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GUILFORD COLLEG MAGAZIN

Breaking Down Barriers: Bonner Center at 25 Change-Maker, Mamta Gurung ’18 Path-Finder, Muhadisa Daqiq ’19 Truth-Seeker, Abe Kenmore ’17 Smarter Justice: Higher Education in Prison Growing a Sustainable Future 7 to Watch in 2017

Rooted in Values. Reaching New Heights. 1 | GUILFORD.EDU


COMMENCEMENT

GENERATION “G” Celebrating 180 Years of Guilford Graduates

As we celebrate the graduating Class of 2017, we recognize an impressive legacy of Guilfordians who have distinguished themselves in living out the College’s mission in remarkable and inspiring ways. Though much has changed over the generations — from facilities to faculty and fashion — Guilford grads share a collective pride in belonging to this great community of F I R S T G R A D U AT I N G C L A S S , 1889

learners dedicated to changing lives. Enjoy this gallery of memories from Commencement

CLASS OF 1896

past and present.


2 CLASS OF 192

CLASS

OF 19 70

CLASS OF 1958

CLAS

1960 S OF

CLASS OF 1999

016 CLASS OF 2

After graduation, check out coverage of Commencement 2017, including video, a photo gallery and profiles of graduating students, at

CLASS OF 2 005

guilford.edu/commencement2017. 1 | GUILFORD.EDU


JANE’S FRIENDLY VIEW Dear Friends, As we put the exclamation point on another eventful academic year with a jubilant Commencement celebration, I find myself already looking ahead to next year with eager anticipation. Plain and simple — Guilford College is going places. As you will see in this issue of Guilford College Magazine, we are growing ever stronger in advancing our mission. Firmly and forever rooted in the aspirant pursuit of our values, we are indeed reaching new heights. Exciting, big changes are straight ahead. This fall, we will launch a fully reimagined educational experience that integrates all the best in liberal

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arts learning with an unprecedented depth and distinction of up-close, hands-on immersion in the real world. The grand idea is to ensure our students are engaged in intimate proximity with the issues and opportunities that mean the most to them. Collaborative learning through team-based, multi-disciplinary projects centered on creative problem solving will define the student experience. Every student will benefit from a personal team of expert advisers dedicated to charting a successful path from day one. We will also rally and renew campus spirit with a much more dynamic and intentionally connected student life experience.


We have much work to do to bring this gamechanging educational experience to fruition. And all of us at Guilford College are energized by the task. You can read more about this endeavor on Page 4 — and I look forward to sharing evolving details with you in the months ahead as it all comes together. Until then, have a wonderful summer!

Jane K. Fernandes President

IN THIS ISSUE

And building on the roots that formed this great College, we will incorporate an emphasis on developing ethical leadership for every student who goes here. Because, at the end of the day, that ethos is essential to creating trusted, globally competent and committed world-changers.

2017 On the Cover I N C A R C E R AT E D I N D I V I D U A L S PA R T I C I PAT E I N G U I L F O R D ’ S H I G H E R E D U C AT I O N I N PRISON PROGR AM. SEE THE STORY ON PA G E 2 9 . / P H O T O B Y A S H L E Y G I L M E R

4

The Guilford Experience

6

News and Notes

15 Arts 18 Athletics 20

Feature: Rooted in Values, Reaching New Heights

22

Breaking Down Barriers: Bonner Center at 25

24

Change-Maker, Mamta Gurung ’18

25 Path-Finder, Muhadisa Daqiq ’19

For more each month from Jane, subscribe to her blog, “Jane’s Friendly View”, at

guilford.edu/blog.

29

Smarter Justice: Higher Education in Prison

Contact Us

magazine@guilford.edu 336.316.2152

32 Truth-Seeker,

Guilford College Magazine

33

Abe Kenmore ’17

Greensboro, N.C. 27410

Guilford College Magazine is published annually by the Office of Marketing. The views expressed within these pages do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the College.

Growing a Sustainable Future

5800 West Friendly Avenue

36

7 to Watch in 2017

38 Philanthropy 48

Remembering Guilfordians

50

40 Years of Study Abroad

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The Guilford Experience

GETTING CLOSE TO WHAT MATTERS MOST Radically Redesigning the Student Educational Experience

PHOTO BY MICHAEL CROUCH ’10, ’12

No, liberal arts education is not dead. To the contrary, it

Learnings from the research add essential context to the

has never been more important.

considerable work the faculty has undertaken over the last three

But the paradigm for how such teaching and learning occurs is about to change dramatically. The big idea focuses on immersing students in eye-opening proximity to life’s most important issues as they gain

years to revise the general education curriculum. Leveraging and creating synergy with some of the major concepts that have evolved in that endeavor will be key to advancing the whole of Guilford’s reimagined educational experience.

expert guidance and exceptional preparation to thrive

“I am very excited about the possibility of including bold, new

in any circumstance.

measures within the general education curriculum,” says Holly

The new educational experience in development is based on results from far-reaching and in-depth constituent research, namely with student prospects. The year-long study explored the viability of a variety of educational emphases in development or in consideration by Guilford faculty, as they relate to prospective student expectations and preferences. “The research was absolutely vital to illuminating a clearer path for growing and sustaining healthier enrollment,” says President Jane Fernandes. “We gained invaluable insights revealing promising intersections between our mission and student desires. So now we can act on what we’ve learned — moving forward with great confidence.”

Peterson, Assistant Professor of Geology and Environmental Studies. “In particular, I think collaborative learning and advising could be deeply integrated into — and extremely successful within — an in-depth central experience around a given topic.”

Four interdependent themes emerged from the research — all of which are consistent with Guilford’s mission and Core Values:

Learning Collaboratively Guilford has long engaged in collaborative learning; now it will permeate the entire curriculum. Every student will benefit from broader and deeper immersion into real world problem solving, frequently involving cross-disciplinary, team-based projects throughout all four years of study.

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S T U D E N T S J O I N H O L LY P E T E R S O N ( B O T T O M L E F T ) , A S S I S TA N T P R O F E S S O R O F G E O L O G Y A N D E N V I R O N M E N TA L S T U D I E S , O N A T R I P TO THE DAN RIVER. / PHOTO BY DAN NONTE

“A key distinction is that these collaborative experiences will be focused on issues that are important to the students — and will often be student-generated,” says Arlene Cash, Vice President for Enrollment Management. “They will be invested in and own their learning in profoundly meaningful ways. As the research show us, today’s students demand such an experience.”

Teaming for Success

involves a more concerted effort to create a vibrant and

All such collaborative learning will be intentionally connected

“We need to intentionally reimagine physical spaces, events

cohesive campus culture that engages and is welcoming to all.

to helping students understand how their gifts and passions can ultimately be used to serve the world’s greater good. To that end, students will receive integrated advising and postcollege planning counsel from their own personal team of expert advisers.

and explore new traditions that will further energize and unite the campus,” says Todd Clark, Vice President for Student Affairs. “Our students are already engaged in a number of their own interests, which is great. The emphasis now is to find more innovative and inviting ways to inspire the types of

Academic and career advisers, peer mentors, alumni and others will form an experientially diverse support network, ensuring every student has a well-designed educational experience that offers optimal preparation for achieving postcollege success and fulfillment.

organic interactions that will grow a sense of community.”

Incorporating Ethical Leadership Finally, incorporating ethical leadership into the totality of the educational experience at Guilford is an essential opportunity

“The idea is to make sure students have astute counsel for making wise choices about their educational journey so they graduate knowing where they want to go and how to get there,” says Alan Mueller, Assistant Academic Dean for Career Development. “That work doesn’t start senior year — it has to begin day one of college.”

to enhance the pursuit of the College’s seven Core Values. Building on the historic and evolving strengths of programs like the Bonner Center, Quaker Leadership Scholars and Principled Problem Solving, Guilford College will become an exemplar of ethical leadership development as an integral component of the student learning experience.

Rallying Campus Spirit

As students engage in thoughtful interaction with each other and

Day one at Guilford also has to set a promising tone for a

lead consistently with values that earn the trust of others.

rewarding student life experience. Rallying campus spirit

the community at large, they will learn what it means to live and

Teams of faculty and staff will be working together to develop initiatives focused on the four themes. First-year students in fall 2017 will benefit from some of the early enhancements. And the College intends to accelerate efforts toward full design and implementation of the new experience. “This is a defining moment for Guilford College,” Jane says. “We have a tremendous opportunity in front of us, but we have to move quickly. I think the experience we are creating for the next generation of Guilford students promises to be one of the most exciting chapters in our storied history.”

PHOTO BY MICHAEL CROUCH ’10, ’12

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NEWS & NOTES

Major Facility Enhancements in Motion BINFORD HALL / PHOTO BY DONNA R ASMUSSEN ’04

Restorations and renovations of Binford, Milner and Bryan halls and the north apartments headline the list of major facility enhancements set to commence in June 2017 and continue over three years. The College also purchased a three-building apartment

intentional care to preserve the historical integrity and prized features of the buildings, which have served the campus for more than 55 years. “There are treasured jewels throughout these buildings,” says Brett Hacker, Director of Facilities and Energy Management. “This is an exciting opportunity to put fresh life into our terrazzo floors, art deco tile, marble restroom

complex adjacent to campus — the East

partitions, solid iron railings and granite entrance steps.”

Apartments (formerly Hodgins Retreat).

Other focal concerns include the installation of sprinkler

In addition to residence hall upgrades, the Art

accessibility, including elevators.

Building (Hege-Cox) will be renovated and expanded

systems and other safety measures, as well as improved

to bring together all of the art programs at the College

One of the most anticipated features associated with the

into one location; and the PE Center complex will be

Binford project is the construction of a 1,100-square-foot

renovated to add additional women’s locker rooms.

student lounge located adjacent to Binford, Shore and Mary

Together, the enhancements and purchase of the

Hobbs residences.

apartments total $17 million. The College issued $15

Themed housing opportunities will continue with a new

million in new money bonds and refinanced its existing

policy in place that calls for theme designations to be

bonds last December without adding any yearly debt

reviewed every two years. Themes and house designations

cost. An additional $2 million in short-term borrowing

for 2017-18 are the Pines, Sustainability; Cobb, Women and

was secured to round out funding.

Gender Non-Binary People of Color; and Pope, International.

Upgrades to the residence halls will involve a dynamic combination of renovation and restoration, with

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Additionally, Shore Hall will be designated as a genderinclusive living environment.


Honored Guests Headline Commencement Guilford selected Patricia Timmons-Goodson, the first African American woman to serve on the N.C. Supreme Court, to deliver this year’s Commencement address. And local community leader and philanthropist Adair Phifer Armfield was chosen to receive an honorary degree. Patricia was named to the state’s highest court by Gov. Mike Easley in 2006 after serving on the N.C. Court

Master’s Degree in Criminal Justice Coming Fall 2017

of Appeals and as a district court judge and assistant district attorney. In 2014, President Obama appointed her to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, for which she is vice chair. She was a College trustee from 2009-16. Adair is a lifelong supporter of the arts, and her commitments to education are significant and aimed at providing excellent education for the next generation. She has worked to lift up the underprivileged and underserved.

Guilford College is excited to announce a new master’s in Criminal Justice for fall 2017. The program, the only of its kind in the Triad, is expected to attract criminal justice professionals seeking career advancement, as well as undergraduates who want to further their education. Students will learn about the importance of the relationship between communities and their systems of criminal justice. The program will offer day and evening

ADAIR PHIFER ARMFIELD / PHOTO BY ASHLEY GILMER

options plus some hybrid online courses. A thesis option will be offered for students interested in pursuing doctoral studies. “The program offers a unique opportunity to infuse Guilford’s values, principles and traditions into a curriculum that prepares its graduates to be leaders in the field,” says Will Pizio, Associate Professor in the Department of Justice and Policy Studies and the director of the graduate program.

PAT R I C I A T I M M O N S - G O O D S O N / PHOTO BY J. KNIGHT P HOTOGR APHY

Applications are now being accepted. For more

guilford.edu/CJMasters or email CJGraduateProgram@guilford.edu. information, visit

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NEWS & NOTES

Students Stage Successful TEDx Guilford Event What inspired a group of Honors Program students to create, plan and host TEDx Guilford, “Securing Our Future”? It’s simple — community.

PHOTO BY NA ARI HONOR ’19

Chemistry and Health Sciences double major Connor Huntwork ’17, who secured the TEDx licenses, was motivated by the synergy he felt at a TEDx event at Duke University. “The ambiance felt safe, imaginative and powerful. I wanted to share that experience with my fellow Guilford students,” he says. An array of speakers shared insights about topics including

Economics Team Places Second in Federal Reserve Contest

sustainability, community development and medical research. “I learned that making sure everybody is engaged is crucial to achieving end goals,” says Computing Technology and Information Systems major Yves Dusenge ’16, who built the TEDx website and spoke at the event. TEDx Guilford was sponsored by the Honors Program, the Center for Principled Problem Solving and the Office of Student Leadership and Engagement, with additional funds provided by Community Senate.

Five Economics majors finished second as a team in the Oct. 28 regional Federal Reserve Challenge, a competition that encourages students to learn about the U.S. economy, monetary policymaking and the role of the Federal Reserve System. Tom Driscoll ’17, Austin Seibert ’17, José Oliva ’17, Jacob Hymowitz ’17 and Mason Church ’17 made up this year’s team. Robert G. Williams, Voehringer Professor of Economics and Chair of the Economics Department, serves as their adviser. Only Appalachian State University finished with a higher score. “Winning second place shows how strong our economics program is,” José says. Guilford finished second in the regional contest in 2008 as well. “All of the members of that team got career-track jobs in 2009 during the worst layoffs since the Great Depression,” Robert says.

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PHOTO BY MICHAEL CROUCH ’10, ’12


Google Awards Grant for Afterschool Program Students in the Cyber and Network Security major are giving children at Glen Haven Community Center in Greensboro an opportunity to learn about robotics and computer programming. A student team led by Ashley Collins Bennett ’17 and Damian “Alex” Hinton ’17 earned funding from

PHOTO BY MICHAEL CROUCH ’10, ’12

Google. They submitted a successful proposal for a grant designed to ignite interest in computer science among children in underserved communities. According to Chafic Bou-Saba, Assistant Professor of Computing Technology and Information Systems, the children will learn while playing with a Sphero robotic ball, a gaming device controlled with a tilt, touch or swing

Mentor Program Enhances STEM Education

of a smartphone or tablet. “It’s very easy and intuitive and the kids will have a lot of fun with it,” he says. Google’s igniteCS grant program provides funding and resources for groups of college and university students to make a difference in their local communities through computer science mentorship.

The N.C. GlaxoSmithKline Foundation awarded a $25,000 grant to the College in partnership with Guilford County Schools to enhance STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education for middle school students. The grant created the Guilford STEM Partnership Program. Guilford students started mentoring at Guilford Middle School

“It’s very easy and intuitive and the kids will have a lot of fun with it.”

this spring. In addition, faculty members provide guidance to the middle school students as they progress to high school and apply to colleges and universities in STEM fields. “Starting this partnership in middle school is essential since preparation for a STEM career begins before a student enters high school,” says Gail Webster, Associate Professor and Chair of Chemistry.

CHAFIC BOU-SABA

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NEWS & NOTES VA N C E R I C K S ’ 9 2 , A S S O C I AT E P R O F E S S O R O F PHILOSOPHY / PHOTO BY MICHAEL CROUCH ’10, ’12

President Joins Education Leaders at Forum

PHOTO BY DAN NONTE

Sharing the stage with five other higher-education leaders in September, President Jane K. Fernandes spoke about what makes Guilford College unique. “Through their education while they’re at Guilford, our students are actively involved in Greensboro and the greater

Community Gathers for Annual All Black Everything Symposium

community,” she told the audience at Higher Education from the Perspective of Private and Independent Colleges, a discussion sponsored by the Governor Morehead Forum. The wide-ranging discussion touched on topics that have been in the news: campus safety, access and affordability, the proper role of athletics and the continued relevance of the liberal arts.

In celebration of Black History Month, the community gathered on campus for the 5th Annual All Black Everything Symposium. From topics like the racial wealth gap to racial injustice in the digital world to learning how to navigate the professional world as a person of color, community

Also in attendance were Bennett College Interim President Phyllis Worthy Dawkins, Davidson College President Carol Quillen, Duke University President Richard H. Brodhead, Elon University President Leo Lambert and Wake Forest University President Nathan O. Hatch.

members expressed themselves through research and creative works including poetry, music and dance. This year’s keynote speaker was Dr. Brian L. McGowan, a successful scholar and an assistant professor in the higher education program at UNCG. His research focuses on the exploration of race, gender, diversity and social justice.

Read more about Jane’s discussion at the forum, including her thoughts on creating brave spaces on campus, on “Jane’s Friendly View”, at

guilford.edu/blog.

Among this year’s activities was a free press party sponsored by the Department of Art. Members of the campus community were invited to the print-making studio to create and make their voices heard through their own political posters.

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NEWS & NOTES

Guilfordian Awards The student journalists of The Guilfordian won Best of Show in the Newspaper and Online Publication categories at the N.C. College Media Association in February. The awards are a tribute to the students’ late adviser, Jeff Jeske, who died earlier this year. F R O M L E F T — F R O N T R O W : F E R N A N D O J I M E N E Z ’ 1 9 , B E AT R I Z C A L D A S ’ 1 8 ; C E N T E R R O W : G R A C E VA N F L E E T ’ 1 7, N E L L I E V I N O G R A D ’ 1 7, N I C O L E Z E L N I K E R ’ 1 7, N A A R I H O N O R ’ 1 9 , E L I Z A B E T H H O U D E ’ 1 7; B A C K R O W : A B E K E N M O R E ’ 1 7, I A N P E N N Y ’ 1 7

Professors Win Best Practice in Higher Education Award Professor of Geology Marlene McCauley and Associate Professor of Political Science Kyle Dell were awarded a Best Practice in Higher Education award in February for a paper on the practicum courses in the new Sustainable Food Systems major. Kathleen Liang, W.K. Kellogg Endowed Chair in Sustainable Community-Based Food Systems at N.C. A&T’s College of Agriculture and Environmental Science, joined them in presenting the paper, titled “Building a Collaborative Effort of Training and Education in Sustainable Food Systems for the 21st Century through Urban Agriculture Programs.” It was recognized at the 2017 Small Business Institute’s annual conference in San Diego, Calif. The award, given each year to one paper, recognizes colleges and universities that develop “new entrepreneurial curriculum, new or innovative classroom delivery and superior outcomes from existing programs.”

PHOTOS BY J. KNIGHT PHOTOGR APHY

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NEWS & NOTES

Every Campus a Refuge Recognized by White House A S S O C I AT E P R O F E S S O R O F E N G L I S H D I YA A B D O ( F O U R T H F R O M L E F T ) A N D A L E X K E R N ’ 9 4 ( O N D I YA’ S L E F T ) / P H O T O S U B M I T T E D B Y D I YA A B D O

Every Campus a Refuge (ECAR) has been recognized as a model of collaboration in response to the global refugee crisis. President Jane K. Fernandes and dozens of other college and university presidents attended the White House Convening

Alum Presents at U.N. Conference

for the Sixth Annual President’s Interfaith and Community Service Campus Challenge. Alex Kern ’94 and Associate Professor of English Diya Abdo, the founder and director of

Walid Mosarsaa ’16

the program, were panelists.

attended the United Nations Association General

“All the leaders in the room heard that Every Campus a Refuge

Conference in New York City

is exemplary,” Jane said. “Several presidents asked me about

in February, representing

the program and expressed their interest.”

Every Campus a Refuge (ECAR) as a Center for

Among those praising ECAR at the September event was the

Principled Problem Solving

closing plenary’s keynote speaker, the Rev. John McCullough,

fellow. He is also ECAR’s

CEO and president of Church World Service. He lauded ECAR as

volunteer and donations

a shining example of how institutions of higher learning can

coordinator.

do more to address the refugee crisis.

Walid, a Business Administration major, presented at the NGO Open

“All the leaders in the room heard that Every Campus a Refuge is exemplary.” PRESIDENT JANE K. FERNANDES

P H O T O S U B M I T T E D B Y WA L I D MOSARSA A ’16

House at Baruch College of the City University of New

York. He also took part in a panel with organizational leaders working on sustainable development goals. “I think this was a very important event for ECAR to be a part of. It put us on the map and connected us with many amazing people, including diplomats and policymakers,” he says. The most notable moment for Walid was when he was called on to ask a question from the floor of the General Assembly and his image was projected onto the screens where nation leaders and presidents are typically projected.

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NEWS & NOTES

The Festival Singers Perform Handel’s ‘Messiah’ The Festival Singers, made up of about 50 faculty, staff, students and alumni, performed its annual concert in November. The performance of “Messiah” included soloists Ali Tynes ’08, faculty member Sarah Taylor and Jonathan Shine

PHOTOS BY DAN NONTE

’12. The orchestra is comprised of local professional musicians and members of the music faculty. “This is a long-standing campus holiday tradition — part of building community through music,” says Wendy Looker, Associate Professor of Music and Director of Choral Activities.

Journeys in Blackness For the fifth year, students, alumni, faculty and staff celebrated black student achievement at the Journeys in Blackness Banquet in March. Seven students and three staff members received awards, and recipients of the BOOST Merit Scholarship given by the Black Alumni of Guilford College (BAGC) were recognized. James Beverly III ’90, a member of the Georgia State House, encouraged attendees to engage as positive community builders. James played a role in establishing the BAGC more than 10 years ago.

P HOTO BY EL EN A ROBL E S ’17

F R O M L E F T — F R O N T R O W : A D R I E N N E I S R A E L , M AYA M O O R E ’ 2 0 , E M E LY C A B R E R A ’ 1 7, R E H S H E T TA W E L L S ’ 17, G E R T R U D E U P P E R M A N ’ 6 9 , J A M E S M C C O R K L E ’ 6 6 ; B A C K R O W : D A R R Y L H Y LT O N , C O R E Y C L E M O N S ’ 2 0 , T E R R I J O N E S ’ 1 8

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PHOTO BY DAN NONTE

NEWS & NOTES

Soy un Líder Celebrates 10 Years Irving Zavaleta Jiminez ’08 helped organize the first Soy un Líder conference in 2007 when he was a student. (“Soy un líder” is Spanish for “I’m a leader.”) The daylong event empowered and prepared Latino high school students to apply to college. “We created the Soy un Líder conference thinking about you, thinking of the next generation,” he told this year’s attendees. “We want to let you know that college is possible.” Sophomores Fernando Jimenez ’19 and Jeniffer Gonzalez ’19

“For many students, Soy un Líder has marked the beginning of their journey on the road to higher education and success,” President Jane K. Fernandes said during her welcome, “and we’re glad that now you’re on that same journey.” About 90 high school students attended the first Soy un Líder conference in 2007. This year, roughly 260 high school students and 60 parents participated.

coordinated this year’s conference, and more than 70 Guilford community members volunteered at the event. Participants attended workshops about financial aid, the college application process, choosing the right college and

Watch a video to learn more about Soy un Líder at

guilford.edu/SoyUnLider..

community engagement.

Team Builds a Sustainable Trail in the Woods It was a stroke of great luck when the Greensboro Fat Tire Society’s need for a place to teach about sustainable trail building — and a lab for building such a trail — coincided with the College’s need to make field trips in the woods better and safer. A community work day in March, guided by trained staff, continued where the Fat Tire Society left off in December. While not quite complete, the trail can be easily followed. A protective viewing platform, with a railing and seating on

PHOTO BY ASHLEY GILMER

three sides, has also been built in front of the 300-year-old Underground Railroad Tree, where the trail ends. The Tannenbaum-Sternberger Foundation financed the platform and an upcoming curriculum. The 2016 Senior Gift was designated to be part of the Underground Railroad Project as well. 14 | G U I L F O R D . E D U

To schedule a tour, email

undergroundrr@guilford.edu or call 336.316.2442.


ARTS

FILLING IN THE CRACKS

After reading an article about human trafficking, Molly Gochman ’01 felt compelled to act. ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY DAN NONTE

Experts estimate that close to 50 million people are enslaved worldwide. “How can this huge issue be so invisible?” Molly Gochman ’01 asked herself. “And what can I do to help with the visibility of it?” She responded by creating the Red Sand Project two years ago at Art Basel in Miami. M O L LY G O C H M A N ’ 0 1 ( A B O V E ) P O U R S RED SAND IN THE CR ACKS OF A CAMPUS S I D E WA L K D U R I N G P E A C E W E E K AT G U I L F O R D . MEMBERS OF THE CAMPUS COMMUNIT Y (TOP) W E R E A L S O I N V I T E D T O TA K E PA R T.

“I invite people to place red sand in sidewalk cracks to encourage us to be mindful of vulnerabilities that exist all around us,” she says. “The cracks are a metaphor for vulnerable populations who are most at risk of being exploited.” In October, Molly received a Young Alumni Achievement Award and shared her project with the campus community in an event organized by the Guilford College Chapter of Amnesty International. The campus installation was part of Guilford’s celebration of Peace Week.

For more on Molly and the Red Sand

In the last two years, the project has had a presence in 70 countries and all 50 states.

Project, including a link to a Greensboro

Participants, including actor Ashton Kutcher, further extend its reach by sharing the

News & Record article about the

hashtag #RedSandProject.

installation, visit

guilford.edu/Molly.

“Art can be a powerful way to mobilize people to come together and take action,” Molly says. 15 | GUILFORD.EDU


J U L I E T G E R VA S I ’ 17 I S H E A D E D T O U N C S C H O O L O F T H E A R T S A F T E R G R A D U AT I O N T O C O N T I N U E H E R S T U D Y O F G U I TA R PERFORMANCE. / PHOTOS BY ASHLEY GILMER

ARTS

TOP PERFORMER B Y L E A H H AY N E S

Juliet Gervasi ’17 has proof she chose the perfect college — she’s been accepted into her top graduate program. Juliet Gervasi’s future sounds pretty sweet.

“Because of my time at Guilford, I am going to my first choice

A senior Music major studying classical

and I’ve gained a lot of valuable experience performing at

guitar, with an Education Studies minor, Juliet is on the path to a life as a performer and teacher. After graduation, she’ll attend UNC School of the Arts (UNCSA) for a master’s in guitar performance.

grad school. I’ve already been teaching guitar for three years, various gigs that I have gotten through Guilford,” she says. Guilford has also given her a head start on her travel goals. She spent the January term in England and studied abroad in Italy for a semester. She’s traveled with the guitar ensemble as well, touring in some of the country’s most interesting cities. “My travel experiences with Guilford were all so enriching,” she says. “They gave me a lot of tools that I use in my personal and professional life.” The travel-savvy Greensboro native says the decision to attend

“I obtained a graduate assistantship so I’m excited to get to teach guitar lessons to undergraduate students and lead some classes,” she says. UNSCA isn’t her first teaching gig. At Guilford, she served as a teaching assistant for the guitar ensemble and tutored music theory. She also teaches guitar lessons at Moore Music in Greensboro, as well as in her private studio — both of which she plans to continue.

college in her hometown was an easy one. Kami Rowan, Chair of the Music Department and head of the guitar program, is to thank for that. “I told Kami I wanted to be a guitar instructor, so she helped set me up with a job interview. Since then her advice and wisdom have been invaluable to me as a young teacher,” Juliet says. “I think the best thing about Guilford is its amazing professors, and I have found that especially the Music and Education Studies departments are really exceptional. They are beautiful reflections of and testaments to Guilford’s values.” 

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PHOTOS SUBMIT TED BY VICTORIA SAR ALDI-GALL ARDO ’16

ARTS

EXCELLING ABROAD BY JAMES SHARPE ’16

Victoria Saraldi-Gallardo ’16 has followed her dreams all the way to London’s Globe Theatre. Victoria Saraldi-Gallardo ’16 is making the most of her

Excellence and community, two of Guilford’s seven

opportunity to study and live abroad.

values, are helping Victoria achieve her dreams.

“I’m currently in residency at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre,

“I adore my faculty here. I feel very close to them, and

working in an all-female cast of A Midsummer Night’s

I think bringing over the Quaker values I learned at

Dream , and I played Bottom the Weaver,” she says. “I’ve

Guilford certainly aid me in feeling as communal with

been lucky enough to work with voice, movement, combat,

them as I do,” she says. “I’m able to explore my creative

historical dance and text coaches here at the Globe and

process in a structured and rigorous environment, which

could not be any more thrilled to be a part of this project!”

is the best gift any creative individual can receive.”

Victoria, who was a Theatre Studies major at Guilford, has been in London about four months and plans to stay two years. “I’m doing my residency through my graduate program, the East 15 Acting School MFA program in London,” she says. “It’s a rigorous two-year program, and I get to take lessons with Globe faculty members.”

17 | GUIL FOR D.EDU


ATHLETICS

HOW SWEEP IT IS Women and men claim conference crowns. BY ROGER DEGERMAN

They were truly seasons to savor. For the first time in school history, Guilford’s women’s

Championship Sunday (Feb. 26) in Salem, Va., was indeed special for both teams. The women earned their fifth conference tournament title by erasing a 13-point secondhalf deficit in a 59-53 victory over top-seeded Lynchburg. The men pulled away from Emory and Henry for a 6454 win to capture their third ODAC banner. Sophomore Carson Long ’19 earned the tourney’s Most Outstanding Player honors on his way to additional post-season accolades, including a spot on the National Association

and men’s basketball teams captured ODAC

of Basketball Coaches’ (NABC) Division III All-South

Tournament championships in the same

recognition from D3hoops.com.

District Second Team and Third Team All-South Region

season to earn berths in their respective

Ragan-Brown Field House was rocking for the opening

NCAA Division III tournaments.

round of the Division III women’s tournament as the Quakers came oh so close to completing a miracle comeback against Marymount (Virginia) University.

18 | GUILFORD.EDU


PHOTO BY KEITH LUCAS, SIDELINE MEDIA PRODUCTIONS

Trailing by 26 points in the second half, Guilford stormed

game or coming off a tough loss, their approach remained

back to within a point in the final two minutes before

steady. They grew closer as the year went along, which I

falling 74-70.

believe played a big part in our late-season run.”

“It was a great atmosphere,” said Coach Stephanie

Tom notched his 500th career basketball coaching win (men

Flamini, “especially in the fourth quarter when we made

and women) and earned NABC All-South District Coach of

our comeback. Our players will definitely remember

the Year honors for the third time. Tom also received the Bob

all the people that came out to cheer them on. That’s a

Johnson ODAC Coach of the Year Award for the record-tying

memory they will talk about the rest of their lives.”

fourth time in his 14 seasons at Guilford.

The Quakers’ men blew past Thomas More, 74-54, in the opening round of their Division III tournament opener before closing their season with an 88-64 loss to host school Marietta (Ohio) College. “What impressed me about this year’s team was its composure,” said Coach Tom Palombo. “The guys never panicked or got rattled. Whether we were down in the

To read more about the seniors on the women’s and men’s basketball teams, go to

guilford.edu/Commencement2017. 19 | GUILFORD.EDU


PHOTO BY ASHLEY GILMER

20 | GUILFORD.EDU


ROOTED IN VALUES, REACHING NEW HEIGHTS Guilford College is on the move.

Innovative academic programs in Cyber and Network Security, Experience Design and Sustainable Food Systems have emerged. Residence hall renovations will soon begin. Campus is buzzing with an increasingly dynamic and diverse student body. Amidst promising great change, one thing remains constant: Guilford’s relentless pursuit of its seven Core Values. These enduring values — community, diversity, equality, excellence, integrity, justice and stewardship — forever provide the guiding light

of a Guilford education. They are more than laudable sentiments. They are the principles to which we aspire and seek to hold ourselves accountable. They define who we are and how we live. They give us meaning and purpose. By nurturing our Core Values in ever-more meaningful ways, Guilford College grows stronger in living out its mission. In the following pages, you will see shining examples of how that collective endeavor is making a profound impact. These are the stories of fiercely dedicated, wellgrounded Guilfordians who are rooted in values and reaching new heights.

21 | GUILFORD.EDU


F I R S T-Y E A R B O N N E R S T U D E N T S S P E N T S P R I N G B R E A K 2 0 1 7 V O L U N T E E R I N G AT S T. H E L E N A I S L A N D , S . C . / P H O T O COURTESY OF GULL AH/GEECHEE ALKEBUL AN ARCHIVE

BREAKING DOWN BARRIERS Bonner Center celebrates 25 years of bringing the College closer to the community. BY K AREN ALLEY AND ABBY L ANGSTON

Spring break is usually reserved for taking a breather from the books, and one group of Guilford students did take a break; they traded their books for wheelbarrows.

JAMES SHIELDS ’00 / PHOTO BY ASHLE Y GILMER

During the Bonner Center’s annual spring break community service and social justice trip, students joined Queen Chet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation, on a disaster-preparedness project in St. Helena Island, S.C. They pitched in to continue cleanup from Hurricane Matthew, remove invasive species and insure proper stormwater flow through a ditch at the compound. An alternative spring break trip may sound like a new idea to some. For the Bonner Center it’s another example of the bridges its students have built from the campus to the community over the last 25 years.

RISUIN KSOR ’18 / PHOTO BY ASHLEY GILMER

COMMUNITY

Becoming Mentors Bonner scholars have dedicated hundreds of thousands of hours volunteering at dozens of organizations in the Greensboro area, including Glen Haven, an apartment complex where a large refugee community makes its home. “We’ve been in that area well over 20 years now, and recently we had a young man from Glen Haven who had been tutored by a Bonner scholar as a child become a Bonner scholar himself,” says James Shields ’00, the director of the Bonner Center. “His story shows the impact of our work.”

“I have such a strong passion to do service because that’s what I’m destined to do and to be.”

That student is Risuin Ksor ’18, a double major in Psychology and Music, from Vietnam and Cambodia, who serves as site coordinator at Glen Haven. 22 | GUILFORD.EDU

RISUIN KSOR ’18, PSYCHOLOGY AND MUSIC


“This place means a lot to me,” he shared during the 2016 Day of Service at Glen Haven. “Now I’m in my mentor’s footsteps, who I really looked up to when I was small. We mentor (the children) and help them with their homework, but we build a deeper connection with the families. Our goal is to help this community out because they come from a whole different environment. It will take a while for them to adapt to this culture.” In recent years, students have also shown a strong interest in food justice. Through initiatives including a mobile market, they share produce grown at the College Farm with people in the community.

B O N N E R C E N T E R S C H O L A R S H AV E T U T O R E D A N D M E N T O R E D C H I L D R E N W H O L I V E AT G L E N H AV E N , A R E F U G E E C O M M U N I T Y I N G R E E N S B O R O , F O R THE L AST 20 YEARS. / PHOTO SUBMIT TED BY THE BONNER CENTER

themselves and gain agricultural independence while also building intentional relationships with them.”

Something to Celebrate The center’s motto is “Access to Education and Opportunity to Serve,” and it is exactly those priorities that led the Bonner Foundation to approach Guilford as one of its first schools in 1991. The community is looking forward this fall to celebrating the center’s 25th anniversary at Guilford and to honoring Bonner scholar alumni, as well as recognizing partner organizations SOPHIA PERLMUTTER ’18 (RIGHT) IS A MEMBER OF THE BONNER CENTER’S FOOD JUSTICE CLUB. / PHOTO BY ASHLEY GILMER

“We’re here to empower our students, and it’s amazing to see how they take their own interests and passion to shape the direction of their work in the community,” James says.

in the community. “I did not expect to be at Guilford,” Risuin says, “but I feel like the universe works in strange ways. Whatever it chooses for you to be, it just falls into place. I have such a strong passion to do service because that’s what I’m destined to do and to be. To help those who are in need and to guide and teach them.”

Sophia Perlmutter ’18, a Sustainable Food Systems major, is active in the Food Justice Club, an organization based in the Bonner Center. To learn more about the Bonner Center and see what students

“We are trying hard to practice food sovereignty — the right of

are up to this summer, visit Facebook.com/gcbonnercenter.

all peoples to healthy and culturally appropriate food grown

Learn more about James at guilford.edu/James. Visit

in a sustainable way,” she says in a video introducing the new

guilford.edu/SFS to hear more from Sophia. And check out

major. “We are trying to create platforms for people to help

the Day of Service video at guilford.edu/DayofService.

BONNER CENTER BY THE NUMBERS Number of community-based research projects:

5

Number of hours per year worked by Bonner Scholars at the Guilford College Farm:

Number of Bonner Scholars from the Glen Haven community:

Number of Bonner Scholars since program’s inception at Guilford:

1 5 4 600+ 375 ABOUT

(2012)

(2015)

(2017)

23 | GUILFORD.EDU


CHANGEMAKER Mamta Gurung ’18, the Bonner Center’s first Public Health Fellow, is focused on improving the health of Bhutanese refugees. B Y L E A H H AY N E S

As an accounting major, Mamta Gurung has plenty on her plate. In spite of her considerable academic demands, she gladly sacrifices time to serve others. Her Friday afternoons are dedicated to helping the Bhutanese refugee community in High Point, N.C. Mamta is the Bonner Center’s first Public Health Fellow. Working to improve the health of area refugees, she serves as a liaison between the Bhutanese Society of High Point and researchers at Guilford.

DIVERSITY

She assesses current services, helps design programs and research and advocates for the needs of the community — all with the ultimate goal of responsibly addressing the Bhutanese refugee community’s most pressing health issues.

M A M TA G U R U N G ’ 1 8 D E D I C AT E S H E R F R E E T I M E T O H E L P I N G B H U TA N E S E R E F U G E E S , A C O M M U N I T Y S H E K N O W S P E R S O N A L LY. / P H O T O B Y A S H L E Y G I L M E R

“I wanted to help this community because I know about these people,” she says. “I came from this kind of community. The quiet students you see in high school that are different from you, they might be struggling.” Mamta’s dedication, initiative and personal experience provide her with an important perspective, while the Bonner Center gives her the framework and support to make a difference in the community. She reminds us why Guilford’s dedication to the value of diversity is so important. “Diversity is important in college — and throughout life — because we all have something to learn from each other,” she says. “Just one person, one perspective, one culture — that’s not the whole picture.”

Mamta, who is a Bhutanese refugee herself, explains that refugee communities in the United States struggle with cultural isolation, which makes achieving positive health outcomes difficult. The Bhutanese community, for example, sees a much higher suicide rate — more than twice the national average.

24 | G U I L F O R D . E D U

Mamta was recently recognized with the Community Impact Award from N.C. Campus Compact. Learn more about the award and why she received it at

guilford.edu/Mamta.


PATHFINDER Muhadisa Daqiq ’19 is devoted to creating a bright future in the tech industry for girls around the world. B Y L E A H H AY N E S

Muhadisa Daqiq’s passion for social justice wasn’t born on Guilford’s campus, but the Guilford community has played an important role in fostering it. “I was surprised by how much of a voice everybody has here,” she says. “Guilford has given me the space to talk about social justice without fear. Here, I can say, ‘This is my voice.’” Muhadisa is already an international force for equality.

MUHADISA DAQIQ ’19, A COMPUTING TECHNOLOGY AND I N F O R M AT I O N S Y S T E M S M A J O R , S P E N T S U M M E R 2 0 1 6 R U N N I N G A C O N F E R E N C E F O R G I R L S I N A F G H A N I S TA N B E F O R E A N I N T E R N S H I P AT FA C E B O O K . / P H O T O B Y A S H L E Y G I L M E R

“All girls, but especially those in Afghanistan, benefit from powerful women role models,” she explains. After her work in Afghanistan, Muhadisa spent the rest of her summer engaged in a similar effort state side. She traveled to California for an internship with Facebook and the Girls Who Code initiative, a national nonprofit organization that focuses on closing the gender gap in the world of technology. “Equality is one of the biggest problems in the tech industry, but some big companies are taking steps toward improving

Conference in Kabul, Afghanistan. She planned and raised

that,” she explains. “I never really intended to see my two

money for the conference with the help of the Bonner Center

passions come together — technology and social justice — but

and the Center for Principled Problem Solving Changemaker

they have!”

EQUALITY

In the summer of 2016, she implemented the Girls Leadership

Grant Program. Having attended two girls’ leadership conferences in the U.S. while in high school, Muhadisa learned a lot about globally and socially conscious leadership. She knew she wanted to bring that opportunity to girls in the Middle East, having spent most of her childhood there. Born in Iran, she moved with her family first to Pakistan and then to Afghanistan as they followed her

Watch a video to learn more about Muhadisa

father’s career with the Red Cross. Muhadisa later moved to

and what she hopes to accomplish at

New York when she was 14.

guilford.edu/Muhadisa. 25 | GUILFORD.EDU


WHAT DOES INTEGRITY MEAN TO YOU?

Students, alums, faculty and staff share their thoughts on this Core Value.

“Practicing integrity is doing what you know and believe to be the right thing based on healthy self-examination and reflection. Integrity necessitates being honest with yourself, and having a balanced understanding of when to stand up and when to let go. I am motivated to model integrity for my students via honesty dipped in compassion and love. I challenge them to possess wellness and inner reassurance to stand on their own as a whole and complete human.” K A M I R O WA N , C H A I R , A S S O C I AT E P R O F E S S O R O F M U S I C

“The practice of integrity provides a kind of self-reflective mirror for examining all areas of my life. Am I consistent with worship practice and understanding of what God calls us to be? I claim my own integrity with great trepidation as I recognize that there is often a gap between my reality and that which I wish to be. But if I undertake the pursuit of integrity within a caring community, I can trust that together we shall be under this work of love together.”

INTEGRITY

WES S DANIELS, WILLIAM R. ROGERS DIRECTOR OF FRIENDS CENTER AND QUAKER STUDIES

“As a librarian who works to boost academic achievement, it is vital that people view my actions, words, decisions, methods and outcomes as whole and consistent. If I am to inspire others to be on the same journey of a lifelong pursuit of learning, then integrity must be at the forefront of all I do.” M I K A D AV I S , D I G I TA L P E D A G O G Y A N D SCHOL ARSHIP TECHNOLOGIST

“In Arabic the word integrity translates to “ ”. As a Guilford College student, integrity motivates everything that I do. Integrity also guides me to push the envelope of my educational expectations on my journey to fulfill my dream career as a dentist.” SAR AH HAMMOOD ’18, CHEMISTRY AND BIOLOGY

26 | GUILFORD.EDU


“Integrity is a trait that I value above all others. I thoughtfully hold myself to high standards and do the same for my students. Teaching at Guilford has taught me that the tough conversations can be had without sacrificing our standards, our respect for each other and our integrity.” W I L L I A M P I Z I O , P H . D . , A S S O C I AT E P R O F E S S O R , D E PA R T M E N T O F J U S T I C E A N D P O L I C Y S T U D I E S , D I R E C T O R , C R I M I N A L J U S T I C E G R A D U AT E P R O G R A M

“I think integrity means understanding your actions and their impact on the community. When I think of integrity as a Guilford student, I think about the idea of being willing to learn and being in an environment that encourages you to take risks to become a more aware and inclusive community member.” J O C E LY N F O S H AY ’ 1 7, H I S T O R Y A N D E D U C AT I O N S T U D I E S

“If you look up the word ‘integrity’, you’ll find that there are several synonyms and meanings. The one that speaks to me best in this season of my life is ‘the condition of being unified, unimpaired, or sound in construction’. As a woman, a wife, a mom of two, a business owner, a leader, a volunteer and a friend, being ‘sound’ is essential to the quality and sanctity of my life and to those around me. I think we equate integrity to something that we have or that we possess, which is also true, but in this mindset, it shapes who I am and who I want to be. Unimpaired. Unified. Balanced. Sound.” T O I YA L . H A N C O C K ’ 9 3 , P R E S I D E N T O F T H E B L A C K A L U M N I O F G U I L F O R D C O L L E G E A D V I S O R Y B O A R D

“Integrity, to me, means being true to a set of personal, spiritual and cultural values. Personally, to standards determined by family and individual experiences; spiritually, to the precepts and statutes that govern a higher accountability; and culturally, to ethnic history and customs. These Core Values have guided me in leading, teaming and sharing in various aspects of my life.”

“Integrity is a whole, undivided commitment to honesty and strong moral principles. As a student, you learn a lot about yourself as you navigate the college experience. An ability to stay true to my moral foundation while growing as a person was extremely important to me in recent years.” J O E M E T T S ’ 1 7, B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

D AV I D H O P K I N S ’ 9 1 , C E O , P R I M A R Y C A R E H E A LT H S E R V I C E S I N C . , P I T T S B U R G H , PA . , G U I L F O R D C O L L E G E B O A R D O F T R U S T E E S

27 | GUILFORD.EDU


B A R B A R A L AW R E N C E I S A S S O C I AT E A C A D E M I C D E A N A N D PROFESSOR OF JUSTICE AND POLICY STUDIES. A FORMER N E W Y O R K C I T Y P O L I C E O F F I C E R , P R O S E C U T I N G AT T O R N E Y AND PUBLIC DEFENDER, SHE’S THE DIRECTOR OF GUILFORD’S H I G H E R E D U C AT I O N I N P R I S O N P R O G R A M .

JUSTICE

“If we can lead and be a model for other states in actually helping reduce the impact of mass incarceration then we’re really ahead of the game.” B A R B A R A L AW R E N C E

28 | GUILFORD.EDU


ON THE COVER

SMARTER JUSTICE BY ROGER DEGERMAN

PHOTOS BY ASHLEY GILMER

Higher Education in Prison program is taking the benefits of college to incarcerated individuals across N.C.

Born of a Student’s ‘Cold Rage’ Inspiration for the program came to life in Barbara’s popular Race and Criminal Justice course at Guilford College several years ago. Her class discussions heated up as she described the rapidly growing epidemic of problems related to mass incarceration and long prison sentences.

Barbara Lawrence knows the criminal justice system inside and out. The former New York City police officer, prosecuting attorney and public defender turned college professor is inspiring a new

“If we keep locking people up for very long periods of time,” Barbara recalls telling her class, “many that could actually be going to college are going to be in prison. If that’s the case, we’re going to have to bring college to them.”

generation of students to fight for justice. And now she’s taking that fight to the front lines of incarceration — as co-founder and director of Guilford College’s groundbreaking Higher Education in Prison Program (HEIPP). The program provides transformative liberal arts education to incarcerated individuals in three N.C. facilities. Ten courses are offered focusing on Business, English, Criminal Justice and Psychology. “With this program we get to fulfill our mission of justice one day at a time,” Barbara says. “All the research indicates that higher education in prison actually reduces the recidivism rate for people going back into the system in a very significant way. If we can lead and be a model for other states in actually helping reduce the impact of mass incarceration then we’re really ahead of the game.”

Barbara’s bold assertion drew an impassioned and determined response from one of her students, Tiffany Kallam Bullard ’12. For Tiffany, the subject matter hit painfully close to home. Her father was imprisoned most of his life, and her mother had been in and out of jail several times. 29 | GUILFORD.EDU


T H E H E I P P R O G R A M O F F E R S A C O U R S E I N S U S TA I N A B L E B U S I N E S S . T H O S E W H O C O M P L E T E I T H AV E T H E O P P O R T U N I T Y T O TA K E T H E L E A D E R S H I P I N E N E R G Y A N D E N V I R O N M E N TA L D E S I G N G R E E N A S S O C I AT E E X A M , A H I G H LY C O V E T E D E M P L O Y M E N T C R E D E N T I A L .

“From a very young age,” Tiffany says, “I saw how decisions are not as cut and dried as choosing between ‘right and wrong’ — and in some regards, those very definitions of ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ come from a place of privilege. Most importantly, I had

The program’s teaching team features Barbara, Guilford Business Professors Michael Dutch and Stephen Hill, as well

the proximity to see the humanity in so many broken people.”

as Shana Scudder, Assistant Director of the UNC Greensboro

Tiffany transferred into Guilford as a Center for Continuing

to make the college course experience as authentic as possible,

Education student, attracted to the College’s Criminal Justice major. She was moved by a number of classes, including a course on power, politics and public policy taught by Sherry Giles, Chair and Professor of Justice and Policy Studies at Guilford. Tiffany says the sum effect of those courses stirred a fire deep inside, what Sherry described to her as a “cold rage — a life’s purpose ignited.” Her burning drive to help launch the HEIP program at Guilford

JUSTICE

Learning Without Google

was not to be denied. She spent the next two years researching other programs and helping Barbara form a partnership with the N.C. Department of Public Safety. The program made its successful debut in January 2014. Tiffany served as program coordinator for a year and a half before moving on to get her master’s degree in the Study of Law from Wake Forest University. She has stayed active ever since in a variety of advocacy roles for incarcerated individuals.

30 | GUILFORD.EDU

Writing Center. Barbara says their collective teaching goal is though the prison educational environment is anything but typical or easy. Just ask her students at the Southern Correctional Institute in Troy. “If you can learn in prison where you have to write an eight-page paper by hand without any Google, you can learn anywhere,” student Katherine says. “I’ve learned that you can accomplish anything you want to accomplish no matter where you are.” Her classmates agree, emphasizing that the positive impact of the program goes well beyond the walls of the prison. “This is not only beneficial to me, it’s beneficial to society,” student Bridgette says. “We need tools to make better choices to get away from whatever life we had before. And for a high-level school like Guilford to come in and give us these things — I can’t even express what that meant to my spirit.”


Getting Ahead with LEED Distinction

Celebrating the Best in Everyone

Faculty also find the program rewarding.

Last December, the first nine of the original 15 cohort of

The sacrifice of making those long, lonely drives across North Carolina week after week has paid off in ways that serve to renew their zest for teaching. And they have come away with a much more authentic and empathetic understanding of incarcerated individuals and the challenges they face. “The students’ preparedness and participation is impressive, and the energy in the classroom makes me look forward to the class each week,” Michael says. One of the most distinctive courses offered in the prison program is sustainable business. Those who complete the course have the opportunity to take the Leadership in Energy

students to complete Guilford’s program in the women's prison took part in a special graduation ceremony. Dry eyes were hard to come by as families joined in celebrating the momentous milestone marking a hopeful beginning to a better future. “This was the best experience that I have ever had,” student LaTaurus says. “We worked so hard and a lot of times we didn’t think we were going to make it. But here I am, I made it — we made it.”

Watch a video to learn more about the Higher Education in Prison program at

guilford.edu/HEIP.

and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Associate exam, a highly coveted employment credential. Guilford College is the only school in the country to offer such an opportunity.

“For a high-level school like Guilford to come in and give us these things — I can’t even express what that meant to my spirit.” BRIDGET TE, A STUDENT IN THE PROGR AM

IN DECEMBER 2016, NINE OF THE ORIGINAL 15 STUDENTS TO COMPLETE T H E P R O G R A M T O O K PA R T I N A S P E C I A L G R A D U AT I O N C E R E M O N Y.

31 | GUILFORD.EDU


TRUTHSEEKER “They’re not kidding when they say Guilford is writing intensive.” A B E K E N M O R E ’ 17

BY L E A H H AY N E S

Abe Kenmore ’17 says his rigorous academic experience helped him find his calling — journalism. Abe Kenmore ’17 knows the real value of quality work. As a student, grade A work feels good, pads a portfolio and boosts GPA. But Abe — like so many at Guilford — is much more than a student. He is a journalist, and a journalist’s excellence is more than self-serving. Abe’s excellence unearths the truth — “as fairly, accurately and completely” as he can tell it. A recipient of a grant from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, Abe spent last summer studying abroad at Oxford University and reporting on the impact that immigrants in the U.K. are experiencing as a result of new immigration legislation.

EXCELLENCE

He then presented his work at the Pulitzer Center office in Washington, D.C., before A B E K E N M O R E ’ 17, A D O U B L E M A J O R IN POLITICAL SCIENCE AND ENGLISH, PRESENTED HIS WORK FROM A SUMMER I N T E R N S H I P AT O X F O R D I N WA S H I N G T O N , D.C. / PHOTO BY NA ARI HONOR ’19

attending a 10th anniversary celebration at the National Press Club. As a double major in Political Science and English, with a minor in Peace and Conflict Studies, Guilford’s academic rigor prepared Abe for the high standards of Oxford. “They’re not kidding when they say Guilford is writing intensive,” he says with a laugh. “So when I was abroad and had to write one or two 2,000-word pieces each week, it was no problem. I’d already handled that before.” Abe’s future after Guilford looks bright, too. He’s been offered a place at the Graduate

Read more about Abe’s experience at Oxford at

guilford.edu/Abe.

32 | GUILFORD.EDU

School of Journalism at Columbia University in New York City.


GROWING A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE BY K AREN ALLEY

Successful campus farm plants the seed for a new major in Sustainable Food Systems.

“Right away the farm became popular with students,” says Director of Sustainability David Petree. “They not only liked the opportunity to get their hands dirty but had a true interest in growing the food they ate in the cafeteria.” As the farm grew, Helen Mandalinic ’14, a Bonner scholar and Food Fellow, saw it as a way to help address hunger insecurity in Guilford County by creating a mobile market to take

Caring for the environment, giving back to the community and teaching students skills for success are fundamental to the Guilford College way of life. The introduction of the Sustainable

produce to immigrant communities, which continues today. Professor Marlene McCauley, Professor of Geology and Earth Sciences, also saw an opportunity to make something happen. “I thought, it’s so great that we have a farm on campus and students are out there working — why don’t we offer classes?”

spring semester, brings together all of these goals to form a unique opportunity to educate students and provide tools they can use to make an impact on their communities now and in the future. The story of the SFS major really starts with the creation of the farm in 2011. That first year, crops were planted with a goal of creating a financially self-sustaining garden to provide

“I thought, it’s so great that we have a farm on campus and students are out there working — why don’t we offer classes?” MARLENE MCCAULE Y

food for the College’s dining services. 33 | GUILFORD.EDU

STEWARDSHIP

Food Systems (SFS) major, launched this past


“I get the opportunity to work with students day in and day out, discussing the work we’re doing and greater issues related to food, agriculture and society.” NICK MANGILI

LIFE ON THE FARM A highlight of the farm is the new farmhouse, which will allow Farmer Nick Mangili to live right in the midst of all the activity. “Having him here will make a big improvement to the efficiencies of the farm, while also improving his quality of life,” David says. “I love that it’s both a production and an education farm,” Nick says. “I get the opportunity to work with students day in and day out, discussing the work we’re doing and greater issues related to food, agriculture and society.” The farmhouse itself shows the College’s commitment to sustainability, built almost completely with wood from campus. The process started a few years ago, when David suggested buying a sawmill to make use of the many trees down around Guilford’s 300-acre campus. In addition to wood paneling taking the place of sheetrock, there is insulation in almost all of the walls, making this three-bedroom, 1,640-square-foot house efficient and economical.

PHOTO BY ASHLEY GILMER

What started out as one practicum has grown into the new major because of the hard work of Marlene, Professor Kyle Dell, Professor Gail Webster, lecturer Bronwyn Tucker and a group of students including Moira O’Neill ’16, Seren Homer ’16 and Hannah Brewer-Jensen ’17.

STEWARDSHIP

And with invaluable support from the community, particularly from the Hillsdale Fund, which provided a $30,000 grant to cover startup expenses, the major is off to a strong start.

Plowing Ahead This spring, classes included practicums in sustainable agriculture and a course on sustainable regional food that looks at food distribution and access, food policy, how people eat and cook food and food production. T H E N E W 1 , 6 4 0 - S Q U A R E - F O O T C A M P U S FA R M H O U S E I S B U I LT A L M O S T C O M P L E T E LY F R O M D O W N E D T R E E S F O U N D A C R O S S T H E 300-ACRE CAMPUS. / PHOTO BY ASHLE Y GILMER 34 | GUILFORD.EDU


“I feel hands-on experiences are an important part of learning, so we headed out to see what’s happening in our area,” Bronwyn says. Students visited grocery stores and co-ops, a farm for refugees and a food hub where farmers sell produce to local chefs.

PHOTO BY ASHLEY GILMER

As the major expands so will its offerings, with classes planned for food preservation, food justice, grant writing, basic carpentry and urban farming techniques, as well as a study abroad and research aspect. “This major really encompasses the Quaker testimonies of being civil and useful, which is why I think it took off so fast,” Marlene says. “What we have is truly a one-of-a-kind program, offering an on-campus farm in an urban area surrounded by food hardship. We’re in a unique position to have our students make a difference in the world.”

CHICKENS AND BEES ARE ALL THE BUZZ Chickens and beehives add to the sustainable aspect in a number of ways. The chickens, black australorps, are a heritage breed known to be good layers even in hot weather. Right now they’re laying about two dozen eggs a day, which are sold at the campus farmers market and to people in the community. Thanks to a mobile chicken coop and moveable fencing, the chickens are moved around the farm to help control weeds and provide organic fertilizer. The bees, managed by Chris Senters of Gypsy Bee Provision Company, help with pollination.

Watch a video to learn from more students, faculty and staff involved in launching the SFS major at

guilford.edu/SFS.

In addition to their contribution to the farm itself, the bees and chickens, through their eggs and honey, are two additional ways students are being taught to produce revenue on a farm. The livestock also show students avenues for creating jobs or businesses that help others in the community be more sustainable in food consumption and production.

MORE THAN FOOD FOR THOUGHT Students graduating from Guilford College with a degree in SFS can play an important role in society in a number of ways, whether it’s through farming, entrepreneurship, advocating for food policy and food justice, working on policies that address food issues or conducting research. Part of the inspiration for creating this major came from the fact that many alumni are currently working in these types of fields, including Rania Campbell-Cobb ’08, sustainability director for Friends Rehabilitation program and founder and executive director of Cloud 9 Rooftop Farm in Philadelphia, Pa. R ANIA CAMPBELL- COBB ’08 IS THE DIRECTOR OF C L O U D 9 R O O F T O P FA R M I N P H I L A D E L P H I A , PA . I T S MISSION IS TO PRODUCE FOOD F O R T H O S E L E S S F O R T U N AT E . / PHOTO BY GEOCORE

Rania majored in Environmental Studies, Sociology and Economics at Guilford, and she later studied social innovation and sustainability at Goddard College. She has been working in sustainable agriculture and community engagement since 2004. “One thing I learned at Guilford is that ideas that come out of the collective can be really powerful,” Rania says. Her work with Cloud 9 includes partnering with others to create a healthier, more beautiful city through education and volunteer opportunities and to produce food for those less fortunate.

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7 TO WATCH IN ’17 These alumni are on the fast track to major impact.

Read more about them at the links on each profile.

The Educator: Ampofo Darko ’04 Major

Chemistry, with a Ph.D. from the University of Florida

Career

Professor at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville

The Innovators: Anne Bowser ’08 and Elizabeth Tyson ’08

Quote

“Guilford College instilled in me a love of learning, and I’m lucky to be able to continue that through my own research as well as pass it on to a new generation of students.”

guilford.edu/Ampofo

Guilfordians are everywhere! When we reached out to Elizabeth (left) to learn more about her, we found out she was working — in the same office — with Anne. Consider Anne a head start on 8 to watch in ’18.

Majors

The Sports Enthusiast: Brandon Rothfuss ’15 Major

Sports Management

Career

Account executive for the Greensboro Swarm, D-League NBA team

Quote

“I know how much sports impacted my life and has enabled me to do what I’ve gotten to do so far, and I’m grateful for the chance to give back.”

Anne — Psychology and German, with a master’s in Information Science and a Ph.D. in Library and Information Studies with a focus on Human-Computer Interactions (HCI) from the University of Maryland; Elizabeth — Religious Studies and Environmental Studies, with a dual master’s in Natural Resources Conservation from Colorado State and ECOSUR in Chiapas, Mexico

Careers

Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars through the Science and Technology Innovation Program

Quotes

Elizabeth says, “I found a new way of looking at the world, giving me Core Values that knowledge production is not relegated to the ivory tower, and inspiring my love of and reverence for the outdoors.” Anne says, “I had a Guilford College bumper sticker on my car that said, ‘be the change you want to see in the world,’ and I really took that to heart. I want to shape my work to reflect the values I learned at Guilford.”

guilford.edu/coworkers guilford.edu/Brandon

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The Musician: Genevieve Holmes ’08 Major

Quote

English and Music

Career

Manager of strategic initiatives at Forsyth Institute in Boston, Mass.; executive director of Make Music Boston

“Taking classes in a broad spectrum of areas including Philosophy and Ornithology as part of the liberal arts education exposed me to so many different people and thought-processes. Guilford’s collegial atmosphere, broad curriculum and enterprising faculty set the stage and provided me the tools for the work that I do today.”

guilford.edu/Genevieve

The Scientist: Michael Khayat ’14 Major

Biology and Computing Technology and Information Systems

Career

Student at Baylor College of Medicine, pursuing a Ph.D. in molecular and human genetics

Quote

“Dr. Melanie Lee-Brown was instrumental in my science training, and she also was a fantastic adviser and mentor to me. Starting in my freshman year, she helped me shape my aspirations into a viable plan, and she was there for me throughout my years at Guilford — and even afterward.”

guilford.edu/Michael

The Speaker: Dima Hanania ’12 Major

Political Science and Environmental Studies

Career

Project Manager at Jawwal

Quote

“To have the opportunity to leave home and study in another country, while my parents were back in Palestine, was a very big deal. Guilford really opened doors for me and helped me break out of my shell.”

guilford.edu/Dima

Who else should we profile? Send the names

The Banker: Jose Ortiz ’08 Major

Quote

Business

Career

Vice President at Georgia Banking Company, pursuing an MBA at Emory University

“When I was at Guilford, they really drove home the Quaker principles and Core Values, and I’ve taken that and tried to involve it in everything I do. I’ve used it for making decisions, in my work and for myself personally.”

guilford.edu/Jose

of Guilfordians who should be featured to

magazine@guilford.edu. 37 | GUILFORD.EDU


PHILANTHROPY

FRANCIS T. KING and Philanthropy at Guilford College

BY AR A SERJOIE

Time, talent and treasure are tenets of modern day philanthropy. However, our history shows those are long-standing Quaker and Guilford College traditions. Between 1837 and 1840, Joseph John Gurney, a successful English banker-turnedF R A N C E S T. K I N G

minister, toured the United States giving impassioned sermons. He spoke about the importance of accumulating wealth and yet living in simplicity, such that the treasures could be used to advance the wellbeing of society. Among those who heard him was a young Francis T. King in Baltimore, Md. After hearing Gurney’s impassioned sermon, Francis sat down to calculate how much wealth he needed to provide for his future family and actively promote the welfare of his fellow man. He succeeded, and at age 42 he retired from business. Soon thereafter, he formed the Baltimore Association of the Religious Society of Friends to provide assistance to Quakers in the southern United States.

38 | GUILFORD.EDU


KING HALL, 2016 / PHOTO BY DONNA R ASMUSSEN ’04

Guilford College established the Heritage Society to recognize donors who document planned gifts with the College. In recognition of the significant role philanthropy has played in the history of New Garden Boarding School and Guilford College, the Heritage Society is being renamed the Francis T. King Society. Planned gifts include charitable gift annuities, charitable remainder unitrusts, gifts of life insurance and retirement plans and simple documented bequests. For more information about making a planned gift, contact Sharon Storm at

stormsr@guilford.edu.

Becoming a College Events leading up to and the tumultuous years of the Civil War wreaked havoc on Quakers in the South, many of whom fled to stay true to their opposition to war, while others stayed and became activists for ending slavery. During this time, New Garden Boarding School, founded in 1837, experienced tremendous financial hardships. Dorothy Lloyd Gilbert notes in her book Guilford, a Quaker College, that David White, a renowned businessman and philanthropist, stood up at the at the 1860 N.C. Yearly Meeting and declared, “Friends, the debt must be paid. The honour of truth is at stake. I will give a fourth of all I possess.” Ultimately, New Garden Boarding School survived the Civil War and eventually became Guilford College in 1888. The Baltimore Association, led by Francis King, sold the Modern Farm in High Point that had been created by Nathan Hunt to practice and teach what we now know to be sustainable agriculture. In 1887, they created the first endowment for Guilford College with $5,000 from this sale and along with other subscriptions (a term used to emphasize the opportunity to subscribe to something that is worth doing) formally transitioned the school to a college.

Creating a Better Future Deeply inspired by his leadership and personal philanthropy, the community rallied to name the institution King College. However, Francis refused and instead suggested Guilford College to honor the area’s people. In a compromise, he agreed for the first building to be named King Hall — a predecessor to the King Hall on campus today. Francis King’s legacy lives on at Guilford. Those who have dedicated their time, talent and treasures in varying forms and proportions are subscribers to the notion that the College is a timeless gem in the higher education sphere. In the words of a contemporary Guilford leader and philanthropist: What we do, who we teach and how we learn are essential to a better future and turning the world as it ought to be.

Ara Serjoie is the Vice President for Advancement at Guilford College. Other sources for this article include Max Carter. KING HALL, 1837

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PHILANTHROPY

Foundation’s Legacy Is Education of BY T Y BUCKNER

Women

Guilford College is able to provide many students

In 1906, upon her husband’s death, Lettie assumed

with access to an excellent and practical liberal

responsibility for the family’s business affairs. She became

arts education because of the generous support

board, expanding both the Coca-Cola bottling operation

of philanthropic organizations like the Atlantabased Lettie Pate Whitehead Foundation, which devotes most of its resources to a college

one of the first women to serve on a major corporation and the family’s real estate investments. She was a trustee for two colleges. Lettie donated millions of dollars to more than 130 organizations, particularly in the South. Influenced by

scholarship program for women.

her generosity, her son Conkey created the Lettie Pate

One hundred sixty-four women students at Guilford have received a total of $1.3 million in scholarship aid from the

Inspired by Generosity

foundation since 2000.

“It was Conkey Whitehead’s strong belief in his mother

Ali Stewart ’06 studied political science, participated in Teach for America, earned a master’s degree and now teaches history in Boston public schools. “It is no exaggeration to say that my experiences at Guilford are among the most pivotal in my life,” she says. “The support of the Lettie Pate Whitehead Scholarship made it possible for me and my family to realize the full potential of my time at the College.”

Driven to Give Lettie Pate was born into one of Virginia’s most established families in 1872. She married Joseph Brown Whitehead, and they had two sons. In 1899, the Whiteheads secured an exclusive contract to bottle and sell Coca-Cola and moved to Atlanta.

40 | GUILFORD.EDU

Whitehead Foundation as a memorial to her.

and her support of causes that would benefit humanity that he created the foundation,” said Lyons Gray of Winston-Salem, N.C., vice chair of the foundation’s board of trustees. “His goal was to create a source of funds that give women an opportunity for an education.” Amanda Szabo ’08 participated in Americorps and received her doctoral degree in communications from the University of Colorado Boulder. “Though I was moved to attend Guilford College, it would not have been an easy decision were it not for the generous financial aid I received,” she says. “I am honored to have been a recipient of this scholarship, and I am inspired to live up to the Lettie Pate Whitehead legacy and give back more than I’ve taken.”


“It is no exaggeration to say that my experiences at Guilford are among the most pivotal in my life.” A L I S T E WA R T ’ 0 6

L E T T I E PAT E W H I T E H E A D F O U N D AT I O N S C H O L A R S H I P R E C I P I E N T S Y M A N I B R E E D L O V E ’ 1 9 ( L E F T ) A N D J U L I A N A AV E R Y ’ 1 8 W I T H LY O N S G R AY, V I C E C H A I R O F T H E F O U N D AT I O N ’ S B O A R D O F T R U S T E E S / P H O T O B Y J . K N I G H T P H O T O G R A P H Y

41 | G U I L F O R D . E D U


PHILANTHROPY

T H E B L U E T H E N T H A L FA M I LY, I N C L U D I N G B E T S Y ( L E F T ) A N D T O N Y, C O N T R I B U T E D $100,000 FOR T WO NE W TENNIS COURTS / PHOTOS BY ASHLE Y GILMER

Bluethenthal Gift

FUNDS TWO NEW TENNIS COURTS

In making a recent gift to Guilford College, the family of the late Arthur Bluethenthal not only honored his memory but also enhanced the experience of students competing for the Quakers’ tennis teams. The Bluethenthals contributed $100,000 to cover the cost of constructing two additional tennis courts on the northwest corner of campus and $25,000 to create an JON-ANTHONY THOMAS ’20

endowed fund for tennis program expenses, including the upkeep of the courts. “Our family looked for an opportunity to honor my father in a way that will make an

“Truly this gift is an investment in the lives of our students.” PRESIDENT JANE FERNANDES

impact,” said Tony Bluethenthal, Arthur’s son. “I think he would be very pleased that we chose to make the gift to Guilford College.”

Part of Guilford History Arthur, who died in 2013 at the age of 89, was a Greensboro business and community leader who once served on Guilford’s Board of Visitors. A “reluctant hero,” the native of Wilmington, N.C., was a B-17 pilot in World War II. He competed in football and wrestling as a young man and in tennis well into later life. He was a friend of Guilford’s fifth president, Grimsley Hobbs ’47, when the two men were students as teenagers at George School, a Quaker boarding school in Pennsylvania. After he became president, Grimsley hired Arthur to establish a wrestling team, which he coached for five years. At a dedication ceremony Nov. 21, President Jane Fernandes said, “The new tennis courts funded by the Bluethenthal gift will make a big difference in the experience of our current tennis players and many students yet to come. Truly this gift is an investment in the lives of our students.”

42 | G U I L F O R D . E D U


PHILANTHROPY

Accomplished Alumni Receive Awards

F R O N T R O W, F R O M L E F T: E S T H E R H A L L ’ 74 , H E AT H E R W E S T M O R E L A N D S C AV O N E ’ 0 3 , PAT H E G E ’ 5 7, C U R T H E G E ’ 5 6 , R A U L S A N L L E H I ’ 9 2 , G E R T R U D E U P P E R M A N ’ 6 9 , C H R I S T I N A R E P O L E Y ’ 0 2 ; B A C K R O W, F R O M L E F T: J A M E S S H I E L D S ’ 0 0 , W E S L E Y R E I D ’ 8 5 , G I L B E R T B A I L E Y ’ 9 1 , TA N YA F E A G I N S ’ 7 1 , C H R I S T O P H E R B E N F E Y ’ 7 7, D AV I D F E A G I N S ’ 7 0 / P H O T O B Y G E O C O R E

The Guilford College Alumni Association presented annual alumni awards to 11 individuals and a group of accomplished alumni during Homecoming and Family Weekend in October.

Alumni Excellence Award Winners

Community Cares Award

Gilbert Bailey ’91

Charles C. Hendricks Distinguished Service Award

Christopher Benfey ’77

Esther Hall ’74

Gertrude Upperman ’69

Wesley Reid ’85

Young Alumni Achievement Award

David ’70 & Tanya ’71 Feagins, representing a group that worked to preserve the Guilford Woods

Raul Sanllehi ’92

Molly Gochman ’01

James Shields ’00

Christina Repoley ’02

Patricia ’57 & Curt ’56 Hege

Katherine Helms Cummings ’83

Heather Scavone ’03

43 | GUILFORD.EDU


PHILANTHROPY

Class of 1967 th Celebrates 50 Anniversary

C L A R A J O P L E A S A N T S ’ 6 7, B O B B U M G A R N E R ’ 6 7 A N D J U N E PAY N E ’ 6 7 / P H O T O S B Y A S H L E Y G I L M E R

A Time of Change The Class of 1967 was in college at a turbulent time in

More than 80 members of the Class of 1967 and their guests celebrated the 50th anniversary of their graduation on April 28-30. The class members were inducted to Guilford’s Golden Circle, and they participated in many on-campus events, including tours related to Quaker history, the Underground Railroad and environmental sustainability as well as a reception for all Golden Circle members at Ragsdale House, the president’s residence. “I have returned to campus many times during the last 50 years,” said Martha Chilton Neas ’67 of Concord, N.C., “but my favorite visits have been the ones which also included some of

U.S. and world history — the height of the Vietnam War, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and the Civil Rights Movement. Guilford was integrated in 1962, a year before this class arrived. “Some of our instructors had escaped from Germany, Russia or Cuba or were released from prison for being conscientious objectors to the war,” said Bob Bumgarner ’67 of Greensboro. “We interacted with them in the classroom, in the student union and on the sidewalk. “I remember the friends I made,” he added. “I even met my wife of 48 years while at Guilford. Our 50-year reunion was very important to me.”

the familiar faces that surrounded me during my four years as a student. Celebrating those days and accomplishments with other members of the Class of 1967 was another wonderful Guilford experience.”

44 | GUILFORD.EDU

For more photos from Golden Circle Weekend, visit

guilford.edu/GoldenCircle.


THE FOOTBALL TEAM DELIVERED A SWEET H O M E C O M I N G V I C T O R Y, D E F E AT I N G C AT H O L I C 5 9 - 0 . / PHOTOS BY GEOCORE

S M I L I N G FA C E S G R E E T E D F O L K S A S T H E Y ARRIVED FOR THE WEEKEND’S FESTIVITIES.

Homecoming

& Family Weekend

I N E A R LY E V E N I N G , T H E W O M E N ’ S SOCCER TEAM TOOK THE FIELD AGAINST SHENANDOAH.

THE POP-UP PHOTO B O O T H WA S A F U N WAY T O CAPTURE MEMORIES.

2016

Quakers from near and far gathered to enjoy the crisp fall weather, reconnect and make new memories. From athletics to alumni awards, there was something for everyone.

T O R O U N D O U T T H E D AY, A L U M N I A N D F R I E N D S E N J O Y E D F O O D , D R I N K A N D C O N V E R S AT I O N W H I L E ANDY E V ERSOLE’S (’02) BA NJO E A RT H PER FOR MED.

VISITORS ENJOYED A DELICIOUS L U N C H AT T H E FA R M , P R E PA R E D WITH PRODUCE GROWN ON CAMPUS.

Mark your calendars! Homecoming and Family Weekend 2017 is scheduled for

November 2-5. 45 | GUILFORD.EDU


PHILANTHROPY

2016 Honor Roll of Giving

PHOTOS BY JOHN MCKEITH

The Honor Roll of Giving celebrates and recognizes the generosity of each donor to Guilford College. Through the leadership and commitment of donors, the academic experience for each student is enhanced. Our deep appreciation goes to all donors for enabling Guilford to maintain its position as a leading liberal arts institution. The following lists recognize donors who have lifetime giving of $500,000 or more through Dec. 31, 2016. They are members of the Macon and Hobbs Societies.

The Macon Society recognizes those who have donated $1,000,000 or more in total giving to date. Advocare of Bradenton, LLC Anonymous Edward J.* and Vivien K. Bauman Joseph M. Bryan Jr. ’60 Malcolm O. ’50* and Jeanne Van Leer ’48* Campbell Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro Corella and Bertram F. Bonner Foundation, Inc. Edward M. Armfield Sr. Foundation Stanley* and Dorothy* Frank Freeman Foundation W. Groome Jr. ’60 and Ann C. Fulton

46 | GUILFORD.EDU

Flavel McMichael and John Godfrey James C. Green* H. Curt Sr. ’56 and Patricia Shields ’57 Hege Joseph M. Bryan Foundation William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust Kresge Foundation Gail McMichael Lane Lettie Pate Whitehead Foundation Lilly Endowment, Inc. Seth C. ’40* and Hazel Monsees ’41* Macon Frank Alexander Masters ’42* Dalton L. Sr.* and Dorothy ’37* McMichael Dalton L. Jr. and Susan McMichael The McMichael Family Foundation Dorothy Louise McMichael Miracle*


Daniel D. and Beth Mosca M. Janette Soles ’87 and Steven Walter Nelson N.C. GlaxoSmithKline Foundation N.C. Independent Colleges and Universities James S. ’38* and Catherine* Parsons Philip Shore* William Roger Soles Jr. ’81 Dewey L. Jr. ’58 and Barbara Trogdon Frank Erwin ’34* and Ava Roberts ’33* Werner William L. Yates ’53*

The Hobbs Society recognizes those who have donated $500,000 – $999,999 in total giving to date. Ruth Bab ’44* BB&T Oleta Brame* Joseph M. Sr.* and Kathleen Price* Bryan Cannon Foundation, Inc. Jesse C. Jr. ’32* and Virginia M.* Carson

Mary M.* and Ray L.* Evans ExxonMobil Foundation Fidelity Investments Charitable Gift Fund William A. and Hughlene B. Frank The Stanley and Dorothy Frank Family Foundation

Charles and Mary Kirkman ’45 Routh Sherwood Anderson Foundation Stephen Suozzi* U.S. Charitable Gift Trust

David A. and Verna George

John A. Weissenfluh ’34*

Patricia Ann Gibbs ’63*

John Hugh ’34* and Virginia P.* Williams

John W. Googe ’50 Lorraine Hayes King ’48*

Winston-Salem Foundation

William F. Jr. ’47* and Lorraine Hayes ’48* King Betsy Bingham ’53 Klein

*Deceased

Marion Stedman Covington*

Lincoln Financial Group

J. Wilbert ’40* and Marianna Dow ’40* Edgerton

L. Kimsey* and Helen Margaret Dukes* Mann

We regret any errors that may occur in these lists and appreciate your correcting us. If this is the case with your name, or if you have questions or concerns, please contact the Office of Advancement at advancement@guilford.edu.

Charles F. Jr. ’63 and Molly Milner To view a comprehensive list of donors for the 2016 calendar year, visit

Lunsford Jr. ’45* and Beatrix L.* Richardson

guilford.edu/HonorRoll.

Chris Mirabelli and Catherine Heller Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation

47 | G U I L F O R D . E D U


IN MEMORIAM

REMEMBERING GUILFORDIANS We celebrate the lives of several members of our community who died in the past year. We continue to hold their families in the light.

Edward J. Bauman Ed, a College trustee emeritus and benefactor, died March 22, 2017, in Naples, Fla., at the age of 92. The former president, CEO and board chair of Blue Bell Inc., a Greensboro-based jeans and apparel manufacturer, joined the Board of Trustees in 1988 and was an active member until 2007. He was a member of the College’s Board of Visitors from 1986-88. He and his wife, Vivien, were generous benefactors, with lifetime contributions of $3.9 million, including a gift of $1.75 million toward construction of the telecommunications building that opened in 1991 and bears their names. They designated a portion of a $2 million campaign gift for

Howard Haworth ’57 Howard, a trustee emeritus, who had a head for business and a heart for education and left a distinguished legacy of service, died Nov. 18, 2016, in Charlotte, N.C., at the age of 81. He served on the Board of Visitors from 1975-77 and joined the Board of Trustees in 1977, serving as chair from 1988-90. He was national chair of the College’s QUEST capital campaign in the 1980s. He and his wife, Pat, established a scholarship fund for honor students in 1983. A furniture executive, he also served as N.C. commerce secretary and Board of Education chair.

renovating Founders Hall in 2004, and the building’s terrace

As a student, Howard majored in history and competed in

and galleries are named for them.

football, tennis and track. Guilford honored him with the Charles

President Jane Fernandes said, “We are truly fortunate that as a business leader, Ed Bauman recognized Guilford College as an important asset in his community, and that he and his wife became such close, valued partners with the College in sustaining the excellent and practical liberal arts education that has benefitted a generation of students.”

48 | GUILFORD.EDU

C. Hendricks Distinguished Service Award in 1984 and Alumni Excellence Award in 1987. He was inducted to the College’s Athletic Hall of Fame in 1980.


Jeff Jeske He was a Charles A. Dana Professor of English, serving Guilford for more than 30 years, teaching Journalism and Film Studies courses and advising the award-winning student newspaper, The Guilfordian. Known to his colleagues for his sage advice and unobtrusive manner, he was honored throughout his career with every award a faculty member could receive. Fellow faculty members Heather Hayton and Jim Hood ’79 called him “a prolific writer and a lover of words” and “a dear friend.”

Bill Grubbs

Jeff, a longtime and beloved English professor, died Jan. 23, 2017. Jeff was a mentor to students and colleagues alike. “He was generous of spirit and genuinely interested that others see the power and the good in writing — and in each other’s potential. Whenever he taught, his delight in the accomplishments of his students was his greatest joy,” Jane shared. Memorials to the Jeff Jeske Memorial Scholarship in English and Journalism may be made by mail or at guilford.edu/ makeagift, specifying this fund in the “Other” category of the Designation section.

Devin Seaverson ’19

Bill, a distinguished accounting professor of 46 years, died Jan. 15, 2017, in High Point, N.C.

Devin, a student from Fuquay-Varina, N.C., died Jan. 5, 2017.

He came to Guilford in 1967 and was the chair of the Accounting Department as well as the Sulon Bidd Steadman Professor of Accounting. He was awarded the Guilford Alumni Exemplary Educator Award for his work over the years to help countless graduates pass the CPA exam, often with distinction.

A valued member of the Guilford community, Devin served as an admission tour guide and was active in theatre, set to perform the lead role in the spring 2017 production. He was a double major in Theatre and Physics.

Noted as a remarkably kind, selfless and giving person, it was clear to all who worked with him that not only was he an effective and dedicated teacher, his students loved him. Deedee Pearman ’03, Administrative Assistant/Licensure Officer for Education Studies, says he always “went the extra mile and gave individual attention to each student.”

David Hammond, Chair of the Theatre Studies Department, described Devin as positive, supportive and committed. “No matter how difficult a scene or an exercise, he responded with a smile that said, ‘I’m with you, I get it, this is interesting, let’s keep going,’” David said. “That’s a joy for a teacher. He was a generous and genuinely kind person, and all of us in the department grieve his loss.” Memorials may be made to the Guilford College Revelers Club (encourages youth theatre opportunities) at guilford.edu/makeagift, or the Trevor Project (provides crisis intervention for LGBTQ youth) at give.thetrevorproject.org.

49 | GUILFORD.EDU


MOROCCO TOPIC S OF STUDY IN THE MOROCCO: M U LT I C U LT U R A L I S M A N D H U M A N S R I G H T S PROGR AM INCLUDE LIBER AL REFORMS OF E T H N I C I T Y, W O M E N ’ S R I G H T S A N D S TAT E V I O L E N C E . / P H O T O B Y D AV I S A . Y O U N G ’ 1 7

MEMORIES FOR MILES Guilford College is celebrating 40 years of study abroad adventures in 2017. Students who study abroad develop intercultural skills and build a global consciousness, preparing them to engage the world responsibly. Here’s a look at the last four decades.

C H I N A T H I S J A N U A R Y, S T U D E N T S T R AV E L E D FROM BEIJING TO K ASHGAR, CHINA, COLLECTING D ATA A N D M A P P I N G C U LT U R A L A N D H I S T O R I C A L PAT T E R N S O F I N F O R M AT I O N , I N D I G I TA L LY M A P P I N G C H I N A’ S S I L K R O A D . L E A R N M O R E A B O U T T H E I R J O U R N E Y AT S I L K R O A D . G U I L F O R D . E D U . / PHOTO BY CHRIS COLLINS ’19

MUNICH GUILFORD IN MUNICH OFFERS STUDENTS THE CHANCE TO STUDY GERMAN L A N G U A G E , L I F E A N D C U LT U R E . T H E Y A L S O TA K E C O U R S E S TA U G H T I N E N G L I S H B Y M U N I C H FA C U LT Y, G I V I N G T H E M A U N I Q U E P E R S P E C T I V E O N A M E R I C A N C U LT U R E . / PHOTO BY K ALI CONOVER ’15

T U N I S I A A N D I TA LY T H E T U N I S I A A N D I TA LY: P O L I T I C S A N D R E L I G I O U S I N T E G R AT I O N I N THE MEDITERR ANEAN PROGR AM ENCOUR AGES STUDENTS TO DIVE INTO SUCH SUBJECTS AS Y O U T H C U LT U R E A N D T H E I M PA C T O F T O U R I S M . / P H O T O B Y K AT H E R I N E M U N R O ’ 1 6

STUDY ABROAD BY THE NUMBERS

1977

Guilford’s study abroad legacy begins. The first program is a faculty-led trip to London in the fall of 1977.

50 | GUILFORD.EDU

2

Ranking of the Brunnenburg Semester — named one of the 50 Best Study Abroad Programs in the Country by College Values Online

250,000+ Dollars awarded in scholarships and financial assistance for study abroad programs in the last 10 years alone

guilford.edu/StudyAbroad

3,400

Number of students who have studied abroad in the last 40 years

57

Number of countries visited by students


BRYAN SERIES 2017-18 Navigating Change in a Complex World

OCT

Lisa Genova

SEPT

17

25

Former Vice President

Neuroscientist and best-selling author of Still Alice

Joe Biden and Jill Biden NOV

Leslie Odom Jr.

15

Tony Award winning actor and vocalist of the Broadway blockbuster Hamilton

JAN

28

Reza Aslan

Scholar of religion and bestselling author of No god but God: The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam

FEB

Ted Koppel

20

Anchor for ABC’s Nightline from 1980 until 2005 and currently a special contributor to CBS Sunday Morning

APRIL

Brandon Stanton

10

Photographer, blogger, best-selling author and creative behind “Humans of New York”

Speakers and dates are subject to change. New subscriptions on sale May 8.

More information at

bryanseries.guilford.edu.

Special thanks to our sponsors: First Citizens Bank, Wells Fargo, Cone Health, Schell Bray, Friends Homes, Diversified Trust, Well Spring, Lab Corp, Piedmont Natural Gas, Purrington Moody Weil LLP and New Garden Friends School

51 | GUILFORD.EDU


guilford.edu 5800 West Friendly Avenue Greensboro, NC 27410

MARK YOUR CALENDARS! Please plan to join alumni, families, friends and the campus community for Homecoming and Family Weekend.

November 2-5, 2017

Learn more about Homecoming and other upcoming events at

guilford.edu/alumni. 52 | GUILFORD.EDU

PHOTO BY MICHAEL CROUCH ’10, ’12

Guilford College Magazine 2017  

Published annually, Guilford College Magazine highlights our mission in action through the lives of our students, alumni, faculty and staff...

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