2015

Clara Atkinson Dennison ’58

June 20, 2015 Clara Coan ’59

May 1, 2015 Robert N. Enochs ’59

Jeannine Voss Fairly ’64

Barry Wade Brown ’79

Jan. 14, 2015

Jan. 19, 2016

’70s

June 23, 2015

Norman Lewis Schlosser ’59

George Vernon McNeill ’64

William E. Beaver ’70

Maurice Russell Edmonston ’79

March 29, 2015

May 4, 2015

July 21, 2015

’60s

Charles Dean Parker ’64 Sept. 23, 2015

Eddie L. Hatley ’70

Ora H. Callicott ’60 July 18, 2015 John Edwards ’60 Sept. 23, 2015 Janice Lillian Hermanson ’60 April 1, 2015 Thomas D. Honeycutt ’60 June 8, 2015 Kenneth V. Howard ’60 Feb. 28, 2016 George Wayne Jones ’61 Jan. 9, 2015 James Carlis Kirkman ’61 Oct. 6, 2015 Gary White Rayle ’61 March 12, 2015 Robert E. Ward ’61 Aug. 22, 2015

O. Lamar Peach ’64

Elizabeth Stratford ’70

Elton Howard Gross ’79 Jan. 10, 2016

’80s

Feb. 5, 2016

Jan. 25, 2016

Kenneth A. Poole ’64

Robert Wood White ’70

George S. Ake ’80

July 12, 2015

April 8, 2015

John Robert Wooten ’70

Jerry Dexter Freeble ’80

June 23, 2015

Jan. 7, 2015

Feb. 12, 2015 Edwin Manning Stanton ’64 Jan. 24, 2015 Roger Wendell Frost ’65 Aug. 22, 2015 Joseph Wayne Gibson ’65

George T. Brett ’71

Malcolm C. Parnell ’80

Aug. 25, 2015

Nov. 30, 2015

March 20, 2015

Elmer Clyde Brown ’71

James Brower Clark ’81

Nov. 14, 2015

Oct. 31, 2015

E. Kevin Thorsell ’65

Anne Clark Jones ’72

Alzury A. Greene ’81

Feb. 4, 2016

Oct. 24, 2015

James Mooney ’72

Stephen Lee Johnson ’81

May 24, 2015

Nov. 21, 2015

John T. Wallace ’72

Gene David Namkoong ’82

March 31, 2015

March 4, 2015

March 24, 2015 Robert Harris Walker ’65 March 17, 2015 Myron Claude Hayworth ’66 Sept. 7, 2015 John Adams Watkins ’66 March 29, 2015 Susan Mary Booth ’67 March 19, 2015

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Feb. 16, 2015

Dec. 9, 2015

Ronald Vinson Jones ’73

John Martin Elliott ’83

Dec. 15, 2015

June 20, 2015

William Marvin Hanes ’74 June 29, 2015


Dave Roberts Blazes His Own Trail BY DONNA RASMUSSEN ’04

It started with a dream.

P H OTO BY DA N I E L B U R G ES S / T H E P O ST S I G N A L .

Dave Roberts ’68 is standing at the gates of Heaven. St. Peter demands, “Why didn’t you take advantage of what they had to offer down there?” When he woke up, Dave decided the question was a good one.

Ralph McNeely Herring ’84 May 19, 2015 John Turner Hill ’84 Dec. 26, 2015 Cynthia Lynn Bowen ’86 July 10, 2015 Wayne Maurice Carter ’86

’90s Kevin Charles Pendergrast ’96 Aug. 27, 2015 Gloria Thornton Hill ’98 Feb. 15, 2016

July 30, 2015

’00s

Emily Culver Smith ’86

James Chadwick Shearin ’03

Feb. 20, 2016

Feb. 8, 2015

Victor Levon Dillard ’87

Philip Ray Lucado ’05

May 6, 2015 M. Janette Nelson ’87

Feb. 13, 2016

Dec. 18, 2015

’10s

Anita Schenck ’87

Taylor Eliot Hunt ’16

June 18, 2015

Dec. 2, 2015

Race and Education in North Carolina: From Segregation to Desegregation, a book by John Batchelor ’69 on the history of the legal and political factors that informed, obstructed and finally cleared the way for desegregation in the North Carolina public education system, has been published.

John Roscoe ’71 has retired (again) from coaching football at Northern Guilford High School. He and his wife, Jane, have returned to their farm in South Carolina.

He quit his job in 2002, at the age of 58, to join the Peace Corps. He followed that up with three years of sailing. Then he started zigzagging across America. Eschewing all forms of motorized transportation, he hiked the Appalachian Trail (AT for short) from Georgia to Maine, biked from Maine to Florida, hiked the Florida Trail, biked from Florida to Minnesota and paddled down the Mississippi River. Now he’s rambling across Texas. As a practicing Quaker and Guilford alumnus, Dave is no stranger to silence, which serves him well on the road. He credits Guilford for the way he approaches challenges, thinks outside the box and takes a broad perspective over a long time frame. “I’m always looking for newness,” he says. “Things I’ve never seen, places I’ve never been, people I’ve never met. Don’t find that so much at home. I’m still not ready to go home yet. The AT was such an awesome experience I just wanted it to continue forever.” It’s a common practice among AT hikers to adopt a trail name for the journey. Dave originally intended to name a sailboat Elusive because he liked the idea of slipping into an anchorage on a whim and leaving without notice. After making up his mind that his sailing days are behind him, Dave settled on Elusive as his trail name. It fits. Before starting his 3,000-mile trek across Texas, he had already hiked 3,794 miles, biked 5,303 miles and paddled 2,082 miles on his grand adventure. Dave aims to be the first person over 70 to complete the Triple Crown of hiking — the Appalachian, the Continental Divide and the Pacific Crest trails. It’s an elusive goal. •

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CLASS NOTES

went on to lead the College’s Quest campaign to a then-record $13 million. Ari Betof ’02, head of school at Boston University Academy, said Elwood never stopped being his advisor, and he relayed a message from former Sidwell Friends School head Bruce Stewart ’61, who said, “There is no person who defines this college better than Elwood Parker.”

N I C H O L AS R E M M ES ’ 9 7, M E D I CA L P H YS I C I ST AT T H E M AYO C L I N I C, P R ES E N T E D T H E S H E R I DA N A . S I M O N D I ST I N G U I S H E D A LU M N I L ECT U R E TO A F U L L H O U S E O F ST U D E N TS , FAC U LT Y A N D A LU M N I .

Alumni Celebrate Physics, Math and Elwood Parker BY TY BUC K N E R

Guilford’s biennial physics reunion drew about 90 alumni and friends, including math graduates, to campus April 1-2 for alumni and student presentations and a luncheon honoring math professor Elwood Parker ’64, who retired last spring after 47 continuous years on faculty. One of Elwood’s former students, Nicholas Remmes ’97, gave the 16th Sheridan A. Simon Distinguished Alumni Lecture on the role of the physicist in proton radiation therapy. He discussed innovations emerging from the new pencil-beam-scanning proton therapy facility at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. After graduating from Guilford, Nicholas spent four years with Bank of America in Charlotte and Chicago and then went to graduate school, earning a doctorate in condensed matter physics at Indiana University. A fellowship led to his current position as a medical physicist at the Mayo Clinic. He grew up among the Parker family in the tiny town of Woodland in eastern North Carolina. John Parker ’72, Elwood’s brother, taught him basic computer programming. “I knew I was being slowly recruited for Guilford as a child,” Nicholas said. “And as a student of Elwood, I learned as much about life as I did about math.”

Niece and neighbor Betsy Shoffner ’97 said Elwood and his wife, Ellen, have “special real estate in my heart.” Several speakers described the couple as true partners. Retired staff member and honorary alumnus Doug Gilmer, a longtime family friend, said he “never met a Parker he didn’t like.” When it was his turn to speak, Elwood said, “Guilford College is about people and the relationships between them.” He credited Ellen with helping him decide to stay at the College after receiving a well-paying job offer in Georgia in his second year. “She reminded me that teaching was what I really wanted to do.” The physics and math reunion weekend also included presentations by alumni and current students ranging from “Glimpses of Gravitational Waves” by Michael Sieverts ’83 to “Recent and Planned Improvements to the Cline Observatory” by Sean Kirwin ’18. •

Phoebe Sorgen ’75, who teaches voice and piano, and works as a greeter/bouncer at Barefoot Boogie, has been active in a number of political causes in Berkeley, Calif., including measures related to trade agreements, corporate personhood, campaign finance, soda, gerrymandering and cell phone safety. She and her son performed at Singing for Social Justice, a fundraiser for the Michael O.D. Brown Foundation. Professionally, Phoebe sang the role of ChiChi for the world premier of the opera "Post Pardon." Her trio, Audible Light, produced a CD putting Rumi to music. She also sang “Carmina Burana” at the Lincoln Center.

Sympathy is extended to Virginia Wood ’76 on the Nov. 2, 2014, death of her husband, Manton Hall “Jody” Wood ’76.

Elwood wasn’t the only faculty member who left a lasting impression on Nicholas. “The physicist I am today has a lot to do with (retired professor) Rex Adelberger,” Nicholas said. “Whatever Rex does, he does it right. He knows how to teach experimental physics. It’s a gift.” At the luncheon, Elwood was praised — and gently roasted — by family, colleagues and friends, including two of Guilford’s four living presidents. Jane K. Fernandes thanked him for helping her transition into the presidency in 2014 and for “just being Elwood.” President Emeritus Bill Rogers recalled a fundraising trip with Elwood to the Quaker Oats headquarters in Chicago in the 1980s. While that major appeal was unsuccessful, Elwood, undaunted,

44 | SU MMER 2 01 6

Jack O’Donnell ’86 was named the 2015 Southern District Recreation Professional of the Year by SHAPE America and the 2015 National Assistant Soccer Coach of the Year by the National Soccer Coaches Association of America.

James Kohl ’88, an attorney with the Howard & Howard law firm in Las Vegas, was named to Mountain States Super Lawyers and Rising Stars lists.


Gilbert Bailey ’91, formerly executive vice president of Beanstalk Data, became vice president of Beanstalk Engage at Heartland Payments following Heartland’s acquisition of Beanstalk.

Troy Martin ’93 earned a Ph.D. in educational studies with a concentration in cultural studies from UNCG in May 2015.

“Crossroads,” the debut EP by Tommy Ray ’95, is available from digital outlets.

Class of ’66 Joins Golden Circle The Class of 1966 returned to campus April 22-23 for its 50th Reunion and induction into the Golden Circle.

Scott Shaffer ’95 of Annapolis, Md., was hired as director of finance by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. He holds a master’s degree in applied economics from The Johns Hopkins University.

Kevin Pendergrast ’96 died Aug. 27 following a short, difficult struggle with adrenal cancer. Kevin was among the best men’s tennis players ever at Guilford, earning the team’s MVP award four times and playing in the 1995 NCAA Division III Men’s Tennis Tournament. After finishing second in the ODAC in 1993 and 1994, he won the No. 1 singles title and the league Player of the Year Award in 1995. He won Guilford’s Best Male Athlete Award twice and the Nereus C. English Athletic Leadership Award. Following graduation, he was a top-ranked player in the U.S. Tennis Association’s Mid-Atlantic Section and was a longtime associate with Crate and Barrel.

Isabelle Lutterodt ’97 was appointed art center director of Barnsdall Art Park in Los Angeles.

Sarah McBane ’98 was elected president of the California Pharmacists Association.

Sympathy is extended to Lynne Marie Walter ’98 and her family upon the death of her stepfather, John James Piparato Jr., who died at home on June 3, 2015, of pancreatic cancer.

The class includes the first three African Americans to graduate from Guilford: James McCorkle, Linda Moore Banks and Melrose Nimmo. James and Linda attended reunion; family members represented Melrose, who died in 1999. In 1962, James became the first African American traditional student enrolled at Guilford. After graduating with a major in chemistry and a minor in education, he joined the Peace Corps and taught in Malaysia and West Africa. He taught in Forsyth County Schools for 42 years and is a member of the Black Alumni of Guilford College Advisory Board. Linda came to Guilford in 1963 at the age of 16 and graduated three years later. She worked on scientific research at Duke University, the University of Virginia and East Carolina University before earning a second bachelor’s degree at ECU and becoming a teacher. When Melrose enrolled at Guilford to pursue a master’s degree in religion in 1962, he already held two bachelor’s degrees and a Doctor of Chiropractic degree. He completed his master’s degree at the age of 45. From 1967 until his death, he served as pastor of Bethel Institutional Missionary Baptist Church in Houston. In addition to the Golden Circle induction ceremony, the weekend featured opportunities to meet current students, attend the ninth-annual Guilford Undergraduate Symposium, and take tours related to Quaker history, the Underground Railroad and campus sustainability. • For more information about Guilford’s integration and Reunion 2016, visit Guilford.edu/magazine16

Nathan Bostick ’00 completed a doctorate in health systems management from the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and received professional certification from the National Board of Public Health Examiners.

Ellen Glebe ’01 has been working as a professional translator specializing in historical, academic texts.

GUI LFOR D.EDU | 45


CLASS NOTES

Ann Vernon ’01 released the illustrated children’s book titled Mama’s Milk Is All Gone on the topic of weaning from breastfeeding.

Lisa Tanico ’12 graduated from Duke Divinity School with a master’s in divinity on May 9, 2015. She is now serving as pastor at Ardmore United Methodist Church in Winston-Salem.

Jeffrey Carmichael ’03 and his wife, Laura, welcomed a daughter, Elizabeth Adele Carmichael, on Jan. 14, 2015.

David Frazier ’14 was accepted into UNCG’s master’s program in peace and conflict studies. He also was among a group of Guilford alumni who went to Selma, Ala., in March 2015 to participate in the 50th anniversary of the “Bloody Sunday” civil rights march. David and Larry Arnold ’14, who had been together for 23 years, married on May 3, 2014.

Lawrence Holdsworth ’03 received a master’s in city and regional planning from Clemson University.

Christin Phelps ’04 completed her Ph.D. in communication, rhetoric and digital media at N.C. State.

Kaira Wagoner ’06 earned a Ph.D. in environmental health sciences from UNCG.

Marion Jasin ’09 started a master’s in public administration & policy at American University and a graduate certificate in Non-Profit Management at UNCG in August 2014.

Dana Brown ’10 graduated as a Doctor of Osteopathy from DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine at Lincoln Memorial University on May 9, 2015. She is now a family medicine resident physician at Carolinas HealthCare System Blue Ridge in Morganton, where she will be for the next three years.

Kaitlin Feeney ’11 accepted a job as head coach of women’s lacrosse at West Virginia Wesleyan College following two years as the co-head coach of the University of Central Florida Women’s Lacrosse Club Team in Orlando, Fla.

Matthew Fisher ’11 and Justine Merritt ’10 were married on July 4, 2015.

Alison Steigerwald ’12 earned her master’s in history from UNC Charlotte and enrolled in the Ph.D. program in history at the University of Iowa.

Samir Hazboun ’14 was hired to provide support to the education team at the Highlander Research and Education Center in New Market, Tenn.

Steven Johnson ’14 married Alexi Johnson ’14 on Oct. 12, 2014.

Dakota Zarganis ’15 has been living in GarmischPartenkirchen, Germany, where she works on the U.S. Army Base for Child and Youth Services writing curriculum, planning lessons and teaching. Before traveling to Germany, she was able to attend the World Congress on Positive Psychology in Orlando, Fla., thanks to her honors senior stipend.

List of Writing Contributers:

List of Photo Contributers:

Diya Abdo

Teresa Bedzigui ’16

R. Ty Buckner

John Bell

Margaret Barnes Budd ’37

Daniel Burgess

Beatriz Caldas ’18

Michael V. Crouch ’10, ’12

Minnette Coleman ’73

Ashley Gilmer ECG ’08

Roger Degerman

Dan Nonte

Kyle Dell

Malaika Geffrard ’19

Jane K. Fernandes

Ben Jenkins

Ashley Gilmer ECG ’08

Cary Kanoy

Claire Massagee Lanier ’12

Grace Kanoy

Dan Nonte

Julie Knight

Donna Rasmussen ’04

Juliet Magoon ’16

Betsi Robinson

John McKeith Kat Miller ’16 Ava Nadel ’17 Perfecta Visuals

46 | SUMMER 2 016


M A R GA R E T B U D D ’ 3 7 C E L E B R AT ES H E R 1 0 0 T H B I RT H DAY S U R R O U N D E D BY FA M I LY A N D F R I E N D S AT T H E P R ES I D E N T ’ S H O U S E . P H OTO BY AS H L E Y G I L M E R EC G ’ 0 8 .

Once at Guilford, professors like Dr. Funas, Dr. Purdom, Dr. Sheppard and Ms. Milner enriched my life with the quality of their teaching. They were amazing professors. I struggled with math, but Dr. Purdom gave me extra tutoring in his home in return for babysitting his children. As president of the Women’s Student Government, I had to meet often with Ms. Milner, dean of women.

Celebrating a Century Thank you, Guilford BY M A RG A RE T BARN E S BU DD ’3 7

President Jane, distinguished faculty, fellow Guilfordians and friends, I am humbled that you invited me here for my 100th birthday. It is an honor I will cherish all my days. My grandkids can hardly believe that any school would have a party for a 100-year-old graduate, and my answer to them is this: You don’t know how special Guilford is! My grandkids are probably asking themselves, “Who are you, Grandma, that Guilford chose to honor you?” After all, I did nothing at Guilford that others did not do — I was here in the 1930s when students had no money. I had two skirts, three sweaters, one blouse and one pair of shoes. Girls swapped clothes in order to get a “new look.” I worked at any job I could find — babysitting, grading papers and supervising jobs in Hobbs Hall.

She followed the lives of the women students with great interest, and she genuinely loved us, despite being stern. I was always afraid she would find out that as a supervisor in Hobbs I occasionally had used my key to the food pantry to steal a banana. What did I do for spending money? Luckily I had several aunts working in Greensboro and weekly they drove out to visit in a hand-cranked Ford Model A. They gave me a quarter a week for spending money, enough for five ice cream cones at the corner drug store. I felt rich. Academically, Guilford has always had high standards. A degree from Guilford was held in high regard because the quality of teaching was so excellent. Thank you, Guilford, for such amazing professors who were not only gifted teachers — they were also fine humans with a strong sense of ethics and human kindness. In my senior year, I was stricken with severe rheumatoid arthritis in my hands and could not hold a pencil. I could not take notes during lectures and was forced to remember the content. When final exams were held, my professors allowed me to take each exam orally, and I passed. How many professors would go so far to help a student? Guilford professors did.

Guilford gave its students a chance to rise above the grinding poverty of the Great Depression by giving us an opportunity to work off our tuition debt, and we were so grateful. Any job was a blessing because it helped pay for a chance to prepare for a better future.

You are a college offering an excellent education, but more importantly, you do so in an atmosphere of human kindness and compassion.

In the 1930s, my father was a builder, but no homes or buildings were being built, so he had no income and with eight children, plus my grandma and grandpa, mom and dad, there were 12 mouths to feed at every meal. We seldom had meat, except on Sunday, when 12 people divided one fried chicken.

Thank you, Guilford. •

We lost our home in foreclosure. Under these circumstances, attending college seemed like an impossible dream, so when Guilford offered me a small scholarship of $100, I jumped at the chance, because Guilford offered hope for a better life. I worked for several professors and lived in Hobbs to help with expenses, but even then I was $100 short of meeting the $400 annual tuition. A family member came to the rescue. He bartered eggs for the cafeteria every day for four years to pay my final $100 tuition.

This old lady will always love and appreciate you, and now I hope my grandchildren do, also.

Watch a video from Margaret’s birthday celebration at guilford.edu/magazine16


guilford.edu 5800 West Friendly Avenue Greensboro, NC 27410 CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

SEPTEMBER 30-OCTOBER 2, 2016 • Learn what the College and alumni are doing to promote sustainability and delicious, locally grown food. • Purchase tickets and attend the Friday, Sept. 30, Bryan Series lecture by Michael Pollan, an award-winning author who writes about places where the human and natural worlds intersect. • Celebrate reunions with the classes of 1971, 1976, 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996, 2001, 2006 and 2011. Learn more about Homecoming and other upcoming events at guilford.edu/alumni

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GUILFOR D COLLEGE T H E MAGA ZIN E • SUMMER 2016

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Guilford College Magazine Summer 2016  

Published annually, Guilford College Magazine highlights our mission in action through the lives of our students, alumni, faculty and staff...