Greenlee Glimpse - Winter 2019

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G R E E N L E E S C H O O L O F J O U R N A L I S M A N D C O M M U N I C AT I O N AT I O WA S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y WINTER 2019

GA ME CH A NGE R Ex p lor ing possibilitie s i n digit al m e dia

RADIO WAV E S L a n d i n g a p r e s ti g i o u s pub l i c r a d i o fe l l o ws h i p

POL IT IC AL I N T E R E S T U n d e r s ta n d i n g a r e c o r d -b r e a k i n g e l e c t i o n


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IN THIS ISSUE 03 FROM THE DIRECTOR

17 HIGHEST HONOR

Read a message from Greenlee School Director Angela Powers.

The Greenlee School recognizes alumnus William F. (Bill) Tubbs with the 2018 James W. Schwartz Award.

04 TODAY AT GREENLEE

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Check out recent news, notes and other highlights from students, faculty, staff and alumni.

18 MAKING RADIO WAVES

08 WEATHER REPORT

20 VISUAL GUIDES

Senior Jacob Vos’ creative use of social media has made him a go-to source for weather info on Iowa State’s campus.

Meet Greenlee School Advisory Council member Kelly Schmidt, who has made a career with Getty Images.

Henry Zimmerman is the first Greenlee alumnus to land NPR’s Kroc Fellowship.

10 POLITICAL INTEREST

21 COUNCIL HIGHLIGHTS

Assistant Professor Kelly Winfrey’s research explores the intersection of women, politics and communication.

Hear the latest from the school’s Advisory Council and alumna Kim Guthrie’s advice shared at the fall 2018 Futures Forum.

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20 IN STEP WITH LAURA WITZLING

Supported by a Greenlee scholarship, Lester Mwirichia has found his niche in sports media with Cyclones.TV.

New faculty member Laura Witzling brings expertise in public relations and a research interest in food topics.

ON THE COVER

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101 Hamilton Hall 613 Wallace Road Ames, IA 50011-4010 515-294-4342 greenlee@iastate.edu greenlee.iastate.edu alumni.greenlee.iastate.edu

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Lester Mwirichia interviews Jon Schaben (‘87 animal science) at the West Virginia football game on Oct. 13, 2018, for a “Cyclone Tailgate of the Week” feature for Cyclones.TV. Photo by Gabe Altier

EDITOR Maria V. Charbonneaux GRAPHIC DESIGNER Hannah Gasper, junior in graphic design STAFF WRITERS Tara Larson, senior in journalism and mass communication Molly Olson, ’18 public relations STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Gabe Altier, junior in journalism and mass communication SPECIAL THANKS TO Deb Gibson, senior lecturer

Iowa State University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, ethnicity, religion, national origin, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information, sex, marital status, disability, or status as a U.S. Veteran. Inquiries regarding non-discrimination policies may be directed to Office of Equal Opportunity, 3410 Beardshear Hall, 515 Morrill Road, Ames, Iowa 50011, Tel. 515 294-7612, Hotline 515-294-1222, email eooffice@iastate.edu.


C L AS S NOTES Are you curious what your classmates, friends and former instructors are up to? Go to alumni.greenlee.iastate.edu/ F18ClassNotes to read the latest updates from alumni and friends.

HAVE NEWS TO SHARE? Visit alumni.greenlee.iastate. edu/ClassNotes to submit your updates any time. We’ll include them in our next digital issue. Photo by Christopher Gannon

D E A R G R E ENLEE SCHOOL ALUMNI AND FRIENDS, Legacy and digital-born media, along with journalism and communication educational programs such as ours, are in the business of presenting factual information and are critical in today’s society. Here at the Greenlee School, our educational mission of providing students with the necessary tools, skills and technology for seeking truth and telling stories guides everything we do. One way we ensure the success of our students in the face of societal and technological change is to align with industry professionals and create partnerships with alumni and experts in our fields. This fall was no different. In early October, we welcomed Kim Guthrie, the president of Cox Media Group, as our Futures Forum speaker. Guthrie relayed the importance of professional behavior in the competitive workplace. We also presented the school’s first named faculty fellowship, the Allen Essman Faculty Fellowship, to Associate Professor Joel Geske. Denise Essman, who established the fellowship in honor of her late husband, and other members of our advisory council were in attendance for the ceremony. The Greenlee Advisory Council, with Rick Phillips presiding as chair, addressed the strengths of the undergraduate program. A few weeks later we presented Bill Tubbs, Greenlee alumnus and publisher of the Eldridge North Scott Press, the 2018 James W. Schwartz Award for his continuous support of the school and excellence in community journalism. In addition, several of our alumni and business associates, including Art Slusark and Dave Kurns, Meredith Corp; Dan Winters, WHO-TV; and the late Henry Ong, an international

playwright, were recognized at the LAS Honors and Awards Ceremony during Homecoming Week. In December, we gained momentum in planning our second Greenlee Summit. Our theme is communication and civility in our democracy. Given the current political environment, the Summit is expected to double in size and engage more students, campus programs, industry and alumni. We will learn how media, advertising and public relations will be used in the 2020 election and their role in influencing society. Watch for major keynotes and industry panels to be announced soon for the event to take place Sept. 5-6, 2019. You won’t want to miss this. Finally, plans are underway to enhance our technology offerings and create space where we can openly teach multimedia by telling stories across platforms using video, graphics, apps and social media. With this edition of Greenlee Glimpse, we hope you will share in our excitement for these and all our initiatives and become even further engaged. Thank you for helping make our program great and helping us provide the best possible education in advertising, journalism and mass communication and public relations.

ANGELA POWERS, PH.D. Director and Professor Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication powers@iastate.edu GREENLEE GLIMPSE 3


TODAY AT GREENLEE

CHECK OUT RECENT HIGHLIGHTS FROM STUDENTS, FACULTY AND ALUMNI. STRATEGY FOR SUCCESS

L i n d s e y M o o r, l e f t , a n d A s h l e y K i r k p a t r i c k participated in a national media plan competition in D.C. Courtesy of Michael Wigton

Ashley Kirkpatrick, senior in advertising, and Lindsey Moor (’18 public relations) were the first runner-up team in the Washington Media Scholars Foundation’s Media Plan Case Competition in June. The duo was one of six teams to present a media plan for a multimillion-dollar arts funding promotion, including strategies to increase funding, infrastructure and attendance for a fictional city’s cultural association. While in D.C., they also visited agencies, political consulting firms and media outlets. Associate Professor Jay Newell organizes Greenlee teams to participate in the annual competition.

EXPRESS YOURSELF JOIN US FOR THE 17TH ANNUAL FIRST A M E N D M E N T D AY S C E L E B R AT I O N I N A P R I L . F O R A S C H E D U L E A S D E TA I L S B E C O M E AVA I L A B L E , V I S I T G R E E N L E E . I A S TAT E . E D U / F A D .

IMPROVING SMARTPHONE PHOTOGRAPHY SKILLS Relying on the idea that “the best camera is the one that you have with you,” a new class shows students how to make better photos with their smartphones. Associate Professor Dennis Chamberlin proposed the course after seeing a growing need for journalists to illustrate their own stories. He led the first iteration of the class for students studying abroad in Urbino, Italy, in spring 2018. Students posted their photos on Instagram using the hashtag #cyclonesinurbino18. In fall 2018, Fundamentals of Mobile Photography was offered online and covered the basics, including lighting, composition and image-editing software.

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Students studying abroad in Urbino snap a selfie on a bridge i n t h e L e M a r c h e r e g i o n o f I t a l y. P h o t o b y D e n n i s C h a m b e r l i n


DID YOU KNOW? THE GREENLEE SCHOOL HOSTS AN INTERN BLOGGING COMPETITION EACH SUMMER. READ S T U D E N T S ’ F I R S T- P E R S O N P O S T S A B O U T T H E I R I N T E R N S H I P E X P E R I E N C E S AT G R E E N L E E . I A S TAT E . E D U / I N T E R N B L O G .

Café B owner Claudio Gianello, left, and Lexi Romitti

CAMPAIGNING FOR IOWA’S BEST BURGER Café Beaudelaire, a Brazilian-inspired Campustown staple, secured the title of “Iowa’s Best Burger” in 2018 with the help of students in Senior Lecturer Erin Wilgenbusch’s spring 2018 Advanced Public Relations Campaigns (PR 424) course. PR students Lexi Romitti, Audrey Nelson, Alfred James Spaulding, Left to right: Denise Essman, Joel Geske and Angela Powers at a r e c o g n i t i o n c e r e m o n y i n O c t o b e r. P h o t o b y M a r i a C h a r b o n n e a u x

Harrison LaGambina and Maddie Hocking developed a campaign that would increase awareness of the restaurant and bring in new customers.

JOEL GESKE EARNS GREENLEE’S FIRST NAMED FACULTY FELLOWSHIP Associate Professor Joel Geske is the first recipient of the Allen Essman Faculty Fellowship made possible by Denise Essman (’73 marketing). The fellowship— the first of its kind at the Greenlee School—honors a faculty member who has demonstrated excellence in advertising and/or public relations education. Denise Essman, who is a Greenlee School Advisory Council member and longtime supporter of Iowa State University, established the fellowship in honor of her late husband, Allen, who was an instructor in advertising and photography at the Greenlee School from 1969-1972. He passed away in 2010 after a distinguished career in advertising. Allen K. Essman (’69 psychology, ’72 M.S. journalism and mass communication) was a copywriter for Meredith Corp. and Creative Director for Wesley Day Advertising prior to partnering with Denise in 1977 to establish Essman/Associates, an integrated marketing communications company, and Essman/Research, a qualitative and quantitative research firm in Des Moines. “Allen Essman was very well-respected in the advertising community, and I’m honored to receive this fellowship in his name. I also really appreciate the opportunities this support offers. These types of gifts really let the school go beyond everyday curriculum and provide enrichment to faculty who can bring this knowledge back to students,” Geske said. As part of the fellowship, Geske is learning about virtual reality and 360-video production along with ways to implement them in the classroom.

When the Iowa Cattlemen’s Association and the Iowa Beef Industry Council began accepting nominations for best burger, the students channeled their efforts to the competition. They conducted research, planned “Burger Bash” events and created flyers and social media content to earn votes from the public. With support from its customers, Café B advanced to the taste-testing round, and its handmade beef patties won over judges. Required of all PR majors, the campaigns course gives students a hands-on opportunity to develop a relationship with a client. “This class has prepared me so well for the future,” Romitti said. “It really gives you a lot of information on just knowing and being ready for real-world experiences.” GREENLEE GLIMPSE 5


2018 A L U M NI & FR I EN D S H O N O RS 2018 Iowa STATEment Makers Kelsey Kremer (’13 journalism and mass communication) Maia Zewert (’15 journalism and mass communication) 2018 Wallace E. Barron AllUniversity Senior Award Brooke Almasi (’18 public relations) Emily Barske (’18 journalism and mass communication, marketing) 2018 ISU Alumni Association Alumni Service Award David Kurns (’82 journalism and mass communication) 2018 LAS Dean’s Arts and Humanities Award Henry Ong (’78 M.S. journalism and mass communication 2018 LAS Distinguished Service Award Art Slusark (Greenlee School Advisory Council) 2018 LAS Young Alumnus Award Dan Winters (’03 journalism and mass communication) 2018 CALS Outstanding Young Professional Award Jen Sorenson (’01 animal science, journalism and mass communication)

Left to right: Staci Hupp Ballard (’00 journalism and mass communication), P r o f e s s o r E m e r i t u s To m E m m e r s o n a n d J e f f J o h n s o n , I S U A l u m n i Association president Courtesy of ISUAA

PROFESSOR EMERITUS TOM EMMERSON RECOGNIZED BY ISUAA Greenlee Professor Emeritus James Thomas (Tom) Emmerson (’60 technical journalism, M.S. ’63 history) received a 2018 Iowa State University Alumni Association (ISUAA) Faculty-Staff Inspiration Award. Emmerson taught reporting, print media editing, media ethics, American journalism history and public relations before retiring in 2004. Recipients are nominated for the award by former students. “Tom transformed my life by example and instruction,” wrote his nominator. “His instruction — in journalistic skills, history, critical thinking, human decency and more — helped me achieve a velocity and trajectory that enriched my professional and personal life.”

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR EMERITUS GILES MERRILL FOWLER DIES Giles Merrill Fowler, associate professor emeritus, died Nov. 3, 2018, in Ames. Fowler was well-loved by students and faculty at the Greenlee School, where he taught reporting

2018 L A S FA C U LTY & S TA F F H O NO RS

and introduced courses on criticism

Early Achievement in Teaching Jan Lauren Boyles, assistant professor

teaching in December 2002, Giles

Excellence in Graduate Mentoring Daniela Dimitrova, professor Institutional Service Joel Geske, associate professor Outstanding Teaching Deb Gibson, senior lecturer, Meredith Professional in Residence P&S Outstanding New Professional Jessica Hansen-Moench, academic adviser 6 GREENLEE GLIMPSE

and literary journalism. Following his retirement from wrote Deaths on Pleasant Street, a nonfiction account of a 1909 Kansas City murder case. Twice married and divorced, Fowler called his children “the joys and redemption of my life.” They are Stephen Fowler (m. Mirjana Risek), Toronto; Andrew Fowler, Bangkok; Kate Fowler, Yangon, Myanmar; Will Fowler, Washington D.C.,; and two grandchildren, Milo Fowler and Tilda Fowler, Toronto. He is survived by first wife, Jane Pecinovsky Fowler, Overland Park, Kansas; second wife, Veronica Lorson Fowler of Ames; sisters-in-law, Libby and Kitty Fowler, both of Kansas City, as well as a niece, nephews, and other family. He is preceded in death by his brothers, Richard (Dick) and Lee. Read more about his life and the January memorial service at alumni.greenlee.iastate.edu/glimpse.


THE PULITZERS OF STUDENT JOURNALISM Greenlee students received 2017-18 Hearst Journalism Awards for their work published by the Iowa State Daily Media Group. > > Emily Blobaum (’18 journalism and mass communication), News and Features Photojournalism, semi-finalist > > Emily Blobaum and Whitney Mason (junior in public relations), Multimedia Team Reporting, sixth place

2018-19 GREENLEE SCHOLARSHIPS $141,375 88 RECIPIENTS

ADJUNCT OF THE YEAR Sherry Berghefer, senior lecturer, received the 2018 Iowa Communication Association Adjunct of the Year Award. Since 2010, Berghefer has taught Greenlee School visual communication courses.

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incoming students

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LIVE STORYTELLING Five Iowa State researchers, including Greenlee School graduate student Denise Coberley, shared their personal stories about science as part of a live storytelling event hosted by The Story Collider podcast series and Iowa State’s Office of the Vice President of Research. Coberley, a 23-year teaching veteran, shared the impact biology has had in her life. Hear her story at alumni. greenlee.iastate.edu/glimpse.

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current students

summer 2018 internships

ACCOLADES APLENTY

Denise Coberley P h o t o b y M u n n Wo o d s S t u d i o

GREENLEE STUDENTS RECEIVED A NUMBER OF RECOGNITIONS FOR THEIR WORK IN 2018. G E T T H E F U L L S C O O P AT ALUMNI.GREENLEE. I A S TAT E . E D U / G L I M P S E . FOCUS ON SCIENCE COMMUNICATION In June 2018, over 50 interdisciplinary scholars and practitioners from around the country descended upon the Iowa State University campus for the sixth biennial Science Communication Symposium. The event was co-organized by members of Iowa State’s Science Communication Project, including Greenlee faculty members Dara Wald and Michael Dahlstrom, and Kathleen Hunt and Shuyang Qu of agricultural education and studies. Attendees explored the theme “Understanding the Role of Trust and Credibility in Science Comunication” as it relates to the environment, health, crisis and risk through several

Dara Wald (left) and Kathleen Hunt

panels and presentations. The next symposium will take place in spring 2020. GREENLEE GLIMPSE 7


WEATHER REPORT RAIN OR SHINE, THIS GREENLEE STUDENT USES SOCIAL MEDIA TO FORECAST CAMPUS HIGHS AND LOWS.

By Mol ly O ls o n

W

H O N E E D S C A R T O O NS WH E N Y O U H AV E WE AT H E R R E P O R T S ? NOT JACOB VOS. The Spirit Lake, Iowa, native spent his childhood studying the styles of admired TV meteorologists in the same way some kids become enamored with the animated characters on their favorite shows. After absorbing the daily forecast, he would then deliver a report to a local audience — his parents. “I wanted to grow up to be just like [those meteorologists],” Vos said. Today, the Iowa State senior in journalism and mass communication and meteorology is developing his own style of weather reporting through Iowa State Weather, a project he launched through the Student Chapter of the American Meteorological Society at Iowa State University. While not an official weather forecasting account of the university,

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the social media-based initiative provides Iowa State campus-specific weather forecasts and daily weather updates on Twitter and Snapchat (@IowaStateWX) and on Facebook and Instagram (@IowaStateWeather). As the director, producer, videographer, graphic designer and on-camera talent, Vos begins each day at 5:30 a.m. to collect data and prepare graphics for his morning report. He then films a one-minute video on campus that highlights the day’s forecast and posts it at approximately 7:45 a.m. on various social media platforms. In addition to weekday forecast videos, Vos posts daily updates during the school year and provides special coverage during weather events. To get information for his forecasts, Vos utilizes sensors on top of Agronomy Hall. He also looks at multiple forecasts and models on a variety of government resources. After taking all of the

information into account, he evaluates what the impact will be for Ames. “Unlike other places, I am focused on a very small area,” Vos said. “A one-town focus allows me to look at every factor and create a more accurate forecast picture.” The innovation is in his delivery. The project exists entirely on social media, and Vos has become a familiar face on campus with students and staff alike stopping him to say, “I watch you every morning!” TAKIN G IN ITIATIVE Vos is no stranger to identifying an audience need and delivering. He found his way to journalism as a sophomore at Spirit Lake High School. After enrolling in journalism as an elective course, he discovered his school’s broadcast news studio had been abandoned years ago. One question led to another. Before he knew it, Vos was leading the reboot


of the broadcast program using his school-issued laptop and a video camera donated by the principal. “I realized I could really make a difference in our [high] school where [broadcast] journalism of any kind had somewhat died,” Vos said. Through his dedication and hard work, Vos made an impressive mark. In 2015, he and his classmates broke a Guinness World Record for the longest uninterrupted live webcast, clocking a 43-hour show. Their success brought them attention from local and national media including the Today show. Vos also raised $5,000 to renovate the school’s studio and build a news desk. Throughout the remainder of his high school career, he led the broadcast program and provided daily weather forecasts for the news program. This experience affirmed his passion for meteorology and inspired his move to major in both journalism and mass communication and meteorology at Iowa State University. CONTIN U I N G T H E A D V E NT U R E Vos is now making his mark at the college level. With encouragement from Grace Provenzano, Greenlee lecturer and Greenlee School TV (formerly ISU TV) faculty adviser, Vos submitted Iowa State Weather to the 2018 Broadcast Education Association (BEA) National Competition in the Interactive and Emerging Technology category. After placing second in the competition, Vos traveled to Las Vegas last spring to accept his award at the 2018 BEA Festival of Media Arts. “I was very impressed that he actually took the initiative and not only developed the project, but kept it updated with material and reports on a subject he loves,” said Provenzano, who joined the Greenlee faculty in 2017 and has taught broadcast journalism for 15 years. “I think there’s a real passion there for what he wants to do.” Provenzano believes Vos’ submission stood out because it showcases the hard work he has put in and the clear passion he has for broadcast meteorology.

“He’s serving a purpose for the community,” Provenzano said. “He’s always looking for ways to keep it updated and his interest in what he does really comes across.” One of the primary factors behind Iowa State Weather’s success is its easy access, Vos said. Content shows up on social media just when his followers need it — as they’re scrolling their feeds before they head out the door. Vos also considers the strengths of each platform and its audience before he posts: “A beautiful sunset caught on one of the sky cams will do well on Instagram. A video of a flooding will do very well on Facebook and Twitter. Snapchat followers interact well with an early morning forecast update that they can wake up to,” he said. Vos finds other ways to weather both inside and outside the classroom. He serves as the producer of “Cy’s Eyes on the Skies,” a weather program collaboration between the university’s AMS chapter and Greenlee School TV. Greenlee’s broadcast writing and production courses have also helped expand his knowledge of digital media. “Being able to produce content efficiently and write for broadcast is

crucial,” said Vos. “I am able to work in front of the camera and behind the scenes because I have received training on both.” MOVIN G F ORWARD An internship last summer with a news station in Salt Lake City has given Vos even more knowledge and experience. “In my internship, I interacted with broadcast meteorologists on a daily basis and helped them create graphics for their shows, while spending time with the journalists out in the field, learning how to ask the right questions, and putting together a package on a deadline,” said Vos. His focus now is quality and growth With Twitter currently Iowa State Weather’s most successful platform, Vos has worked on bringing traffic to its Facebook and Instagram accounts. To keep the project going after he graduates in spring 2020, he also plans to train fellow students who are also interested in broadcast meteorology. “Iowa State Weather will continue to be the leading source for weather information on campus well beyond the time that I leave Iowa State University,” said Vos.

O P P O S I T E U s i n g h i s p h o n e a n d a t r i p o d , Vo s records a video forecast on campus. Photo by Molly Olson ABOVE He creates graphics each m o r n i n g f o r s o c i a l m e d i a . C o u r t e s y o f Vo s

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“... A LOT OF TIMES RESEARCHERS STUDY WHAT WE DON’T FULLY UNDERSTAND. FOR ME, THAT WAS WHY THERE AREN’T MORE WOMEN IN LEADERSHIP POSITIONS ...” KELLY WINFREY, P.H.D

K e l l y W i n f r e y, a s s i s t a n t professor in the Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication, also serves as the outreach and research coordinator for the Carrie Chapman C a t t C e n t e r f o r Wo m e n a n d Politics, housed in Catt Hall. Photo by Gabe Altier

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Political

INTEREST WITH RECORD NUMBERS OF WOMEN WINNING OFFICE AT EVERY LEVEL, 2018 WAS A HISTORIC YEAR IN POLITICS. IT WAS ALSO A BIG ONE FOR THE GREENLEE SCHOOL PROFESSOR WHO STUDIES THEM.

By Tara L a r s o n

A

S RE SU LT S T R IC K LE D IN N O V. 6, 2 0 1 8 , IT BECAME CL E A R WO M E N W E R E N ’ T J U S T G O ING T O CRACK G L A SS CE I L IN G S T H IS MID T E R M E L E C T ION CY CL E . I N M A NY C A S E S , T H E Y ’ D S H AT T ER THEM. While the record number of women running for—and winning—elections at all levels in 2018 has been exciting for many Americans, it’s downright thrilling for Greenlee School Assistant Professor Kelly Winfrey. Winfrey, who studies political communication and gender, also serves as the research and outreach coordinator for Iowa State’s Carrie Chapman Catt Center for Women and Politics. This fall, she took on an additional role as interim director of the Catt Center following longtime director Dianne Bystrom’s retirement in August. (Karen M. Kedrowski took the reins as director in January.) The historic election contributed to a whirlwind year of media appearances and analyses for Winfrey.

On election night, she kept a close watch on the results, waiting off set at WHO-TV until it was time to offer her commentary on the station’s election special. After months of helping Iowa women prepare for campaigns as part of the Catt Center’s Ready to Run Iowa program, studying media coverage and campaign ads and analyzing the numbers, the night felt like somewhat of a crescendo for Winfrey, as well. RECORD-BREAKIN G YEAR “For someone who studies politics, to be in Iowa, that is a dream,” Winfrey said. While the nation always keeps a close eye on Iowa at caucus time, the 2018 election results also gave them reason to watch. Previously, Iowa was one of five states to have never elected a woman to the U.S. House of Representatives, according to the Catt Center. In 2018, it elected two. Abby Finkenauer and Cindy Axne join Senator Joni Ernst, making GREENLEE GLIMPSE 11


WINFREY’S RECENT RELEASE Do women prefer female or male candidates? What issues do they care about? Which candidate traits are important to them? Kelly L. Winfrey explores these questions and more in U n d e r s t a n d i n g H o w Wo m e n Vo t e : Gender Identity and Political C h o i c e s ( P r a e g e r, 2 0 1 8 ) . T h e b o o k focuses on the psychological and sociological reasons for the gender gap in American politics. It presents original research and theory on group identification to explain specific political beliefs and behaviors, while providing examples and explanations. In addition, it offers advice for candidates who seek to engage and persuade women. 12 GREENLEE GLIMPSE

half of the state’s Congressional delegation female. At the state level, 41 women were elected to serve in the Iowa legislature—a 29 percent increase— and Kim Reynolds became Iowa’s first elected female governor. Iowa wasn’t alone. According to the Center for American Women and Politics, a record-breaking 126 women will serve in the 116th Congress. Eight other states elected women governors. More women won, but more also ran. “We can’t know for sure [why more women ran for office],” Winfrey said. “I think there are two big reasons, particularly on the Democratic side. Trump has motivated a lot of women who are unhappy with his election and that has brought a lot more women to run for office. The #MeToo movement I think also is a big part of highlighting issues that pertain to women.” Besides the sheer number, Winfrey pointed out this year’s pool of women candidates included more diversity in race and ethnicity, sexual orientation and age than previous years, as well those with combat military backgrounds, including M.J. Hegar, a candidate from Texas who ran for the U.S. House. While Hegar lost her bid, Winfrey notes many will remember her viral web ad “Doors.” Winfrey also cited two noteworthy female gubernatorial candidates who breastfed children in campaign ads. “It ... showed the human nature of, ‘Yeah, I’m a woman, I’m running for office, I’m a mother, and I’ve got to do these things to get through my day, and some of it is feeding my child and some of it might be making laws,” Winfrey said in an ISU News Service interview. R O O T S IN RESEARCH Winfrey can trace her interest in politics back to middle school. She recalls seeing Anita Hill testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee about allegations of sexual harassment committed by then Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas.

While the hearing sparked debate, it sparked something stronger in Winfrey, who noticed the absence of women in leadership roles in the proceedings. Not long after, she was also struck by the public criticism of Hillary Clinton’s approach to her role as First Lady. “I remember talking to my mom about it and my mom saying, ‘Well, she doesn’t act the way First Ladies are supposed to act,’” Winfrey said. “And at a young age, I was like, ‘Well, what does that mean?’ So, I think it made me really interested in why there weren’t more women in office and what sort of gender stereotypes prevent women from seeking office.” Winfrey pursued these interests in grad school. Her doctoral dissertation focused on explaining the behaviors of women voters through gender group identification and sex-role ideology. “I think that a lot of times researchers study what we don’t fully understand. For me, that was why there aren’t more women in leadership positions, and in government in particular.” Winfrey’s research focuses on how both male and female candidates communicate to voters, specifically, through the use of advertisements. She also studies how gender differences play a role in how candidates present themselves and in how they are perceived. Factors include everything from the issues they focus on to how they dress to their facial expressions. “In general, we have found that the way male and female candidates are presenting themselves is more similar than different these days,” Winfrey said. “Both men and women try to play up their gender-stereotypical positive traits and play down the stereotypical negatives ones.” Her research findings on the effects of advertising on voters in the 2012 presidential election led to an opportunity to publish a new book this fall. Understanding How Women Vote: Gender Identity and Political Choices (see sidebar, page 12) combines her


dissertation research and data from the American National Election Study. COMMU N I T Y CO N N E C T IO N A desire to see more equality in the number of women and men serving in public office motivates Winfrey and is at the heart of her various roles. In teaching, Winfrey brings her research into classes such as JLMC 101, the introduction to mass media and society; JLMC 305, publicity methods for nonmajors; and a graduate seminar. “I really like that I get to work with students from different classes,” she said. “Teaching students from different places in their academic careers gives me different feedback. What a first-year student is thinking about might be very different than what a senior might be thinking about in terms of what issues are important, so I learn from them.” In addition to students, Winfrey also brings a fresh perspective to colleagues. “Within Greenlee, [I thought] she would strengthen our research that looks at women in communication and issues surrounding gender,” said Michael Dahlstrom, Greenlee associate director and associate professor. While her analysis of the 2018 election will continue and the 2020 election cycle is already gearing up, Winfrey also has her sights set on the Catt Center’s next round of Ready to Run Iowa, a campaign training program that encourages women to become involved in public life as leaders in their communities. The next workshops take place in spring 2019 and cover a variety of topics including launching a campaign, working with the media, fundraising and online campaigning. “In 2019 I’m conducting research that examines the communication strategies that made so many women successful in their 2018 campaigns. I’ll also be looking forward to 2020 at women who have already or may launch a campaign. We’ll also be gearing up for the caucuses, and that is one of my favorite parts of living in Iowa.”

P O LI T I C A L C O M M U NI C AT IO N AT G R E E NLE E AN INTERNATIONAL LOOK As social media becomes more pervasive in our lives, so does its usage in campaigning. “Social Media and Political Campaigning Around the World,” a special issue of Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly co-edited by Professor Daniela Dimitrova, addresses the complexities of social media content, its use and the effects on political campaigns, both in the U.S. and abroad. “In the beginning of social media there was a lot excitement about how it was going to democratize everything. Over time, we’ve realized it’s a little more complex. Now we’re talking about things like fake news going viral, we’re talking about political polarization and trolling, so I think it’s challenged some of our assumptions about how people function online and would use some these technologies,” Dimitrova said. TV POLITICAL AD SPENDING According to a study of political advertising for the 2016 Iowa caucuses, the candidates who spent more on TV ads generally received more support on caucus night. However, this does not suggest a candidate can buy an election, said Jay Newell, associate professor. While the $46.3 million spent on TV ads in Iowa influenced which candidates were considered by caucusgoers, Newell says there is no evidence to suggest overspending was rewarded. “We think political advertising is all-powerful, but it’s not,” Newell said. “Candidates who buy the most ads tend to get the most votes, but that could be drawing conclusions from coincidence. Those leading in the polls get more resources. So the additional advertising being purchased is essentially insurance and not as much to move the meter.” 2019 GREENLEE SUMMIT With several key elections in 2020, this year will bring a challenging test for civility. That’s why the next Greenlee Summit is focused on communications and civility in our democracy—and how journalism, advertising and PR professionals can foster civil discourse and help promote freedoms necessary for democracy to thrive. Join us on campus Sept. 5-6, 2019. Find more info at alumni.greenlee.iastate.edu/summit. GREENLEE GLIMPSE 13


GAME CHANGER LESTER MWIRICHIA PURSUES HIS PASSION FOR SPORTS MEDIA AT IOWA STATE’S CYCLONES.TV. By Mol ly O ls o n

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P h o to s b y G a b e A l ti e r

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N A N Y G I VE N D AY, IT C A N B E A CH A L L E N GE T O K E E P U P WI T H G RE E NL E E S T U D E NT L E ST E R “ L E S ” M W IR IC H IA . You might find him in front of the camera at an Iowa State sporting event or working behind the scenes at Hilton Coliseum editing video for Cyclones.TV. Perhaps he’s recording a podcast or pounding the pavement selling ads for the Iowa State Daily Media Group. Or, maybe you’ll find him studying for an exam at Parks Library or attending

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a meeting of Greenlee School’s First Amendment Committee at Hamilton. One thing’s for certain — whatever he’s up to, he’s pursuing his goal of landing a career in digital sports media. T H E R O AD TO IOWA STATE Since coming to Iowa State in fall 2017 as a transfer student, Mwirichia, now a senior in journalism and mass communication, has immersed himself in student media, internships, his schoolwork and other activities.

“I try to capitalize on opportunities that allow me to put myself out there,” he said. “I know where I want to be and where I can be and every day is an opportunity to get closer to my goals.” While Mwirichia is confidently pursuing those goals now, he wasn’t always so sure. After graduating from Des Moines’ Hoover High School in 2011, he attended Marshalltown Community College and Des Moines Area Community College. While he had worked as a KDPS radio DJ through


the Des Moines Central Campus broadcasting and film program in high school, he hadn’t started thinking seriously about a career in journalism until community college. After scoring an internship with FOX Sports Midwest in St. Louis in summer 2014, he knew he was on to something. Through that opportunity, Mwirichia got a front-row seat to the world of sports broadcasting. As he helped cover the St. Louis Cardinals, he shadowed anchors and directors, assisted in writing scripts, worked in the control room — and loved every minute. After returning to Iowa, he completed another year at DMACC and made plans to transfer to Iowa State. With his experience, it’s no surprise Mwirichia secured an internship with Cyclones.TV, the official content and programming provider of Iowa State Athletics, in spring 2018. As an intern, Mwirichia helps out with all aspects of production. One of

his primary responsibilities this fall was hosting the “Cyclone Club Tailgate of the Week,” where he showcased a Cyclone Club member at each Iowa State home football game. Mwirichia also hosts “Mat IQ,” a new Iowa State wrestling talk show, with Kyven Gadson, a graduate assistant for the Iowa State wrestling team, former Cyclone wrestler and three-time NCAA All-American. As the director of digital media for Cyclones.TV, Tyler Rutherford (’05 journalism and mass communication), recruits at Greenlee’s Jump-Start Internship and Networking Fair each semester to find students with the skills to join his team. Mwirichia has impressed him with his personality and work ethic. “He’s a very energetic person and has a positive attitude,” Rutherford said. “He has a lot of things going on, but he does a really great job of managing everything.”

“I’VE FOUND A NEW TYPE OF FREEDOM— WHEN THE ON-AIR LIGHT COMES ON AND THE CAMERA HITS, I GET LOST IN THE WORLD OF SPORTS.” LESTER MWIRICHIA GREENLEE GLIMPSE 15


BELOW Les Mwirichia edits video at the Cyclones.TV office in Hilton Coliseum. BELOW CENTER Mwirichia interviewed Jon Schaben (‘87 animal science), left, for the Oct. 13, 2018, “Cyclone Ta i l g a t e o f t h e We e k ” f e a t u r e f o r C y c l o n e s . T V. B E L O W RIGHT Mwirichia gets a peek at some Cyclones.TV tailgate footage shot by Kobe Gaines, left, a junior in journalism and mass communication.

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This fall, Mwirichia was recognized for his academic and extracurricular achievement as recipient of the William F. and Linda Z. Tubbs Digital Media Scholarship. In its first year, the Greenlee School scholarship provides support to a student working for the Iowa State Athletics department in a digital media capacity. Bill Tubbs (’71 agricultural journalism) recognizes the growing importance of digital media in his own work as the co-owner and co-publisher of the Eldridge North Scott Press. “We are newspaper people and our primary product is print, but we are also looking at digital since that is an important part of media,” Tubbs said. “We wanted to continue to support the school in some way, and this scholarship seemed to fit our interests.” Mwirichia, who previously worked nearly 40 hours per week to pay for school, says the scholarship has eased the stress of funding his education. “I’m so relieved now—in the past, I was working multiple jobs and trying to balance that with my schoolwork,” Mwirichia said. “This scholarship

allows me to let my work be my work, and I don’t have to worry so much.” THE F UL L EXPERIEN CE Along with his internship at Cyclones.TV, Mwirichia develops his skills through other hands-on campus opportunities. Mwirichia hosts the Iowa State Daily’s podcast the “Les & Kobe Show,” with fellow Greenlee student, Kobe Gaines, a junior in journalism and mass communication. New podcast episodes are released on Fridays with content focused on Cyclone athletics, campus events and other trending topics. In addition, Mwirichia makes regular appearances on Greenlee School TV, the student-run broadcast organization, to provide analysis of Iowa State athletics. Beyond these on-campus involvements, Mwirichia has also emceed multiple university events, including the CyFactor Talent Show and homecoming pep rallies. One of his favorite events to be part of, however, is Science Bound Saturday. Hosted by the Iowa State School of Education, the program empowers young students of


color to pursue degrees in STEM fields. “It’s imperative to give back to young people, especially young students of color,” Mwirichia said. “I get to speak to students and tell them about the importance of going to class and having good relationships with their friends and teachers.” In addition to giving back to the community, Mwirichia also recognizes the foundation the Greenlee video production and newswriting courses provide. He often sends his clips to his instructors for feedback. “I can learn how to make a good video or write well in my classes, and then that will translate over into my work,” Mwirichia said. “There is a direct correlation there, and it’s really helping me improve.” After graduating in December 2019, Mwirichia hopes to continue working in college athletics. “I’ve found a new type of freedom— when the on-air light comes on and the camera hits, I get lost in the world of sports,” Mwirichia said. “This is what I chose to do, and I plan on taking it up to the highest level.”

L e f t t o r i g h t : L i n d a Tu b b s , B i l l Tu b b s a n d A n g e l a P o w e r s a t Hamilton Hall. Photo by Maria Charbonneaux

HIGHEST HONOR TUBBS RECEIVES 2018 SCHWARTZ AWARD W i l l i a m F. ( B i l l ) Tu b b s ( ’ 7 1 a g r i c u l t u r a l journalism) has loyally covered his community for 47 years as co-owner and co-publisher of the Eldridge North Scott Press and WiltonDurant Advocate News. I n O c t o b e r, t h e G r e e n l e e S c h o o l f a c u l t y p r e s e n t e d Tu b b s w i t h t h e 2 0 1 8 J a m e s W. Schwartz Award for distinguished service to journalism and communication. “I knew and admired Jim Schwartz and frequently draw upon my experiences with the remarkable, eclectic faculty which he led... g i a n t s l i k e R o d F o x , J a c k S h e l l e y, B i l l K u n e r t h , D i c k D i s n e y, E d m u n d B l i n n , G e n e B r a t t o n a n d L a R u e P o l l a r d  …  I a p p r e c i a t e t h e m m o r e now than I did at the time and am humbled to be considered among the recipients of this a w a r d  …  f r o m H u g h S i d e y t o t h e p r e s e n t … a n d many other ISU grads who have made, and are making, great contributions to our profession.” Tu b b s i s t h e N a t i o n a l N e w s p a p e r A s s o c i a t i o n ’s 2 0 1 5 J a m e s O . A m o s A w a r d w i n n e r, a p a s t p r e s i d e n t o f t h e I o w a F r e e d o m o f I n f o r m a t i o n C o u n c i l , a n I o w a M a s t e r E d i t o rP u b l i s h e r, a r e c i p i e n t o f t h e I o w a N e w s p a p e r A s s o c i a t i o n ’s D i s t i n g u i s h e d S e r v i c e A w a r d a n d a past district governor of Rotary International. “ B i l l ’s l e a d e r s h i p i n c o m m u n i t y j o u r n a l i s m serves as an example for our students of the importance of news and information in o u r s o c i e t y, ” A n g e l a P o w e r s , d i r e c t o r o f t h e Greenlee School, said. Tu b b s a n d h i s w i f e , L i n d a , s u p p o r t G r e e n l e e ’s Futures Forums, which bring industry leaders to campus to prepare students for their careers. GREENLEE GLIMPSE 17


)

) ) ) ) WAVES M AK ING R A D IO

HENRY ZIMMERMAN PURSUES PUBLIC RADIO AS GREENLEE’S FIRST GRAD TO LAND NPR’S KROC FELLOWSHIP. By Mari a V. Charbonneaux

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T WAS A CHAN CE ENCOUNTER W ITH AN IN F ORMAT I ONAL BROCHURE THAT PUT HENRY (HAN K) ZIMMERMAN ON THE PATH TO N PR IN WASHINGTON, D.C. While he was a student at Western Iowa Tech Community College, Zimmerman worked as a weekend announcer at Siouxland Public Media KWIT-KOJI. During his hour off the air one day, he went for a walk. Tucked among literature about public radio support and programming in the station’s light-filled entryway was a pamphlet detailing NPR’s Kroc Fellowship, a yearlong program that provides training in audio and digital journalism to aspiring public media journalists. Zimmerman was intrigued. As he researched more, the opportunity helped shape and channel his burgeoning interest in journalism. “It was even before my first story. In the back of my head [I thought] if and when I graduate, that’s what I’m going

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to do. I’m going to apply,” he said. Zimmerman would later earn his degree in journalism and mass communication from Iowa State University in May 2018, but graduating from college wasn’t always a given for the Sioux City native who dropped out of high school when he was 16. A self-proclaimed public radio super fan who grew up listening to “Car Talk” with his father and classical music with his mother, Zimmerman jumped at the opportunity to turn the dials at the NPR Media station when a friend recommended him for the job. Eventually Zimmerman was given the opportunity to produce his own stories. “Once they let me do a little more [I thought about how] I listen to public radio stories and these are the ones I like ... I could start making the kind of stories I like,” he said. From monster trucks to aerial yoga, Zimmerman had lots of latitude to explore various topics. His favorite story chronicled the experience of accompanying a colleague who was having his chest waxed at a local blowout bar. “The first time I heard my own story on air was wild. It was very surreal to hear a recording of myself. I’ve never gotten used to that as much of my own voice as I’ve heard,” Zimmerman said. With encouragement from his colleagues, Zimmerman decided late in the game in April 2016 to continue his education at Iowa State after earning his associate’s degree. He knew he’d need a four-year degree to land a fulltime reporter job in public radio. He also knew it was necessary to pursue the Kroc Fellowship. When Zimmerman arrived in Ames in fall 2016, he focused on experiences that would help him reach his goal. He joined the staff of 88.5 KURE first as a DJ and later as news director. In summer 2017, he traveled to Dublin for an internship through Iowa State’s study abroad program with EUSA. He landed at 103.2 Dublin City FM, where he gained hands-on experience interviewing and hosting. When he returned, it was time to focus on his Kroc application. After making the cut from 500 to 50 to 10

candidates, Zimmerman made the trip to Washington, D.C. for an interview last spring. He brought along the brochure that started it all for good luck. While it was likely his previous experience and story pitch more than luck, Zimmerman got the good news in June that he would become Iowa State University’s first-ever Kroc fellow. Awarded to three recent graduates each year, the fellowship has produced several notable journalists, including “All Things Considered” host Ailsa Chang and “S-Town” creator Brian Reed. Zimmerman has been living and working in Washington, D.C. since October. He’ll complete several rotations in various departments at NPR throughout the year before being assigned to work at an NPR member station for the final three months. While there are no guarantees, Zimmerman hopes the yearlong competitive experience will help him continue on a path in public radio. “The whole point of the fellowship … and I’ve read that pamphlet front to back 100 times especially right before I went … is to help people launch their careers. It’s basically to build that foundation.”

“THE FIRST TIME I HEARD MY OWN STORY ON AIR WAS WILD ... I’VE NEVER GOTTEN USED TO THAT ... HENRY ZIMMERMAN

OPPOSITE Henry Zimmerman is one of three 2018-19 NPR Kroc fellows. Photo b y Ta r a E f o b i R I G H T During his time at KURE, he helped find ways to air content produced by Greenlee students in classes and launched a program called “Ames Matters,” which focused on stories about the Ames and campus c o m m u n i t y. P h o t o b y Christopher Gannon

GREENLEE GLIMPSE 19


V ISUAL GUIDES A SERIES OF SNAPSHOT MOMENTS THROUGHOUT HER CAREER LED KELLY SCHMIDT TO HER GIG AT GETTY IMAGES. By Ha n n a h Pe t e r s o n JLMC 3 4 4 : F e a t u r e Wri ti n g , Fa l l 2 0 1 8

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E L LY SCH M I DT ’ S W O R K L IF E I S A L L A B O UT IMA G E — A B O U T 8 0 M I L L IO N O F T H E M , A CT U A L LY. The Nevada, Iowa, native, and 1992 Greenlee journalism graduate is vice president of product services and senior director of product and platform services for Seattle-based Getty Images. The large media company works with photographers, videographers and editors to sell their work to editorial and corporate clients. Schmidt joined the company in 2004 and has been based in New York, London and Seattle during her tenure. This position has allowed her to build products for the media and customers, while managing a global corporate team. Schmidt has worked with numerous images that made international headlines. One of her favorites that reflects her pride in her work changed the conversation around women and stereotypes in their commercial images. The top-selling image in 2007 when you searched “woman” in Getty Images was a naked woman lying on a bed. If you Google searched “woman” in 2017,

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the top-selling picture was a woman hiking alone in Banff National Park, wearing a jacket and a hat. “That’s my favorite part, really being able to get the right image for an article or piece or the right image to represent a brand,” Schmidt said. “Imagery is so powerful. It goes hand in hand with journalism and mass communication, and that is something that needs to be continued to be thought about for journalism majors.” Schmidt, daughter of ISU professors Steffen and (now retired) Helen Schmidt, came to journalism at Iowa State following a year at Arizona State and a semester in London. She grew up around horses and knew she wanted to leverage her passion for the equestrian sport through work as a journalist. One day in Hamilton Hall, one of Schmidt’s friends dug through a bin of internship files and came across information on Chronicle of the Horse magazine in Middleburg, Virginia. In short order, Schmidt was the title’s intern for six months in 1992. “From there, my career took off,” Schmidt said. She continued working there as

a journalist and photographer after graduation, traveling the world for two years. She then moved to Minneapolis and worked for Skyway News for two years as a reporter and a special sections editor. A pivotal moment in Schmidt’s career came when she was handed a magazinelike project to publish. Schmidt was responsible for all the behind-thescenes work, including scheduling contributors, and she soon realized this was the work she wanted. “I realized I loved being the architect of something that was a culmination of a lot of people’s work into something someone can use and enjoy,” Schmidt said. From 1998 to 2004, Schmidt worked as a program manager for several Seattle-area technology companies, including Microsoft, until joining Getty Images. She joined the Greenlee School’s Advisory Council in fall 2018. To help others find her same success, Schmidt suggests, “Look at what you’re passionate about and look at the trends around you. Look for trends in media or technology and spend some time getting to know people in those industries.”


C OUNC I L H I G H L I GH TS NEWS FROM THE SCHOOL’S ADVISORY COUNCIL Made up of alumni and friends who bring diverse perspectives and experiences from the fields of journalism, advertising and public relations, the Greenlee School Advisory Council exists to support the school, including its director, faculty, staff and students. In 2018 the council modified its approach. In addition to meeting in the fall and spring, it has formed subcommittees focused throughout the year on several school initiatives, including the Greenlee Summit; council membership; public relations and messaging; alumni relations; and curriculum and assessment. While each subcommittee has a different focus, Chair Rick Phillips said the common goal for all is to build connections. “I think it goes back to the charge the council has, which is trying to be a bridge between alumni and the students, the alumni and the faculty and the alumni and the staff,” he said. The council serves as a helpful resource on the latest industry trends and challenges. It is committed to seeking diversity in all aspects when recruiting new members. “The council I think is somewhat different than just a couple years ago because we’ve put an emphasis on trying to balance out the viewpoints,” Phillips said. The council played a key role in the school’s inaugural Summit last spring, and it continues to be instrumental in planning the 2019 Summit, which will take place on campus Sept. 5-6, 2019. “The Summit was very important for raising awareness for alumni and raising awareness of Greenlee,” Phillips said. Phillips sees the school as one of the industry’s “best-kept secrets.” He hopes the council can help get the word out about what alumni already know. “The students who I’ve met in my view are so much further along than when I was in school. It’s really reassuring and makes me feel great not only about Iowa State but about Greenlee and knowing that we are graduating students who will literally be able to step in and perform roles,” Phillips said. — Maria V. Charbonneaux

Kim Guthrie shared career advice with students at the Futures Forum. Photo by Maria Charbonneaux

F UTURES F ORUM KIM GUTHRIE SHARES CAREER ADVICE Never underestimate the power of a handwritten thank-you note — people appreciate the personal touch. Proudly include your first jobs on your resume — those experiences say something about your work ethic. Share your career aspirations with your supervisors — if they don’t know where you want to go, they can’t help you get there. Kim Guthrie, president of Cox Media Group, shared these and other career wisdom with students Oct. 4 at the 2018 Futures Forum. In her presentation “From the Iowa Cornfield to the New Yo r k B o a r d r o o m , ” t h e 1 9 8 4 G r e e n l e e School journalism grad also shared lessons from her career that started in broadcast journalism in the Midwest and transitioned to advertising sales and management on the east coast. As the leader of an integrated broadcasting, publishing and digital m e d i a c o m p a n y, G u t h r i e a l s o d i s c u s s e d the industry changes media professionals f a c e , i n c l u d i n g o v e r- t h e - t o p m e d i a services (OTT) and digital advertising. New innovations require media professionals to think differently than they have before, but that doesn’t make platforms such as radio and television i r r e l e v a n t . I t ’s a l l a b o u t k n o w i n g h o w a n d

Greenlee School Advisory Council, front row: Kelly Schmidt, Ann Omvig Maine, Angela Ossian, Denise Essman, Rick Phillips, Angela Powers, Lawrence Cunningham, Donna Ramaeker Zahn, Nancy Padberg, Kim Guthrie. Back row: Dave Kurns, Rick Jost, Doug Jeske, Tara Deering-Hansen, Susan Kenedy Hood, Andrew Killinger, Jeff White, Chris Conetzkey. Not pictured: Brennan Buckley, David Chivers, Joel Davis, Bob and Diane Greenlee, Elias Johnson, Kim Hernandez Kuch, Alan Mores, Gladys Nortey, Art Slusark, Mirtha Vaca-Wilkens, Dan Winters.

when to use them, Guthrie said. While challenges exist, Guthrie said the key to success is keeping up with the c h a n g e s a n d t h i n k i n g c r e a t i v e l y. — M a r i a V. C h a r b o n n e a u x GREENLEE GLIMPSE 21


IN STEP WITH

LAURA WITZLING A NEW FACULTY MEMBER BRINGS FOOD FOR THOUGHT TO HER RESEARCH AND PUBLIC RELATIONS COURSES. By Reagan Clay J L M C 3 4 4 : F e a tu re Wri ti n g , Fa l l 2 0 1 8

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Laura Witzling can trace her passion for food to her college days when she volunteered for a café that served healthy, inexpensive meals featuring local foods. During that time, she also interned at a communitysupported agriculture farm in Wisconsin, and later worked as a volunteer on several French farms to better learn different agricultural techniques. An assistant professor who joined the Greenlee faculty in August, Witzling now focuses her research on food issues while teaching public relations courses. She recently received her Ph.D. in mass communications from the University of Wisconsin, where she also earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism. In between, she earned a master’s degree in natural resources and environmental sciences from the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign. At Illinois, she worked closely with a soil science professor with whom she studied soil lead levels in Chicago. “My research was about urban gardens and I really enjoyed that work,” said Witzling. “I liked the component with communications, so I decided to pursue that.” Witzling was drawn to Iowa State and the Greenlee School for their academic reputations. “I was really looking for an institution where I could teach and research — a place where I felt like my research was supported,” she said. “I felt like there were a lot of people doing research that I could relate to here.” Her current research looks at public opinion of fish farming (aquaculture) in the Midwest. She focuses on inland fish farming, which involves raising fish in tanks or ponds. Before earning her doctorate, Witzling worked as a public information and education officer

with Dane County University of Wisconsin-Extension. In that role, she coordinated a program aimed at food directors of hospitals and school districts who wanted to incorporate local foods into their organizations. She also produced farmer education and outreach programs. “During that time, I started thinking more about the communication issues in our food system, which is why I wanted to get involved in the first place,” Witzling said. She draws from that experience now as an instructor. Witzling taught Publicity Methods (PR 305) and Public Relations Writing (PR 321) this fall. To provide her students plenty of writing opportunities, she finds realworld clients and incorporates their projects into the classroom. Her fall 2018 PR 321 students created fliers and table tents for the Iowa Department of Natural Resources to raise awareness about Rehoming Our Animals/ Aquariums Responsibly (ROAR), a coalition that works to reduce the number of animals ‘dumped’ by people who can no longer care for them. Her spring 2019 class will assist the Iowa Water Center with blogs and interviews related to its upcoming Iowa Water Conference. To boost engagement, Witzling asks students to email examples relating to concepts from class. “I think the students enjoy making connections between what we talk about in class and the media that they like. Because of the creative examples they supply, we end up looking at all kinds of things in class — Tweets from fast food companies, newsletters they subscribe to, news releases from local organizations, screenshots from Snapchat. I think it makes class more engaging for them, and I get some insight into what is important to my students.”


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The Society of Greenlee Alumni & Friends connects Greenlee alumni through events and social media. Contact Greenlee’s program coordinator Stacy Horner (stacyh@iastate.edu) if you’d like to help plan or attend future activities. alumni.greenlee.iastate.edu/network

Meet ISU students majoring in advertising, public relations, journalism and mass communication and related fields at the boutique-style JumpStart Internship & Networking Fair on Feb. 26 in the Great Hall of the ISU Memorial Union. This event is free to employers. Contact Greenlee’s internship coordinator Juli Probasco-Sowers (julip@iastate.edu), with questions. Register online: greenlee.iastate.edu/jump-start

2019 will bring several events open to all, including First Amendment Days in April and the Greenlee Summit in September. Check out our events calendar for more info. greenlee.iastate.edu/calendar

For a monthly update containing news and notes from Greenlee School faculty, staff and students, sign up to receive “Good News from Greenlee,” our email newsletter. greenlee.iastate.edu/goodnews

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To kick off the academic year, the Greenlee School hosted an ice cream social for Iowa State University students, faculty and staff in September 2018. #whygreenlee


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