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www.outsourcingportal.eu No. 4 (41) | July – August 2018 ISSN 2083-8867 PRICE EUR 6 (INCL. 8% VAT)

Bulgaria – source of outsourcing experts for Europe Interview with Ivaylo Slavov, Chairman of the Bulgarian Outsourcing Association and CEO of BULPROS page 22

BUSINESS

INVESTMENTS

CAREER & DEVELOPMENT

Attending an event? Use this 101. A Guide To Maximising Your ROI For Events And Exhibitions

Time for Czestochowa

The cow people or employer branding in the SSC industry

page 32

Interview with Krzysztof Matyjaszczyk, Mayor of Czestochowa page 72

page 96


L E T ’ S M E E T AT

T h e B S S To u r Byd g oszcz

THEME

Organizer:

F&A with no secrets

DAT E

VENUE

September 11th, 2018

Holiday Inn Hotel,

Tuesday, 9 a.m.- 7 p.m.

36 Grodzka Street

www.bsstour.com/bydgoszcz2018


INTRODUCTION

Editor-in-chief Dymitr Doktór dymitr.doktor@proprogressio.pl Managing Editor Kamila Czyżyk kamila.czyzyk@proprogressio.pl DTP Iwona Nowakowska

@DymitrDoktor

Advertising reklama@outsourcingandmore.pl

Dear Readers,

Published by PRO PROGRESSIO

The world of Business Support Services is moving forward, and Europe is becoming an increasingly interesting place for this industry. Only in the last few months, business initiatives have been created on our continent, which will certainly have an impact on the development of the sector and its relations with final clients. Among the most interesting of them are the European Outsourcing Council established by the American IAOP association or Emerging Europe Alliance – another initiative of UK Think Tank aimed at promoting the CEE region as a global location for the BSS industry. Both initiatives were summarized during the conferences in Brussels and London casting a new quality market for BPO and SSC conferences, summits and forums.

Editorial address ul. Sobieskiego 104/29 00-764 Warszawa www.proprogressio.pl

P: +48 22 213 02 45 F: +48 22 213 02 49 editor@proprogressio.pl www.outsourcingandmore.pl Print Drukarnia Jantar Legal support Chudzik i Wspólnicy An electronic version of the Magazine see the website www.outsourcingandmore.pl Selected photos come from shutterstock.com website. Circulation 3,000 copies All rights reserved. No copying, reproduction or photocopying allowed without written consent of the publisher. The views expressed in this publication as well as the content of the adverts are not necessarily those of the editor. Partners

AUTHORS Maciej Kulbat • Łukasz Kobiec • Magdalena Janiak • Ivaylo Slavov • Loredana Niculae • Monika Vilkelytė • Tom Quigley • Jarosław Pilch • Marcin Siewierski • Adam Schroeder • Michał Galimski • Maciej Wawrzyniak • Piotr Libicki • Krzysztof Matyjaszczyk • Artur Hajdorowicz • Marek Janiak • Mariusz Sagan • Jarosław Bondar • Szymon Motławski • Monika Reszko • Magda Staniszewska

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

The tone of this year’s business events is one – Europe is gaining in attractiveness and we should expect further investments of large and medium-sized players, who will create from scratch or expand already existing shared service centers. These signals are received by cities but also Real Estate companies who are open to new business projects. In current edition of Outsourcing&More Magazine we have decided to take a look at Bulgaria. We had a great pleasure to run the interview with Ivaylo Slavov – the new Chairman of Bulgarian Outsourcing Association and CEO of Bulpros. Bulgaria has a strong presence in outsourcing industry located in CEE Region, what was summarized during the 5. Annual Outsourcing Conference hosted in Varna – one of the fastest developing cities in Bulgaria. The conference has been also connected with Awards Programme and Bulpros was one of the companies recognized as industry leader. We are facing the period of holidays, vacations and calm down of business activity, but by looking at the autumn of 2018 right now, many initiatives and activities await us, both on the side of service providers and investments of the BSS industry. Enjoy reading the July issue of Outsourcing&More Magazine! Dymitr Doktór, Chief Editor

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INDEX

BUSINESS

6

Technology talks in Katowice

22

Bulgaria – source of outsourcing experts for Europe Interview with Ivaylo Slavov, Chairman of the Bulgarian Outsourcing Association and CEO of BULPROS.

8

Collaborating to compete: cities as growth engine

Cities have long been engines for growth. But how can they stay that way? How can cities compete to attract talent and investors? What are the key elements of city planning that capitalizes on both these things?

12

We know the winners of Top Woman in Real Estate

14

Maciej Kulbat, Board Member, Global Business Services in AVON talks about GBS “Beauty” – the history of AVON’s Shared Services Centre.

26

Romanian call center industry reaches 320 million U.S. dollars

Romania has been a suitable destination for many companies wanting to develop their business in Eastern Europe. We’ve seen massive improvements in the IT&C industry and the development made in Research and Development has helped Romania to be even more appealing for investors.

28

Better together: why business and academia are pairing up

Businesses and universities are seeking ever-closer ties to foster innovation. We spot the five key trends in collaboration, and find out why Lithuania is leading the pack.

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Processes that are not matered cannot be improved, so the Customer will tell you the truth... (Part 2.)

Increasingly, not only small companies, but also large corporations carry out test implementations aimed at comparing indicators between teams working on the basis of standard rates of service speed and efficiency, and those based only on qualitative parameters.

20

Video surveillance post GDPR The new trending word “GDPR” has been cropping up in the press, television and the internet.

32

Attending an event? Use this 101

Most people have an expectation that by simply purchasing an exhibition space or securing a speaking slot for an industry event they will guarantee more business, and then end up disappointed when their pipeline isn’t creaking under the weight of new prospects.

36

Jazz meets and impacts Lviv IT economy

There are two types of events, which massively impact their host cities and the entire countries. First are business and second cultural or vice versa. And how about joining those two types of events together? This is not a dream, not a wish, but a fact and takes place in Ukraine. Shall we find out?

40

Welcome to the new era of office space leasing!

There is nothing to suggest that its expansion will slow in the near future. The development of the flexible office market is very dynamic, however, there is still room for many new providers or for expansion for existing ones.

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42

Investment news

44

Polish-German BSS Forum in Szczecin

GBS “Beauty” – the history of AVON’s Shared Services Centre

INVESTMENTS

48

Warsaw and what else?

Cushman & Wakefield experts discuss regional office markets and potential of BSS sector.

52

Duopolis – Europe’s largest BSS hub is developing in Poland For many years now, Polish cities have been developing dynamically. This process entails both the development of individual metropolitan areas and the emergence of natural partnerships between cities, created by collaborating business centres. The process brings benefits both from the perspective of the inhabitants and the development of business.

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Local commercial real estate market – Bydgoszcz and the neighbourhood

Regional markets, including Bydgoszcz hope to succeed due to the rapidly expanding Business Process Outsourcing /Shared Services Centre market.

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Bydgoszcz – number 1 for IT in Poland

As indicated in the latest report on business services in Bydgoszcz, prepared by the Association of Business Service Leaders (ABSL), Bydgoszcz occupies the first place on the list of eleven largest business services centres in Poland in terms of the share of IT services in the employment structure of BPO, SSC, IT and R&D.

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018


INDEX

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How does high-quality urban space affect the lives of citizens? Should investors adapt their projects to the existing architecture? Do Poznań’s Alfas fit into the New Święty Marcin? And finally, how does the City look after aesthetics? – all this in an interview with Piotr Libicki, the City of Poznan Mers’ Proxy for City Aesthetics.

Interview with Krzysztof Matyjaszczyk, Mayor of Czestochowa.

Business in Poznań’s urban space Time for Czestochowa

78

Urban planning in Kielce

In general terms, it is difficult to identify one specific aspect of urban planning that would be the most important. The art of building cities – urban planning – is one of the most interdisciplinary branches of science.

82

CAREER & DEVELOPMENT

94

HR news

96

The cow people or employer branding in the SSC industry

On a current market, when most major companies offer almost exactly the same variety of products and services, the company’s brand, reputation and marketing communication become the decisive elements which determine its ultimate success or failure. For the SSC industry, employer branding plays a similar role as it does for companies selling salt or mineral water.

Business requires an architectural setting

Adam Pustelnik, Director of Investor Service and International Cooperation Bureau, City of Łódź Office, talks with Prof. Marek Janiak, Architect for the City of Łódź.

84 66

Rzeszów attracts innovative industry

The first and second quarter of 2018 brought many key decisions on the implementation of new, extremely important investments in Rzeszów and its neighboring Special Economic Zones.

Gdynia is developing with the participation of the tourism industry

This occurs systematically as a result of the increasing tourism potential created by the city and with its participation, as well as by domestic and foreign entrepreneurs interested in investing in Gdynia.

Leadership is a privilege – a lesson for young managers

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Warsaw supports startups: 60 thousand entrepreneurs have benefited from city incubator facilities

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We plan urban space for investments

Lublin has been experiencing an investment boom since 2010, both regarding urban and business projects. Over eight years, the city’s budget has spent almost PLN 3.5 billion on improving infrastructure – both transport, economic and social.

90

Being a manager is a responsibility. However, it is also a kind of ennoblement, because employees basically consider their supervisors as a direct representative of the company. How, then, to realize yourself and at the same time meet the needs of employees so they want to stay with us?

108

Recruitment of specialists in IT industry

Interview with Magda Staniszewska, HR Business Partner at ESKOM.

110

Szczecin focuses on the sustainable development Recruitment ads of the urban structure

Interview with Jarosław Bondar, Architect for the City of Szczecin.

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

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Technology talks in Katowice On 19 June 2018, the latest edition of the BSS Tour, a series of conferences organised by the Pro Progressio foundation, took place at the Angelo hotel in Katowice. This year, the event’s main focus was on technology, and specifically modern technological solutions in business. A discussion about the location of the modern business services sector, and specifically about the city where the conference is to be held, is a regular part of the BSS Tour. This conference, held in the capital of the Silesian region, was no exception and the event’s opening forum focused on the current state of development of the BSS industry, the challenges facing Katowice and actions required in order to make the city even more successful in attracting domestic and international investors from the BPO and SSC sectors. The city’s visibility beyond its own borders and the need to increase the number of activities aimed at promoting Katowice as a location for international BSS companies was quite often touched upon during the dis­­ cussion. Speakers at the Forum also pointed out a lack of consistent communication regarding the city and the region; on the one hand, some communications promoting the city referred to Katowice, while on the other hand, they referred to the Katowice Agglomeration or the Silesian Agglomeration, and yet further to the Górnośląsko-Zagłębiowska Metropolis or Katowice Metropolis. Panellists at the conference rightly pointed out that using such mixed naming conventions may be confusing to readers and communication in this regard should be standardised.

months and years. These factors work to the advantage of Katowice and other neighbouring cities. Guests at the conference also mentioned on numerous occasions that Katowice is very welcoming to every new investor and each new investment in the city is given much more attention than in the case of e.g. Kraków. Thoughts on the above points were shared by Danuta Protasewicz (Grafton),  Kamil Krępa (TDJ),  Tomasz Dyba (Cushman & Wakefield) and Marek Gorczyca  (Kinnarps). The discussion was moderated by the chairman of Pro Progressio, Wiktor Doktór. Some of the discussion panels at the BSS Tour in Katowice were complemented by two very interesting presentations by Rafał Osmoła  from ASD Consulting and Waldemar Nowak  from Automation Innology. Two specific case studies – one from the pharmaceutical industry, the other based on experiences in the area of shared services centres (including Ericsson, DSV, Maersk or Danske Bank) – demonstrated to those present how automation can and should be implemented by businesses.

Katowice will be remembered as the city where a lot was said about technology, where meaningful conversations were held and where those in attendance were able to open their minds to solutions that may not have seemed so obvious at the outset On the positive side, speakers pointed to the high of the conference. level of education, the appealing level of labour costs and expenses regarding the rental The BSS Tour will continue to travel around of office buildings and the projected addi- Poland, the next stop will be on 11 September tion of new office space during the coming in Bydgoszcz.•

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018


BUSINESS

Photo: Adrian Czyżyk

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BUSINESS

Above: Discussion panel: Polish BSS market. From the left: Michał Ross (Kinnarps), Mieszko Czarnecki (POSEJDON Szczecin) and Rafał Szajewski (PAIH).


BUSINESS

polishgerman bss forum in szczecin On May 24th 2018, the Polish-German Outsourcing Forum organised by Pro Progressio was held in Szczecin. For the first time, experts from the BSS sector from both countries met to discuss business relationships in the area of outsourcing and modern business services. The conference was not only held to show how the industry has developed, but also to point out the differences between the Polish and German service markets and discuss potential areas for mutual cooperation. Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

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The Forum was attended by representatives of business, science and government agencies responsible for the development of the BSS industry in Poland and Germany. It was Josefine Dutschmann representing German Trade and Invest and Rafał Szajewski from the Polish Investment and Trade Agency (PAIH) that enabled the Forum participants to get acquainted with current data on the size of both markets, main BSS locations, the pay scale, or the costs of leasing office space. An interesting thing is that in certain areas cost differences are rather minimal, and the markets seem to face similar challenges, which mainly concern the availability of employees (in this case, the majority of which have advanced IT competences). Both countries present the scope of the BSS industry in their territories in a different way. While in Poland we have long used data describing employment or the number of operating centres, Germans generally assess the industry’s value in billions of EURO, which is currently estimated at over 40 billion with an average annual increase of 2.6%. On the one hand, the Forum provided an opportunity to learn about differences between countries, but on the other, it also provided opportunities to establish business relationships. The participants learned that in order to cooperate with customers from Germany it is necessary to be present on the German market. This presence makes the service provider more credible and they are much more likely to build an onshoring-nearshoring business model than a model solely based on nearshoring or offshoring. The fact that potential partners are expected to speak German has been stressed several times. The German-Polish Outsourcing Forum provided the opportunity to listen to experts during presentations and discussion panels, as well as in the course of a lively discussion during a brainstorming session called the Hard Talk, which, in 2018, was officially introduced to be a permanent element of the BSS Tour conference series agenda. The event would not have taken place if it had not been for the support of our Partners and Sponsors, such as The City of Szczecin, ESKOM,  Kinnarps, Poseidon, Deutscher Outsourcing Verband and BrightOne. The Marshal of the West Pomerania Province, PAIH and GTAI granted their honorary patronage for the Forum. The BSS Tour Szczecin: The Polish-German Outsourcing Forum proved that there is an extensive area to be covered by business cooperation between Poland and Germany, and prospects for further development are very positive.•

Photo: Adrian Czyżyk


BUSINESS

Stephan Fricke, CEO of German Outsourcing Association, during the conference, has been presenting German market outsourcing marketing strategies.

Thanks to Josefine Dutschmann’s, who was representing German Trade and Invest Agency, presentation, Forum delegates had the opportunity to get familiar with the newest data describing German market. Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

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BUSINESS

We know the winners of Top Woman in Real Estate Agnieszka Kalinowska-Sołtys from APA Wojciechowski Architekci with a triple win!

The evening of May 11th, will be remembered as a celebration of ladies that drive the development of the real estate sector. During a gala ceremony held at the InterContinental Warsaw Hotel, the statuettes for the first edition of TOP WOMAN IN REAL ESTATE were awarded. The honorary award of the Jury for the most influential women of the real estate industry, Special Award – Influencer of the Year, went to Monika Dębska-Pastakia from Knight Frank, while the most votes in the Personality of the Year from online voters were given on Agnieszka Kalinowska-Sołtys, also awarded in two other categories.

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Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018


BUSINESS

This is a great honour for me, to be among women distinguished in such a prestigious contest as the Top Woman in Real Estate. That Contest is part of a unique initiative embracing a cycle of numerous events that promote businesswomen and their achievements as well as companies that support ladies – says Agnieszka Kalinowska-Sołtys, APA Wojciechowski Architekci. In my opinion, the category that deserves a special attention, is the one that distinguishes a real estate company promoting women within its structures, as it shows how much can be achieved by giving women a chance to develop using a specific example – said Monika DębskaPastakia, CEO and Partner at Knight Frank. The award in that category –

Pro-Woman Company of the Year – went to Skanska Property Poland. “Skanska is a woman!” said Arkadiusz Rudzki, Managing Director, Skanska Property Poland. 100 ATTENDEES AT THE WOMEN’S CONFERENCE

The Gala was accompanied by a conference and a business mixer held on 11th May at Holiday Inn hotel in Warsaw. Its leading theme was self development. Invited to cooperate, among others, were TLnC Global Institute, GALLUP certified Coaching/ Consulting, which led the session entitled “Free your inner genius and start the life that was meant for you! How to find your talent”, and Hays, which organized workshops „Ladies first –

how to achieve success?”. A separate panel was devoted to the issue of building a personal brand. The extensive interest in the Contest and conference confirm the strategic role of women in the real estate sector. It was the first edition of the event, but definitely not the last one. We are now so much richer with tens of new inspirations, ideas and motivations coming from all over the market. We are very happy to see our initiative and the Final Gala with accompanying events achieve success – says Krystyna Swojak. The summary of the contest and a coverage of the gala can be seen at www.topwoman.pl.•

The following ladies were awarded in the essential categories: Activities for green building Agnieszka Kalinowska-Sołtys, APA Wojciechowski Architekci Architecture and design Agnieszka Kalinowska-Sołtys, APA Wojciechowski Architekci Business management Kinga Nowakowska, Capital Park S.A. Commercial sales Danuta Dzierżak, AXI IMMO Group Innovation Katarzyna Wojnar, Adgar Poland Journalism Anna Pakulniewicz, Eurobuild CEE Residential sales Małgorzata Nowosielska, Angel Poland Group

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

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SSC

SSC GBS “BEAUTY” – THE HISTORY OF AVON’S SHARED SERVICES CENTRE


Word of admission: SSC Lions is a new project run by Pro Progressio and focused on the communication support provided to Shared Service Centres. On ­ Outsourcing&More Magazines’ pages we will present business cases and interviews with leaders of Shared Services Centres, industry experts and consultants. Our interlocutors will provide the answers to the questions related to best business practises, project manage­ ment and employer branding.

This is already sixth article of SSC Lions. This time we’d like to present you the interview with Maciej Kulbat, Board Member, Global Business Services in AVON about GBS "Beauty" – the history of AVON’s Shared Services Centre.


SSC LIONS

Outsourcing&More: AVON and its Global Service Center have been operating in Poland for a few years now, but just over a year ago it started undergoing some serious changes. When did your centre start operating in Warsaw and what is the current stage of its transformation? Maciej Kulbat: AVON has over 15 years of experience in managing Shared Service Centres. It all started in 2003, when AVON began their adventure with the Shared Services Centre, centralizing accounting processes for North American countries (USA, Canada, Puerto Rico) in New York. Then, in 2005 AVON expands globally and establishes a centre in Warsaw with the aim of servicing countries from the EMEA region in the field of accounting (F&A), Sox and Compliance and IT processes. By 2009, three more Shared Services Centres had been established: in Argentina for the LATAM region, in Russia and China. In 2012 the operational model was changed, with regional Shared Services Centres evolving towards a hybrid Hub and Spoke model. The Warsaw centre manages the remaining regional centres and an operational hub with a BPM component. Today, the next step is to crean organiLOOKING BACK AT THE LAST ate zation that will 15 YEARS IN THE BPO/SSC support the entire corporation SECTOR WE HAVE COME A LONG offering a full WAY, WHICH CAN SOMETIMES range of service functions. TAKE OTHER SECTORS These plans are AS LONG AS 50 YEARS. ambitious indeed, but this is what we do. We no longer treat our GBS as an isolated function, but rather as a multifunctional body providing a wide range of services necessary for running a business. What are the processes of the AVON operations centre and how does it maintain business relationships with other AVON GBS centres? Our GBS strategy is closely linked to that of the entire AVON Group.

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It is an indispensable element of it, because only in this way, as an organization, we can contribute to the overarching corporate goals. We are responsible for financial and accounting processes, management accounting, support for purchases, sales and marketing, HR, IT, as well as legal processes. There have been many changes regarding the relationships. The market is constantly evolving, and the forms and ways of selling are increasingly moving into the virtual world, a good example of which is, for example, social selling. To meet the requirements of our customers in the best possible way we also need to undergo some changes. In recent months, we have significantly simplified our operating model by creating four operational centres out of the former seven. All the objectives of the individual centres have been shared, as well as cascaded, which enabled us to create a strong link with the corporate objectives. The Warsaw centre still functions as the management hub, but we now put strong emphasis on the area of Learning&Development and technology. It is worth mentioning that our newly established innovation centre and CoE RPA provide a solid foundation for building an organization that will deal with the challenges ahead in the most effective way. Today, it is no longer a transaction centre, but an incubator of modern technology, design thinking and an academy for the staff of the entire organization. How long have you been involved with the BPO/SSC sector and how have you become the Head of GBS at AVON? I have been working in the BPO/ SSC sector for 12 years. I have had quite an interesting career. Starting from the operational functions – managerial positions, through consultancy and advisory to sales. I must admit I learnt the most in sales. Working for international corporations, including the largest global players in the BPM industry located in many countries (the Netherlands, UK, USA, Brazil,

India), I have managed to gain interesting international and intercultural experiences. Of course, knowing our sector well is a huge asset. Knowing what really works and why it works, and what is simply a marketing bubble. Looking back at the last 15 years in the BPO/SSC sector we have come a long way, which can sometimes take other sectors as long as 50 years. AVON was looking for a manager who would help carry out organizational changes, simplify its communication model, increase process efficiency, increase value for internal and external customers, and at the same time significantly reduce operating costs. I decided it was a great challenge. We have heard that there will be some changes in your current role, and as a result you will continue your career in London – what will these changes be? Allow me to keep our readers in the dark for a little longer. On personal grounds, London is my second house, where I regularly spend 2 weeks a month. This particularly shows in everyday routines – I still find it difficult not to use Oyster (an electronic card granting authorization to use public transport in London, issued by the “Transport for London”) in the Warsaw subway. I moved to Warsaw 15 months ago, but in fact I have never really moved here. I spent the last 12 months on frequent trips getting to know AVON in Europe, Asia, North and South America. Changes are necessary, they pose new challenges and enable to see our achievements from a different, and more critical perspective. Will your new role be somehow connected with the management of SSCs in Warsaw, or maybe AVON will face further changes in its management structures? It will certainly be connected to it. Warsaw remains my area of interest. Changes are inevitable in order to build new competences and knowledge that we need today, but also to create a strong base for the future. We plan to imple-

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018


SSC LIONS

ment considerable investments in knowledge of technology, IA and automation, change management and Lean management. We are finalising our growth strategy with digital strategy being a large component of the former. The plans for the next 36 months are indeed very ambitious, but as I said, this is what we do at AVON. If you had the opportunity to assess the changes faced by the SSC/ GBS centres, what do you think will happen in the co­­ming years? I am sure that there are three things ahead of us: changes, changes, changes. The development of technology takes place so quickly that it is difficult to predict what the year 2020 will bring. To say today what the SSC/ BPM sector will look lik in the next 5 years is simply playing the prophet. I think that the sector will undergo many changes of a revolutionary rather than an evolutionary character. Today, as a country and a region, we compete with the global market. This creates many risks but also more opportunities, such as access to the solutions that exist in the global innovation base. Countries such as India, China and the Philippines are no longer just the Hubs of low-cost transactions. Today, many cities have already been established as strong competence centres in regard to light software development, RPA, Automation, AI, dT, process re-engineering, Enterprise Wide Transformations. Our region will be under enormous pressure to compete with other regions, but to be honest, it will not only be our region. During my visits to Guatemala, Mexico, China, South Africa, Romania, Ukraine, the United States or India, I see the same positive tension. I am glad to see that during out discussions my colleagues show extreme openness and hunger for change as well as willingness to take up the challenges of our global race. Thank you for the interview.•

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

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Processes that are not metered cannot be improved, so the Customer will tell you the truth… (Part 2.)

Let’s face few facts:

71% of clients claims that they are willing to change the supplier of products or services if they are poorly served (Gallup Institute research),

73% of clients believe that friendly service brings them closer to the brand (RightNow Technologies research),

66% of clients, after good contact with the brand, will more likely continue shopping with the same seller (Dimensional Research report).

Considering that a satisfied customer stays with the brand longer, more and more often we can observe the second, extreme model in which only one goal is set before the customer service team: customer satisfaction and building the best Customer Experience, regardless of the way the team will perform this goal.

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018


BUSINESS

Increasingly, not only small companies, but also large corporations carry out test implementations aimed at comparing indicators between teams working on the basis of standard rates of service speed and efficiency, and those based only on qualitative parameters. One of the large insurers carried out a pilot project in which a dedicated group of customer service employees was released from the typical benchmark of indicators for work based only on the values resulting from the NPS (Net Promoter Score) parameter. The results were very promising. Not only quality, but also sales increased. Nay. Indicators from which employees were usually accounted for were maintained at a similar level. BUT WHAT’S WITH THAT WHOLE NPS THING?

Net Promoter Score is a way to measure customer loyalty, which was created as an alternative to the long satisfaction surveys. This indicator allows to determine the probability of recommending our brand, website, product or service to friends or family. Research shows that customers who gave 9 or 10 points are more likely to renew the purchase of a product or service from a given company and more often recommend it to friends. Interestingly, companies that achieve long-term profit growth have twice the NPS ratio from average companies. How to measure this indicator? After contact with the company, a short questionnaire is conducted, in which the customer gives an 11 points, 0-to-10 scale response. “0” means complete lack of willingness to recommend our company. “10” is full of joy and customer satisfaction and a full sign loyalty. Based on the collected responses of all respondents, the results are divided into three groups: critics, passive and promoters.

Sometimes, when satisfaction results start to fall sharply, the Dissatisfaction Score (DSAT) parameter is worth measuring. This is the inverse of the Customer Satisfaction Score, which allows us to quickly diagnose which elements cause dissatisfaction with our customers. Focusing on these elements, we can quickly implement solutions that will again make customer satisfaction come back, and CSAT will be above 70% again. Because this percentage means that we have a high level of service.

Increasingly, not only small companies, but also large corporations carry out test implementations aimed at comparing indicators between teams working on the basis of standard rates of service speed and efficiency, and those based only on qualitative parameters.

Critics are clients who rated us in the range from 0 to 6. The passive group is theoretically satisfied, but not quite willing to recommend our company. Their grades are between 7-8. And the most desirable group – promoters who, by giving us 9 or 10, declared their will to express their positive opinion and recommending our company to their friends. Customer loyalty measured by the above indicator only indirectly reflects the quality of service. A much better way is to check the Customer Satisfaction Score. Customer Satisfaction Score (CSAT) helps answer the question, not only how much the customer is satisfied with our services or products, but also how he assesses the interaction with the service center itself. By default, the following question is used to measure: “How satisfied are you with the last contact with the contact center / company xyz” or “How do you rate your experience after contact with the brand abc”. Interestingly, there is no single scale, as in the case of NPS.

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

We can meet both the 1-3 scale and 1-10 scale. However, the most common in the customer service departments is the scale from 1 to 5, where 1 means very dissatisfied, and 5 very satisfied.

Łukasz Kobiec, Partner Networks Director, Unified Factory SA

One of the interesting indicators, because on the one hand it’s relatively young, and on the other is not very often used, is the Customer Effort Score. It allows us to measure usually on a 5-point scale, what “effort” the customer had to make to go through the purchase or service process. Usually the value of this indicator is determined by the question: “How much do you agree with the following statement: The company X has done everything to facilitate the ordering of the product / use of the service. Rate the compliance with this statement using a scale of 1 to 5 “.

The indicator has close connotations with CSAT and NPS. It can be defined as an effective indicator in forecasting the effects of interaction with the customer service department. Interestingly, the parameter can be used both as a quality meter, but also from the point of view of automation gives us a premise for how processes in our company affect customer experience (Customer Journey) and should we change, improve or not? It is difficult to build the WOW effect when we do not have a solid base in the form of a low CES indicator. It’s worth remembering that currently the decisive voice belongs to the customer and either we listen to it or the client will look for an alternative to our competition. It is difficult to create a single, golden rule that will show us a better, more important or more accurate set of indicators for our organization. Before the final choice, it is worth considering and defining what information we need to improve processes and achieve the intended goals. Only then we should consider, not only which tools will allow us to easily measure them, but also make multi-channel customer support much more efficient. Because, as you know, the basis of success is not only a good product, but even better customer service. The Customer Service that is able to not only distinguish your business, but also win loyal customers and satisfied brand ambassadors. The people who will recommend your company, because you were able to quickly provide them with the right level of service, bring their “Customer Experience” to the next level.•

The first part of article you can find in May/ June ‘18 edition of Outsourcing&More.

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Video surveillance post GDPR The new trending word "GDPR" has been cropping up in the press, television and the internet. It raises concern among the entities which process personal data professionally (employers, entrepreneurs, public law bodies, institutions and governmental offices): will they be able to adopt all the data processing operations appropriately to become "GDPR-compatible?"

GDPR refers to the Regulation No. 2016/679 of the European Parliament and of the Council (EU) of 27 April 2016 on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data and the repeal of Directive 95/46/WE (GDPR, the general regulation on data protection). It is a legal act adopted by the European Union which comprehensively regulates the principles of personal data protection and replaces both the Directive 95/46/WE and the Act of 29 August 1997 on personal data protection previously applicable in the Polish legal system. It is noteworthy that the GDPR provisions have been applied directly in Poland since 25 May 2018, without the requirement to implement them to the country’s legislation via a legal act of the Polish legislature.

Magdalena Janiak, Lawyer in the Law Firm "Chudzik i Wspólnicy Radcowie Prawni" sp.p. www.chudzik.pl

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Video surveillance – also referred to as close-circuit television (CCTV), video monitoring or network surveillance systems – has become embedded in the panorama of Polish cities, shopping malls, public use facilities, schools and estates. Once GDPR entered into force, public and private entities have been forced to re-consider the legality of solutions such as the previously employed video surveillance, particularly in the face of the fact that there is no act in Poland which comprehensively regulates the issues related to this form of personal data processing. While the current provisions allow for the possibility to record video and audio by the services involved in maintaining public safety and order such as the police or border patrol, it is obvious that these particular regulations do not exhaust all the areas in which personal data processing has been implemented. There is no doubt that applying systems which record sound and image is an example of processing personal data, such as a person’s image or voice.

NEW LEGAL REGULATIONS

An employer shall process videos exclusively for the purposes for which they were recorded and they shall be stored on principle for a period of 3 months since the day when they were recorded.

Video surveillance in public places allows for collecting personal data, which, pursuant to Article 4(2) of GDPR, is considered as an operation of personal data processing subject to legal protection.

Video surveillance in public places allows for collecting personal data, which, pursuant to Article 4(2) of GDPR, is considered as an operation of personal data processing subject to legal protection. In the preamble to GDPR, the European legislature indicates that in order to process data according to the law, it shall be based on the consent of the data subject or other legitimate basis laid down by law: either in this regulation or another legal act of the Union or the law of a Member State (…) – recital 40 of the preamble. Recital 45 to GDPR’s preamble specifies directly that if processing (…) is necessary for the performance of a task carried out in the public interest or in the exercise of official authority, the processing should have a legal basis in Union law, or in a Member State law. (…) The Union law or a Member State law should also specify the purpose of processing. (…) Pursuant to Article 6(f ) of GDPR, the legality of processing data performed by public bodies in order to carry out their tasks cannot be justified solely with the legitimate interest of the administrator (a given public body). In this situation, in order to comply with the data processing law, a legal basis indicated in the legislature or legal authorization is required. While various entities, including the Commissioner for Civil Rights Protection, had expressed their doubts regarding the application of Polish provisions to GDPR before it entered into force, it appears that the complex contents of GDPR regarding the duties of public bodies managed to be translated onto the Polish law in time. The Act of 10 May 2018 on personal data protection, which entered into force on 25 May 2018, specifies in chapter 12 the changes introduced to approximately 50 legal acts, of which, considering the issues related to video surveillance, the following should be noted: the Act of 8 March 1990 on municipal government (Articles 9a and 50), the Act of 5 June 1998 on regional government

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018


BUSINESS

(Article 60a), the Act of 5 June 1998 on district government (Articles 4b and 50), the Act of 14 December 2016 on Education Law (Article 108a), the Act of 16 December 2016 on the principles of state asset management (Article 5a) as well as the Act of 26 June 1974 – the Labor Code whose Article 221 was followed by 222 and 223. NEW DUTIES IN WORKPLACES AND SCHOOLS

In the context of the modified regulations, the following is noteworthy: the administrator (employer, school principal or director of an institution) is required to mark surveilled facilities clearly and visibly with the information about surveillance, particularly, via appropriate signage. It is also an employer’s, school principal’s or director’s duty to inform students and employees about the introduction of surveillance in the manner customa-

rily adopted in a given organization, no later than within 2 weeks (14 days) before surveillance has started. Finally, the broad scope of the protection of collected data against unauthorized use should certainly be mentioned. An employer shall process videos exclusively for the purposes for which they were recorded and they shall be stored on principle for a period of 3 months since the day when they were recorded. After the expiry of the periods specified in the Labor Code, paragraphs 3 and 4, Article 222, the personal data shall be removed, unless separate provisions state otherwise. To recapitulate, considering the complexity of the legal matter and the ubiquity of applied solutions, it should be emphasized that the legal regulation of the issues related to video surveillance is undoubtedly a serious challenge for the legislature. In 2013, in our country, similarly to other European states, attempts were made to create a comprehensive solution to this issue in the form of an act on video surveillance. However, the act has not been effected. It remains to be seen whether the legislative efforts resume in order to regulate the issues connected to video surveillance in a single, comprehensive legal act.•

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

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BUSINESS

Bulgaria – source of outsourcing experts for Europe Interview with Ivaylo Slavov, Chairman of the Bulgarian Outsourcing Association and CEO of BULPROS.

Wiktor Doktór, Pro Progressio: Ivaylo – congratulations. Recently you took the position of Chairman of the Bulgarian Outsourcing Association. As BOA is the most important organization in the Bulgarian outsourcing industry, can you share with us some information about the size of the Association and what are your main goals? Ivaylo Slavov: Thank you, Wiktor. Yes, the importance of the association is growing as Bulgaria has become a preferred destination for outsourcing services for many companies. More and more international organizations find a favorable environment and qualified professionals in the country which makes the outsourcing in Bulgaria a profitable investment. The opportunities for developing a business and the interest of foreign investors are growing leading to the desire of local companies to grow as well. There is a huge growth in orders and willingness to continue investing in Bulgaria by both existing and new companies – for example, BULPROS, Cargotec, Experian, Visteon, etc. The good news is that many companies are shifting their activities from traditionally large destinations such as India, China and

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

the Philippines to countries like We can observe the outsourcing in BulBulgaria in search of diversification garia is on the growing path since some of activities with higher added value. time already. What is the current size of the outsourcing industry, and what The double-digit growth of the industry are the main services provided from is becoming more and more important Bulgarian based companies? The Bulgarian IT industry is one to the Bulgarian GDP – claiming 3.6% of it only for the last year. By 2020, this of the fastest growing industries percentage is expected to reach 4.2%, in the country. Founded in 2012, BOA has with a turnover of over 2.5 billion euros, now 41 members in ITO, BPO, KPO, LPO, while employees number 65 thousand HRO. They have 20,000+ employees. – both in traditional BPO services The industry is driven by globally recoand in IT Outsourcing (ITO). Since all gnized companies as well as fast-develothe companies in the sector have busi- ping Bulgarian organizations. According ness opportunities and want to grow, to the European Information Technology we need to focus on resolving the chal- Observatory (EITO), the Bulgarian IT indulenge with the growing demand for stry has been enjoying a two-digit rate, and there are no signs that this growth professionals. will slow down anytime soon. Another priority, related to the positioning of Bulgaria as a preferred outso- Service providers usually are locating urcing destination, is the development their operation centres in the cities of more cities as centers that offer with good HR potential and also avaoutsourcing services. The goal is to ilability of modern office spaces. What develop at least 4 cities – for example, are the main outsourcing destinations Blagoevgrad, Veliko Tarnovo, Burgas in Bulgaria – Sofia, Varna, Plovdiv, and Ruse have great potential. We want others? Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria, is to be a part of this important strategic region in Europe, and why not be the main outsourcing destination. It is quite understandable, since Sofia a leading destination.

The Bulgarian IT industry is one of the fastest growing industries in the country. Founded in 2012, BOA has now 41 members in ITO, BPO, KPO, LPO, HRO. They have 20,000+ employees.

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BUSINESS

The profile of the requested services is now changing – call centers are no longer the preferred business choice. Several years ago most people imagined BPO (business process outsourcing) as a standard call center. Today this is changing – companies are now looking for added value, and we are talking about shared services, business processes in human resources, finance, building management outsourcing companies, and growing interest in highly qualified services, especially in information technology services – software development, maintenance, system integration. In BOA you take care of know-how sharing, networking and awarding best practices. What are other activities the BOA runs on daily basis? There are many activities related to the BOA that have positive outcomes for the business environment. The most favorable working conditions occur when there is a prosperous business environment, legitimate framework of rules and regulations, and a justice system which will ensure contract compliance and investment protection.

Bulgaria is one of the leading outsourcing destinations not only in Europe but also in the whole world. The country is among the Top 10 Most Desirable Places on a global level. meets the necessary preconditions for turning a city into an attractive outsourcing hub such as universities, educated people, local government support and business offices. One of the main priorities of the Bulgarian Outsourcing Association will be to develop the potential of Blagoevgrad, Veliko Tarnovo, Burgas, Ruse and others. An excellent example is Plovdiv – a city that focused in the recent years on creating all the necessary conditions for its economic growth and is now enjoying the benefits. Bulgaria as other CEE located countries is attracting foreign companies to invest in locating their operation centres on its territory. If you could describe the profile of operation centres in Bulgaria what would it be? Are those mainly IT centres or perhaps Finance&Accounting and Call Contact Centres as well? Outsourcing companies in Bulgaria perform more sophisticated processes related to analytical activities, building, maintaining and securing growth in basic business activities such as marketing, sales, accounting, human resources and others.

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Bulgaria is one of the leading outsourcing destinations not only in Europe but also in the whole world. The country is among the Top 10 Most Desirable Places on a global level. A number of international companies have offices in Bulgaria and continue to expand their businesses. Many new investors are entering the Bulgarian market due to the excellent geographical location, the attractive flat tax, and the multilingual and highly intelligent people with a high level of knowledge in the field of information technologies. Let’s take a look into the future. How do you think the Outsourcing industry will develop within next 5 years and what would be the main challenges? The rapid technological development leads to major changes in the out­­sourcing industry on a global level. For example, the cloud technologies, Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, which are part of the Digital Transformation,

have a great impact on the outsourcing services. As I mentioned, the traditional project based approach is not the preferred one anymore and the demand for added value is increasing. In this context the main challenge is the need for highly qualified experts, especially in the IT sector. Nowadays software is everywhere and regardless of the industry, companies need to find a way to benefit from the opportunities which the digital transformation offers. For the end one more time let’s come back to international co-operation. Which countries usually Bulgarian ITO and BPO companies are providing services to? Is it Germany, US or perhaps other countries? Services are mainly exported to the United States, Germany, France and the UK in the banking, insurance, telecommunication and technology sector. In the 2017 Global Services Location Index Bulgaria ranked 15th out of 55 countries, despite falling several position over the past two years (compared to from 9th place in 2014) due to the shortage of skilled labor and a number of business regulations. Another index, that of 2016 Business and Outsourced Outsourcing Destinations (Cushman & Wakefield, BPO and Shared Service Location Index 2016), places Bulgaria in 7th place among the pioneers in the outsourcing industry (out of a total of 15 countries included in this category). In 2015 Bulgaria won the National Outsourcing Association of the United Kingdom (NOA) Award for an Outsour­ cing Destination of the Year. The UK-based Global Procurement Association predicts that the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the EU will have a positive effect on outsourcing providers in Central and Eastern Europe, including Bulgaria, in the long run. This is due to the expected shortage of skilled labor in the UK due to the limited migration and ambitions of British outsourcing companies, especially in ITO, to maintain their existing relations within the EU. Bulgaria is ranked 3rd in world for certified IT professionals per capita. Thank you very much.•

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018


BUSINESS

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

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BUSINESS

Romanian call center industry reaches 320 million U.S. dollars Romania has been a suitable destination for many companies wanting to develop their business in Eastern Europe. We’ve seen massive improvements in the IT&C industry and the development made in Research and Development has helped Romania to be even more appealing for investors. Moreover, this country remains one of the most dynamic outsourcing markets, with many advantages to offer compared to other BPO (Business Process Outsourcing) leaders. But in the past decade, another industry has started to grow and to attract the attention of many international companies: the call center industry.

CURRENT STATUS AND EXPECTATIONS According to Statista, the revenues for all call centers in Romania in 2010 reached 148 million U.S. dollars, and this year they will grow to 320 million U.S. dollars.

The Romanian outsourcing market has had a significant evolution, and according to a recent CBRE study, it has tripled. 47% of the Romanian outsourcing companies are offering software services, both development, and maintenance, 17% are active business service providers for accounting, support or human resources, while 12% mainly provide call center services. The Romanian call center industry started to grow in 2010. According to Statista, the revenues for all call centers in Romania in 2010 reached 148 million U.S. dollars, and this year they will grow to 320 million U.S. dollars. By the end of 2020, the revenues will surpass 335 million U.S. dollars. Also, according to the National Office of Commerce, the top ten call center companies in Romania generated around EUR 196 million in the past year, and included more than 10.000 employees altogether.

Furthermore, 25% of the Romanian citizens speak at least understandable English. It is estimated that around five million Romanians speak English, while another four to five million people speak French. However, Romania has highly educated people, able to speak many Loredana Niculae, CEO NNC Services other languages, such as the Nordic Romania languages. A recent report also highli-

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ghted that the cost of call center outso- The call center industry is growing faster urcing in Romania is cheaper than when than ever, and the demand for this relying on Indian resources. kind of services has increased not only in the biggest Romanian cities but In 2016, the salaries in the call center also in the secondary or tertiary ones. industry increased by 10–12%. The same The competition for the available candigrowth has been experienced in 2017, dates makes them choose what’s best due to the massive demand for call for them, even if that means changing center services from companies around multiple jobs. the world. Moreover, the number of people In Bucharest, wages in this sector range available for the new positions is between an entry level of EUR 550 for decreasing, and this aspect affects people offering customer support the development of companies. Only in in English, EUR 650–700 for French, EUR Bucharest, the call center industry needs 700 for German, and EUR 1.300–1.400 around 12.000–15.000 new employees. for Nordic languages. In the region, Romania remains the only viable alterna- Also, the young generation is fairly tive. Salaries in Poland, for example, are different from the old ones. According double compared to those in Romania. to the HR specialists working in the call center industry, Millennials want more In the next year, we are expecting benefits from a job than other generaanother growth when it comes to wages tions, such as flexible working program, in this sector, but it won’t still be enough friendly team and patient management. to change Romania’s position. However, the biggest challenge is that they require from call center compaTHE MAIN CHALLENGES IN THE CALL nies more than they deserve. They use CENTER INDUSTRY the lack of available candidates as a way The labor market poses some problems to negotiate better contracts. for the call center industry. Multiple studies have been highlighting that indu- NEW GENERATIONS, NEW stries face issues in keeping people moti- REQUIREMENTS, NEW SOLUTIONS vated. The same thing happens in the In this context full of challenges, compacall center field, where companies have nies have started to transform their HR the challenge to keep their employees representatives in strategic partners engaged for extended periods. for their employees. Their central role is

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018


to step outside of what they know, recruitment and personnel administration, and to get involved in strategic management activities. Both employees and management team see a significant help in these new agents. However, these new strategies encourage internal communication processes. It seems like giving feedback is the primary driver for this new department. Not only do employees have the opportunity to say out loud what’s wrong in the company, but also businesses have the chance to develop their future strategies according to these ideas, so they could also increase the general retention rate. What call center companies can also do to solve the personnel requirements challenge is to offer new development opportunities. We can identify here some similarities with other industries in which professional development is also important. The need for constant development and learning is mandatory for young people, and the opportunity to advance in position is something that could motivate employees and improve their engagement with the company. The Romanian Call Center sector has experienced massive developments in the past decade. The rise of the outsourcing market has influenced this sector to grow as the demand for call center and support services has increased. Even if there are challenges in attracting and keeping employees motivated, the HR department has already started implementing various strategies to create a good employer brand.•

47%

Romanian outsourcing companies offering software services, both development, and maintenance

17%

Romanian outsourcing companies are active business service providers for accounting, support or human resources

12%

Romanian outsourcing companies mainly provide call center services


BUSINESS

Better together: why business and academia are pairing up Businesses and universities are seeking ever-closer ties to foster innovation. We spot the five key trends in collaboration, and find out why Lithuania is leading the pack.

The last decade has seen an explosion in the number of collaborative relationships between business and universities. It’s easy to see why: at a time when commercial R&D budgets are under increasing pressure, such partnerships enable companies to spend more wisely – and giving them access to cutting-edge research talent. For universities, there’s the draw of financial support and partnership.

And when it comes to cooperation, one European nation is conspicuously ahead of the curve: Lithuania, home to a fastgrowing global business services sector, and a centre of innovation in fintech. We take a look at the key trends shaping the market and examine the secrets of the Baltic state’s success. LONG-TERM RELATIONSHIPS

Science and business need to work closely together to achieve mutually beneficial goals – Petras Baršauskas, former Rector, Kaunas Technology University. But the benefits of cooperation are about more than simply cost savings. Stronger ties between industry and academia enable both sides to achieve things that were previously impossible, delivering innovation in fields from life sciences and biomedical engineering to communications, environmental sciences, artificial intelligence, and more.

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Instead of one-off, ad hoc projects, businesses from many sectors are forging long-term, collaborative relationships with universities and other academic institutions. These educational and research bodies, for their part, benefit from long-term funding stability and closer ties with the business community that provide valuable market insights, skills and technical expertise.

Examples can be found in the relationships that US technology company Cognizant is building with Lithuanian universities. The country is at the forefront of a truly international market in business services, and companies investing in Lithuania are no longer simply looking

for English-speaking talent. Cognizant’s operations in the country focus on the Nordic market, and company consequently needs qualified specialists with good Scandinavian language skills. Rather than simply investing in on-the-job training, Cognizant has built longer-term links with universities to supply the skills it needs. Besides helping future professionals expand their language portfolio, it now also offers students from the ISM University of Management and Economics the possibility to gain first-hand business consulting experience. US healthcare giant Intermedix is another major international player building longterm relationships with Lithuanian universities. In 2015, the company invested more than 100,000 EUR into a specialist laboratory at the Kaunas Technology University (KTU) Faculty of Informatics, providing hardware and software for processing Big Data. The Creativity Lab partnership is just one part of an evolving, long-term relationship between the two: since Intermedix established its first European service centre in Lithuania in 2014, many of its staff have been either current students

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BUSINESS

or graduates of KTU. As former KTU Rector Petras Baršauskas put it at the time: Science and business need to work closely together to achieve mutually beneficial goals. The new laboratory offers researchers and students the opportunity to develop and realise their ideas, and gives business the chance to work with the most talented future employees, and to participate in the process of developing new technologies and innovations. COOPERATIVE, NOT TRANSACTIONAL

Alongside this longer-term perspective comes another trend: relationships are becoming truly cooperative and collaborative. Neither side in the arrangement wants a transactional model, in which negotiations must take place every time a new research project is being con­sidered. Instead, they are turning to a relationship model.

research, and are able to accelerate the translation of that research into new products, driving economic growth. Since 2014, international industrial control and automation company Festo has provided scholarships and work placements to KTU students, as well as providing lectures on current issues in information technology. It‘s a relationship that clearly demonstrates the advantages of collaborative working – and it’s already bearing fruit, delivering innovative research with clear market potential. In 2017, KTU programming student Aivaras Čiurlionis received a scholarship from Festo for work on an applet for teaching mathematics that exploited the potential of neural networks.

to ‘seed’ research into potential areas Lithuania is like of benefit. a hidden jewel of Software giant SAP currently works with Vilnius Gediminas Technical University (VGTU), and provides lists of topics for potential research projects that run the gamut from AI and Big Data to Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.

Europe… you have the potential to do really good research and contribute to common European prosperity – Michael Harte, Head of Operations and Technology, Barclays.

By co-funding research and providing input into course design, businesses can become part of a positive feedback loop that produces results in the real world

Instead of simply monitoring early-stage research, smarter companies are becoming involved throughout the research chain.

This new, durable, cooperative model enables businesses to partner with academia in such a way that they remain TWO-WAY PROCESS continuously connected to early-stage Instead of simply monitoring early-stage research at universities, ready to pounce when something of interest emerges, smarter companies are becoming involved throughout the research chain – enabling them

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BUSINESS

Companies are now recognizing that in order to attract the brightest and best talent, they must create purposedriven partnerships that align with values such as meaningful work and social utility. Likewise, universities see their role extending beyond simply teaching and research, and are becoming valuable contributors to social mobility and economic growth.

– while universities and students gain valuable contributors to social mobility valuable insights into technology trends and economic growth. The most effective of these new partnerships help to enerand the process of commercialisation. gize the wider economy and society. CLOSER TO THE ACTION

One feature of recent trends in collaboration has been the willingness of companies to locate themselves in industry clusters close to where the academic talent lies. The benefits of this has long been known: California’s Silicon Valley, for example, is its close proximity to Stanford and University of California, Berkeley. But the last decade has seen the phenomenon widen, with big players such as Google, Amazon and Oracle opening offices on America’s east-coast, close to the USA’s commercial and financial centres. Lithuania’s twin innovation hubs of Vilnius and Kaunas, with expertise in a range of areas from global business services to banking and fintech, make them a go-to destination for international players in search of the expertise necessary to build growth in Europe and beyond. ADDING VALUE

The new, deeper, more durable brand of cooperation is also seeking to do more than simply provide universities with funding, and businesses with talent. By working together, creating new enterprises, these partnerships between business and academia can achieve results that neither party could achieve alone.

One such initiative, between Vilnius University ( VU) and international finance giant Barclays, aims to tackle the scourge of the modern digital economy – cyber-crime. Cooperation between the two began as far back as 2009, when the bank established a strategic centre for technologies and services as part of the Lithuanian capital’s burgeoning international banking and fintech hub. Since then, the company has worked with VU’s Faculty of Mathematics and Informatics to develop courses, and Barclays staff are involved in lectures and teaching initiatives, helping to provide VU students with real-world insights into online threats. In 2013, Barclays and VU opened the mobile application development lab “Innovation Space”. You are like a hidden jewel of Europe – said Barclays’ Head of Operations and Technology, Michael Harte, on a visit to review cooperation in 2015. – Perhaps as small as a state, but you have the potential to do really good research and contribute to common European prosperity.•

Companies are now recognizing that in order to attract the brightest and best talent, they must create purpose-driven partnerships that align with values such as meaningful work and social utility. Likewise, universities see their role Monika Vilkelytė, Investment Advisor extending beyond simply teaching Invest Lithuania and research, and are becoming

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Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018


BUSINESS

ATTENDING AN EVENT? USE THIS 101 A G uide T o M aximising Your ROI F or E vents A nd E xhibitions . In my 30-year career I’ve been involved in literally thousands of events; designing and delivering them, exhibiting, speaking or even just attending them as a delegate.

I’ve attended many great events, some good events and even the odd bad event, but one of the things that always surprises me is how little effort a business puts into leveraging events for the benefit of maximising their reach, amplification and engagement. Most people have an expectation that by simply purchasing an exhibition space or securing a speaking slot for an industry event they will guarantee more business,

PRE-EVENT – START EARLY!

Whilst some events occur opportunistically along the way, most events these days are advertised up to a year in advance. This means the event is often on the radar of your business months ahead. Yet a lot of organisations leave it until just 2-3 months beforehand before committing to it, often to save cashflow.

I’ve attended many great events, some good events and even the odd bad event, but one of the things that always surprises me is how little effort a business puts into leveraging events for the benefit of maximising their reach, amplification and engagement.

This, however, counter-productive and my strong advice is don’t do this.

At the start of your fiscal year, determine what your event budget is going to be, define what you want your event strategy to deliver (whether it’s to raise your profile, assert your voice of authority, disrupt your audience, exhibit your latest value proposition, launch a new product, add to your pipeline etc), identify the key events that will support your and then end up disappointed when their strategy – and then select and commit pipeline isn’t creaking under the weight to them straight away! of new prospects. The advantage to this is that most events But the effort required to maximise your will promote your involvement from the participation at an event starts months outset, giving you several months of ‘free’ and months before the event actually multi-channel advertising (which, these takes place. days could well deliver an ROI before the

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event actually takes place). If this isn’t part of the agreement, negotiate; most event organisers will be more flexible at the beginning as they will want to get some early adopters on board. Because of this, you might also be able to negotiate on price, or ask for add-ons as part of the deal (Note – a lot of businesses leave such negotiations to much nearer the event, but this is a false economy; if the event is selling well (in tickets or sponsorship), the organiser is unlikely to be as flexible on price or additions. And if the event isn’t selling well and you’re being offered knock-down prices or add-ons, do you really want your brand to be associated with it?). As part of your pre-defined event strategy you will already be aware of the types of organisations that have attended previously, and also identified your target audience down to who in each company you are specifically targeting (that is, the name and job description of your target prospect). You should then connect with the individual (not the company) on social platforms like LinkedIn, Facebook and/or Twitter. This way, they will see any of your promotions around the event without you being too intrusive. Once you have done this you should have a marketing campaign producing

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018


BUSINESS

weekly content that is aligned to either the overall theme of the event, the nature of your exhibition or the topic of your speaking opportunity. In addition to conveying your key business messages, your marketing content should also signpost your attendance at the upcoming event. Use the event-specific hashtags where applicable, alongside your own unique hashtag. This way you can track engagement levels; who is commenting on the event, acknowledging your participation in it and also who else might be attending.

social feeds, at the foot of your e-books and white papers, and on your website, etc), suggesting businesses drop by to see you at the event, or better still book an appointment to meet with you. Suggest that you are in demand so they should book early to avoid disappointment. At regular intervals signpost that spaces are filling up! Work with the event organisers! You have effectively signed a partnership agreement with them so it’s in both your interests to promote the event and your participation in it. In effect, they will become an additional marketing channel; make sure they Like, Re-Tweet and Share your content on their own social channels, or ask if your related blogs or videos can be hosted on their website. Often, they will produce event-specific graphics featuring your brand, logo or Speaker profile. If they don’t – ask them. Remember, it’s in their interests to provide you with collateral to help you promote their event.

Provide something of value for free to your target audience in the run up to the event. This could be a series of compelling downloadable 101 Guides, Top-Ten-Tips e-books or themed White Papers that are aligned to the event (and most importantly, also addressing your target audience’s needs). Signpost that the final edition in that series of downloads will be made available exclusively at the event in order to encourage people to visit your stand, Don’t forget your existing clients either. or to approach you during your Involve them in the countdown, share attendance. the marketing collateral with them through your existing client distribuAll through your marketing campaign tion channels (Newsletters, Client Briefyou will have calls to action (in your ings, Direct Mailings, etc). If you are

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

speaking at the event, invite them along to hear your thoughts, views and opinions – remember, it’s easier to upsell to an existing client than it is to acquire a brand-new customer. AT THE EVENT

Have a plan for the day. Be clear about which sessions you are attending, which networking areas you will focus on, where you want to be at coffee breaks etc. If your budget allowed, and you were provided a list of attendees in the run up to the event, you will have highlighted all those that you wished to speak with. Focus on getting to as many of those people as possible.

If your budget allowed, and you were provided a list of attendees in the run up to the event, you will have highlighted all those that you wished to speak with.

If you are exhibiting, you will have perhaps identified the businesses (or better still, people – remember, specifics!) attending that you want to meet. You will have hopefully engaged with them via social channels in the run up to the event, so you have ‘social’ permission to approach them at the event and engage. DON’T TRY TO SELL!

If you are overtly salesy you will simply drive people away. Whether you’re exhibiting or presenting make your engagement informative, interactive,

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fun and sales-free. If you are delivering a presentation or speech never begin by talking about yourself or your company. Instead, focus on providing education and information – address your prospects’ key needs/industry problem and share your solution or opinions on the matter. If you must, talk about you or your company only in the closing few minutes. You will come across as knowledgeable and confident. I have seen people give keynotes where they don’t even mention the name of their company or what they do throughout the entire presentation, and then walk off stage to a queue of people wanting to talk to them. This is simply because they focused on only providing value to the audience. Your goal in attending any event is to engage new prospects, establish a rapport and then gain their trust and their contact details so you can follow up afterwards. It is not to deliver a 20 minute salespitch whilst standing in the queue for the buffet – or worse still, the toilets! Captive audiences will find a way to avoid you as soon as they think they are being sold to. Tom Quigley, Owner & Chief Marketing Officer of QUIGLEYMEDIA

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than two days later but certainly not longer than a week), you should reach back out to the list of contacts you have collected. Start by asking how they enjoyed the event or thank them for stopping by your exhibition stand. If you can, offer them one final piece of exclusive content that is educational or informative. Invite them for a coffee (or lunch or dinner, depending on your strategy and budget) to explore how you might

Avoid automated mailings! Personalise the exchange where you can. Make short notes about such meetings on the business cards you’ve been given and then write them up afterwards. This means you can drop in specific details about the meeting, which gives the impression that you gave your prospect your full attention.

Throughout all your marketlevel exchanges – social channel feeds, marketing content, downloads and calls to action, exhibitions, speaking slots and networking – remember you are showcasing the very best of your brand promise. And never forget that marketing in all its forms is about engagement at a human level and that every business transaction is based on an emotional trigger. If you’ve approached your events correctly, you will have come across as professional, courteous, authentic and engaging in all your content. In my experience such an approach will always get you a favourable response to your follow-up email or phone call.•

I have seen people give keynotes where they don’t even mention the name of their company or what they do throughout the entire presentation, and then walk off stage to a queue of people wanting to talk to them.

collaborate further together for mutual benefit. Position the next meeting FOLLOW-UP! as a further exchange of ideas rather After the event has come and gone and than a sales pitch. Make it clear you once the dust has settled (say, no sooner value their opinion.

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Jazz meets and impacts Lviv IT economy There are two types of events, which massively impact their host cities and the entire countries. First are business and second cultural or vice versa. And how about joining those two types of events together? This is not a dream, not a wish, but a fact and takes place in Ukraine. Shall we find out?

A famous Alpha Jazz Fest has been renamed this year into “Leopolis Jazz Fest” after its host city’s latin name – Leopolis (stands for Lviv). The eighth edition of the jazz fest is anticipating more than 100,000 visitors in Lviv during 5 jam-packed days. Not only Leopolis Jazz Fest attracts music lovers to the city, but also due to its exclusive atmosphere and good timing, several satellite business events are happening.

Lviv IT Jazz conference, organized by Lviv IT Cluster for the third time this year, became the meeting point for business and political leaders accompanied with jazz atmosphere. The event offers a perfect opportunity for C-level networking and expert discussions. This year Lviv IT Cluster went beyond just hosting a satellite event and also supported Leopolis Jazz Fest as an exclusive partner.

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Local tech companies have accumulated their efforts to drive the IT industry and support the development of our city’s global brand. Lviv IT Cluster is delighted to become an exclusive partner of Leopolis Jazz Fest and to be involved in the international festival of this importance and scale. Music brings people together, creating an absolutely special atmosphere in the city. I’m proud that people come to Lviv these days not only to enjoy jazz but also to attend our event IT Jazz.

STEPAN VESELOVSKYI, CEO, Lviv IT Cluster

Making business from the comfort of your office chair doesn’t sound like 2018. Embracing the versatile world, where business, art, and technology are fused together is crucial. Today Lviv has many guises and is acknowledged as Ukrainian business landmark, a magnetic destination, where one may enjoy the city and its culture while doing business.

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There are several reasons why Lviv has been selected as a host city for Leopolis Jazz Fest. Primarily, this has to do with the fact that the festivals’ founder comes from Lviv. Secondly, when planning the festival we have closely evaluated the city’s character and cultural component. Lviv offers a good combination of its own heritage and the ability to contain and cultivate the festival’s unique jazz atmosphere.

NATALIIA GORBACHEVSKA, Executive Director, Leopolis Jazz Fest

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Nataliia Gorbachevska, Executive Director, Leopolis Jazz Fest says: The whole idea behind the jazz festival’s launch was to start a project which would support the city’s development and bring new opportunities to its inhabitants and small businesses. According to the research, we ran together with the Kyiv School of Economics, we see a significant economic effect for the city. From the city council’s standpoint, a jazz festival is a much more profitable event than, for instance, a football championship, which normally lasts only one day.

Leopolis Jazz Fest attracts people to stay in the city for 3-5 days and they tend to spend more. Nataliia shared the results of the Leopolis Jazz Fest economic effect research, which the organizers had run a couple of years back. The direct economic effect, excluding ticket purchases and transportation expenses (because they do not contribute Lviv city’s economy) makes 42 million uah. The indirect financial impact generates 127 million uah according to the research. Booking. com reports 95% occupancy rate during the jazz festival period.

Each year Lviv hosts around a hundred large-scale international forums, conferences, festivals, and lots of smaller events. My idea is to have a big event in Lviv every day. This would not only positively affect the city’s economy, but also give extended opportunities to the local people in terms of self-education, communication, and leisure. Speaking of the Leopolis Jazz Fest, it attracts a high-profile audience, who frequently make investment decisions after enjoying their visit to Lviv.

According to the research conducted by Lviv Convention Bureau, about 400 conferences took place in Lviv last year, of which 74 were international. Thus, in total during the year, almost 70 thousand conference delegates visited the city. Business tourism development is one of the strategic missions declared in Lviv city socio-economic and cultural development program 2017-2019. Another city council’s priority is the development of the city’s investment attractiveness which includes infrastructure improvement.

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EVALUATING ECONOMIC IMPACT OF LOCAL EVENTS

Consequently, new workplaces are being created, affecting citizen’s life quality. The ‘attractive Lviv’, praised by the Ukrainians and foreigners is a result of common efforts of Lviv citizens. Every single event is an immense community effort, which is sometimes left behind the scenes. We shall thank everyone involved in the organization of such events.

On top of being a robust business center, Lviv has historically been a prominent cultural destination, which is another factor ensuring a sustainable tourist flow. From the artistic standpoint, city’s attractiveness is proven by a large number of local and international art festivals hosted in Lviv. Leopolis Jazz Fest, acknowledged by The Guardian as one of the top European jazz festivals, is the most famous among them.

ANDRIY SADOVYI, Lviv Сity Mayor

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The team wouldn’t manage to organize a festival at this level anywhere else in Ukraine, including Kyiv, even given an equal financing... Lviv is compact enough, meanwhile, it offers unparalleled locations for three concert stages. The tourist flow and city’s infrastructure are excellent.

OLEKSIY KOGAN, Art Director, Leopolis Jazz Festival Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

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HOW TECHNOLOGY IMPACTS BIG EVENTS LIKE LEOPOLIS JAZZ FEST

According to the research conducted by Lviv Convention Bureau, about 400 conferences took place in Lviv last year, of which 74 were international. Thus, in total during the year, almost 70 thousand conference delegates visited the city.

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Nataliia Gorbachevska says that technology is a “must” in any sector today, however, Leopolis Jazz Fest still a certain resistance on behalf of their audience. This year we open the 8th festival’s edition and this is the first year when tickets are sold exclusively online via our website. We hear a lot that concert tickets purchase is a part of the tradition for many visitors: they find pleasure in going to a ticket office to pick up a printed ticket – explains Executive Director. – We had the same painful experience when implementing the cash-free territory at our festival in the past. Although this is the best practice many international music festivals have, the first year has been a bit of a hustle. Both our vendors and visitors felt resistant. The next year we received a positive feedback in regards to the official festival card. Today our visitors cannot imagine other payment options.

Oleksiy Kogan is a recognized jazz expert: he has been Leopolis Jazz Fest’s art director for 8 years, a radio host for 17 years, a journalist and a musician himself. When asked about the role of technology in transforming music and jazz culture, Oleksiy shares his observations: We had a chance to understand how the technology influences jazz music when listening to “R+R=NOW” by Robert Glasper. He is a bright representative of the disruptive cross-genre movement. When the acoustic music is performed, jazzmen mostly play acoustic instruments. When music is targeted at the younger audiences, the millennials, it tends to use more gimmickry and gadgets, keyboard synthesizers, and computers. It doesn’t really matter what you use to create music, what really matters is how you do it and how you can sway the listener. Jazz music and technology cannot be opposed. When you are heading to the ‘after 7 parties’, you put your tuxedo and shiners on. When going to play tennis, one wears a tennis outfit. Somehow nobody tries to question this. I believe that jazzmen can delicately combine acoustic instruments and technology tools to create a unique sound. They don’t let the electronics vanish the acoustics entirely. There is a rule in jazz music which helps to balance the new and the old school, which says

that innovators rely on tradition much more than create their own. The 2018 festival’s highlights in terms of music & technology mix are Luca Ciarla’s SolOrchestra Jazz Violin performance and Robert Glasper’s band concert. My job as an art director is to balance the festival’s program in the best way. It has been challenging to beat last year’s line up and the musician’s balance at the three stages. In 2017 this balance has been miraculous! Lviv is the first Ukrainian city to establish a municipal Convention Bureau aimed to promote it as a new Eastern European MICE destination. Undoubtedly, recurring events are the most challenging to manage: It takes a lot of effort to create a positive reputation and only a few mistakes to ruin it, states Oleksiy Kogan. The fact that Lviv has been hosting Leopolis Jazz Festival for almost a decade already, as well as a major tech event IT Arena, which will be happening for the fifth time this fall, leaves no doubt that the city’s positive image is growing global.•

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018


Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

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Welcome to the new era of office space leasing! Last months were undoubtedly the time when coworking space took off. There is nothing to suggest that its expansion will slow in the near future. The development of the flexible office market is very dynamic, however, there is still room for many new providers or for expansion for existing ones.

According to Savills, Poland has an estimated coworking space and serviced offices stock of 129,000 sq m, and in 2017, Warsaw alone saw more lettings signed for flexible workplaces than the capital cities of Spain, the Netherlands or Austria.

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Coworking spaces took the Polish market by storm in 2017. Their growth continues unabated, confirming it as one of the strongest trends on the office market in many years. According to Savills, Poland has an estimated coworking space and serviced offices stock of 129,000 sq m, and in 2017, Warsaw alone saw more lettings signed for flexible workplaces than the capital cities of Spain, the Netherlands or Austria. Flexible workplaces include serviced offices and co-working spaces, and the two tend to be confused as both can be rented short-term. Serviced offices provide fully furnished and equipped office space, frequently with a cellular layout and administrative and mainte­­nance support.

Co-working space is focused on creating an atmosphere that fosters cooperation between users. The dynamic development of co-­­ working spaces and serviced offices is a phenomenon observed throughout Europe. The UK is still the largest flexible office market in the old continent with over 204,000 sq m of coworking space leased in 2017 solely in the two largest office hubs (18% of total takeup). However, also smaller markets such as Birmingham and Manchester, are experiencing rapid growth – the share of flexible workplace providers in total take-up stood at 21% and 10% respectively. In continental Europe, amongst those markets we have analyses, the highest share of coworking areas and serviced offices was observed in Berlin (80,700 sq m; 8% of take-up), Hamburg (42,400 sq m;

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7.2% of take-up) and Amsterdam (24,400 sq m; 7.1% of letting activity). What is the phenomenon of flexible workplaces? The research conducted by Savills on 20 European markets show that the main reason for growth of flexible offices is the growth of tech sector. Especially small companies and start-ups often need flexible offices, which is a requirement the conventional leasing market is often not able to meet. The second important factor pointed in the study is the inability to lease space in conventional offices with a minimum lease length (in Poland it’s usually 5 years). Those companies want to be able to increase or decrease leased space depending on their needs or projects they are involved in. How does the flexible workplaces market look in Poland? It is worth noting that the market is very diverse. Spaces for joint work or co-work are offers not only by operators specialised in such offer but also, for example, some shopping centres where units were equipped with office furniture and adapted to work, cafes that are used for business purposes by freelancers among others, as well as houses and apartments. In the second edition of the report „Flexible workplace in Poland” we took a closer look at five cities: Warsaw, Kraków, Wrocław, Poznań and Łódź, and our analysis shows there were 174 locations of coworking areas and serviced offices operating in those cities. However, it is already confirmed next locations will be opened in 2018 and in the next few years. Warsaw remains the largest market in Polad – there are 105 locations with a total area of 94,000 sq m, followed by Kraków with 25 locations and 17,000 sq m. In Poznań, the offer of flexible workplace is

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

in 19 projects (9,300 sq m), whereas in Wro­ cław there’s 14 of them (6,200 sq m). Łódź is the smallest market when coworking spaces are considered – at the end of 2017 there were 11 locations (2,200 sq m). We find out about the next locations almost every week, which confirms the dynamic development of the flexible workplaces market. Recently, SkyHub, an initiative of the Łodzkie Province Governor, had its premiere in Łódź, on the 15th floor of Red Tower office building. Cambridge Innoviation Centre leased approximately 14,000 sq m of office space in Warsaw’s Varso. It is also known that more operators are actively looking for the right space and some of this search is already at negotiations stage or finalizing the lease agreement. It can be expected that 2018 will be another record-breaking year when demand for flexible office space is considered. Also leases signed by these providers will be one of the largest transactions in the market. The key flexible workplace providers who operate in the Polish market are: Brain Embassy, Business Link, CitySpace, Dago, InOffice, Office Hub, OmniOffices and Regus. The last one has been operating in Poland since 1997 offering serviced offices, but recently introduced a new format, previously absent here, which is Spaces – dedicated to coworking. There is a lot of talk about the fact that flexible office space is a solution for start-ups, which are usually smaller, young companies focused in innovative technologies with potential for significant sales and / or employee growth. An impor tant group of tenants are also large companies, which constitute a large portion of tenants in flexible offices. Such offices secure the short-term needs of these companies resulting from inability to lease temporary space in anticipation of the target area in which the company will operate. Corporations also benefit from flexible solutions if it’s necessary to secure an appropriate space for a project that requires employment to increase.

Some of the flexible workplaces operators are derived from developers of office space, for example: Business Link and Skanska, City Space and Echo Investment, Ghelamco with The Meet District and Adgar Poland with Brain Embassy and BE Yourself concept. The advantage of such cooperation is the comfort of having readyto-use temporary space for tenants, as well as the fact that developers are in a direct contact with companies that may in the future, as a result of growth and expansion, need more office space and become a tenant of office space in the traditional sense of the word. The anticipated limited supply of office space in Warsaw in 2018-2019 and falling vacancy rates will drive demand for serviced offices and coworking spaces. In future, flexible workplaces are likely to be embraced even by corporate occupiers that today cannot even imagine themselves using them. I expect many large businesses to enter the Polish market by leasing such office space first. For some, such space is a response to the forthcoming entry into force of IFRS 16 and the need to disclose leases in excess of 12 months as ba­­lance sheet l i a b i l i t i e s. O n the other hand, operators who h ave n o t expanded into Poland yet are aware that now is the time to clinch deals as the market is likely to become saturated soon. Most of the planned new locations will open by 2020, which will be a moment of truth for the new phenomenon and will show whether or not the market is oversupplied with coworking spaces and serviced offices. We are clearly witnessing an emergence of a strong, alternative leasing market for large office spaces where there is no need to make long-term commitments for five years ahead as before.•

Jarosław Pilch, Head of Tenant Representation, Office Agency, Savills

Serviced offices provide fully furnished and equipped office space, frequently with a cellular layout and administrative and maintenance support. Co-working space is focused on creating an atmosphere that fosters cooperation between users.

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INVESTMENT NEWS

World Cup tourists help to boost Russian hotel market The operating performance of hotels in Moscow and St. Petersburg has grown for the third consecutive year as a result of the increased tourist flow. The study shows that the hotel occupancy rate in Moscow increased by 3%, reaching a record 75% since 2015, and by 5.5% in St. Petersburg. The average revenue per room increased to 4,345 roubles – the highest level in the last three years. According to figures from global real estate advisor, Colliers International, 21.5 million tourists visited Moscow in 2017, which is 13% more than in 2016, while 7.5 million visited St. Petersburg, 8.4% more in the previous year. The growth trends in hotel operating performance in both cities have held steady for the third year in a row. In particular, average hotel occupancy in Moscow has increased by 3 percentage points year on year, the price per room (ADR) increased by 1.6%, and the revenue per room (RevPAR) grew by 5%. Over the past three years, hotel occupancy in Moscow has grown 7.5%, reaching 75% – a record for the period since 2015. In St. Petersburg, where tourist flow is more prone to seasonal influences, hotel occupancy remained at 2016 levels and was 68% in 2017. However, due to an increase in room prices during the high season, revenue per room (RevPAR) in St. Petersburg increased by 5.5%. The most significant price increase occurred during major sporting and business events in the city, such as the Confederations Cup and the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum (SPIEF). Colliers International forecasts that average annual hotel occupancy in Moscow could grow in 2018 by 5% to reach 80%, and 3%

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in St. Petersburg, reaching 71%. Colliers experts expect that holding the World Cup in Russia will have a greater impact on the operational performance of the hotel industry in Moscow than in St. Petersburg as free rail travel and affordable flights will enable some fans to base themselves in Moscow and take a day trip to St. Petersburg. Colliers International forecasts that the average annual room price (ADR) in Moscow will grow 28%-30% to 5,930 roubles per day, which was the average rate for 2017, while St. Petersburg will see 22%-26% growth. Source: Colliers International

Ratuszowa 6 - a new spot on the cultural and culinary map of Warsaw The property adjacent to the Warsaw Praski Park, where the modern cultural and gastronomic center Ratuszowa 6 is to be built, is already becoming an attractive meeting spot in the capital.

The previously forgotten post-industrial building quarter at 6 Ratuszowa Street in Warsaw’s old Praga district has just gained new identity. A new Warsaw Targ Śniadaniowy breakfast market has started to operate on the parcel in the first weekend of June 2018. The youngest residents of the city were playing with their parents during the “Children’s Weekend” initiated by the investor. The children took part in, among others, art workshops, sports competitions, board games tournament, archery and balloon twisting. A gym and a six-meter inflatable slide created for the children met with an enthusiastic reception. Moreover, MedFood - Dietetyka, Zdrowie & Lifestyle company, which was the co-founder of the event, prepared healthy snacks and freshly squeezed juices, made according to the recipes of their dietitians. Targ Śniadaniowy on Ratuszowa Street will continue to operate until the beginning of construction of the investment, as was the case with Biobazar, which operated at the Norblin factory at Żelazna before the revitalization of the facility began. The construction of the cultural and gastronomic center Ratuszowa 6 is to begin this year. The newest generation, four-storey building with a total area of 2.8 thousand sq m will be built on a 4.4 ha plot, and will be surrounded by greenery. The facility will also be integrated with the nearby park thanks to the green roofs and terraces. The authors of the project focused on a modern design. Young, talented Polish artists will take part in the creation of the complex.

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The center is to provide a rich and diverse entertainment and gastronomic offer. Ratuszowa 6 will be a very lively and energetic place. It will host culinary concepts, including restaurants, cafes, bars and sale points with organic food and oriental products from around the world. In addition, the complex will include space for organizing cultural and artistic events, such as openings, exhibitions and workshops related to the subject of culinary art and healthy life, as well as broadly understood culture, art and design. Moreover, concerts will be organized in a nearby concert shell in cooperation with the district authorities. This way, Warsaw district of Praga will gain a new, interesting local center, and the city will get another tourist attraction, because the complex will have its own unique character. The concept of center arrangement is based on the most interesting and popular facilities of this type in the world. Huge interest in projects based on revitalization has already given Warsaw Hala Koszyki, and in the near future it will also bring Elektrownia Powiśle and the ArtN complex. Mateusz Strzelecki, Partner at Walter Herz company, which is responsible for the commercialization of Ratuszowa 6 center, notes that investments based on the building of attractively located industrial areas are much more interesting for the residents and tourists than new constructions built on vacant lots. Source: Walter Herz

Savills wins property management of Arkada Business Park Real estate advisory firm Savills has been appointed property manager of Arkada Business Park, a prime class A office complex in Bydgoszcz.  The building has already received an occupancy permit. Arkada Business Park is a complex of two office buildings that will provide more than 22,000 sq m of leasable space once fully built out. It is located in Bydgoszcz, near the city’s major junction: Fordońskie Roundabout. The scheme’s first phase, which is nearing completion, will offer 11,000 sq m of modern office space. The project is being developed  to meet sustainability requirements and has received a Very Good rating in BREEAM certification. The investor of Arkada Business Park is For 2, a company of the Arkada Invest Holding Group. Skanska is the general contractor.

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

appearance, changing its function from retail to office and services at the same time. Unique location in the centre of the city, on the corner of 27 Grudnia and Mielżyński streets, makes it especially appreciated by the tenants. In total, the building offers 7,000 sq m of modern office space as well as retail-services. Source: Colliers International

Diverse consulting group to launch new branch in Alchemia complex in Gdańsk

Savills Property and Asset Management team currently has more than 300,000 sq m under management, specialising in adding value, service charges audit and optimisation, marketing and technical advisory services. Its property portfolio includes such office buildings as Millenium Park, Mokotów Plaza and Tulipan House, retail schemes, including Galeria Pomorska, Morski Retail Park and Ferio Wawer, as well as warehouse and industrial facilities. Source: Savills

GFT Poland stays in Okrąglak and expands the office GFT Poland has prolonged the lease agreement in Poznan Okrąglak for further five years and expanded the office space by additional 376 sq m. In the process of extension of the leasing agreement, Sharow Capital and Benson Elliot, the owners, were represented by Colliers International, GFT Poland was represented by CBRE.

Diverse Consulting Group, a company specializing in building teams for IT projects, is launching a new office in the Alchemia complex in Gdańsk. To address its needs, the company has leased nearly 300 sq m of space in the Argon office scheme. Advisory firm JLL represented the tenant during the process of selecting the location and negotiating lease terms. Diverse Consulting Group has been operating on the IT market, from its Warsaw headquarters located, for 10 years. The company has experience in implementing projects connected with both permanent recruitment and the outsourcing of IT staff. Furthermore, it has also developed state-of-the-art solutions which are tailored to the specific needs of its business customers both in Poland and internationally. As is the case with the company’s Warsaw branch, the newlydeveloped Gdańsk structures will be responsible for recruitment processes in the areas of IT and new technologies. The development of the company’s new branch in the Tri-City is in response to the needs of customers and business partners in the region. The company’s new 300 sq m office will be located in the Argon office building of the Alchemia complex in Gdańsk. The Alchemia complex (Argon office building comprises its third stage) offers not only modern office space, but also a sports and recreation centre, cafes and restaurants a hair & beauty salon, and other shops. The opening of Diverse Consulting Group’s new office is scheduled for the beginning of August. Source: Torus

GFT Poland, the pioneer of nearshoring services, has decided to stay in the famous Poznan office building for another five years. The contract also includes expansion of the leased office space by 367 sq m. Altogether, the company will occupy the total space of 2,468 sq m. Okraglak, which for over 60 years is an inseparable element of Poznan landscape, between 2011-2012 went through thorough renovation. Thanks to which, it got back its old glory and once again successfully blended into urban structure. The building constructed in years 1948-1954, on the basis of a project of Polish architect Marek Leykman, regained its original character and

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INVESTMENTS

Collaborating to compete: Cities as growth engines Cities have long been engines for growth. But how can they stay that way? How can cities compete to attract talent and investors? What are the key elements of city planning that capitalizes on both these things?

The RICS World Built Environment Forum  London Summit brought together a respected panel to try and answer these thorny questions. Cities are widely seen as the world’s primary engines of growth and centres of political and cultural influence. Accordingly, competition for inward investment and talent has intensified. Challenges, including those of geography, sprawl and population growth highlight the need for new approaches to trade and commerce, public policy and placemaking. Globalising forces increasingly reward closer collaboration between smaller cities. Those best prepared to succeed will adopt networked approaches to infrastructure, emerging technologies and social questions, building on diverse but complementary strengths to attract investment and incentivise innovation. Great trends – rapid urbanization, climate change, resource scarcity – weigh ever heavier on our cities and built places. Once again, emerging technologies will displace and disrupt our industries. New business models and practices will reshape our professions. The built environment – which touches every person, nation and business – is on the cusp of change. We must help it change for the better – Dr Sean Tompkins, CEO, RICS.

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WHAT MAKES INVESTORS WANT TO INVEST IN A CITY?

Vanessa Muscarà, Associate Director, Property Research at M&G Real Estate shares some findings of her research, which supports the investment decision making process at M&G. M&G is a low risk investor in a low yielding landscape, she says. So we have to look beyond typical supply/demand fundamentals to characteristics which enable property fundamentals to flourish – she explains. The first of Vanessa’s studies looked at innovation and connectivity. One of the key areas she considered was the number of patents filed per resident worker. This gave rise to an innovation score for each of the cities she looked at. She then overlaid the rental growth with the innovation score and looked for a positive correlation. Among the cities that came out on top were Eindhoven and Dortmund not your traditional real estate markets, she says.  The next study looked at urban connectivity, using 18 indicators of connectivity.  The best connected cities were Paris, Berlin and Stockholm. But when Vanessa then added data points like the maturity of an urban transport system, the Wi-Fi speed and number of hotspots, the dedicated cycle paths as well as the affordability of a monthly ticket, transport emissions, and passenger satisfaction surveys, then Gothenburg, Helsinki, Dusseldorf and Stockholm came out on top. 


INVESTMENTS

It’s food for thought from an investment Governance and transparency are parti- However, he also issues a warning. point of view. But what about inno- cularly important – Alex Edds, Director vation itself, how important is that to of Innovation at JLL. As we move technology forward, we a city? mustn’t lose sight of those not moving BEYOND CITIES as fast. The elderly might baulk at the idea Few disagree that much of a city’s future David Burrows, Managing Director, of their pensions being paid into success lies in its ability to innovate and International Organisations and Global their bank account, because they rely harbour innovation. Alex Edds, Director Public Sector at Microsoft Organisation, on the weekly contact at the post office. of Innovation at JLL explains how cities suggests that we could think beyond cities into cohesive regions. can support innovation. As entire industries are reshaped in the fourth industrial age, successful There is a new language of city compe- Examples he gives include Cascadia, cities must adapt. Businesses are signititiveness emerging, he says. Words like an independent vision for the Pacific ficantly less reliant on the location diversity, technology, entrepreneurship, Northwest in the US, and the Blue of natural resources and mass labour and future proofing. This than at any point in the last two competitiveness relies centuries. New economic and business on attracting talent, and models can help cities address growing cities need to nurture that pressures on space, resources and vital talent, such as providing services. the necessary research and development hubs. Technology and disruptive business models are shaping our world as never Cities now had to come before, with huge and perhaps unpredicup with a proposition for table geopolitical and social consequtheir citizens and busiences. Successful cities will respond nesses, much like cities to these forces through resilience and in America had done for economic competitiveness. The built Amazon’s beauty contest environment professions can play – he adds. a crucial role in shaping the cities that best serve their inhabitants’ needs – Joanna Future proofing was also key. Future- Banana, a corridor of urbanisation spre- Plaisant, RICS Country Manager proof cities like San Francisco, Silicon ading over western and central Europe. in Poland. Valley, New York, London and Boston shared some key characteristics, such Cities have been building blocks to econo- BE PART OF THIS GLOBAL FORUM as technology firms, good educa- mies for centuries, they thrived either While the London Summit is over, tion, thinking about the environment, because of location or skills, trade focus The RICS’ World Built Environment Forum is an ongoing and open platform transparency, infrastructure, and gene- or patronage – he explains. to debate around the issues and deverating international patents. But today, with the new forces of tech- lopments affecting the built environHowever, there were cities that were nology is this the desirable direction we ment and therefore affecting you changing at a frantic pace and challen- should be going in? Or should we be having as a professional and as a citizen.  Stay updated with the latest insights from ging the status quo. Some of the most a more elastic definition? – he asks. the forum and announcements on the dynamic included Hyderabad, Bangalore, We can’t underestimate the increasing upcoming summit and help us strengand Ho Ch i Minh.  important of information technology and then the network, joining now: https:// However, while rapid urbanisation and cities – he adds. ww2.rics.org/uk/wbef/ population growth had made them key hubs on the global stage, they had not There is a growing body of evidence Remember that our next meeting yet demonstrated longevity. about the role of IT for economic growth point will be next year at the World and connectivity and the use of modern IT Built Environment Forum Summit There is plenty a city can do to help foster in governments to enable efficiency, in  New York, where our focus will be innovation and creativity and to ensure he states. on the changing nature of work and its they are places we want to live and work. profound impact on urbanisation. We Things like making real estate a driver Every industry is digitising. The world is will also pay special attention to how we of city success through smart, produc- becoming one giant network – we are all can accelerate the flow of capital into tive and flexible spaces; creating a sense connected to the internet. green assets and seize the opportunities of place where innovation and collaboraof a low carbon economy. tion can be fostered; improving liveability; There is an acceleration in velocity driving a sustainability agenda and facili- of change and urgency for cities to You can follow: #WBEF Twitter and tating transparent business practices.  engage with @RICS_Europe.• respond, he adds.

Businesses are significantly less reliant on the location of natural resources and mass labour than at any point in the last two centuries.

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WARSAW AND WHAT ELSE? Cushman & Wakefield experts discuss regional office markets and potential of BSS sector.

The business services sector (BSS) is a major catalyst for the growth of regional office markets in Poland with Krakow, Wrocław and Tricity leading the way. What attracts investors and developers to these locations? What drives tenants to expand into regions? Is it location, availability of high-skilled workforce, the quality of modern office space, or perhaps some other factor? Marcin Siewierski: Wrocław, the capital city of Lower Silesia, boasts a prime location in Poland. It beckons investors with its proximity to the German and Czech borders, good road infrastructure and public transport, and an airport that handles approximately 2.5 million passengers per annum. Wrocław’s key strength is its educational potential. Wrocław is among Poland’s top three cities, in addition to Warsaw and Krakow, in terms of the number of business-relevant IT, science, engineering and technology, and foreign language students. Wrocław is ranked third, behind Krakow and Warsaw, in terms of BSS employment standing at 40,000 and accounting for

The gap between Warsaw and Poland’s largest regional cities has greatly narrowed in recent years. There’s a growing number of international firms opening offices and shared services centres outside the capital city. 48

Marcin Siewierski, Associate, Office Agency, Cushman & Wakefield

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16% of this sector’s total employment in Poland according ABSL’s data. The BSS maintains its strong growth momentum in the city, acting like a magnet that attracts new investors. There’s no doubt that Wrocław is already a leading R&D location in Central and Eastern Europe.

total office stock amounted to 942,400 sq m while another 300,000 sq m was under construction. If this robust development activity carries on, the city’s office stock is likely to surpass the one million sq m mark by year-end 2018.

both the current talent pool and the location’s potential. Tricity has a tremendous potential to attract labour. This has been recognised by tenants, which is evidenced by the steady growth in office demand coming from existing firms and newcomers to the city.

Large supply of office space in Wrocław is opening up new opportunities for tenants who benefit from lower leasing costs thanks to modern technological solutions in office buildings and intense competition on the office market helping them obtain more attractive commercial lease terms. Tenants can have their office standard upgraded without any risk of costs rising. In the first quarter of 2018, Wrocław’s

Adam Schroeder: Tenants who have either recently opened or are planning to open new offices in regional cities in the near future come mainly from BPO/SSC and ITO/CTO sectors. When choosing a new office location, investors will usually check availability of suitably skilled workforce in the area considered and whether qualified professionals would be willing to move home and work in that area. In other words: they check

MS: Wrocław is the top work destination for specialists and managers. In a survey conducted by a recruitment company Antal, as many as 39% of the respondents said they would be willing to move to the capital city of Lower Silesia. In the January 2017 report, Wrocław was ranked as the most popular relocation destination in Poland. The city is attracting a growing number of people ready to move there permanently. Wrocław’s business services market is greatly varied, but dominated by technical and financial processing services.

Tenants who have either recently opened or are planning to open new offices in regional cities in the near future come mainly from BPO/SSC and ITO/CTO sectors.

With its large pool of technical and financial professionals, generated by existing business services centres, Wrocław continues to attract new investments. Given the ongoing labour market changes, quality of office space is becoming an increasingly valuable asset in the war for talent. When it comes to choosing an employer, the location, standard, modern solutions and design of an office are frequently critical factors. Many job candidates expect to see their future office environment before they sign a contract.

Adam Schroeder, Associate, Office Agency, Cushman & Wakefield

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AS: Another important factor is, of course, suitable infrastructure that could attract investors. Tricity’s office buildings are largely located near public transport stops and along congestion-free roads. Tricity also boasts a large supply of Class A office space in buildings aged less than six years, thereby

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offering a very high standard. Those working in large corporations, shared services centres, co-working spaces and conference centres enjoy access to a wide range of attractive amenities on the ground floor of office buildings, such as conference rooms, canteens, sushi bars, healthcare facilities, kindergartens and fitness centres. Benefiting from a varied offer, office buildings are vibrant not only during business hours, but also in the evenings and at we e k e n d s, p a r t i c u l a r l y in the OBC/Alchemia and Garnizon areas. The view from your office is not a critical factor in the choice of Tricity, but is usually an additional advantage. Most office buildings offer impressive views over the Tricity Natural Protected Area and the Gdańsk Bay. Others, including C200, Tryton and Heweliusz, afford a view of the industrial landscape of the shipyard and the old town, while the tallest office buildings such as Neptun and Olivia Star boast a full view of Tricity. During a work break you can soothe your eyes and actively enjoy the city and its natural environment in your leisure time. What is Krakow doing to maintain its leadership in attracting BPO/SSC investments? Michał Galimski: Krakow has been focused on training and education of people entering the labour market for years. The city has 29 universities turning out 70,000 graduates every year. In addition to catering for Krakow residents, its educational institutions attract those living in southern Poland and countries

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Michał Galimski, Associate, Office Agency, Cushman & Wakefield

to the east of Poland, including Ukraine. As a result, firms looking to open offices in the Krakow area enjoy a regular inflow of job candidates. Access to a large pool of high-skilled employees with strong international language proficiencies is equally important to the expansion of the local office market. Krakow’s business centres deliver services in more than 29 languages. Krakow is a popular location for existing and new BPO/SSC/IT/R&D or BSS projects, because it enables execution of complex projects and offers specialists with multiple skills and expertise in such areas as finance, HR, IT or R&D. This is considered an essential prerequisite of a project’s success and development. In addition, Krakow has been consistently ranked high in various indexes, making it an attractive location.

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It was among the top nine outsourcing locations in the world in the TOP 100 Outsourcing Destinations Ranking published by Global Services and Tholons 2017.

For example, it was among the top nine outsourcing locations in the world in the TOP 100 Outsourcing Destinations Ranking published by Global Services and Tholons 2017. In 2018, Krakow came eighth in the Tholons Services Globalization City Index globally, and second in the ranking of European cities. Krakow now has more than 245 BSS firms employing more than 60,000 staff with several new BSS centres being set up in the city every year. Factors attracting international firms to invest in Krakow include the presence of business support institutions and the city’s modern office stock, which totalled 1,128,096 sq m at the end of the first quarter of 2018. The local market’s growth is also driven by the Krakow-Balice International Airport, which handles more than four million passengers annually. In addition, average costs of living are lower compared to other countries, making Krakow a foreigner-friendly city. What’s more, in addition to being an important business location, Krakow is a popular prime European tourist destination globally. How successful is Gdynia at attracting new BSS investments compared to the whole Tricity region? AS: Tricity’s strength lies in its perception by investors in this region as a integrated metropolis whose several cities, including Gdansk, Sopot, Gdynia as well as Pruszcz, Rumia, Reda and Wejherowo, are interconnected through a shared urban fabric, roads, public transport and so forth. People study and live in Gdansk, but work in Gdynia, for instance.

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

Which city, mutatis mutandis, is likely to catch up and truly compete with Warsaw? MS: The gap between Warsaw and Poland’s largest regional cities has greatly narrowed in recent years. There’s a growing number of international firms opening offices and shared services centres outside the capital city. At year-end 2017, Warsaw still had more office space compared to regional cities (5.2 million sq m vs 4.3 million sq m). However, given current supply forecasts, Warsaw is lagging behind. In 2017, regional markets saw a lot more office space completed than Gdynia is, however, seeing a strong Warsaw (450,000 sq m vs 275,000 sq m) occupier interest. All new space that and lower vacancy rates (9.9% compared comes on stream and represents a busi- to 11.7%). ness opportunity is let very quickly. This was the case with the Tensor office According to the outlook for 2018, this complex. Going forward, Gdynia will see trend will carry on in the near future. several new large-scale office projects More than 640,000 sq m of new office break ground, significantly improving space is expected to be delivered the city’s capacity to attract new BSS in regional cities compared to just 270,000 sq m in Warsaw, which is twice investors. less. The largest regional markets such Wrocław is a leading ITO and R&D lo- as Krakow, Wrocław and Tricity are cation. What’s the city’s policy for at- expected to continue to attract large tracting ITO and R&D investors? tenants, benefiting from their estaMS: Wrocław is the third top per- blished market positions as top BSS former in attracting investors, behind destinations in Europe. This growth will Warsaw and Krakow, and is strengthe- be additionally driven by expansions ning its position on Poland’s commercial and consolidations of existing entities. real estate market. The city’s authorities Other regional markets such as Poznań, invariably support programmes of co- Katowice and Łódź will also expeoperation with universities and acti- rience rapid growth in 2018. Smaller vely assist start-ups and entrepreneurs markets such as Szczecin, Lublin, Opole, in securing financing. Wrocław is al- Rzeszów and Bydgoszcz are seeing so a leading city for foreign direct invest- a growing occupier interest due to rising ments. It has the best FDI strategy saturation levels recorded in the largest according to “Polish Cities and Regions regional cities. These locations benefit of the Future 2017/18” report, prepared from strong tertiary education instituby fDI of the Financial Times group. tions providing access to skilled labour.• Although a number large investors such as Thomson Reuters, DNV, WNS and Sony Pictures opened their offices in Gdynia many years ago, it is Gdansk that attracted new BSS investments in recent years. The rapid growth in new supply of office buildings was one of key factors. The Gdynia office market grew at a much slower pace. A single medium-sized office building is not enough to attract businesses. Tenants prefer to have a choice of several office buildings or parks and an option to expand is a major factor in the choice of locations.

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Duopolis – Europe’s largest BSS hub is developing in Poland For many years now, Polish cities have been developing dynamically. This process entails both the development of individual metropolitan areas and the emergence of natural partnerships between cities, created by collaborating business centres. The process brings benefits both from the perspective of the inhabitants and the development of business.

At the moment, 92.2 thousand sq m of modern office space are under construction in Łódź and upon completion they will add to the 196.4 thousand square metres already available.

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Some well-known examples of this include the Tri-City, consisting of Gdańsk, Sopot and Gdynia, as well as the recently-created Metropolia GórnośląskoZagłębiowska which brings together 41 cities and towns situated around Katowice. There are more similar examples but these are representative and are mainly based on the ‘hub city – satellite towns’ model. The development of the residential and office infrastructure, as well as road and railway connections, has given rise to a new example of the natural collaboration between two large Polish agglomerations – Warsaw and Łódź. According to the Central Statistical Office, at the end of 2017, Warsaw and Łódź had 1,764,615 and 690,422 inhabitants, respectively. The total number of inhabitants of both these cities is almost 2.5 million and is even greater if the residents of the neighbouring municipalities situated around both cities are included.

We are witnessing the rise of Duopolis – a huge metropolitan area consisting of two large cities. For many years, Warsaw was the magnet attracting newcomers looking for jobs. However, this trend has been changing in recent years and Łódź has been steadily increasing its appeal to prospective employees, thanks to such factors as the rapid development of the BSS sector. This process is becoming more and more dynamic with the passing of each year, thanks to the development and modernisation of the road and railway infrastructure. As recently as in the first decade of the 21st century, drivers who wanted to get from Warsaw to Łódź by car had to take the road


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to Katowice, via Rawa Mazowiecka. Although this route is still available, the A2 motorway now allows motorists to cut down on travel time by several dozen minutes. The same can be said about the railway connection: the rail infrastructure is being modernised on an ongoing basis and the time required to get from the Central Station in Warsaw to the Łódź Fabryczna station in the morning is around 90 minutes, with passengers traveling in comfortable conditions. Travel time will continue to be reduced and will ultimately amount to approximately 60 minutes. The occupancy rate of trains travelling from Łódź to Warsaw or Warsaw to Łódź during rush hour already exceeds 60%. The improvements in logistics have caught the attention of companies which are tracking and analysing the potential for development in Łódź with interest. Both cities are great places to live and work in thanks to

their potential, cultural and tourist facilities and available housing. However, there are also differences between the cities with regards to employment costs and competition. There are no significant disparities as concerns salaries in the modern business services sector which is of most interest to employees, and therefore investors from the BPO, SSC or R&D industries looking to invest in central Poland can choose between two large cities instead of having just one available, and among those two cities Łódź is catching up with Warsaw in terms of the economic factor and availability of employees. The office property sector has already taken notice of this fact. At the moment, 92.2 thousand square metres of modern office space are under construction in Łódź and upon completion they will add to the 196.4 thousand square metres already available. Łódź is currently a huge construction site and developers are making it clear that they hope to attract tenants to their office projects, mainly from the BSS sector. These hopes are unlikely to be in vain, as new BPO, SSC or R&D centres are being opened in the city practically every month. The last few weeks alone saw the opening, development or announcement of new projects by such companies as BFF Banking Group, BSH, Clariant, Philips Lighting and Commerz Systems.

We are witnessing the rise of Duopolis – a huge metropolitan area consisting of two large cities. airports, the Duopolis model is becoming a reality. Both cities will thus create one of the largest, if not the largest BSS business hub in the entire Central and Eastern Europe. Seeing the diversity of processes serviced in shared services centres, Duopolis can be said to offer a comprehensive and versatile performance of business processes, starting with multilingual customer service and financial, accounting and HR processes and concluding with financial analytics, research and development and IT support. Given the profile of foreign investors interested in locating their business projects in Poland, Duopolis is sure to meet most of their needs, ensuring excellent logistics, unrestricted access to human resources and office space, and, importantly, a cost-effective alternative.

The rise of Duopolis offers a completely new perspective of Łódź – no longer as merely a separate, although notable and large urban area, but as part of a potent agglomeration consisting of two cities, each with a strong business and academic presence, located in the central part of Poland, with Given this dynamic development excellent transport connections and of the office infrastructure in Łódź and a huge potential for the development the constantly reduced time needed to of the European BSS sector.• travel between the Polish capital and Łódź, as well as the ability to use two

Investor Service and International Cooperation Bureau Piotrkowska 104a St. 90-926 Łódź Phone.: +48 42 638 59 39 fax: +48 42 638 59 40 e-mail: boi@uml.lodz.pl

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Local commercial real estate market – Bydgoszcz and the neighbourhood Regional markets, including Bydgoszcz hope to succeed due to the rapidly expanding Business Process Outsourcing / Shared Services Centre market.

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or the research related to this market is not lengthy. So far there have been the projects aimed at particular tenants or the adaptations and modernisations of the previous office buildings. During the meetings and conferences the discussion whether Bydgoszcz is avoided by the more prominent tenants due to lack of appropriate amount of modern office space or whether it lacks its office space due to the lack of tenants’ can be often heard. There has been a distinct economic boom in the local commercial property market for the last two, three years. The accomplishment of a few projects started at the same time, the most important of them were: Idea – the Business Space, Arkada Business Park, Optimum Park, Business Park at Kraszewskiego Street or the office building Immobile K3 carried out by CDI Konsultanci Budowlani Sp. z o.o. at Kościeleckich Square in the old city of Bydgoszcz. The optimistic signal is the rising interest in new office space Warsaw tops the commercial real estate market in Poland area in Bydgoszcz of tenants, also including and its position seems to be unthreatened with the supply the entities not present until now. of almost 5.3 mln sq. m of the office space area. In order to understand the speciNext, there is a group of regional cities with the distinctly ficity better and the lower supply marked Cracow, where the supply of the commercial real in the medium size cities, it should be estate in 2017 exceeded one million square metres of the office noticed that the considerable majority space area and Wrocław ranked as the third one, which is close of the office investments is carried out

According to data gathered by the Regional Development Agency in Bydgoszcz, the supply corresponding to the commercial market in Bydgoszcz in 2017 amounted 74.000 sq m. to break the barrier of half a million square metres. The subsequent positions are held by Tricity, followed by Katowice, Poznań and Łódź with the values below 500 thousand square metres of the modern office space area.

by local developers, often these are the so called ‘speculative projects’ with only a few or without preliminary agreements. These cities are still avoided by big global development companies Furthermore, it is worth mentioning medium size cities such and what follows it, lower positioned as Szczecin, Lublin and particularly Bydgoszcz. in many rankings. Bydgoszcz as the biggest city and the capital of the Kuyavian and Pomeranian Voivodeship becomes the biggest commercial market in the region. However, in comparison with other big and medium size regional cities in Poland, there can be seen a great discrepancy in this respect. According to data gathered by the Regional Development Agency in Bydgoszcz, the supply corresponding to the commercial market in Bydgoszcz in 2017 amounted 74.000 sq. m. However, it is the amount which is disproportionate considering the size of the city and its economic potential. It is also difficult to obtain unambiguous data due to the fact that while examining the office space market in Poland by the global consulting companies, the volume concerning Bydgoszcz is rounded off

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

Regional markets, including Bydgoszcz hope to succeed due to the rapidly expanding Business Process Outsourcing / Shared Services Centre market. In contrast to Warsaw, in the smaller centres these are the tenants from this segment who constitute the main target group for the developers. In 2017 the BPO/SSC market in Bydgoszcz was the eighth concerning the size, employing 8.7 thousand in this sector (data from ABSL report). According to the forecast, the barrier of 10 thousand workplaces will be exceeded in one or two years.

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Maciej Wawrzyniak, Head of Sales and Real Management, CDI Immobile

One of the most significant aspects while choosing a location for the site or branch of the company is the access to the potential workforce which is tantamount to the number of graduates in the region. This argument is frequently emphasized while choosing Bydgoszcz by the companies, especially the ones from the IT sector. There are around 60 thousand students in Bydgoszcz and the neighbourhood, with the substantial proportion of students being the graduates of technical faculties. Due to the significant decrease in the un­ e mployment rate and at the same time in the light of the deepening population decline as well as an increase in workers requirements, for who apart from remuneration and benefits, the more important are such aspects as the atmosphere at the workplace, office conditions, the distance from the workplace or the ergonomics of the workplace, companies more often look for offices offering highest standards and which are conveniently situated for their locations. These days the worker values easy access by public transport, being close to a restaurant where lunch can be provided or the possibility to do the shopping right after a day at the workplace.

The following ideas also motivated us to build our office building – Immobile K3 at Kościeleckich Square in Byd­­ goszcz. Apart from many requirements for category A buildings, which are becoming a standard these days, we tried to introduce other facilities such as energy efficient technical solutions, ergonomically designed common areas shared by all users or specially designed for cyclists – bicycle parking spaces on the underground floors. In these places, a cyclist will have a chance not only to leave the bicycle in a safe place but also to take advantage of a locker and a full set of sanitary facilities with a shower to refresh himself or herself after reaching the workplace. Additionally, there

is the BRA (city bicycle-sharing system) station outside the building. According to research, this means of transport is most frequently chosen by the office workers and the bicycle season lasts much longer than just during the summer months. In the end, it is worth emphasizing the fact which is no less important and which is the cooperation with the city authorities. At present, most of the city officials understand well the need to support both the entrepreneurs entering the markets and the local developers. The great example of the institution backing up investors is the frequently appreciated Regional Development Agency in Bydgoszcz.•

In order to understand the specificity better and the lower supply in the medium size cities, it should be noticed that the considerable majority of the office investments is carried out by local developers, often these are the so called ‘speculative projects’ with only a few or without preliminary agreements.

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Bydgoszcz – number 1 for IT in Poland As indicated in the latest report on business services in Bydgoszcz, prepared by the Association of Business Service Leaders (ABSL), Bydgoszcz occupies the first place on the list of eleven largest business services centres in Poland in terms of the share of IT services in the employment structure of BPO, SSC, IT and R&D.

Bydgoszcz is among the most important investment locations in the business services sector in Poland and it is still growing dynamically. According to the latest ABSL report, published at the beginning of June, there are 41 BPO, SSC, IT and R&D centres in the City. Nine have been created since 2016 and a conservative scenario predicts an increase to 50 centres by 2020. In combination with the intensive development of existing centres in the City, the number of jobs in the industry has increased in total by 28%, or slightly over 2,000 people. AN IMPORTANT POINT ON THE NATIONAL MAP OF IT SERVICES

Bydgoszcz makes great use of the opportunities related to the development of the sector, in particular the wider IT industry. IT services, including research and development activities in the field of software development, constitute the most important category of services provided in Bydgoszcz centres and currently generate 86% of employment in the industry. The specialization of Bydgoszcz in the provision of teleinformation and programming services is also visible through the profile of investors, among which there are globally recognizable brands, such as Nokia, Atos, Asseco, Mobica, SDL, Cybercom or Teldat. Most of them have expanded the range of services in recent years and increased employment in their centres, signalling at the same time realistic forecasts for further development. The largest Polish branch of Atos, located in Bydgoszcz, currently employs over 3,500 people and this year the company plans to increase this number by another 500 employees. The specialists from Bydgoszcz implement strategic projects for global clients and participate in such prestigious projects as IT service for the Olympic Games. The Bydgoszcz branch of the international Mobica corporation managed to grow from a small office in the centre of Bydgoszcz to the size of a company employing almost 200 people, in just seven years. A completely different example of investment success is Nokia Bydgoszcz – Technology Centre with a very rich heritage reflecting the history of the telecommunications sector in Poland dating back to 1927 and a part of the Finnish structure since 2016. Appreciating the significant contribution of the Bydgoszcz branch to building the global position of the company on the market, Nokia plans its further growth, especially in the field of research and development. These and many other examples prove that in the opinion of the most important investors in the City, Bydgoszcz is a reliable location for business.

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The more efficient development of the office infrastructure in Bydgoszcz is aided by the resolution of the City Council of Bydgoszcz adopted at the beginning of this year on the exemption from property tax for high-quality offices in newly constructed buildings.

Competences of the local staff, convenient location and an attractive investment offer of the City also encourage new companies from the IT industry to enter the Bydgoszcz market. Recently, Cognifide and Meelogic opened their branches in the City. Strong IT staff, good technical facilities and esteemed universities – this is what attracted us to Bydgoszcz – says Marcin Stańczyk, Managing Director of Cognifide. – The excellent transport links between the City and our offices in Poznań and London as well as the dynamic development of the agglomeration is also of great importance – he adds. PERSONNEL MEETS THE EXPECTATIONS OF INVESTORS

The high potential of human capital in Bydgoszcz is one of the factors most appreciated by investors. As the largest academic centre in the Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Bydgoszcz offers entrepreneurs access to human resources with the right competencies. As the above-mentioned ABSL report indicates, currently more than one third of students of the Bydgoszcz-Toruń agglomeration study on business and administration, engineering and technical, language and ICT courses. The graduates most often receive employment in the modern business services sector. Close proximity of the City of Toruń also has a positive impact on the supply of qualified employees in the local labour market. Many employees commute daily from Toruń to Bydgoszcz centres. Moreover, in the publication prepared by ABSL, the compe-­ titive level of pressure on the local labour market was emphasized, which is still lower in Bydgoszcz than in the majority of the main business services centres in Poland. Full “Business services in Bydgoszcz” report is available on the ABSL website in the Publications section: www.absl.pl/publications.

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New investment in the city EDUCATION IN COOPERATION WITH ENTREPRENEURS

The training of appropriate personnel for the business services sector in the City is also supported by the entrepreneurs themselves, especially in the most dynamic IT industry. In Bydgoszcz, you can see many good practices in the field of cooperation between companies and universities, and also at the stage of education in secondary schools or non-formal education. With significant involvement of enterprises from the sector, special curricula were developed and partner directions at universities and partner classes in secondary schools were created. It is also important to support the education process with practical elements through the implementation of internships and practices in companies.

Bydgoszcz Regional Development Agency Unii Lubelskiej 4C St. 85-059 Bydgoszcz p: +48 52 585 88 23 barr@barr.pl www.barr.pl

MODERN AND RECEPTIVE OFFICE MARKET

In parallel with the development of the BPO/SSC sector in Bydgoszcz, the supply and In addition, experienced employees, experts quality of office facilities are and engineers from such companies as Atos, also changing. This is confirmed iQor, Nokia and SDL regularly conduct practical by the mentioned ABSL report, trainings for students and graduates in IT, commu- stating that approx. 30% nication and management. There are also more of the office space resources and more initiatives promoting the research and in the City were commisdevelopment sector and building a community sioned in the last three years. around the IT industry. In September, the first This means that a large part “bITconf” IT conference will be held in the City, and of the office space in the City is the November plan will include the second edition located in modern buildings, of the “Women in IT” event, promoting science which is not without signifiand IT among women and showing them career cance, for example in the recruitment of employees in the IT opportunities in the modern technology industry. industry. At the same time, the vacancy rate decreased, showing how absorptive the office market in Bydgoszcz is. The more efficient development of the office infrastructure in Bydgoszcz is aided by the resolution of the City Council of Bydgoszcz adopted at the beginning of this year on the exemption from property tax for high-quality offices in newly constructed buildings. Therefore, it can be estimated that in the next two years, the supply of office space in Bydgoszcz will increase by another 30%. Bydgoszcz gradually and permanently changes its image from the industrial centre to the centre of modern technologies and services, offering a stable business environment and qualified staff. The consistently implemented strategy of the City authorities, local IT specialization as well as comprehensive support of investment processes on the part of the Bydgoszcz Regional Development Agency create a good climate for new investments as well as for the development of existing enterprises.•

Name of the investor: Meelogic Consulting AG Country of origin: Germany Number of workplaces: 100 jobs within 2 years Sector: IT, Consulting Company’s residence in the city: Arkada Business Park Occupied surface: 300 sq m

Offering solutions for the Internet of Things company Meelogic continues to grow and opens a new office in Bydgoszcz. It is the second, next to Szczecin, company’s office in Poland. For the first two years the company plans to grow up to 100 highly qualified employees in Bydgoszcz. The company’s office is located in the city center in a newly created office complex: Arkada Business Park. In Bydgoszcz there will be developed projects in the areas of medicine, autonomous driving and electromobility. Meelogic offers its employees a friendly work atmosphere, flat management structure and ambitious tasks. An international and multicultural team focuses on commitment and good cooperation between the sites.

Robert Ostojski, Director of Meelogic Poland

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Business in Poznań’s urban space How does high-quality urban space affect the lives of citizens? Should investors adapt their projects to the existing architecture? Do Poznań’s Alfas fit into the New Święty Marcin? And finally, how does the City look after aesthetics? – all this in an interview with Piotr Libicki, the City of Poznan Mers’ Proxy for City Aesthetics.

We are working intensively on the so-called landscape resolution, which will be adopted by the City Council next year. The resolution will precisely regulate the rules on which advertisements or signs may be placed in urban space.

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Does the City create projects that help nurture historic urban space? The City initiates and leads them. Archaeological research is carried out in the immediate vicinity of the main seat of the Poznań City Hall – a prelude to the reconstruction of Plac Kolegiacki, which will involve the change from a car park to a fully fledged, multifunctional public space. In the next two years we are talking about improving the quality of the Old Market space – especially in terms of its surface and additional greenery. As part of the programme for the City Centre, the Strategy includes an item called “Poznań’s markets and squares”. Therefore, this year There is no doubt that today, and the reconstruction of Rynek Łazarski this is what the Strategy also says, we will begin, followed by : Rynek are focusing our efforts on building Jeżycki and Plac Bernardyński. the best possible quality of public space in Poznań. And this is what ultimately As far as the public space in Poznań is concerned, there is a lot going on, and affects the quality of its residents’ lives. we must remember that the public space Poznań is known for its markets, which also includes the areas along the Warta are the central commercial squares River, which, thanks to the efforts of the of individual districts. Historic archi- City Hall, are becoming an increasingly tecture is also adapted to the needs attractive place for Poznań’s residents of different institutions and actors. and visitors. Outsourcing&More: The latest Development Strategy of the City of Poznań focuses on cooperation. How can we understand urban planning in this light? Piotr Libicki: To answer this question, we need to refer to the definition of public space and even to the definition of a city. A city is first and foremost a community of inhabitants, which carries outs its pursuits in public space, i.e. the space between buildings. It is a place of meetings, improving relationships, often random meetings, which consist only in exchanged looks, but which all build a community.

Business decisions depend on many factors, but whether a city is attractive in terms of public space also has an impact on the choice of investment location. If employees of a company, no matter if higher or lower level, live in a pleasant space, they have where to go and spend time after work, this encourages you to do business in this City.

Photo: Przemysław Turlej

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Now let’s talk for a moment about how to combine traditional Poznań architecture with modern projects, such as office buildings, which are necessary for business. Recently, Bałtyk has been opened. Two more Pixel office buildings and the Nowy Rynek complex are under construction. In your opinion, is it worth combining innovative projects with traditional architecture or, on the contrary, should investors adapt their projects to the space they have already come upon in the city? The design should always be adapted to the existing space, no matter what architecture you plan to create. Space is a palimpsest, a composition of objects that were created in different eras. There is no doubt that today we expect contemporary architecture, located in the existing urban space both with understanding and respect, as well as bringing new, bold value. Bałtyk is a very brave project, because it tries to dominate the space, but it was created with such awareness that it has full right to do so. In fact, Bałtyk builds the identity of this bland space, which Rondo Kaponiera had been until now. Kaponiera is a transport hub, but today it is slowly

We absolutely need new architecture – in the context of building a new identity of a place, as in the case of the Bałtyk and Rondo Kaponiera, but also in a more modest way, as in the case of the Za Bramką office building and car park, which is also the seat of the Investor Relations Department of the City of Poznań.

Piotr Libicki The City of Poznan Mers’ Proxy for City Aesthetics Poznan City Hall piotr_libicki@um.poznan.pl Phone: +48 61 878 5101 Mobile: +48 783 949 077

becoming a public space because it is not only the building itself, which attracts with its architecture. It is a building that creates a meeting place (cafés and restaurants) and cultural events at its base. We absolutely need new architecture – in the context of building a new identity of a place, as in the case of the Bałtyk and Rondo Kaponiera, but also in a more modest way, as in the case of the Za Bramką office building and car park, which is also the seat of the Investor Relations Department of the City of Poznań. Photo: Agata Łakińska The building harmoniously fits into the dense urban fabric and does not want to dominate. It introduces new public functions and complements the space, but it does so with great respect to the existing environment. The introduction of modern forms of architecture in a city can take many different shapes. It is important not to make mistakes of the past, not to ignore the context – there were instances of buildings erected in Poznań without thinking, without respect for what was happening around them. New projects must be very conscious about their surroundings.

City of Poznań

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How then, in connection with what you said, do five skyscrapers of the former Alfa fit into the revitalization of Święty Marcin Street? The Centre – Nowy Święty Marcin project is really modern, while the skyscrapers of Alfa Department Stores remain in stark contrast with their modernist, even coarse nature. I can’t agree with that. The Alfas were the Bałtyk of their time (they were built in 1965-1972). They were a modernist project fitted into the historic urban fabric. It is the height of the Alfas that gives character to Poznań’s panorama and in this sense creates a new image of the City Centre, just as the Bałtyk has now created it around Kaponiera. In the case of Alfas, I see an example of a courageous

of users to this space. The remaining three buildings are still available for investors. I do not see the Alfas as a problem for the future of Święty Marcin after the renovation – I see a huge potential that is slowly being activated. The revitalization of the city centre is also connected with the subject of defacing advertisements, which are far from beautiful neon signs, which Poznań could take pride in years ago. What does the City do in this respect in order to improve the aesthetics of urban space? There are still a lot of challenges, but also a lot of things have changed. We are working intensively on the so-called landscape resolution, which will be adopted by the City Council next year. The resolution will precisely regulate the rules on which advertisements or signs may be placed in urban space (size, height, location, type of media). We have published a “Sign Designer” (“Szyldownik”) which is a precise guide for smaller entities and property managers

City of Poznań on how to mark sales and service outlets in the city. The “Szyldownik” was created on the basis of the assumptions for the landscape resolution – we are already acting so that the introduced resolution will not surprise the entrepreneurs. On a daily basis, we also take actions to clean up the city – in the last three years we have managed to remove more than 100 illegal advertising media that were defacing many spaces. For example, on Strzelecka Street, which leads directly to the City Centre, we have liquidated several such media. This gives an immediate visual effect.

Investor Relations Department City of Poznań Za Bramka 1 Street 61-842 Poznan P.: +48 61 878 54 28

inwestor@um.poznan.pl

www.poznan.pl

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action that fits into its era, but not as shameless as in the case of the skyscrapers on Piekary Street (the so-called “Pointers”), which abuse the historic fabric and introduce quality that is a dissoImproving the aesthetics of urban space is an important nance, not a harmonious fit. issue. Poznań is very active in this direction. What measures Most importantly, today the Alfas can are still being carried out in public places? We have changed the appearance of all catering gardens complement and enrich the public functions of the renewed Święty Marcin. in Poznań. Single-coloured parasols, which aren’t too large, The first building will serve a hotel func- significantly affect the reception of the Old Market Square tion, a university dormitory is planned and other streets. We tried, in cooperation with other units in the second, which would attract of the City Hall, to also organize the issues of infrastructure a new, absolutely necessary group – posts, city furniture, bus shelters, all the city’s equipment.

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We want these elements to fit well into the public space, to be aesthetic, discreet and in subtle colours.

New investment

In the Development Strategy of the City of Poznań we can also find a provision concerning urban greenery – the amount of greenery in right-of-ways should increase. As the Faculty of Urban Planning and Architecture, we try to give opinions on projects and pay special attention to this matter. Poznań

in the city

Name of the investor: Nordcloud Sp. z o.o. Country of origin: Finland Number of workplaces: 40+ Sector: IT, R&D Company’s residence in the city: Kupiec Poznański, Wiosny Ludów 2 Sq. Occupied surface: 520 sq m

Nordcloud is a European leader in public cloud infrastructure solutions AWS, MS Azure & GCP, and cloud native application services. We are helping businesses to accelerate their Cloud adoption. Right now I’m building Nordcloud’s team & operation in Poland. We are recruiting heavily, mostly in Poznań but also elsewhere in Poland, so I spend a lot of my time supporting our recruitment and interviewing candidates. I also meet our local partners and

has a unique, long-standing tradition of caring for the greenery along streets, on squares and in parks. There are many areas of aesthetic activity in the city – it is a very important element in public space, thanks to which we perceive a given place as pleasant to stay. Finally, let’s say a little more about the Free Cour t yard (" Wolny Dziedziniec") project, i.e. restoring utility to the courtyard at the main seat of the Poznań City Hall. If we are talking about changes and reclaiming historic public space, then you have to start with yourself, that is, with the City Hall. By decision of Mayor Jacek Jaśkowiak, the cars of officials and councillors were removed from this

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space. Today, the Free Courtyard is open to the needs of residents and tourists. All seats are mobile and the pots can be easily moved. Its precise design resulted in the creation of a multifunctional space for everyday living and also can be used for the organization of concerts, events and other happenings.

plan together with the Nordcloud group how we can ramp-up new operations and teams. We are hiring to Poznań pretty much the same talent as to all the other markets we operate in. That means Cloud Architects, Software Developers and Managed Cloud Engineers for example. We have already

Every urban space should be multifunctional by definition. A city that has high quality public space will be a pleasant place to live and a city that attracts new residents and investors. Thank you for an interview.•

multiple teams in place and a couple of new ones will be started during 2018. We just moved to a new, more spacious office in the top floor of Kupiec Poznanski and now we have some desperately needed room for growth again.

Henri Jääskeläinen, Site Manager Nordcloud Sp. z o.o.

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RZESZÓW ATTRACTS INNOVATIVE INDUSTRY The first and second quarter of 2018 brought many key decisions on the implementation of new, extremely important investments in Rzeszów and its neighboring Special Economic Zones. The following article briefly describes most important of them. We wish you a pleasant reading.

Rzeszów IT potentate, Asseco Poland S.A., decided in November 2017 to establish the Asseco Innovation Hub – an innovative research and development center. The Center will deal with the development of advanced systems and technologies for key national sectors and the global economy – e.g. health care, energy, banking sector, enterprises, telecommunications as well as agriculture. The research work of Asseco Innovation Hub will focus on priority phenomena and trends from the world of modern technologies, such as: electromobility, telemedicine, artificial intelligence, Internet of Things, as well as on control modules for unmanned aircraft systems. The Asseco Innovation Hub will also develop concepts related to broadly understood IT security.

Rzeszów City Hall Investor Support Division 3 Maja 7 St. 35-030 Rzeszów Phone: +48 17 875 47 43 +48 17 875 47 65 boi@erzeszow.pl www.erzeszow.pl

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crease in innovation and competitiveness of the entire region. The total cost of creating Asseco Innovation Hub comes to over PLN 80 million, planned date of opening the center is the second quarter of 2020.

At the end of January 2018, one of the most dynamically developing companies in the IT and engineering industry in Poland – Sii Polska, decided to set up its branch in Rzeszów. The Rzeszów branch will be responsible for the implementation of projects in the field of application development, Business Intelligence as well as mechanical and electrical engineering, for clients from key sectors of the economy. – The opening of Sii Rzeszów was The project of establishing an innova- a strategic decision in line with tive research and development center Sii Polska’s development plan, especially next to the headquarters of Asseco as the company’s revenues continue Poland in the capital of Podkarpacie was to grow, hence the reinvest of its profit. commented by Adam Góral, President Rzeszów is a great market for employers, of the Board: Asseco Innovation Hub will as there are highly valued academic be a modern R&D center that will allow centers in the city. In addition, it is us, as a Polish company to compete more a region full of business opportunities, effectively on foreign markets. Thanks not only in the area of IT, ​​ but above all to this investment, approximately 400 engineering. Not using this potential new jobs will be created and its imple- would be a waste – says Gregoire Nitot, mentation will also contribute to an in-­­ President and founder of Sii Poland.

At the end of January 2018, one of the most dynamically developing companies in the IT and engineering industry in Poland – Sii Polska, decided to set up its branch in Rzeszów.

Within the next year, the company plans to employ several dozen people in Rzeszów. At the beginning, employees with a minimum 3 years of experience in the first place. Rzeszów has the University of Technology, University of Rzeszów and several other great universities educating in the field of IT and engineering, so it is a  market with great potential It is also a great place to live in and develop your professional career. In  addition to many green areas and rich cultural offer, the advantage of Rzeszów would be the proximity of the airport offering domestic and international connections – says Tomasz Eberbach, Branch Manager at Sii Rzeszów.

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The Deloitte Shared Service Center for Central Europe is also developing dynamically. As for today, the Rzeszów Center employs more than 400 employees and, according to Gerard Murray, Vice President of Deloitte CE Business Services Center, plans to employ another 100 employees by the end of this year. Deloitte Business Services Center provides internal services related to accounting, auditing, IT support, administration and risk management for Deloitte branches from 18 countries. Within its framework, there are four departments: audit delivery center, finance, IT and risk management, combined with internal support services: graphic studio, administration, HR and payroll team, legal department and a global marketing team. The company EME Aero, which includes the aviation potentates Lufthansa Technik and MTU Aero Engines, in mid-March 2018 bought a 16-hectare plot in Trzebownisko, where one of the most modern service centers for repairing aircraft engines in Europe will be built. The company will provide MRO services – maintenance, inspection and repair of turbofan engines. 800 employees will find employment at the EME Aero Sp. z o.o. – mainly engineers, aircraft engineers, logisticians, planners and technologists. The representatives of EME Aero are planning to start operating in 2020. It is worth mentioning that MTU Aero Engines decided to further expand its sub-complex. The beginning of works is planned for September 2018, whereas currently operating facilities will be increased by 11,400 sq m. The extended plant will produce components for the most modern GTF aircraft engines as well as components and modules for the latest generation of General Electric jet engines used in Boeing 787. MTU Aero Engines Polska employs in Rzeszów nearly 800 employees and plans to increase employment during the next 3 years to over 1,000 people.

In March this year, the production activity in the area of the Science and Technology Park “Rzeszów Dworzysko” was initiated by Lisi Aerospace Creuzet Polska. Lisi Group is a world leader in engineering and technical solutions for the aerospace, automotive and medical industry, operating on 4 continents, 13 countries and consisting of 43 manufacturing plants with nearly 11,000 employees. Lisi Aerospace Creuzet Polska produces specialized components for the aviation industry, including processing and finishing compressor blades in aircraft engines for companies such as Airbus, Boeing and Comac. Another company that decided to invest in the Science and Technology Park "Rzeszów-Dworzysko" is the Weiss Solutions company. The company will produce innovative rotary tables as well as elements necessary for the automation of industrial lines. There will also be a modern engineering center in which the concepts of new devices will be designed. The company will recruit specialists in the field of mechatronics, computer science, automation as well as CNC operators. One of the global leaders in the field of industrial locking systems, American Southco, decided to build a modern production facility on the area of ​​6.5 thousand sq m in the Podkarpackie Science and Technology Park "Aeropolis". About 400-500 people will find work in the new plant. The Southco company is known for its sliders, locks, locking fasteners, latches, hinges, electronic access and production of other accessories. – Southco products are used in the electronics industry by companies such as Cisco, Samsung and Lenovo, in the automotive industry by Mercedes, Ford and Toyota, and in the medical industry by Siemens and Olympus – says Thomas Mehler, President of Southco. Our solutions can also be found in many other sectors. They are also used in the aviation, marine or agriculture industry. The company’s representatives plan to start operating in 2019.•

Source: Asseco Poland S.A.

Source: EME Aero Sp. z o.o.

Source: EME Aero Sp. z o.o.

Photo: B. Szczupaj Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

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Warsaw supports startups: 60 thousand entrepreneurs have benefited from city incubator facilities In recent years Warsaw has topped many rankings of the most business-friendly, open and accessible cities. This success is based on, among other things, its active involvement in supporting entrepreneurship. By placing emphasis on business innovations, Poland’s capital city focuses on implementing initiatives targeted at Warsaw’s startups.

In 2017 as many as 15.3 thousand new businesses were established here and, according to the reports by the Startup Poland Foundation, every fourth Polish startup is created in Warsaw. One of the city’s methods to help in achieving a better start for business is to develop modern centres supporting entrepreneurship and networking of local companies. The activities of those places are centred around three main areas – information, training and consulting, and business incubation. We would like to offer Warsaw residents not just a place to work, such as offices, with free training and a meeting area, but to build contacts with business support stakeholders in Warsaw and primarily to establish trust in the relations between the city and entrepreneurs, particularly those who have only just begun, unwinding their startups and opening a new chapter in their lives, said Michał Olszewski, Deputy Mayor of Warsaw. 5 YEARS ON SMOLNA

Warsaw’s first business incubator, the Centre of Entrepreneurship Smolna (CES), is entering its sixth year of activity.

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

More than 10 thousand people have already benefited from its wide offer of free workshops, coaching and networking, led by the experts and lecturers who are well-known coaches, including Agnieszka Skala, Artur Kurasiński, Paweł Tkaczyk, Piotr Bucki and such institutions as Startup HUB Poland and Investin.

as those who plan to open a business can find out how to obtain initial funding, prepare social insurance declarations, protect commercial property and avoid problems with VAT. You can also open a business here incubator – 1,500 people took this opportunity over the course The centre offers 4 rooms and 40 desks of five years. for rental at preferential rates. At the moment, they are occupied by 11 compa- We really appreciate the support nies. Any company can apply for space we have been given here. We were in the incubator, provided it operates the first business in Warsaw to provide in the Mazowieckie Voivodeship and has car sharing services, i.e. rental of cars been on the market no longer than three by the hour. We started with 10 cars, but years. – It’s a great place to start off – you currently in Warsaw alone there are 300 rent a desk, you get access to the kitchen, such vehicles, said Paweł Błaszczak from all office equipment, conference rooms 4Mobility. and training, said Eliza Kruczkowska from the Polish Development Fund, THE LARGE BUSINESS ACCELERATOR former President of Startup Poland. A highly-effective way of building and The building also features three confe- refining new business ideas is running rence rooms – free for all who want an accelerator programme for startups to organise an entrepreneurship-related at their early stages of development, with only a product or service concept. event. Acceleration programmes allow scaling Young entrepreneurs have invariably up a business on a step by step basis – expressed high interest in CES specialist from a concept, through a prototype, legal, accounting and financial consul- to a product ready for exports. Over ting services, workshops and networ- 4 editions, as many as 250 startup teams king meetings. The owners of small from various sectors have benefited and medium-sized enterprises, as well from this activity.

In recent years a number of new places associating young entrepreneurs have appeared in Warsaw, such as Campus Warsaw, HubHuB, The Brain Embassy, Mindspace and The Heart. An estimated number of 100 business hubs (co-working spaces, entrepreneurship centres, incubators, etc.) currently operate in Warsaw.

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In 2017 as many as 15.3 thousand new businesses were established here and, according to the reports by the Startup Poland Foundation, every fourth Polish startup is created in Warsaw.

Warsaw Bankowy 3/5 Sq. 00-095 Warsaw Phone: +48 22 443 22 44; +48 22 443 22 20 e-mail: investinwarsaw@ um.warszawa.pl

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Warsaw has implemented the largest in Poland city acceleration programmes since 2015. The first WAW.AC was designed for the biology and biotechnology industries. Two editions of the Startup Hub Warsaw programme, intended for startups dealing with advanced communications technologies and the Internet of Things, as well as the Be Creative in Warsaw accelerator for the creative sector, took place in 2016 and 2017. This year’s #Warsaw_booster programme will feature 40 teams representing fintech and insurtech sectors. 30 mentors and representatives of 12 business partners have been invited to provide 600 hours of mentoring and business consulting.

know what their role is. The Smolna Centre has found its place in the area of helping to create and accelerate the development of businesses. Regardless of whether people want to open a greengrocer’s, a car wash or a startup, they can take advantage of training that will allow them to avoid basic mistakes. This is important for motivation and the wallet of beginner entrepreneurs, emphasised Konrad Latkowski from Startup Poland.

The City of Warsaw is the co-organiser and partner of events aimed at the exchange of knowledge and experience, as well as finding partners and investors. These include thematic workshops for representatives of the creative The first stage is the Startup Camp industries – Creative Mikser, Wolves workshop and the next one is pre- Summit – the biggest international acceleration, which comprises 4 weeks of workshops on verifying the market potential of products and services, creating value for clients and preparing pitch deck s. Qualification to the second stage depends on the assesment of a 5 -minute presentation delivered in front of the competition committee. 10 com- meeting of beginner entrepreneurs panies will go through to the second with investors in this region of Europe, stage and compete in the finals for the Innovative Economy Congress, PLN 100 thousand worth of awards. Pixel Heaven, Young & Innovative, the conferences of the Foundation for HOW ELSE CAN WE SUPPORT STARTUPS? Female Entrepreneurship, The Job and It is significant that the Smolna Centre Entrepreneurship Fairs, Hush Warsaw houses the Economic Development and Innoshare. Over the last 5 years Department responsible for actions over 30 thousand people took part supplementing the range of services for in 120 conferences and congresses. the SME sector. Economic promotion abroad, particularly during investment The concept driving our company is the trade fairs, advertising the potential creation of modular wooden objects of the city, including products designed that can be combined like Lego bricks. and manufactured in Warsaw, esta- In the course of our cooperation with blishing relations with investors ready the city we transformed from a sole to locate their investments here, and trader into a company that prepared supervision over company registration the final product. During this time we in the city, bazaars and marketplaces participated in more than ten diffe– these are only the most important rent training programmes and had of the Department’s tasks. the opportunity to present ourselves at the MIPIM exhibition in Cannes, said In building ecosystems, it seems impor- the owner of enJoiner, Agnieszka tant to me that all components should Bukowska.

MORE CITY INCUBATORS

The success of the first incubator led to further investments. Two years ago, the Centre of Creativity Targowa was opened as the first of a series of investments made by the city to support the creative sector. In the spacious modern building at 56 Targowa St. startups can use office, conference and co-working space, and take part in the events held there. In three years’ time another place for the creative sector will be established – the Centre of Creativity Nowa Praga. For many people, entrepreneurship centres are physical meeting places for the startup community, but for the sustainable development of the high-tech environment in Warsaw they are much more. This mainly involves an experienced team, a hub for Polish and foreign contacts and a showcase of how open and supportive the city is towards startups, which most often choose Warsaw over a dozen or so other capital cities in the region, said Maciej Sadowski from Startup Hub Poland. In recent years a number of new places associating young entrepreneurs have appeared in Warsaw, such as Campus Warsaw, HubHuB, The Brain Embassy, Mindspace and The Heart. An estimated number of 100 business hubs (co-working spaces, entrepreneurship centres, incubators, etc.) currently operate in Warsaw. The Centre of Entrepreneurship Smolna fits in well with this landscape by activating the entities operating within Warsaw’s ecosystem to develop Warsaw’s image as a strong centre attractive to foreign talent and investors. Photo: R. Motyl

The Centre is not going to slow down any time soon. Evaluation studies have been commissioned to help determine the development directions, package and functions of entrepreneurship support and the role and function to be played by the Smolna Centre.•

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TIME FOR CZESTOCHOWA Interview with Krzysztof Matyjaszczyk, Mayor of Czestochowa.

Outsourcing&More: How Czestochowa has changed for the past few years? Krzysztof Matyjaszczyk: The city has clearly changed, its landscape is changing, new large-surface production halls are being built, road infrastructure is still developing, new solutions in our communication system are emerging – it is visible. The mentality of the inhabitants is changing as well, thanks to their activity and tools in form of, for example, participatory budget which can have an influance on the city development. It is mostly visible for people who come back to Czestochowa after a few years of absence. There are more companies in Czestochowa and investors in our Special Economic Zones. Only in 2017, there were 11 zone tenders. At the same time, thanks to EU funds that have been obtained, the city could realize many strategical investments which had an influance on communication system and changing the image of the city. We prioritised things which help with changing the image of our city: being open to new investors, supporting entrepreneurship, building a modern road network, better public transport,

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creating new forms of help for residents (health programmes, support for families – including foster families, young parents and couples who want a baby). We want an effective usage of EU funds – its role in modernization of the city and realization of the social programmes is priceless. With public funds we are able to give voice to the residents by encouraging them to participate in further editions of the participatory budget or the local initiative of the residents. We owe that economic recovery mostly to comprehensive activities for investors, for example on Special Economic Zones. In 2014-2017, managements of both Zones in Czestochowa conducted, in total, 25 tender proceedings concerning grounds in Czestochowa and investors declared investments outlays for a total amont of nearly PLN 1mld 269 mln. These permissions result in formation of around 1,000 new ones and the maintenance of nearly 5,400 already existing job places in Czestochowa. The system of tax reliefs in our city results in forming over 500 job places. About 64% of the area dedicated for investments has already local spatial development plans, which include companies development

needs. Czestochowa is becoming an increasingly important centre of the automotive industry and the Polish Investment and Trade Agency (PAIH) considers us as a "rising star" of the business services sector. What are the main challenges that city is facing right now? Czestochowa focuses on sustainable economic development and building social capital based on extensive cooperation of urban environments: local government, business, academic or artistic. The city is expanding the base of small and medium enterprises, but there are also – thanks to special economic zones – new, large investments. We count on further development of tradition a l l y s t ro n g i n dustries in the city and location of shared service centers in Czestochowa. We will do everything to ensure that

Czestochowa is becoming an increasingly important centre of the automotive industry and the Polish Investment and Trade Agency (PAIH) considers us as a “rising star” of the business services sector.

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the development of the areas of special economic zones will bring optimal effects in the form of investment outlays, and also more and better jobs for the inhabitants of the city and the region. Movement in the zones is big, new plants are building new companies, further letters of intent are being made.

struction of the Polish Army Avenue – DK 1. We are also continuing the urban programme of street construction and reconstruction. Soon we will end the drainage of the Grabowka district and later – Kiedrzyn. We also intend to build interchange centers at railway stations. We perform thermomodernization of other public utilities – all of that An ideal solution for the city would also thanks to European support. be to cover additional, prepared areas with the status of “zone” The construction of a large communal plots. In other areas – we want to block is in progress, we are already plancontinue road modernization pro- ning another one. We are commencing grammes (including the construction of the next section district roads), im- of the road in the Katowice Special prove the comfort Economic Zone on Skorki, last year we of living in the city have completed a new road in the KSEZ and care for resi- in the area of Kusięcka and reconstrucdents, develop social tion of the bridge on Legionów Street. economy and voca- We do not forget about recreation. tional education, cooperation with Soon, we will finalize the construction non-governmental of the “Adriatic” leisure zone in Lisiniec o r g a n i z a t i o n s , Park. Recently, we had a presentation and expand social of the Water Park project, which will be participation. created in the vicinity of the municipal summer swimming pool (work will start Please tell me about this year). We are expanding the bicycle the most important infrastructure, we already have about current investments 80 km of bicycle roads in the city, this and p r o j e c t s year the Czestochowa City Bike system in Czestochowa. was launched. The most expensive investments are Last year 40 new buses arrived the recently com- to Czestochowa, we have signed pleted construction contracts for the delivery of another 12, of the extension as well as 10 new trams. We are beginof Bohaterow Monte ning the reconstruction of the older C a s s i n o Av e n u e part of the tram line. These are European to Dzbowska Street projects worth around PLN 215 million. and extension of the provincial In addition, we expand health road No. 908 (street: Dzbowska, programmes, we run EU socio-educatio­ Powstanców Warszawy, Goscinna), co- ­nal projects, we continue the program -financed from the European Union. of building multifunctional fields, we can also boast of modernization and There are also ongoing design and extension of the Hospital Emergency preparatory works for an even larger Department. EU road project – the extension of DK-46 – Główna and Przejazdowa What fosters development and innovaStreet along with the construction tion in Czestochowa? The very location of zones in the city of a bypass of St. Barbary to Pulaski Street. We already have an execu- is already associated with the devetion contract signed in the amount lopment of innovation because it is of 98 million PLN. We are also facing somehow inscribed in the activities another flagship road task – recon- of Special Economic Zones, and as

We will do everything to ensure that the development of the areas of special economic zones will bring optimal effects in the form of investment outlays, and also more and better jobs for the inhabitants of the city and the region.

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you know in the city there are two SEZs – in three locations. What is more, the City Council of Czestochowa at the end of 2016 adopted another resolution on real estate tax exemptions in the field of regional investment aid for supporting new investments for innovative entrepreneurs or the ones that are conducting research and development in the City of Czestochowa. A little longer we have a real estate tax relief for developers building in the B+ or higher standard, which aroused the interest of the industry. The DL Center Point office building built in the city in B+ standard, followed by further investments. The self-government’s cooperation with business and universities in the city is also interesting for the sector. The Faculty of Management of the Czestochowa University of Technology, after consulting with business circles, created a speciality: accounting in shared service centers. Students working on the SAP programme purchased by the city may find a job during the studies, eg. in the ZF TRW settlement center. The Czestochowa University of Technology starts with a specialization dedicated to the glass and ceramics industry, which is patronized by the city. The purpose of it is to educate staff, among others for Guardian, which puts another modern steel mill in Czestochowa. These are, of course, only examples of actions designed to development and innovation. These and other initiatives are part of the urban program of supporting entrepreneurship and job creation, prepared and adopted a few years ago. It is also necessary to mention the unconventional forms of city promotion or investment areas

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The Faculty of Management of the Czestochowa University of Technology, after consulting with business circles, created a speciality: accounting in shared service centers. Students working on the SAP programme purchased by the city may find a job during the studies, eg. in the ZF TRW settlement center.

(eg. street art festival in the economic the Shopping Centre, an IT Service Centre zone) which attract interest and positi- was established, and now ZF begins vely influence the image of the city. the construction of a new production plant (advanced safety systems) and What kind of companies decide to run another office building. Other compaa business in Czestochowa and what nies from Automotive industry are also encourages them to invest in this city? investing, the Guardian, which I already Czestochowa was and still is a city mentioned, invests in the technologically of enterprising people. Most of the com- advanced glassworks. panies investing in the city are domestic companies that decide on development, What encourages to invest? We have invest and relocate within the city. developed solutions related to the real estate tax reliefs, we prepared investmant In the Special Economic Zones invest also areas, we work so that planned investeforeign companies: German, French and ments, including new EU projects, will Italian. Those are mainly small or medium not only improve inhabitants’ comfort enterprises. The largest employer in of life, but also the possibilities of running the city is currently ZF (formerly TRW), a business in our city. a coporation operating in the automotive industry. After opening the new headqu- Entrepreneurs who will invest in Czestoarters of TRW Shared Services Centre chowa in areas of economic zones – accounting for almost all European in addition to statutory, partial exemptions company factories, enlargement from income tax on activities conducted of the Engineering Centre and within the special economic zone – can

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benefit from local tax relief, adopted by the local government, just for investors in zones. We always try to treat the needs of the business environment of Czestochowa as a matter of priority, in the scope of possible facilitations in administrative procedures or in planning urban investments that support the business environment and the development of business activity zones. At a time when many cities offer attractive properties to be developed, other advantages of the location become important. Entrepreneurs pay attention to the climate created by the city authorities. This is noticed by the business world and consulting agencies in Poland. We have already entered the rankings of attractive cities in terms of relocation prepared by recruitment agencies for specialist and managerial positions.

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Please tell me about employee activating programs, as well as projects which support young people in Czestochowa. Every year, for active forms of counteracting unemployment from the Labor Fund and the European Social Fund (ESF), the Poviat Labor Office in Czestochowa spent several dozen million PLN. Every year more and more people were able to cover various programmes, trainings, start-up grants or other forms of support. These activities, better situation on the labor market and the increase in the number of enterprises in the city contributed to the fact that we have the lowest unemployment rate in Czestochowa for

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15 years. This unemployment fell faster than in the country and the region on average. Very important thing for the city is supporting vocational education – that is why we create multi-professional classes, expand the workshop base and we have a vocational counseling system. We adapt the educational offer of schools to the local needs of the labor market. Schools increasingly sign cooperation agreements with entrepreneurs and meet their expectations. One of the largest projects implemented by the city is the „Professional cooperation” program (several million PLN from

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the European Union). With its help, we try to coordinate the system of education and apprenticeships and internships with various employers. This and other EU programs related to vocational education are implemented to create qualified staff, as well as to "directionally" retrofit our practical training centers and apprenticeships. We want young people who finish their education to be well prepared to enter the labor market in those specializations and professions that are particularly sought after. In turn, as part of the "Academic Czestochowa" programme, we support effective education courses for our students at universities, we equip workshops, we buy programs. We also remember about active "excluded" who can take advantage of the offer of social integration centres or become interested in participating, for example, in a social cooperative. What are the plans for the development of the city in the becoming years? Please tell me about the most important undertakings. The city’s development priorities focus on three strategic programs. The plan for the nearest future is the further optimal use of funds from the European Union in the current programming period.

be the purpose of the reconstruction the return to the labor market of heavily loaded urban fragments (eg. employment of nannies) and DK-1 and DK-46. improving the professional skills of Czestochowa residents. At the same time, we want to solve the problem of crossing the DK-1 with I believe that by consistently building Bugajska Street, we also developed urban infrastructure, creating favoa concept of connection over the railway rable conditions for entrepreneurs tracks of the Old Town with the city and improving the comfort of living in center. One of the key urban programmes a city, focusing on further development is also "Better Job Now". New jobs for of social economy and social participaresidents of Czestochowa were one tion, Czestochowa is still able to move of the priorities of our activities in recent towards good European models when years. We set a clear goal: new investors, it comes to the standards of urban life. new jobs, less unemployment. However, This is why we created the Direction now we have to fight for more, because Friendly Czestochowa, in which we now it is not just about jobs, but about focus, among others, on expanding making those jobs, which are available opportunities in a scope of more in the city, better quality. This is why we active, green and cultural city. I believe created the Better Job Now programme that these purposes will be supported which includes Fair Play Programme, by macroeconomic factors and will not the Better Workplaces Center and be hindered by politics. pro-development projects. Thank you very much.•

We prioritised things which help with changing the image of our city: being open to new tinvestors, supporting entrepreneurship, building a modern road network, better public transport, creating new forms of help for residents.

Under the slogan "Better communication", we implement investments that will make Czestochowa a city of equally friendly for drivers, passengers of public Better Job is one that meets expectatransport, cyclists and pedestrians. tions, gives satisfaction, a sense of sefety, enables development and fulfillment Finally, the city bypass is being of ambitions. We want the Czestochowa built, which is why our activities are labor market to be a market of socially heading towards the connection vulnerable employers who care about of motorway intersections with invest- their employees, knowing that it is their ment areas and the layout of the road largest capital. network in the city. This was the purpose, among others, of ex- That is why we offer reliefs, certificates pansion of the voivodship road No. 908 for reliable employers and, on the within the city borders, and this will other hand, programmes facilitating

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Urban planning in Kielce In general terms, it is difficult to identify one specific aspect of urban planning that would be the most important. The art of building cities – urban planning – is one of the most interdisciplinary branches of science.

In order to efficiently exchange information in Kielce, we have created an internet consulting platform (www.idea.kielce.eu), where we submit for consultations all current projects in the next stages of their preparation – it is important that local residents have a sense of real co-creation of the city.

After all, spatial management takes into account an incredible number of aspects, such as economic, financial, functional, infrastructural, cultural, sociological and social ones, as well as those connected with transportation, ownership or environmental protection. All these should be taken into account in a way that is equally intense, regardless of dynamically changing external and internal development conditions, political turmoil and inevitable but somehow justified conflicts connected with this “branch”, raised by various entities, groups and lobbies – including conflicts of private and public interest, often manifested in a very radical way. Each city has its own specificity, and each specific fragment of city space is characterised by various potentials and problems – hence each local spatial development plan is a different kind of unique and very complicated “puzzle”. In terms of the so-called “urban planning practice”, we are obliged to respond to current development needs by respecting the principles of sustainable development, basing on local traditions, values and potentials, as well as applying contemporary ideas, priorities and guidelines for urban design. Economic development must be accompanied by raising the quality of broadly-understood (natural and cultural) environment, care for resources for future generations,

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as well as social cohesion and justice – the modern city must be an egalitarian organism. As far as urban structure is concerned, this means: compactness, high population density, complete and comfortable technical and social infrastructure, and that related to transportation and services, as well as maximum multifunctionality (mixed land use) and creation of social mix. One more principle should be added to all these universal and important ones, which is definitely raised too rarely, i.e. the city should be, above all, BEAUTIFUL

embedded in local cultural traditions, rejecting discredited modernist urbanism and referring to traditional urban planning of a “compact and dense” city (neo-traditionalism – “newurbanism”). And here is a huge role of the so-called “urban design”, a landscape composition of the system of public spaces as a whole and shaping the strings and sequences of urban interiors whose walls are formed by the fronts and facades of buildings.

Each city has its own specificity, and each specific fragment of city space is characterised by various potentials and problems – hence each local spatial development plan is a different kind of unique and very complicated “puzzle”. as a whole (structure, profile) and in all its parts. Beauty is not a concept identical to that of “spatial order” regulated by our law, which should be simply considered as “orderliness”; beauty is something more ... Beauty is not measurable, it is an elusive and creative element which seems to be present in original decisions

This three-dimensional system, proportions and equipment of urban public spaces (available for ever yone) determine the visual reception of the city. Beauty is the opposite of unification, it is strongly associated with people’s sense of well-being, often forgotten or downplayed by us – especially when money comes into play. The beauty of space also has an enormous and underestimated economic dimension.

It should be mentioned that urban planning is only one of the tools used to achieve the objectives of the superior local government document, i.e. a development strategy – planning is therefore as effective as it allows to achieve specific objectives set out in this strategy.

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The greatest difficulty in urban planning is to obtain a social consensus for proposed solutions. Not only land owners have the right to take an active part in the procedure of drawing up local spatial development plans for a given area, but according to our law, just everyone. Urban planning is, by definition, a very conflicting matter, and the reconciliation of numerous, usually conflicting, particular interests and postulates is extremely difficult. Achieving full consent in this respect is practically impossible; during many years of my practice as an urban planner, I do not recall any case where a project of local spatial development plan achieved full, one-hundred percent, social acceptance.

Therefore, the role of urban planner is, apart from designing original structures being correct in terms of engineering, as well as functionally and spatially attractive – conducting the entire long-term urban planning process in such a way that the above-mentioned and often conflicting interests and postulates are reconciled as much as possible, without losing the quality of solutions. Apart from the issues of quality of the so-called “urban planning practice”, I think that the aspect of broadly-understood social consensus for developing the urban space is the most important and the most difficult one in the whole process. In this aspect, a very efficient and intense exchange of information among all stakeholders of spatial development plans during their preparation is of key importance. Year by year, we intensify the process of social consultations,

using various forms of communication; in order to efficiently exchange information in Kielce, we have created an internet consulting platform (www.idea.kielce.eu), where we submit for consultations all current projects in the next stages of their preparation – it is important that local residents have a sense of real co-creation of the city. We also take care for the city councillors (to whom final decisions belong) to be kept informed in detail about the course of work at each stage of the spatial development procedure. Urban planning in Kielce is approached in a very pragmatic way. The main objective is focused on qualitative development of the city as a whole, use of reserves and opportunities for change in already urbanised areas (equipped with infrastructure) and post-industrial

City Square in Kielce after revitalisation. Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

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areas which are currently changing their functions. We have selected with careful consideration new investment areas for development for the next several years, choosing them in such a way that expenditures for supplementing infrastructure are relatively low in relation to the planned increase in urban tissue. While implementing the principle of sustainable development, we make sure that the structure of urbanised areas of the city remains compact and is used intensively. We also strive to ensure that individual parts of the city have a maximally multifunc-

of City Development and Revitalisation; its structure also includes Investor Assistance Centre. It allows efficient and quick undertaking of consistent decisions at many levels, and simultaneously, effective support for many investments, regardless of their nature. In 2015, Kielce achieved the third place in the nationwide ranking of efficiency of construction administration, awarded by the Polish Association of Developers.

(i.e. resolutions on drawing up a local spatial development plan). Having such thoroughly prepared urban planning conceptions will allow the so-called “quick response” in case there will be a real need for drawing up a local spatial development plan. One such a pre-emptive study is the conception of developing the north-western part of the city, which in the coming years will most likely be the subject of intense urbanisation in connecWe started a new opening in spatial tion with the planned investments for management in Kielce from building the new streets of the main technical a solid base for these processes – we class. We are very focused on impro-

During many years of my practice as an urban planner, I do not recall any case where a project of local spatial development plan achieved full, onehundred percent, social acceptance; Achieving full consent in this respect is practically impossible.

Conception of developing Plac Wolności in Kielce (1st place in the urban-architectural competition); authored by Em4 Pracownia Architektury. Brataniec.

tional character. Multifunctionality of areas at the local level seriously reduces the need for migration (internal transportation loads), creates the desired diversity of space use and its landscape, as well as creates very flexible conditions for investors. mgr inż. arch. Artur Hajdorowicz, Urban Architect of the City of Kielce, Director of Department for City Development and Revitalisation at City Hall in Kielce, Mayor’s Plenipotentiary for City Revitalisation www.invest.kielce.pl www.mapa.invest. kielce.pl

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have created one of the best urban spatial information systems in Poland, which is consistently expanded with new thematic layers and data sets. This system greatly facilitates and accelerates urban planning considerations – a large part of this data (including urban planning) is publicly available via the Over the last years, about 50 local local geoportal (www.gis.kielce.eu), and spatial development plans have entered thus constitutes an excellent information into force, ensuring the development platform for residents and investors. of all possible functions for the near future. In Kielce, there is one City Apart from drawing up local spatial Hall’s unit which is responsible for development plans, more and more the processes of development stra- operational and variant urban planning tegy, economic stimulation, revitali- conceptions for selected areas of the city sation, urban planning, and construc- are being prepared – without launching tion administration, i.e. Department formal urban planning procedures

ving the quality of public urban space by implementing consistently projects of individual urban interiors. In Kielce, we do not forget about striving for this beauty – we inherited from the previous generations a city of extraordinary beauty, in internal and external landscape shots, where the cultural landscape permeates with the attractive natural landscape with high-quality natural assets. Natural and landscape assets create the quality of life in the city – this value, along with a very efficient internal transportation system, are among our advantages in competitive conditions of urban centres.•

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By all odds, office buildings concentrate around the New Centre of Łódź – multimodal railway station Łódź Fabryczna, attractive land prices and labour costs and also availability of skilled personnel provide good reasons to situate businesses in Łódź.

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Business requires an architectural setting Adam Pustelnik, Director of Investor Service and International Cooperation Bureau talks with Prof. Marek Janiak, Architect for the City of Łódź.

Adam Pustelnik: I think we are past the times when all one needed to conduct business was any kind of office, located anywhere, with no heed of modern urban standards? Marek Janiak: The most important thing in urban space planning is ensuring that this space will be coherently combined with its context – both when it comes to architectural form and urban structure, as well as functional coherence. This should also be the purpose of office buildings. “Glass houses”, the idea pursued in particular in connection with such buildings, lost its relevance long time ago. Modern office buildings must have a character that will attract investors, leaseholders and residents.

But in order to avoid monofunctionality of the area – which would be lethal for the city centre – the local land management plan for NCŁ has provided for varied functions and attractive public spaces, surrounded by miscellaneous activities. The industrial character of this place and the vicinity of beautiful, eclectic tenement houses support the development of the Metropolitan Area structure and supplement it in a healthy way.

put into use or being under construction, which benefit from their genius loci and unique design solutions, while preserving their historical character and bringing new life into these ancient walls, thus providing an inimitable opportunity to promote a given place and its authenticity. At the same time Łódź still has large empty spaces to offer downtown, which can accommodate new architecture sourcing from the language of the classical one. Unlike Vienna or London, where erecting a new building requires demolition of an old one. In Łódź buildings can still be raised on undeveloped plots in the magnificent surroundings of historicism and Art Nouveau.

Not only work can be organised optimally in the area, but people can spend their free time here. A healthy balance between professional life and economic matters allows middle management to locate their centres of vital interests right in the centre of Łódź, which is partiOver the last years we have witnessed cularly important for contemporary busi- So, we can say that this architectural a real boom related to construction nesses and their development. eclecticism serves Łódź well... Combining functions, which is of office buildings in our city – for instance in the area of the New Centre Another trend in the office indu- an innate feature of this city – as early of Łódź. Isn’t there any danger of cre- stry in Łódź includes revitalization as in the 19th century factories were locaating industry enclaves detached from and adjusting historical buildings ted right beside tenement houses, villas the urban fabric? to new functions. and factory owners’ palaces – encourages I am very glad that such builOffice buildings mean not only us to introduce a contemporary mixture of dings appear in Łódź. The city is new architectural designs, which not service, office, commercial, residential and now experiencing an investment bo- always can be harmonised with their cultural functions. It results in a mosaic om – communication functionality, surroundings, therefore many inve- of solutions distinguishing Łódź from the vicinity of Warsaw and attractiveness stors undertake to adopt historical other European and American cities of Łódź Metropolitan Area make inve- buildings (factories, villas, tenement rooted in the 19th century. This sense stors more and more interested. By all houses) to such functions. We can of “urbanity”, so particularly strong in Łódź, odds, office buildings concentrate around name many excellent examples in Łódź, has finally begun to attract capital and, the New Centre of Łódź – multimodal ra- such as Jakub Kestenberg’s palace com- preserving the existing harmony, we have ilway station Łódź Fabryczna, attractive plex at Sterlinga and Jaracza Streets, a chance to pay tribute to industrialists land prices and labour costs and also ava- Zenit at Sienkiewicza Street or Monopolis who created this city over a century ago. ilability of skilled personnel provide go- at Kopcińskiego Street. These are od reasons to situate businesses in Łódź. marvellous examples of buildings already Thank you for the interview.•

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Łódź still has large empty spaces to offer downtown, which can accommodate new architecture sourcing from the language of the classical one. Unlike Vienna or London, where erecting a new building requires demolition of an old one.

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Gdynia is developing with the participation of the tourism industry This occurs systematically as a result of the increasing tourism potential created by the city and with its participation, as well as by domestic and foreign entrepreneurs interested in investing in Gdynia.

According to a study of tourist numbers conducted by T-Mobile in 2016, Gdynia was visited in the summer by 1.5 million people from Poland and abroad, spending 2–3 days in the city.

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The tourist attractions are based on the city’s advantages, i.e. the centrally-located beach, marina, the modernist buildings of the city centre and the proximity to the Tri-City Landscape Park. These attractions indicate the types of tourism that are being successfully developed in Gdynia. Cultural tourism is currently dominant, offering specialized products which are enhanced every year, such as the Gdynia Modernism Trail, the Gdynia Maritime Legend Trail and the Culinary Route of Central Gdynia. The trail offers are complemented by cultural events, such as: the Polish Feature Films Festival, Open’er Festival

or sensational theatrical performances at the largest musical theatre in Poland (Danuta Baduszkowa Musical Theatre) and the Witold Gombrowicz Municipal Theatre with the famous summer stage on the beach in Orłowo. The coastal location of Gdynia, in the vicinity of the Tri-City Landscape Park, lends itself to the organization and popularization of various forms of physical activity, with the participation of both residents and tourists. Gdynia promotes an active lifestyle through projects including PKO Grand Prix Gdynia, four cyclical running competitions, Volvo Gdynia Sailing Days and Enea IRONMAN 70.3 Gdynia. Gdynia complements the offer of spectacular events by proposing industry events, specialist events, avant-garde and innovative performances for a smaller group of tourists and residents of all ages.

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These include: Gdynia Design Days, Blues In Gdynia, the tourism industry coopeFestival Gdynia and Globaltica Gdynia rates within the Gdynia Tourist Board, World Cultures Festival. involving about 50 entities, such as: hotels, museums, theatres, transThe recognizable Gdynia events are port and food companies, etc. This enhanced with subsequent events, sector observes trends on the tourism fitting in with the new trends, fashions market on an ongoing basis, eagerly and interests of contemporary tourists uses expert knowledge, participates visiting Gdynia in ever greater numbers. in specialist trainings and implements According to a study of tourist numbers innovative promotional projects. conducted by T-Mobile in 2016, Gdynia For whom and what is the purpose was visited in the summer by 1.5 million of the regular meetings, discuspeople from Poland and abroad, spen- sions and “brainstorms” undertaken ding 2-3 days in the city. by the GTB members and partners? They serve activities intended to create Together with a large amount of cultural an image of Gdynia as a “meeting place”, and sports events, hotel facilities are attractive for business and conference enjoying increasing interest among tourism, the so-called MICE. tourists, competition participants, people accompanying them and fans. Currently, A comprehensive list of Gdynia’s among 13 hotels in Gdynia there are conference possibilities is presented two-star to five-star hotels, chain and in the “Let’s meet in Gdynia” catalogue, private hotels, boutique, elegant and available online. It includes all the confeintimate hotels, with a magical atmo- rence facilities of Gdynia, their size and sphere and luxurious spa and well- hall equipment, also suggesting intereness. Demanding guests are impressed sting places and events to spend leisure by the coastal location, the high time. Among these, it is worth drawing quality and variety of services, attention to the Pomeranian Science as well as the professionalism of service. and Technology Park, Gdynia Arena, The range of hotels is complemented the halls of the Gdynia Maritime by other accommodation facilities, University and the Polish Naval Academy, such as hostels, villas and apartments. as well as halls available in the Emigration Their proven standard is strongly Museum, Musical Theatre and the Naval recommended by the City Tourist Museum. Gdynia invites business travelInformation Centre. lers to functional hotels with proven

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gastronomy, allowing one to combine business trips with leisure, so-called “bleisure.” Gdynia provides conference organizers with qualified staff of facilities, modern equipment, as well Gdynia City Hall as varied and sea-related opportunities Investor Support Division to spend leisure time. 10 Lutego 24 St. The planned and implemented development of Gdynia in the direction of MICE tourism requires new investments in 4- and 5-star hotel facilities, at the same time being unique with high and very high standards.

81-364 Gdynia Phone: +48 58 668 20 18 politykagospodarcza@ gdynia.pl www.gdynia.pl

www.gdynia.pl/turystyczna-eu

www.kulinarnagdynia.pl/ www.modernizmgdyni.pl/ www.legendamorska.pl

And still the advantages of the city are: its “freshness” – not only of air, the use of new technologies also in the operation of theatres, museums and sports facilities, and the availability of these places for people with disabilities and Gdynia’s seniors. The hospitable residents of Gdynia warmly welcome tourists at any time of year, and the local government is creating a favourable, stable economic atmosphere for investors interested in the broader tourism sector in the city with the cleanest air in Poland, perfectly connected and cooperating with Scandinavian countries. For this and more, we invite you to Gdynia.•

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We plan urban space for investments Lublin has been experiencing an investment boom since 2010, both regarding urban and business projects. Over eight years, the city’s budget has spent almost PLN 3.5 billion on improving infrastructure – both transport, economic and social. Along with the consequent improvement of the quality of life and work in the city, the Special Economic Zone Lublin Subzone has developed, and modern office buildings pop up like mushrooms. We talked with Mariusz Sagan, PhD, Head of the Strategy and Investor Relations Department at the City of Lublin, about the influence of urban planning on economic development.

Outsourcing&More: The last few months have been a significant period for Lublin – a new Urban Development Study is being prepared. What is the future of the city according to this plan? Mariusz Sagan: The new Study is a solid foundation for the further development of the city, whether it is infrastructural, economic or social. After all, the study is the primary document creating the spatial policy of the municipality, and all the local spatial development plans are created according to the study. A previous document of this type was adopted 18 years ago, even before the economy or cultural life in Lublin revived and, above all, before joining the European Union when the vast opportunities for co-financing projects from EU funds came to light. Hence the need to cre-

There is already 200,000 sqm of modern office space in Lublin, and another 80,000 sqm are under construction or planning, so we are sure that interested IT and BPO companies will find an ideal place for themselves.

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ate a new study, which will correspond Which of them have the most signito the metropolitan future of Lublin. ficant impact on Lublin’s investment attractiveness? What does this approach mean for First of all, works are underway the city? to close the inner-city ring road, thanks The changes taking place in Lublin to which the target shape of the three clearly show that Lublin confirms its ring roads: downtown, urban and express dominant position in Eastern Poland, – outside-urban – will be achieved becoming the only significant urban in 2019. The city’s southern bypass, which centre on this side of the Vistula River, would become the primary access point even on a European scale. According to the economic activity areas planned to the standard definition of metropo- in the south part of the city, is also litan areas adopted by the European in distant plans. These investments Commission and the OECD, Lublin is in transport infrastructure, together with the centre of one of eight such regions the expanding airport, will significantly in Poland, next to Warsaw, Katowice, improve Lublin’s transport accessibility Łódź, Kraków, Wrocław, Poznań and over the next few years, which is of great Gdańsk. In practice, this implies importance for future investments in any the need to prepare new areas for ho- sector of the economy. using development, to plan places for the development of sports, recreation What is the significance of social infraand public greenery, as well as new are- structure projects in this case? Do they as of economic activity. This is all in line influence the assessment of the city by with the idea of building a sustainable potential investors? city. To develop these new areas, public Of course. We must remember that investments are needed, which have every new investment is connected with already been consistently implemented new employees who spend at least twofor a long time. -thirds of the day outside the company,

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Thinking about the future of the city in the 2030 perspective, to which we are just beginning to write a development strategy, we do not forget about the current creation of appropriate conditions for entrepreneurs wishing to invest in Lublin.

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hence even the most modern office building or innovative production plant will not suffice in the current labour market, where the employee begins to dictate the employer’s conditions. In Lublin, we can be glad that for years we have been doing very well as a city in all rankings of the quality of life, and the indicators that define it have been improving year by year. We have a very highly valued, modern and low-emission public transport, an extremely active cultural environment, modern stadiums – athletics and football – and an aquapark with an Olympic swimming pool, and at the same time we are successively revitalising public spaces: The Saski Garden, the Litewski Square, soon the Ludowy Park and the Bystrzyca River valley. We are developing the cycling infrastructure and the Lublin City Bike network, thanks to which it is possible to use that infrastructure at any time. We are also preparing for two large interconnected projects, which will change the image of Lublin. In the coming years, an intermodal metropolitan station will be built in the vicinity of the present railway station, thanks to which this part of the city will change beyond recognition. The transfer of the station functions from Podzamcze area will allow creating a new Lublin’s showpiece in this representative place – at the foot of the Castle and next to the Old Town – following the best standards of urban space design. Lublin is planning new areas for economic activity, at the same time successively increasing the quality of life in the city with new investments. However, these are long-term plans. Is Lublin ready to welcome new investors now? Thinking about the future of the city in the 2030 perspective, to which we are just beginning to write a development strategy, we do not forget about the current creation of appropriate conditions

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for entrepreneurs wishing to invest in Lublin. The Lublin SEZ Subzone is already fully developed, but new industrial investors can still find proper warehouses and production facilities there. The situation in the modern office space market is similar, where there is a very stable supply of A class buildings. There is already 200,000 sqm of modern office space in Lublin, and another 80,000 sqm are under construction or planning, so we are sure that interested IT and BPO companies will find an ideal place for themselves. These buildings are built in very well-connected places, which creates very comfortable conditions not only for companies but also for their employees and guests.

opened, including well-known global brands, and three more large hotels are already under construction near the city centre. Now we are ready to welcome guests of internationally renowned festivals, business conferences or families visiting international students. So how would you summarise Lublin’s activities within the framework of urban space planning concerning new economic investments? For eight years, Lublin has been consistently pursuing a development path that takes into account the needs of the city’s inhabitants and entrepreneurs in a sustainable manner, at the same time taking care of the environment. Thanks to this, the city can offer investors a high quality of life in the city and space for business development, both in the service sector and in industry. This model of progress has been successful for us, so we do not intend to deviate from this path in the years to come.

As far as guests are concerned, the recent years in Lublin have been abundant in large international festivals, events and conferences. Increased tourist traffic, both recreational and business, has revealed a specific problem, which is the lack of hotel space. Did Lublin find a solu- Thank you for the interview.• tion to this problem?

The changes taking place in Lublin clearly show that Lublin confirms its dominant position in Eastern Poland, becoming the only significant urban centre on this side of the Vistula River, even on a European scale. Indeed, with the development of the city and the improvement of its image in the country and in the world, more and more tourists began to come to Lublin, including entrepreneurs visiting our city on business trips. While just a year or two ago on some days it was challenging to find suitable accommodation for business in the city, now also in this aspect we can see the significant changes that have taken place in the city. Several new hotels have been

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Szczecin focuses on the sustainable development of the urban structure Interview with Jarosław Bondar, Architect for the City of Szczecin.

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Dymitr Doktór, Outsourcing&More: What is the main priority for an Urban Architect when planning the city space? Jarosław Bondar: The main challenge, also faced by other cities, is to find a formula for sustainable development. Sustainable development is not only a slogan repeated all over the world, but mainly a need arising from the current state of the environment and its limited resources. This situation is in a way a "side effect" of the development of our civilisation. Both globally and locally in our city we focus on development as we are aware that high quality of life of the

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residents depends on many, often correlated factors. Back to "priorities". Without a doubt balancing two different needs, i.e. work and housing, is at the top of the list. To solve that issue through spatial design we need to reserve some space for housing and some space for business to create new jobs. It is important that just like in all other big cities in the world we see the effects of cities "spreading out" through intense, often very dynamic urbanisation of suburban areas. Recently we have been seeing a comeback of the idea of "living

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in the city", i.e. in the centre. For local governments it creates challenges related to ensuring the right standard of public spaces, in particular, to develop the available offering of cultural events and free-time activities. In that context we should mention a process that is important from the residents’ point of view – revitalisation – with regard to three aspects of city life: social, spatial and economic.

Recently we have been seeing a comeback of the idea of “living in the city”, i.e. in the centre.

Szczecin Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra named after Mieczysław Karłowicz can undoubtedly be called an architectural gem. Is the city planning similar investments? The new, multi-award-winning, successful Szczecin Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra completes a list of public investments such as the sports hall in Szafera Street, the new hall at the tennis courts in al. Wojska Polskiego and the "North East Marina" on Grodzka Isle. Szczecin has been successful thanks to the consistently implemented policy oriented at improving the quality of public utility buildings by relying on architectural competitions as a tool for choosing the best designs. In the coming years our city will enrich its offering by adding the new "Fabr yka Wo d y " Aq u a p a r k , the City Stadium named after Florian Krygier will undergo extensive reconstruction, Letni Theatre named after Helena Majdaniec will be completely redesigned, we are also star ting our preparations for the construction of the new Współczesny Theatre. In terms of the right-bank part of the city, important investments include construction of the Local Activity Centre in Podjuchy and of a branch of the Public City Library on Majowe Estate. Such important public investments as the award-winning Dialogue Centre – Przełomy, planned construction of the Maritime Museum – Science

An important issue from the perspective of spatial planning is to facilitate implementation of the concept of “sustainable transport”, increasing public transport, bicycle and pedestrian traffic in the centre.

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Centre and significant expansion of Polski Theatre strengthen the city’s offering and Szczecin’s position as a metropolitan centre – capital of the region – also in terms of transborder relations. Taking into account the city’s location by the River Oder, do urban development plans for Szczecin include development of its riverside boulevards? Public space improvements are high on the list of priorities. Pre-war solutions implemented in Chrobry embankments, Jasne Błonia, "Golden Route" squares and streets show just how important high-quality public spaces are in the city. Reconstruction of the boulevards has shown that the residents want to be in high-quality, well-designed spaces. Our activity in that scope continues in the form of ongoing reconstruction projects for Aleja Wojska Polskiego (section between Plac Zwycięstwa and Plac Szar ych Szeregów) and Aleja Jana Pawła II (bet ween Plac Lotników and Plac Żołnierza Polskiego), as well as a range of investment projects which involve substantial reconstruction of different streets and squares. An important issue from the perspective of spatial planning is to facilitate implementation of the concept of "sustainable transport", increasing public transport, bicycle and pedestrian traffic in the centre. Is the office infrastructure plan for Szczecin based on a central office hub or on buildings spread across different parts of the city? What does it depend on? The specific character of the investment market and the changing trends in global economy show that the intended use of land and property needs to be an universal as possible and open to increasingly fast changes. Moreover, concentrating on just one function or service in a wide area may have a negative impact on the attractiveness of the space from the perspective of different user needs.

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INVESTMENTS

The space of a modern city is a place where different functions and needs meet and coexist, supporting and supplementing one another. Construction of new office buildings is based on market needs, so we prepare the city to fulfil those needs, but we cannot directly impose such an obligation on the investor or land owner. Looking at this issue from the perspective of a current, ambitious project involving development of the area of Międz yo drze, including Łasztownia Isle, we assume that it will be possible for the area to ser ve office -related functions, but we do not impose such an obligation – leaving it up to the market and investors. When thinking about the city of the future, we want to integrate that part – centrally s i t u ate d l a n d s – into the living urban organism, creating an opportunity to introduce various functions which balance the needs of different participants in the urban space development process. Thank you very much.•

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HR NEWS

Devire is strengthening its Sales & Marketing recruitment division in the FMCG sector

He developed his career at various positions at IKEA in Poland, Sweden and Lithuania. Directly before joining the Colliers he worked as the Acquisition Manager in IKEA Centres Polska. He was responsible for business development and company’s investment plans. He supported the process of property acquisitions involving both single buildings and company’s real estate portfolios, including the acquisition of Wola Park in Warsaw. He cooperated with companies such as: EPP, Blackstone, Griffin Real Estate, Caelum, Immochan, Castorama, Acteum, Plaza Centers, MMG, IKEA. Dariusz graduated from Kozminski University in Warsaw, mastering in Business & Management. He completed Advanced Business Negotiation training organised by the Scandinavian Purchasing Group, Project Management and finance training at the University of Lund in Sweden. The Investment Services department at Colliers International advises on and coordinates transactions involving the sale and acquisition of property assets across major market sectors including office, retail, logistics and hotels. Its scope of services also includes asset management and value creation advisory, commercial due diligence and equity raising.

Marika Hartwich took the position of Principal Consultant at Devire recruitment agency, taking responsibility for the FMCG division in Central and Northern Poland. Marika has 7 years of experience in the industry. Previously she worked as an Associate Manager at Michael Page. Marika successfully coordinates recruitment projects to the Sales and Marketing departments for the consumer goods industry, with particular emphasis on the FMCG sector. She is a graduate of SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities.

Dariusz Forysiak promoted to director in the Investment Services department at Colliers International In the new role he will still be responsible for the development of the specialized Retail Investment business line within the Investment Services department, focusing on advisory in the purchase and sale of retail properties, building relationships with investors and retail operators active on the Polish market as well as new sources of retail-focused capital. Dariusz Forysiak has over 20 years of professional experience on the real estate market.

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New faces in Adaptive Group team!

In the first months of 2018, another group of talented specialists and managers have joined our Adaptive team to help us bring even better results for clients. – Aleksandra Pudlarz, F&A Consultant, – Robert Godziszewski, Program Manager, – Agata Opłatowska, F&A/HR Consultant, – Irmina Liczbik, Marketing Specialist & Content Manager.

The Adaptive Group team has been also strengthened with several new Junior Consultants hired to support our client programs and operations: Liliya Artym, Galyna Biletska, Agnieszka Gałązka, Anastasia Kotvytska, Szymon Litman, Aleksandra Owczarek, Ana Ubović, Antoni Wilkiel.

Paweł Nowakowski appointed as head of capital markets at Cresa Poland Paweł Nowakowski, an expert with twelve years’ experience in commercial real estate, has been appointed as Head of Capital Markets at advisory firm Cresa Poland. Paweł will lead the strategic and transaction advisory team in Cresa’s Warsaw office, advising clients on real estate acquisition and disposal in Poland and Central and Eastern Europe. He is a specialist in real estate portfolio management strategies focusing on restructuring and optimization. Previously, Paweł led a transaction and strategic advisory team in EY’s Real Estate Advisory department in Warsaw. He had also worked for both real estate advisory firms CBRE and King Sturge, and a strategic advisory company A.T. Kearney. Paweł is a graduate of the Warsaw School of Economics. He is also a property valuer and an MRICS.

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THE COW PEOPLE,


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or employer branding in the SSC industry On a current market, when most major companies offer almost exactly the same variety of products and services, the company’s brand, reputation and marketing communication become the decisive elements which determine its ultimate success or failure. For the SSC industry, employer branding plays a similar role as it does for companies selling salt or mineral water. The communication strategy and target customer groups define the category of the offer – are we a company selling regular mineral water to be drunk straight from a plastic bottler, or is the water sparking and should be served in wine glasses?

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People’s associations with the industry are often unflattering. It is perceived as a “white collar production line”, where work is boring and repetitive. Additionally, associations with the core brand often inspire SSC employees to speculate widely about the imagined “life on the top floors” of office buildings, which remain inaccessible to ordinary people.


CAREER & DEVELOPMENT

The analogy between employers operating in the shared service industry and those active on the mineral water market is based on several factors which constitute inherent features of both mineral water producers and shared service centres. The first of such features is the organizational structure of a typical share service centre, which constitutes in itself a direct indicator of career development opportunities available to employees. Depending on the range of business processes transferred from central units, career development offer in shared service centres varies horizontally, but almost never vertically. The typical career path leads from junior-level positions, through specialist- and senior-level posts, to such titles as team coordinator, team leader and ultimately area manager. The second distinctive feature is the re­­­ muneration policy, for which cost saving is one of the most important components, as it is, after all, one of the main reasons for transferring business processes to such countries as Poland. Newly-established centres are an exception to this rule. As the need to recruit employees very quickly, they usually offer remuneration which is higher than the market average. At least at the transition stage. The third distinctive feature is the shared service centre’s dependence, or rather independence from the core brand. On the one hand, recognisability of the brand and its products may be an advantage at the start, but on the other hand, in practice, employees tend to

demon­­strate a relatively low level of identification with the global structure. For example, they do not see any influence of “their” centre on the parent company’s business decisions. What is more, they are often convinced that they represent the “low cost country”, which does not create good conditions for facilitating brand identification and commitment.

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The last, but not least important feature is the image of the SSC industry itself, and job candidates’ low level of awareness of how it functions and what employers can offer. People’s associations with the industry are often unflattering. It is perceived as a “white collar production line”, where work is boring and repetitive. Additionally, associations with the core brand often inspire SSC employees to speculate widely about the imagined “life on the top floors” of office buil­ dings, which remain inaccessible to ordinary people. This image issue obviously influences the process of recruiting new employees. For those who already operate in the SSC industry, work in this sector is a good and, importantly, long-term choice. This is reflected in individual people’s professional decisions. Employees who already have experience in SSCs tend to move between different centres rather than change the industry.

apart from standard benefit package bought by the company in the form of a service. How did Arla deal with recruitment? Let’s start by saying that even though the Gdańsk centre had a recruitment tab on its corporate website, it was difficult to locate, as the website architecture was very complicated. Recruitment of candidates was done by means of traditional tools and channels. The recruitment processes were successful only because of the competence, ingenuity and commitment of Arla’s Talent Acquisition Team. However, although Arla has been active on the Tri-City employer market for more than a decade, it failed to raise awareness of its offer. If people had any associations with the business activity of the Gdańsk branch of Arla at all, they were usually connected not with shared services, but with Arla Appetina Feta, the first feta cheese cut into cubes available on the market.

When we take the above-presented factors into account, it becomes clear that employers have the best chance to attract most promising employees by focusing on such areas as: benefits, work culture, interpersonal relations and brand communication, both inside and outside A PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED During that decade, the Tri-City employer the organisation. market has changed a lot. New business ARLA GLOBAL SHARED SERVICES IN GDAŃSK centres began to spring up, some linked Arla Foods is a Danish cooperative and a global to much more recognisable brands, leader in the production and processing of milk all offering the same kind of job, but which opened its business centre in Gdańsk ten with better remuneration for new hires. years ago. During the first years of its operation, The risk of some of the employees the centre focused on handling financial and leaving Arla and the growing diffiaccounting processes, and recently expanded culty of acquiring new talent by means the scope of its activities to include also HR, IT of traditional channels resulted and procurement processes. in the need to rediscover the identity and culture of the company. Such rediscovery Over three hundred linguistically-gifted had to be supplemented by defining employees of Arla perform their duties on several the strategic framework for fighting floors of Neptune, the highest office building for the best employees on the market. in Gdańsk. Specially designed office space guaran- The main obstacle, identified at the very tees a lot of daylight and beginning, was the fact that potengreenery. The building tial job candidates had no awareness is also outfitted with of the employer’s offer and that the canditop-of-the-line furniture dates’ uncontrolled associations with and equipment – from the brand were misleading. It was notithe office chairs created ceable, for example, during the job fair, by the prestigious Kinnarps where visitors inquired about job offers brand, through electrically for sales representatives in the FMCG controlled desks, to a well- industry, and chemistry and biotechequipped kitchen. Such features as a library and nology graduates expected to find chill-out rooms with game consoles complete employment in the quality department the image of a perfect office. of the com­­ pany’s laboratory (think that this was what the company did). The brand The company’s Scandinavian roots affected also was associated with such keywords as: the company’s work culture and its approach breakfast, milk, meadow, cow and cheese. to the issue of social security. The company’s benefit and care policy is extensive and includes a number Therefore, the main challenge of the em­­­ of pro-health and pro-development schemes, ployer branding strategy was to build

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awareness of the company’s operations on the local market, establishing it as a financial centre which employs accountants with high level of language skills. The next step consisted in presentation of the employer’s brand attributes, that is, EVP (employment value proposition). ALL HANDS ON DECK

It is well-known fact that employees are the greatest asset in any employer branding campaigns, and the project’s success depends on their commitment. Therefore, Arla made sure that more than 120 of its employees (i.e. one third of the company’s human resources) got involved in the workshops which identified the strengths of the company, from member of the senior management and team leaders, through representatives of junior-, specialist- and senior-level positions, with varied levels of ex­­ perience in the organisation, to a group of “newcomers”, i.e. people who only recently joined the company. Each group had a task to do. The senior management defined the competence model for the future, combining it with the company’s business strategy. Operational staff prepared a list of benefits

of working at Arla, and the new employees focused on the external market perspective and associations with the company, as well as their role in the process of making decisions about applying for an internship or a junior position at Arla. The data collection process lasted a month, and resulted in defining four attributes of the brand which best reflect its character and simultaneously meet the expectations of target groups for recruitment. The developed communication strategy was then presented to all workshop participants during a special strategic session. The above-described actions were meant to get employees involved in the decision-making process, allowing them to influence the shape of communication of the company they are part of and giving them another reason to be proud of the workplace they create. The presentation of the strategy was also aimed at gathering feedback from employees and deepening their involvement in the project. The presentation of the strategy ended with a democratic and secret vote on scenarios communicating the employer’s brand and led to the first small success of the project – 100 percent of the employees, when presented with the choice between opting “in” or “out” of the further work on the project, indicated that they are “in”.

It is well-known fact that employees are the greatest asset in any employer branding campaigns, and the project’s success depends on their commitment. The main task of the employer’s external communication was to strengthen the awareness of the brand’s attributes among representatives of two groups of people. The students of the Tri-city universities and employees of other business centres in Poland who could be willing to move to the seaside in search of better work-life balance. There was only one question – how could the company do it, when social media, advertising space in city centres or even television, was already filled with messages from employers seeking employees? NOTHING VENTURED, NOTHING GAINED

identification and materials for social media (Facebook, Linkedin, Instagram, YouTube, and Vimeo), including videos which became the main tool for communication and employee engagement. More than 60 employees were engaged in the production of 5 videos and a photo shoot, and despite their lack of acting experience, they did a fantastic job. The first video: We Are Arla GSS (available on YouTube, Vimeo and on the jobs.arla.pl website) was viewed by nearly 100 thousand people within a month, causing over 10,000 reactions across social media platforms. HOW WAS THIS SUCCESS ACHIEVED?

In creating its message, Arla used both the typical stereotypes about corporations and associations with the brand of products for which it is known around the world. A large dose of humour and lack of self-seriousness allowed the company to invite its employees and viewers to imagine the answer to the following question – What would happen if Arla was a typical corporation?

The implementation of the employer branding strategy was divided into several phases, and began with building awareness of the brand itself and its attributes. It was a particularly important stage of the plan, because it verified feasibility of the implementation of all strategy indicators. New tools were prepared, including a new website, www.jobs.arla.pl, new recruitment ads, pos- Employees wearing suits and cow masks ters and leaflets, as well as a trade fair stand. presented a sad work environment in which The company developed completely new everyone is the same, politely fulfils their

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tasks, and interpersonal relations are kept to a minimum. The entrance of the courier, a man from the outside, breaks the status quo and triggers transformation of the employees. Corporate standards and rules are abandoned, showing the true face of the organization: young, energetic and open. The message of the video was as follows: “If you think that we’ve got cows working out strategies for selling milk – think again. We deal with finance the Scandinavian way.” And it was meant to encourage the viewer to reflect on their current job and look for more information about the company. The video created a large media and industry buzz, and it was reported on by, for example, the trojmiasto. pl portal and a HR-focussed blog for professionals, bardzoHR. It was also discussed at many conferences organised for HR practitioners. The university-focused part of the campaign, showing “corporate cows” turning into young, cool people, resulted in Arla immediately becoming a topic of conversation among students of finance and accounting. The fact that the video received a distinction in the prestigious EB Kreator 2017 competition in the “Best Image and Recruitment Video in Po­­land” category was just the icing on the cake.

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WE DEAL WITH FINANCE THE SCANDINAVIAN WAY! This is the main message of the employer branding strategy of the company, which is supported by four attributes (employer’s offer):

FLEXIBLE WORKING HOURS – that is the opportunity to work both in the office and at home, without a rigid time frame, focussing on achievement of specific tasks. This is one of the key arguments used in image and recruitment-focused communication aimed at target groups, which is also appreciated by its employees. It is also an expression of the employer’s trust in its people.

FAST CAREER – the company’s organisational structure allows to plan a career path from a junior-level post to a managerial position. Almost every manager employed at Arla started by working in a junior position, and promotions from one level to the next (especially from the entry level) can be planned within several months. The chance to quickly acquire new competencies is particularly important for one of the target groups defined in the strategy.

NO DRESS CODE ZONE – which means celebrating individualisms and abandoning typical corporate dress code customs. Everyone feels at home at Arla, enjoying their freedom and lack of unnecessary rules. It is also a feature which distinguishes the employer’s offer from that of other employers on the Tri-City market.

GREAT ATMOSPHERE – it is the emanation of both the company’s goodwill and the Scandinavian culture of the organization which is based on respect and partnership. A single visit to any of Arla’s integration events is enough to see what this attribute means in practice.

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PRESENTATION OF THE BRAND’S ATTRIBUTES

Szymon Motławski, Employer Branding Strategist and Creative Director at the employer branding agency Pracownia EB www.pracowniaeb.pl

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After the success of the first phase of communication, Arla switched to the EVP communication, starting with promotion of its flexible working hours. The phase consisted of three subsequent videos showing how flexible working hours support Arla employees, for whom work is just one part of their lives. The main message of this phase of communication was: “Some say it’s work-life balance. We’d rather say: flexible working hours put into practice.” One of the videos showed an athlete who regularly jogs with her friends and colleagues on the beach, another told a story of a romantic man who leaves work early to pick up his beloved from the airport (it was published on the Valentine’s Day (2018). The third video showcased a mother who organises her professional commitments in a way that allows her to attend the first theatre play put on at her children’s kindergarten.

All these materials can be viewed on the company’s YouTube channel: Arla GSS. Emotions and authenticity of the message have brought great results. The second phase of communication achieved more than 150,000 views of video materials and thousands of social media interactions, but also moved to tears Arla’s Danish CFO (herself a mother, she emphasised with one of the videos’ characters). Both phases of the implemented strategy reached more than four million Internet users, and Arla, despite focusing on image-building activities (rather than recruitment), received over 1,000 new applications for various open positions. Arla’s employer branding strategy has also been recognized by the jury of the Employer Branding Excellence Awards. The company received a distinction in the “Best Employer Branding Strategy in Poland” category, beating many more powerful brands, not to mention its competitors from the SSC industry.

TO BE CONTINUED

As I’m writing this text, Arla is preparing for implementation of the third phase of communication, the effects of which can be tracked on the brand’s social media. Still, even at this point, Arla’s experience can be treated as an example of effective planning and implementation of employer branding activities, and the company itself can be a role model for other organisations, including ones from outside the SSC industry. It is also a proof that EVP is effective when it reflects the DNA of the organisation and is not just a made-up marketing slogan which lacks credibility. SPECIAL THANKS:

Exceptional projects are made possible by exceptional people. The members of the Talent Acquisition Department of Arla GSS deserve special thanks to their open-mindedness, expertise and outstanding professionalism. This applies in particular to: Ania Gugała, Joanna Grzegorzewska, Patrycja Spinek, Magda JurkowskaBogusz, Kasia Komorowska.•


L E T ’ S M E E T AT

T h e B S S To u r Często c h owa

THEME

Organizer:

Employer Branding in services

DAT E

VENUE

September 27th, 2018

Czestochowa

www.bsstour.com


CAREER & DEVELOPMENT

Leadership is a privilege – a lesson for young managers Every day, there are more and more managers in Poland. In the outsourcing sector itself, nearly 20,000 team leaders, operational managers and senior managers are struggling with high employee turnover, looking for ways to engage their people and they often expose themselves to solitary coping with stress and everyday challenges. Being a manager is a responsibility. However, it is also a kind of ennoblement, because employees basically consider their supervisors as a direct representative of the company. How, then, to realize yourself and at the same time meet the needs of employees so they want to stay with us?

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CAREER & DEVELOPMENT People come to the company, but they leave the boss – surely every leader knows this truth. By taking a managerial position, you get responsibility, but also a great benefit of the doubt. Unfortunately, only a few companies prepare employees for the role of a boss. The most often promoted are those who are reliable, active, showing initiative and at least seems to at first glance that more than others are involved. Rarely are they people who have achieved a really high level of understanding not only of business but also their role as a boss. And even more rarely, the organization presents to the promoted employee the full scope of the goal and expectations of the given position. In this way, the young manager bases his work on imagination, experience with his own superiors and what he thinks is right.

Recently, I have suggested to the client a reduction in the number of integration events a year. Such activities can reduce discomfort, be entertaining, cause that employees will not hate their work. However, it does not make their job a dream job. Therefore, we put the cart before the horse mean – instead of expanding the leadership function and preparing employees to be leaders, we invite everyone for the next events, believing that they will improve relations and engagement. I have written many times about the need for competence as one of the most important needs of every human being. As a reminder – this is the desire to feel their own effectiveness and to feel a sense of the taken actions. Thanks to this you are interested in your own activity, open to new experiences and willing to learn new things. So how do “games and fun” or colorful offices ensure this need?

The results of the exit interview, which I carried out over the years, show that in almost half of the cases the reason for leaving the company was the attitude of the manager. In addition, the results CREDIBILITY MAKES A DIFFERENCE of the oldest organization of public I recently did a small experiment. opinion research, the Gallup Institute, show that almost 60% of the population I asked a question, to over a hundred have trouble sleeping because of their seminar participants, who likes relationship with the supervisor. Being to know why they are doing something. As you probably guess, a boss is a responsible job, burdened I saw a show of hands. You are with risks and requiring work over and with yourself. And this is not about psychological gibbering, but about the fact that you can communicate, choose responsibilities and build relationships based on your and your employees’ strengths, so that people will love their work. Especially that the vast majority of us really want to work and they like their work. PUTTING THE CART BEFORE THE HORSE MEANING

a broader context. “My employee, I will transfer him myself” – that is how one of the managers justified his decision to change the scope of duties for his subordinate, who was informed about new tasks by e-mail without being able to comment on this topic. Information is necessary to give people choices, and this is the foundation of effective leadership. Mahatma Gandhi said that at one time muscle strength was enough, today you have to get along with people. So, the point is to develop a set of competences that will make people follow you. Here, the basis is trust and credibility. You will not build this one through a single meeting, message or the above-mentioned integration event. In fact, it will be a long and endless process. This is one of those things that you have to constantly strive for. “THEY DO NOT KNOW WHAT THEY ARE DOING, THEY DO NOT KNOW HOW IT WILL BE ...”

That’s what Muniek Staszczyk and Ziemowit Kosmowski sang about. This is a song about newlyweds – it is supposed to be funny but it is a bit scary. At the same time,

People come to the company, but they leave the boss – surely every leader knows this truth. By taking a managerial position, you get responsibility, but also a great benefit of the doubt.

I like my research and I often go deeper into the results of the latest analyzes. However, reading the above data, and adding that only 8% of the society has a dream job, fills me with fear. Because in the end our children will also go to work and will also have a boss, and perhaps later they become bosses themselves. Is really the condition of Polish probably wondering how it is with management so bad, then? Well, it’s you now. I bet you are also one not about evaluation but about understanding the causes of the current situaof those for whom sense of meaning tion. On average, once a month I receive and purpose is a condition of motivainquiries about motivation trainings and tion and commitment. It is so obvious employees’ engagement building trainthat up to unbelievable, how often ings. By consulting and implementing we forget about it. Bosses happen development programs, I also observe to forget that they are dealing with that corporations have huge possibilities people the same that they are. They and budgets for improving social condimake decisions and commission tions, further benefits and entertainment. tasks without justification, without

this nonchalant joy, happiness, hope and conviction about the rightness of a young couple’s decision reminds me of the emotions and experiences that accompany a young manager. And then comes life and it turns out that working with people is one of the biggest challenges in life. I work with experienced managers and management on a daily basis. They know very often how hard work and the number

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of challenges comes to a position when people follow you not because you have power, but because you let them grow. That is why, we are building programs for beginning leaders increasingly. Smart organizations know that the condition of managers determines the condition of employees. Here the metaphor of family life is hit – we are more and Monika Reszko, more conscious parents. We know that it Communications Expert, is up to our decisions, the way we bring Business Psychologist up and the time we devote to building relationships with children. As a boss, a leader you also take responsibility for the well-being of your people. Yes – they are adults, so they are also responsible for themselves. However, the deeply rooted sense of hierarchy and “place in line” means that before your employees surprise you with their creativity and competence, you will first have to reach them.

THE PROPER LESSON – 4 STEPS Leader’s identity The boss’s responsibility and challenges are fantastic experiences and space for self-development. In order to draw from this fact a satisfaction and pride, determine what kind of boss you want to be? What do you want people to say about you? How do you want them to feel with you? By answering these questions, you define yourself, your leader’s identity – a kind of brand that others will love. The relationship and trust that employees give is the best compensation for the effort you need to make to be the boss you would like to have. Ask for help At the moment of promotion, something strange happens in your head – suddenly you feel like you have to know everything, and in addition, do everything by yourself. Even being a boss, remember you are still an employee and, above all, a human being. Look for a mentor, refer to your own authorities, ask questions and take advantage of the involvement of your people. And while deciding on a promotion, establish a development plan with your superiors, implementation time and rules on which you will learn new responsibilities.

AS YOU WISH

I know it is summer and you would like to read something light, and here is a serious topic and still so common. However, half of the year and a favorable holiday climate is a good time for reflection that only sophisticated management tools and techniques are not enough today. The standards are already well-developed. Time for a human factor and a personalized approach to the employee. This, however, starts with the approach to yourself – your goals and values. So, if you are struggling with the challenges of a young manager, let this holiday time inspire you to define your role, define yourself as the boss and set a plan to reach the point where people will fight to be in your team. There is no one effective way to be a leader, but being a boss is really a privilege.•

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Not everything HR This function has gained its deserved rank and role in the whole management process. However, for me it is a function that meets the needs of leaders. Therefore, do not wait for someone to guess that you need support, training or additional tools to develop yourself or your employees. Report them, share your thoughts, regularly meet with your HR Specialist and build synergies that will not be experience but status. Remember, you will go faster on your own, you will go further with someone. Monitoring More and more often I feel that being a boss just not happens, the man becomes a boss. It is continuous development and internal changes that result in external results. Therefore, observe, formulate goals and monitor their achievement. Adolescence is rarely pleasant for a teenager. Adolescence in becoming a boss can be not only pleasant, but above all conscious. Take advantage of this and enjoy every success. Pride and satisfaction are the best motivators. And when you develop it in yourself, you can easily give it to others.

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018


CAREER & DEVELOPMENT

Recruitment of specialists in IT industry Interview with Magda Staniszewska, HR Business Partner at ESKOM.

The position of HR Business Partner in an IT Outsourcing&More: How long have you been HR Business Partner? company is a big challenge. The market is Shortage of talented people Magda Staniszewska: I have been involved commonly claimed to lack IT talents. Is it alis a challenge for each and every company. When in HR since 2010; for 4 years I have managed so a challenge for ESKOM? working in the IT field, the team and the HR department. At ESKOM Shortage of talented people is a challenge you have to keep in for each and every company. When working mind what is considered I have been engaged since March. Previously, important: clear and I worked as Recruitment Team Leader in a recruin the IT field, you have to keep in mind what is smooth communication, itment agency and an IT outsourcing company. considered important: clear and smooth comopenness and munication, openness and individual approach. individual approach. ESKOM has been developing dynamically, every Looking back at your professional history, month new people join the company. Of course, what has made and contributed to that fact these processes are not always easy. When lothat you choose your place in the world oking for specialists, we try to focus on people’s of HR, that is IT HR to be precise? individual needs and aspirations. The issue HR was my dream career path. It was alreof remuneration or benefits is similar in that kind ady during my studies that I knew that I wanof companies. The key is to keep a specialist, ted to get into it in the future. My internship in the recruitment agency was the first bregain mutual trust, communicate clearly, have akthrough. I remember my first day at work a good atmosphere and talk honestly, even in difficult situations. during the internship; the company was organising a big conference and I was sitting at the   We know that, apart from the internal reception. The Head of HR, Google Poland appeared in the door and I got a chance to medemand for IT staff, ESKOM has also entered IT contracting and has been conquet him and talk with him for a while. It made ering international markets. How do these a great impression on me. It was my first job in the business. All the people I met there, new initiatives get reflected into the area of HR management? good atmosphere at work and opportunities to develop convinced me that this career path   We try to think globally and act localwas the right choice. ly. Apart from the office in Warsaw, we have The second breakthrough was made by my our unit in the UK and we plan to expand to the German and American markets. first recruitment project for a large insurance In terms of development of our Staff, in adcompany. I remember that it was for the posidition to career paths, we provide them with tion of a Java Programmer. I had to prepare opportunities to improve their knowledge myself very thoroughly for this recruitment of foreign languages and run IT certification – get to know the technologies, prepare paths. We also take care to keep the workthe questions. It required a lot of my -life balance. At ESKOM we promote physicommitment; the screening process itself cal activity; we even have our own cycling was successful. and bridge teams.  

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If you had been able to predict the future, what do you think would be crucial in the area of HR management in the coming year or years? I would very much like to have that ability. Much is said about automation and robotics in the area of HR which undoubtedly is to improve the work of HR staff. However we should remember that a HR department should always be dedicated to its Staff and Candidates, have a human face and time for talents.

Finally, we would like to ask a question related to your job position – what in your opinion should a person who would like to lead a HR Department in an IT company turn her attention to? And is it an easy and enjoyable work? When working with people, relations, talk skills, empathy and accountability for set goals are the key. Be able to anticipate risks and focus on solving problems and resilience to emerging difficulties is also relevant. The role of a manager is to set the course of action and lead his/her team to carry out tasks entrusted to them, provide them with support at difficult moments, be a mentor when mistakes occur but still remain a member of the team. Thank you for the interview.•

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

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Recruitment ad RECRUITER:

CONTACT: MARIANNA.SWIDERSKA@HRK.PL

SERVICE DELIVERY DIRECTOR (Salary: 40,000 – 50,000 PLN/m gross)

You will be responsible for: • • • • • • •

Cooperation with Delivery Managers (locally & globally) to ensure smooth delivery and customer as well as employee satisfaction, Establishing and maintaining strong professional relationships with senior stakeholders, Responsibility for monitoring the quality of the services delivered, Developing and driving a high performance culture across the team, leading people through a number of Team Leaders, through development of objectives and targets for performance and career development, Manage finance and administration operations, Prepare budgets, manage P&L and associated components like utilization, expenses, etc. as per budget, Coaching and mentoring employees.

Your profile: • • • • • •

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Experience gained in a SSC/BPO on similar position in a dynamic, multinational environment, Good understanding of Service Centre & Business process Outsourcing business, Leadership skills are mandatory along with good Management skills, Functional knowledge and experience in Finance & Accounting would complement the management skills, Fluent English and Polish is a must have, Short travels within Europe might be required.

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018


CAREER & DEVELOPMENT

Recruitment ad RECRUITER:

CONTACT: ANNA.FEDEROWICZ@GRAFTON.PL

BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE FINANCIAL ANALYST (Salary: 14,000 – 18,000 PLN/m)

Main duties: • • • • • •

provide SQL support for data extracts (regional accounting systems), design, develop and test new reporting requirements and tools, cooperate with finance and global integration teams, produce formats and templates (global key clients), create dashboards and reports, provide BI recommendations.

Requirements: • • • • • •

min. 2–3 years of experience and proficiency in working with spreadsheets, databases, busines intelligence and analytical tools e.g. (not all are required): spreadsheets (Excel, VB), databases (Access, Oracle, SQL Server, DB2, MySQL, ODBC), reporting (Crystal Reports, SSRS, Brio, Cognos Report Studio), business intelligence: SSIS, SSAS, SSRS, MDX, PowerPivot, Power BI, OLAP, ETL), fluent English.

Outsourcing&More | July – August 2018

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L E T ’ S M E E T AT

T h e B S S To u r Byd g oszcz

THEME

Organizer:

F&A with no secrets

DAT E

VENUE

September 11th, 2018

Holiday Inn Hotel,

Tuesday, 9 a.m.- 7 p.m.

36 Grodzka Street

www.bsstour.com/bydgoszcz2018

Outsourcing&More 41 July-August 2018  

July – August edition of Outsourcing&More we have dedicated to urban topics, office environment and comfort at the working spaces. But not o...

Outsourcing&More 41 July-August 2018  

July – August edition of Outsourcing&More we have dedicated to urban topics, office environment and comfort at the working spaces. But not o...

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