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“Reaching Out Report” the Greene County Extension Newsletter 2400 S. Scenic Ave., Springfield, Mo. 65807 Email: greeneco@missouri.edu * Tel: (417) 881-8909

March 2014 * Vol. 6, Issue 3

INSIDE THIS ISSUE Upcoming events … page 2 Annual Meeting … pages 3-5 Jeff Barber … pages 6-9 David Burton … pages 10-13 MU President visits… page 14-15 Patrick Byers … pages 16-17 Master Gardeners … pages 18-19 4-H Report … page 20-22 Pam Duitsman… page 23 Nutrition program… page 24 2014 Friends list … page 25 Sponsors & Partners page 26

Online Event Calendar The most up-to-date list of reported upcoming MU Extension programs in Greene County is available online at extension.missouri.edu/greene

Calendar is visible on right side of page.

New Council Members Sworn in and Others are Honored Richard Struckoff, Greene County’s County Clerk, administered the oath of office to seven of the eight newly elected county council members as part of the extension council’s annual meeting on Monday, Feb. 24. Struckoff has performed this duty for over 20 years but is retiring at the end of this year. In inset shows David Burton presenting Carl Allison with certificate recognizing him for serving two terms as council chairman. The matting of the frame was signed by council members and staff all thanking Carl for his many years of service to Greene County Extension. See pages 3-5 for more on the annual meeting including profiles of those named to the “Leader’s Honor Roll.”

University of Missouri Extension provides equal opportunity to all participants in extension programs and activities, and for all employees and applicants for employment on the basis of their demonstrated ability and competence without discrimination on the basis of their race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, age, disability or status as a protected veteran.


Greene County “Reaching Out” Report

Last Updated March 27, 2014

Selected Upcoming Extension Events in Greene County Business Development Classes

Botanical Camps

Regular business classes are held at the Small Business Development and Technology Center, 405 North Jefferson Ave., Springfield. Assorted dates and topics. Register by calling 417-836-5685 or check online www.ws.missouristate.edu/sbdc.

Kids (age 7-11) are invited to spend the morning with Botanical staff, Extension specialists and volunteers to connect with gardens. Call 891-1515 Date: June 2-6 and July 7-11 Gardening June 9-13 and July 14-18 Arts in the Garden June 16-20 and July 21-25 Bugs & Butterflies Time: 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. Fee: $75/week; FOG members $50/week

Garden Inspired Writing Retreat This program is for anyone who wants to be more creative whether you like journal writing, poetry, fiction, non-fiction or news writing. Meet in the Botanical Center Atrium. Sessions available: April 3 and May 1. To register call 881-8909. Time: 9 a.m. to noon Fee: $20 per person, per session Registration available online. Age: All ages

Organic Gardening Academy Topics presented to help guide you to balance in your garden with naturally occurring products and practices. Call MU Extension 881-8909 Date: Apr 17 -- Introduction to Organic Gardening May 1 -- Preparing Garden Soil May 6 -- Basic Plant Nutrition/ Organic Fertilizers Jun 12 -- Growing Organic Vegetables at Home Jun 19 -- Disease Scouting and Treatments Jul 16 -- Organic Pest Control Jul 31 -- Organic Weed Control Aug 7 -- Organic Gardening for Pollinators and Beneficial Insects Aug 21 -- Garden Planning for the Next Season / 4 -season Gardening Sep 18 -- Composting Sep 30 -- Sustainable Gardening Time: 6 p.m.

Potting Shed University Master Gardeners of Greene County have planned a series runs through April 28, Potting Shed University will present a series of 10 topics. Learn more online at http://mggreene.org/.

Young Sprouts in the Garden Explore child-oriented displays, crafts, and activities designed to nurture an appreciation for gardening and nature. Visit the Plant Zoo, climb a tree, “pollinate” flowers, observe ladybugs and more. Call Botanical Center 891-1515 Age: All ages Fee: Free Date: May 17 Time: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Master Gardener Plant Sale Tried and true perennials, house plants, and landscape plants sold to benefit the gardens in the park. For information call Extension 881-8909 Age: All ages Fee: prices vary per plant Date: April 26 Time: 7:30 a.m.

Salute to Century Farms Educational evening to honor Century Farms in Greene County with a guest speaker and musical entertainment. Call Extension 881-8909 Date: Sept. 20 Time: 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Fee: $25 per person Round Barn Event Cnt

Presiding Commissioner Debate Hear from the candidates running for Greene County Presiding Commissioner. The Greene County Extension Council is hosting this debate as a kickoff to the election. Call Extension 881-8909 Date: Tuesday April 29 Time: 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Fee: free Location: Executive Conf. Center, 910 W Battlefield Rd, Springfield, Mo.

Program Calendar Online The most up-to-date list of reported upcoming MU Extension programs in Greene County is available online at http://extension.missouri.edu/greene Calendar visible on right side of page.


Greene County “Reaching Out” Report

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Council’s Annual Meeting Council More Important Than Ever to Success of Extension

rectly from the University of Missouri Extension in Columbia, example the Fire and Rescue Training Institute that last year provided training for Speech by George Deatz 752 students in Greene County, the largest number of students for any county in Missouri. I want to start by thanking everyone who is In addition to the development of needed here this evening in support of the University of programing one of the main Extension Council Missouri Extension Greene County. A personroles in Greene County today involves fundraisal thank you to Carl Allison for his years of council ing to supplement the $10,000 state mandated leadership and the other council members who will minimum contribution from the Greene County be leaving us. Commissioners through the county budget proThat brings me to the new council members cess. A minimum that we have been receiving the who were sworn in this evening. You are now part last few years, including again this year. of a unique Greene County team, a team made up Our local office operating budget for of not only the Greene County Council members 2014 calls for a minimum $57,000 in needed inbut all of the residents of Greene County and othcome. One of our main sources of operating iners who use the MU Extension services. This team come is now the Friends of Greene County Exincludes all in attendance this evening, the Univertension, a group of individuals and business, who sity of Missouri Extension staff across the state have generously contributed supplemental fundwho guide and assist us in fulfilling our mising that started for the 2013 budget year. For exsion, the Greene County Commissioners and other ample, last years contributions were $27,662 county employees that we rely on for assistance cash plus $11,576 in-kind. with our state mandated partnership. So far the cash contributions to the Friends of I do want to take a moGreene County Extenment to thank the Greene sion for the support “Are we up to this challenge? County Commissioners and of 2014 Extension office You bet we are! the Springfield-Greene Counoperations total $19,576 The depth and quality of ty Park Board for working in cash coupled with our together to provide Extension $10,000 county budget our 2014 Extension services with the offices and meeting commitment equals alto the Greene County rooms located here in the most $30,000 of the community depends on it.” Springfield Botanical Center, needed $57,000. As you the heart of horticultural accan see there is still a tivity in Greene County. minimum $27,000 of George Deatz We are all working to fundraising work for our 2014 council chair improve and expand the team to do. Greene County Extension Of course any service programing that additional funding we touches so many lives. Since 1914, Greene County are able to raise from the community translates to residents have sought help from Extension in areas expanded Extension programing. Are we up to related to nutrition, families, business and commuthis challenge? You bet we are! The depth and nity development, plus agriculture, gardening, and quality of our 2014 Extension services to the 4-H youth development. Programs in addition to 4Greene County community depends on it. H like the Master Gardeners of Greene county, Master Naturalists and more. To do this takes adequate and consistent funding. Other Extension services are brought to us di-

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

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Greene County “Reaching Out” Report

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Council’s Annual Meeting Three individuals were recognized for their long-term commitment to MU Extension programs by being named to the “Leader’s Honor Roll.”

David Burton (left) and Mark Green (right).

Angela Jenkins (left) and Pam Duitsman (right).

Mark Green Honored

Angela Jenkins Honored

Mark Green is a District Conservationist with USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in Springfield. Greene received his bachelor in agronomy from Missouri State University in 1983 and has worked for the Soil and Water Conservation District and NRCS since 1981. He has been serving in Greene and Webster Counties in SW Missouri since 1994. “Mark is always a calm and thoughtful partner in programs and projects. He is an educator and a great supporter of Extension and our programs. He is vital to the success of our Soils and Crops program. He also works with extension specialists in this region on a number of events like the Regional Intensive Grazing Schools, Spring Forage Conference and hay schools,” said David Burton, county program director for Greene County Extension. “For this reason, the Greene County Extension Council recognized Mark Green with our Leader’s Honor Roll Award.”

Angela Jenkins is project coordinator for the Ozarks Regional Food Policy Council (ORFPC) and a pediatric nutrition specialist for CoxHealth. Angela is also working closely with Dr. Pam Duitsman on building Food Policy Councils in southwest Missouri communities, and helping communities decrease food insecurity. “Angela is also currently partnering with me and other community leaders on a project to foster economic development in Greene County through the building of stronger infrastructures between large systems and local producers,” said Duitsman. “Extension’s Leaders Honor Roll program is intended to honor outstanding community leaders who have excelled in supporting or coteaching MU Extension programs and who support Extension’s program priorities. The program priorities include three areas where Angela is a leader: enhanced economic viability, building strong individuals, families and communities, and creating and sustaining healthy environments.”

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

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Greene County “Reaching Out” Report

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Council’s Annual Meeting Three individuals were recognized for their long-term commitment to MU Extension programs by being named to the “Leader’s Honor Roll.”

George Deatz (left) and Barbara St. Clair (right).

Barbara St. Clair Honored Barbara St. Clair has been a member of Master Gardeners of Greene County since 2004. She is a past chapter president and current chair of both the Nathanael Greene Demonstration and Xeriscape Gardens. Last year she was the chair of our very successful 18th Annual Missouri Master Gardener State Conference with over 400 attendees. Barbara is currently an educator with the Nixa School system and is a wonderful supporter of Greene County Extension and our programs. “For these reasons, I am pleased to announce that the Greene County Extension Council has recognized Barbara this year with our Leader’s Honor Roll award,” said George Deatz, chairman of the Greene County Extension Council. “Thank you Barbara for all you have done, and are currently doing, to support the University of Missouri Extension and the Master Gardeners of Greene County.”

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

Even the appetizers were local and excellent.

Annual Meeting Meal Features Local Foods Prepared by Local Chef Chef Craig von Foerster and council member Tamara von Foerster provided a meal for this year’s annual meeting featuring local Missouri purveyors. From the charcuterie board featuring smoked ham and unique breads to the BLT soup and the pork roast from Circle B Ranch, the meal received rave reviews. Even more importantly, the meal featured food from farms and greenhouses that have worked with Extension and put the spotlight on Extension’s current work with local food production. To learn more about the von Foersters visit them online at www.fromtabletofarm.com.

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Housing and Environmental Design Specialist Community Partnership of the Ozarks - Housing Collaborative As a member of this Housing focused collaborative for over 8 years, I have helped organize and participated in homeless counts, “A Day in the Life” homeless simulation, monthly meetings, representation on City committee dialogues and continuously advocated for a more energy efficient, sustainable and diverse housing stock for Springfield and greater community. In January, I accepted the nomination to become the Vice-Chair of the Housing Collaborative with the request of CPO staff and committee members to help the group study and promote more housing options, promote universal design and expand the pathways to own or rent safe, affordable housing. This group is seen as central to helping the city and county pursue the Housing chapter of the new Field Guide 2030.

ing just south of the City Utilities office building. This facility provides a ‘clearing house’ for those seeking affordable housing, public housing assistance or even homeless services. Additional aspects of the housing recommendaJeff Barber tions were to find ways to Housing and design effectively, safely and barberj@missouri.edu efficiently renovate the community’s aging housing stock. Cooperative work with rental homeowners, city officials and developers could help realize the longer term vision of diversifying the available housing options and assuring safe, energy efficient housing for the future. Lastly, the Housing committee echoed the need to pursue programs for energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofitting as seen nationally through PACE (Property Assessed Clean Energy) funding programs, as signed into Missouri law in 2010.

Field Guide 2030 More than 100 Springfieldians joined City Manager Greg Burris and Mark McNay Feb. 6 to celebrate the launch of Field Guide 2030, a community strategic plan for Springfield's next 20 years. The event was the culmination of more than two years of work by community and business representatives and the Field Guide Strategic Plan Coordinating Committee to draft a set of strategic goals for the next two decades. As a member of the Housing Committee, our sessions focused on impacts that were both immediate and on a further horizon. Prior to the release of the final report, a Housing Office was established in an underutilized build-

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

PACE Communities across Missouri are considering ways that they can take advantage of PACE (Property Assessed Clean Energy) funding, allowed by Missouri law since 2010. This innovative method of financing energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements for commercial, agricultural, industrial, multi-family, not-forprofit and public properties binds the debt to the property rather than the owner, allowing repayment of an annual increment that is billed with the property’s tax bill and can transfer from owner to owner. The key is that funding is based on the utility cost offset by the improvements and must have a positive cash-flow from day one.

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Housing and Environmental Design Specialist lowing the endorsement of three Field Guide 2030 committees and central to recommendations from the Environmental Advisory Board’s Green Building Taskforce, the community has expressed strong support for moving forward with a PACE funding option, possibly passing a Missouri Clean Energy Funding District participation ordinance before summer. I have been and will continue to hold a lead role in this effort.

Under a ‘Memorandum of Understanding’ between the Missouri Clean Energy Funding District (www.mced.mo.gov) and University of Missouri Extension, specialists are helping communities and counties take the first necessary steps to participate, by assisting passage of ordinances / resolutions that enable property owners access to PACE funding. Specialists will work with civic leaders, economic developers and the business community to identify eligible properties and originate potential PACE funded projects. I will be taking a lead role in this effort. PACE has been listed as one of 20 ways to build a cleaner, healthy and smarter world in the December 2009 issue of Scientific American magazine. It has been seen as the latest economic development tool available to communities with no public liability or fiscal impact such as tax abatement, allowing communities to reactivate their existing structures and supporting infrastructure. Most recently, I helped the Reeds Spring Board of Aldermen to pass a PACE participation ordinance. Two primary aspects became the focus of how PACE could help their community by first focusing on the Old Reeds Spring High School Community Center, then Spring Street businesses. Likewise, I assisted Lamar in passing their PACE participation ordinance during the summer of 2012 with the hope of reactivating the O’Sullivan plant, retaining existing businesses and building on the progress of the DREAM Initiative for the revitalization of their downtown and Square. Springfield and Greene County are investigating how they can best engage PACE funding. Fol-

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

Project CoRE Through the persistent efforts of the ad hoc Project CoRE Advisory Committee, progress has continued to provide an educational opportunity for Missouri Division of Youth Services offender rehabilitation program. Working to support the mission of David Lowry, a Building Trades Instructor for OTC, to engage youth that have made poor decisions in the past, while teaching building skills to rehabilitate homes and the broader neighborhood context. Through a partnership with the Sherman Avenue Project Committee and City of Springfield staff, Project CoRE has devised the purchase, abatement and construction financing of a home just north of OTC campus. Additionally, persistent communication with OTC administration has secured the promise of the institution’s continued support. Last fall, 14 students participated, in a 10 on -site day session that provides them with ½ high school credit upon completion. Interested students can repeat and continue to build their stake in the project. Past participants have been proud to show people the homes that they have rebuilt and note how it has re-centered their lives.

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Housing and Environmental Design Specialist Community Visioning Collaborative with Drury Architecture Students

Webb City: Spring 2014 – pop. 10,841 Five students will work with a Visioning Advisory Committee to build upon the Spring 2008 Main Street visioning effort, Fall 2013 King Jack Park visioning effort, and the DREAM Initiative reports to develop a citywide vision for their 20-25 year future horizon. The students have toured the community and conducted a workshop with 29 participants sharing their input through a gaming method used to determine an overarching goal, objectives and methods. Funding is provided by Webb City.

Sheldon: Spring 2014 – pop. 534 Four students will be working with a Visioning Advisory Committee to develop a citywide vision for their 20-25 year future. The students have toured the community, studied super-trends affecting Sheldon and have conducted a workshop with 39 participants sharing their input through a gaming method used to determine an overarching goal, objectives and methods. Funding is provided by West Central Community Action Agency, citizens, businesses and the City of Sheldon.

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

Carthage: Fall 2013 – pop. 14,095 Last fall, 5 students studied the parks and recreation facilities in Carthage in order to assist a citizen committee to develop their broader vision for improving and expanding park opportunities. The final presentation was held after the semester break due to a weather cancellation. Clear to all participants was the need to have a focus that ranges in scale from the neighborhood park to possibly regional assets like conservation areas and expanded greenway trails. Additionally, the use of participatory process should be pursued when considering activities and particular sites, making a significant effort to engage the Latino community and other stakeholders.

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Housing and Environmental Design Specialist Community Vision-to-Action: Reeds Spring – pop. 903 Following the Spring 2011 Visioning Effort in Reeds Spring, the school district approached the Board of Aldermen to gift the Old Reeds Spring High School building and property to the city. This led to the relocation of the City Hall to the site and notions of developing the Old High School into a community center. In pursuit of preparing partnerships, grant applications and moving toward the creation of a viable community center, I was asked to facilitate a three session workshop to get citizen input on a long range vision for activities and facility improvements for the Community Center. Discussions, goal-objective-method deliberations and sketching activities were used to record participant input. Attendance at the sessions averaged 12 persons. Anticipated followup includes assistance with PACE funding application, grant applications, professional services procurement and an advisory role in any implementation.

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

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Civic Communication Specialist and County Program Director KEY PROGRAMS OR EVENTS  Internal reporting known as webapps.  CPD phone conference about fall training.  Southwest Regional Council meeting  KOLR TV Spot  I submit three special columns each week. SALUTE TO CENTURY FARMS I’m working on a fall event I’m calling: “Salute to Century Farms.” This replaces the Century Farm presentations that have been done at the Ozark Empire Fair and should also be a fundraiser. BY THE NUMBERS (for the month)  News Service Subscribers: 9,523 weekly  Requests for advisement: 18  Regular weekly news columns: 14  TV/Radio Interviews – 1  Total articles written this month – 42 COUNTY PROGRAM DIRECTOR DUTIES  Financial oversight, travel authorizations.  Park Board and County Commission mtgs.  Friends of Greene County Extension.  Edited monthly “Reaching Out Report”  Regular updates to county extension website SOCIAL MEDIA REACH (Feb. 2014) Individuals reached during this month via the regional extension social media tools: 152,684. MO. HISTORIC SCHOOLS ALLIANCE A board of directors (which is a council committee) has been established and includes statewide representation. I’ve written grants that are outstanding right now with two groups seeking funds to get this launched. I have an intern working on a publication/directory of one-room schools in Missouri that we will sell and expand each year. I’m also working out details for a Century School program that will generate funds. We will ask local Extension offices to present these awards to historic schools in their area that apply for the program. Therefore, the program crosses regional lines. I’m working with volunteers and board members to restart our quarterly newsletter known as the Historic School Quarterly.

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

COAD WORKSHOP AND GRANT Working with a team of Extension specialists across four states as part of a grant focused on Extension’s response following disasters. This grant generates revenue from my work in the area of David Burton using social media for dis- Civic communication burtond@missouri.edu aster response. WORKING ON REVENUE PROPOSALS Developing ideas to generate revenue from the Southwest Region News Service. This takes a bulk of my time, builds our local image and gets people in our programs. TEAMED UP TO OFFER SUPERVISORY TRAINING EVENTS IN BRANSON I am part of a regional director formed team of six regional Extension specialists conducting trainings based on curriculum from the Extension’s Missouri Training Institute. I have developed a day-long program on business writing. Over the course of four days, our team jointly conducted and learned material for the “Supervisory Certificate Training” which covers topics important to supervisors. The goal is to be able to offer these trainings in urban areas to business clients or large companies. MARKETING PROGRAMS TO BUSINESS I am using the available program sheets from specialists serving Greene County to market our programs to Springfield businesses for employee trainings. The content goes out in late April.

www.botanicalcenter.org

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Agriculture

March 31 Tested Bull Sale at Springfield Livestock Center The Southwest Missouri Beef Cattle Improvement Association held its tested bull sale March 31 at the Springfield Livestock Marketing Center. MU Extension livestock specialists help with all aspects of the sale, work with producers who want to qualify stock for the sale, and provide educational programs at the start of the sale itself. For more information www.swmobcia.com.

Private Pesticide Applicator Training Draws 30 Agronomy Specialist Tim Schankenberg provided a private pesticide applicator training on March 11 for 30 individuals looking to renew or earn a PPAT license. The training was held at the Springfield-Greene County Botanical Center. Under Missouri law, this training provides certification to obtain a Private Pesticide Applicators License for Missouri agricultural producers and will also count for recertification requirements by the state. The training will not certify for commercial application licenses. The training is held in Greene County twice a year and is designed to make sure restricted chemicals are used and stored in a way that is safe for individuals and the environment.

Attendees at Annie’s Project on March 17.

Annie’s Project Program Draws 25 Women to Greene County A series of farm management courses designed just for women – known as Annie’s Project –is being offered at the Greene County Extension Center every Monday night from March 10 to April 21. The course is of particular interest to women who want to learn how to run a farm as a business. This is the first time Annie’s Project has been offered in Springfield. The class reached its limit of 25 participants. Various MU Extension specialists teach but the program is organized by Dr. Gordon Carriker and David Burton.

Spring Forage Conference Draws 300 to Springfield The 30th annual Southwest Missouri Spring Forage Conference was held Feb. 25 at University Plaza Hotel and drew over 300 participants. The conference planning team (at right) includes seven MU Extension specialists. David Burton also manages media and marketing for the program. The conference is co-sponsored by several southwest Missouri Soil and Water Conservation Districts, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, Missouri State University, University of Missouri Extension, Missouri Department of Conservation, and USDA Farm Service Agency.

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

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Agriculture

UAVs are Crowd Favorite at Annual Greene County Soils and Crops Conference

The 91st Annual Greene County Soils and Crops Conference and SWCD Annual Meeting on Tuesday, March 18 drew 102 people to the banquet room at Springfield Livestock Center. Program topics and speakers included: “Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Agriculture (Drones),” by Bob Schultheis, MU Extension natural resources engineering specialist; “Getting Top Dollar for Your Feeder Calves,” by Andy McCorkill, livestock specialist with MU Extension, “Winter Livestock Water: Nothing is MaintenanceFree,” by Mark Green, Greene County NRCS and “Pasture Weed and Brush Control,” by Tim Schnakenberg, agronomy specialist, MU Extension Program and cost-share updates were given by staff with the Greene County NRCS, FSA, and the Soil and Water Conservation District. Sponsors for this event include Greene County Soil & Water Conservation District, Old Missouri Bank, Springfield Livestock Market, MFA in Ash Grove, Friends of Greene County Extension and the Greene County Commission. The presentation given by Schultheis on using drones in agriculture was a crowd favorite. The uses for UAVs on the farm are as varied as Missouri farmland. Entomologists may find the devices especially helpful for directed scouting of pests. UAVs can collect information on plants that have grown to heights that make it difficult to walk through narrow rows. Livestock producers can use them to check on their cattle without leaving the house. Farmers can also use the unmanned devices to document conditions when applying for government programs or crop insurance. UAVs suited for farm applications vary widely in cost and size. Entry-level aircraft cost $500$1,500 and can fly for 10-20 minutes without recharging batteries. Most weigh less than 5 pounds, have a wingspan of less than 3 feet and travel under 30 mph. For about $300, farmers can install cameras in drones that can send clear still or video images to a smartphone.

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

A capacity crowd of 102 attended this year.

Bob Schultheis was a crowd favorite.

Billy Claiborn (left), a member of the Greene County 4-H Foundation, honored Tom Kissee and the Springfield Livestock Center for supporting 4-H.

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Extension Fire and Rescue Training Institute MU Extension Fire and Rescue Training Institute Benefits Greene County by Training Nearly 1,000 Local Firefighters University of Missouri Extension’s Fire and Rescue Training Institute exists to plan and deliver training for fire and rescue personnel, emergency managers, and other responders in Missouri according to David Hedrick, director or MU FRTI. Over the last three fiscal years (2011 – 2013), 2,823 fire and emergency service personnel in have received over 46,424 instructional hours of training in 147 classes provided by FRTI through MU Extension in Greene County. This includes students from Greene County, as well as students from other counties coming into Greene County to attend classes. “FRTI training prepares firefighters and other emergency first responders to handle emergency situations, situations that may require them to place their own lives at risk. It is imperative that these responders receive safe, realistic, and effective training,” said Hedrick. “Enabled by this training, Greene County’s emergency responders have made a significant impact on the protection of lives and property of the citizens.” Programming is conducted across the state in local communities, as well as through annual and regional fire schools. Missouri has 893 fire departments and fire protection districts with over 23,600 firefighters in the state. “We use a regional field extension infrastructure so courses are conducted across the state at the local level to meet the training needs of the state’s fire service, 80 percent of which are volunteers,” said Hedrick. MU FRTI receives 21 percent of its budget from the University of Missouri Extension. The Institute self generates the rest of the necessary budget. PHOTOS AT RIGHT: Taken during the Aircraft Rescue & Fire Fighting (ARFF) Program taught by FRTI at the Springfield airport in 2011.

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

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Office of University of Missouri System President

University of Missouri President Tim Wolfe Visits Willard School and Chamber Tour promotes the value of higher education to Missouri students, business and community leaders University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe resumed his Show Me Value Tour on March 5 with stops in Willard and Springfield, continuing the conversation he began with Missourians to counter growing sentiment that a college education is not as valuable as it once was. Wolfe visited Willard Middle School, his latest stop on the tour that began in March 2013. Since then, the president has visited Moberly, St. Joseph, Farmington, Lebanon, Webb City/Joplin, Jackson/ Cape Girardeau, California, Boonville, St. Louis and Kansas City, speaking to more than 3,000 middle and junior high school students about the importance of a college education. Focused on communicating the value of higher education to Missouri’s middle and high school students – as well as community members – Wolfe

President Wolfe speaking to individual students at Willard Middle School after his presentation.

used today as an opportunity to talk about the innumerable benefits of going to college. In addition, he toured Springfield Remanufacturing Corporation, a company in Springfield that remanufactures large-scale transportation parts, to discuss workforce development needs. “I firmly believe that a college education is a person’s greatest opportunity for a successful life,” Wolfe said. “By any measure – income, prosperity, health – a college education has a profound effect on an individual, which in turn can provide a tremendous boost to our communities, culture and state as a whole.” Wolfe – a graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia – said he became alarmed that this message was getting lost soon after he became university president a year and a half ago. There has been a growing body of literature that points to increases in student debt and declining job placement rates, which he fears could cause some students to reconsider a college education. Wolfe said that in reality, insurmountable debt for students following graduation is the exception, rather than the norm, and the alternative of not going to college has more dire consequences than paying off student debt. For in-

President Wolfe speaking to students at Willard Middle School.

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

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Office of University of Missouri System President “As a son of two college professors, a college graduate myself, university president and – most importantly, the father of two college freshmen – I urge all Missouri students to think about college when they consider their future,” Wolfe said. “Whatever their life ambition, a college education can truly help make their dreams a reality – and we as a society will be better off for it.” CHAMBER & EXTENSION Regional Extension Director Jay Chism President Wolfe visits with Executives at SRC in Springfield. and Greene County Program Director David Burton attended President Wolfe’s presentation to the Willard Chamber of Comstance, a person with a college degree will make nearly twice as much in his or her lifetime as some- merce at the Willard Community Center. Wolfe focused his Chamber presentation on one with a high school diploma. And the rate of the fact that Missouri is not funding education return on a college degree is about 15 percent – well when compared to other states. compared to the stock market at around 7 percent “Companies look at communities and the and the housing market at .4 percent. culture of the community and the education being At the four campuses of the University of Misoffered there,” said Wolfe. “The biggest piece of souri System, about eight out of 10 students also the Missouri pie of taxes is Medicaid. The next get some form of financial aid. biggest are K-12 and Higher education. We are Aside from the financial advantages, President Wolfe also said a college education allows students near the bottom nationally for funding of education and we are racing to the bottom.” to discover their talents, hone their strengths, think To be competitive, Missouri needs to rethink creatively and strategically, and learn to work in its priorities according to Wolfe. teams, which are all skills needed in today’s work“We need to change the conversation about force, regardless of the job. College graduates also education. It is an important part of our state’s lead healthier, longer lives, on average. economic development,” said President Wolfe. President Wolfe also mentioned MU Extension and the impact Extension does have in the area. “I remember when I was just a few weeks into this job that I made a trip to Springfield to learn about Extension programs. I remember hearing from the dairy farmer who told me that Extension programs saved his family farm. That is just one area where Extension is making an impact.” Extension is also a proven program for reaching all Missourians. “We asked ourselves, ‘Are we serving 6 million Missourians as the state constitution says we should?’ Extension is one of the ways we can,” said Wolfe. President Wolfe touring SRC.

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

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Horticulture Specialist Community Contact: TV and Radio  2 live interviews with KOLR10’s Chris Smith  5 radio interviews with Morris Westfall’s “Farm Page of the Air”  1 live radio interview with KKOZ, Ava (3/25/14) Requests for information  Telephone contacts – 73 for advisement  Email contacts – 31 contacts  Office visits, professional contacts – 1 for consultation and advisement  Farm site visits – 2 for advisement

Programs Presented:   

  

Gardeners of Greene County core training, Springfield (3/18/14) Food Safety from Farm to Fork,” FMO/ Kraft Professional Development workshop, Springfield (3/19/14) “Pest Management,,” Patrick Byers FMO/Kraft ProfesHorticulture sional Development byerspl@missouri.edu workshop, Springfield (3/19/14) “Woody Landscape Plants,” Master Gardeners of Greene County core training, Springfield (3/20/14) “Building Your Farm Income through Horticulture Diversity,” Farming Diversity meeting, Ava (3/21/14) “Building Your Farm Income through Horticulture Diversity,” Farming Diversity meeting, Theodosia (3/21/14) “Starting a Vegetable Farm,” Missouri Minority and Limited Resource Farmers Conference, Jefferson City (3/22/14)

Grape Pruning Workshop, Nevada (3/3/14)  “Specialty Bulbs,” Nevada Master Gardeners workshop, Nevada (3/3/14) “Developing a Winning Farmers Market  Booth,” FMO/Kraft Professional Development workshop, Springfield (3/5/14) “Specialty Bulbs for the Landscape,” Vernon  County Master Gardeners, Nevada (3/8/14) “Pruning Grapes,” Grape Pruning Workshop, Nevada (3/8/14) “Food Safety and Water Use on the Farm,” Food Safety Workshop, Kansas City (3/14-15/14) “Food Safety and PYO Farms,” Food Safety Workshop, Kansas City (3/1415/14) “Food Safety and Manure Use on the Farm,” Food Safety Workshop, Kansas City (3/14-15/14) “Vegetable Grafting,” guest lecture MSU vegetable production class, Springfield (3/17/14) “Home Landscape Hands-on practice at the Grape Pruning Workshop. Design,” Master

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

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Greene County “Reaching Out” Report

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Horticulture Specialist 

“Easy Care Turf and Groundcovers,” Potting Shed University, Springfield (3/24/14) “All About Tomatoes,” LIFT Senior Citizens group, Springfield (3/26/14)

Coordinated: 

              

Master Gardeners of Greene County core training (2/20, 2/25, 2/27, ¾, 3/6, 3/11, 3/13, 3/18, 3/20, 3/25) Missouri Blueberry School conference, Springfield (2/21-22/14) Food Safety and Specialty Crop Production workshop, Bolivar (2/24/14) Master Gardeners of Greene County board meeting (3/7/14) Grape Pruning Workshop, Nevada Attendees at the apple grafting workshop preparing (3/8/14) whip and tongue grafts Blueberry Pruning Workshop, Joplin (3/9/14)  Mini Envirothon, Lebanon (3/24/14) Master Gardeners of Greene County chapter meeting (3/11/14) Upcoming programming High Tunnel Construction Workshop, Mount  Composting, Mount Vernon (3/27/14) Vernon (3/12-3/13/14)  “Seed Saving,” Springfield Herb Society Fruit Grafting Workshop, Mountain Grove seed swap, Springfield (3/29/14) (3/12/14)  Elderberry Producers Workshop, RedSpringfield Plateau Master Naturalists board bud, IL (4/23/14) meeting (3/12/14) Master Gardener Hotline Development meeting, Springfield (3/17/14) Springfield Plateau Master Naturalists chapter meeting (3/17/14) LUC Tree Pruning Workshop, Lampe (3/20/14) Fruit Grafting Workshop, Springfield (3/26/24) Grape and Fruit Pruning Workshop, Springfield (3/26/14) Horticulture soil test reports - recommendations The Missouri Master Naturalist Program and distribution for SW region – 126 reports durresults from a partnership created in 2004 ing reporting period between the Missouri Department of

Participated in:    

MOSES Organic Farming conference, La Crosse, WI (2/27-3/1/14) MELD VI, Session 2, Kansas City (3/4-3/7/14) Lincoln University IPM Advisory Board meeting (3/6/14) Global Food Systems thematic team meeting, Springfield (3/19/14)

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

Conservation (MDC) and MU Extension (MUE). The Missouri Master Naturalist Program is recognized as a “named and branded” program within MU Extension. The MU School of Natural Resources is the academic home for the Program. See www.springfieldmasternaturalist.com or springfieldmn.blogspot.com/

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Greene County “Reaching Out” Report

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Master Gardeners of Greene County

Master Gardener Workdays Workdays took place at both the Xeriscape and Nathanael Greene Demonstration Gardens in March. A special thanks to the 40 Master Gardeners who came out to get the beds ready for Spring. The Xeriscape Garden workday was featured in the Springfield NewsLeader. At right: Master Gardener Minuen Odom

The Master Gardener Program is a popular and successful statewide volunteer community-service organization administered through University of Missouri Extension. The organization’s goal is to train gardeners who are willing to share their knowledge with others. Master Gardeners become volunteers of University of Missouri Extension and donate hours for community educational projects in horticulture. Volunteer activities include working with non-profit organizations, maintaining community gardens, conducting workshops, participating in a Master Gardener speakers’ bureau and staffing the Master Gardener “Hotline.” The Master Gardeners of Greene County can boast of over 300 members. For more information visit the chapters website at http://www.mggreene.org.

Upcoming Events 

Mike Sidebottom and Glenn Blake working on top of the Wisteria Pergola in the Master Gardener Demonstration Gardens

Native Bed Makeover

The Native Beds at the Nathanael Greene Demonstration Gardens are in the process of undergoing an overhaul and rejuvenation process this year, thanks to Master Gardener Kay Johnson. Kay has a passion for native plants including his project at Hickory Hills School in Springfield which gives students a hands on approach to learning about natives.

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

 

April 7-Potting Shed University: 6:307:30 “Introduction to Herbs” April 8-Monthly Chapter Meeting: 6:30-8 p.m. at Botanical Center April 14-Potting Kelly McGowan Shed University: Horticulture Educator 6:30-7:30 “Worm University of Missouri Composting Bins” Extension April 21-Potting mcgowank@missouri.edu Shed University: 6:30-7:30 “Butterfly Gardens.” April 26-Plant Sale 7:30 am at Botanical Center April 28-Potting Shed University: 6:30-7:30 “Mixing Annuals and Perennials in Your Garden” *All Potting Shed University Classes are at the Botanical Center with a fee of $5. No registration required; pay at the door.

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Greene County “Reaching Out” Report

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Master Gardeners of Greene County .Nearly

23,000 Volunteer Hours Contributed to the Community by Master Gardeners of Greene County den, Master Gardener Demonstration Gardens (at Nathanael Greene/Close Memorial Park), Xeriscape Garden, Lawn & Garden Show with classes, speakers bureau, Hickory Hills School Greenhouse and Gardens, Springfield Botanical Gardens, and community garden tours. This year, Master Gardeners had several projects that resulted in large numbers of volunteer hours. For example: volunteers reported 2,620 volunteer hours at the demonstration garden in Nathanael Greene Park, 1,844 volunteer hours operating the Master Gardener Hotline inside the Botanical center, 1,227 volunteer hours maintaining the Xeriscape Garden on South National and 1,467 volunteer hours working in other gardens at the Botanical Center.

Master Gardeners of Greene County has announced that members contributed a grand total of 22,936 volunteer hours during 2013. The valuation of volunteer time provides one way to measure the impact individuals make with each hour they volunteer. According to Independent Sector (IS), the national average hourly value of volunteer time is $22.14. The average hourly value in Missouri is placed at $19. That means the value of the time volunteered in the community during 2013 by members of the Master Gardeners of Greene County exceeds $435,784. During the year, chapter members use forms to track their volunteer hours on projects approved by leadership of Master Gardeners of Greene County. Those forms are submitted by members to the Greene County Extension office to document the number of hours required to retain active membership. This year, the total hours reported in Greene County were submitted by 163 "active" Master Gardeners. There are a number of community projects that generate volunteer hours for Master Gardeners of Greene County. A few of the projects include: Master Gardener Basic & Advance Training classes, Potting Shed University classes, community garden classes, Hotline Garden information, assistance with the “Ask a Master Gardener” colJ.J. Averett working with the iris in the Xeriscape Garden during a umn, Young Sprouts in the Gar- clean-up day. Photo by Master Gardener Cary Stokes. Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

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Greene County “Reaching Out” Report

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4-H Report for Greene County

Greene County 4-H’er Among Those Selected to Attend Missouri 4-H Congress Anthony Gott will be among the nearly 400 4H’ers attending the Missouri State 4-H Council’s 69th annual Missouri State 4H Congress in Columbia on May 28-30. This year’s theme for State Congress is “A New League of Super Leaders.” Attendees like Gott will get the opportunity to learn about the benefits of the leadership skills gained through 4-H, develop those and other skills, meet other 4-H’ers from across the state, attend thought-provoking workshops and hear from some nationally known speakers. Anthony Gott is a student at Strafford Public Schools and is a member of the Highmark 4-H Club. “I have never been to the Missouri 4-H Congress before. I don’t really know what to expect but I’m excited. I know this is my last year in 4-H and I am trying to figure all this out by myself. My grandma used to be very involved in 4-H, until about 4 years ago when my grandfather had a severe stroke. My Grandmother used to help me with camp, trips and kept me involved with 4-H,” said Gott.

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

More About 4-H As the largest out-of-school youth organization in the world, 4-H is open to all boys and girls, ages 5 to18. Children who are five to seven years old are eligible for 4-H Clover Kids, an introductory program. Youths who are 8 to 18 years of age can select from a variety of 4-H projects and activities that stress social and life skills in areas like decision making, communication, social interaction, civic responsibility and physical skills. Children do not have to live on a farm to join 4-H. Project opportunities include computers, robotics, foods and nutrition, horticulture, large and small animals and more. Missouri 4-H is University of Missouri Extension's youth development program. Learn more online.

4-H Dairy Cow Camp in Springfield Prepares Future Dairy Leaders Youth ages 8-18 interested in learning about the dairy industry will want to register for 4-H Dairy Cow Camp, set for May 24-26 at Robthom Dairy in Springfield, Mo. This camp draws attention to the importance of farming and its important role in Missouri’s economy. It provides youth a hands-on opportunity to care for dairy animals and learn about dairy production while learning life-skills at the same time. Persons working in the dairy industry visit with campers about careers in the dairy industry as well. The registration brochure and health form for the camp can be found online at http://extension.missouri.edu/lawrence . For more information, contact Karla Deaver at the Lawrence County Extension Center in Mt. Vernon, (417) 466-3102.

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Greene County “Reaching Out” Report

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4-H Report for Greene County

Three Greene County 4-H’ers Attend Summit and Celebrate 100 years of learning through Cooperative Extension

souri 4-H Kids Helping Kids fund, voted on several ballot issues in a mock election, and learned about additional trip opportunities through 4-H. Participants gained skills for successful work on teams, in careers, and in their communities through workshops presented by the Missouri College Advising Corps, Purdue 4-H Teens Teaching Biotechnology, Minnesota 4-H State Ambassadors, and Wisconsin and Missouri 4-H teams. Summiteers also honed their knowledge and skills with the EDGE challenge course, Bridal Cave Tour, line dancing, and team talent showcase emceed by Mizzou 4-H. On Sunday, youth and adult teams created plans to implement 4-H “teens as teachers” projects in their communities during 2014. With support from adults and opportunities to teach their peers about an issue or cause they care about, event organizers say youth can step into roles as community educators, change makers, and lifelong learners.

A.B. Burkhart, Taylor Groves and Lora Wright, all Greene County 4-H members, were among 140 youth and adults who participated in “Life is a Highway!” the 2014 Youth Civic Leaders Summit at Windermere Conference Center March 7-9. The 4-H team was joined by teams from 15 other counties, as well as groups representing Indiana, Minnesota, and Wisconsin 4-H. Carroll County 4-H Teens served as youth hosts for the retreat, bringing history to life with Route 66 themed décor, snacks, and teambuilding activities. Through a trivia challenge, Summit teams learned about the history and passage of the Smith-Lever Act of 1914, which formalized Cooperative Extension into a nationwide system, making 4-H and higher education accessible to youth across the United States. During Friday and Saturday sessions, 4-H alumni were invited as guest speakers, presenting thoughtprovoking questions on topics ranging from agriculture, technology, and medicine, to education, leadership, and service. “It was fascinating to hear how much 4-H alumni still value the program and what it has done for their personal, professional, and civic lives, even years afterward,” said Steve Henness, State 4-H Specialist. “It really made the point that youth development is an investment in education, careers, and communities over the long term. Life (in 4-H) is a highway, and we hope more young people experience the whole trip.” On Saturday evening, Summiteers celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Smith-Lever Act with activities promoting citizen- A.B. Burkhart, Taylor Groves and Lora Wright, all Greene County 4ship and lifelong learning. They H members, were among 140 youth and adults who participated in donated over $220.00 to the Mis- “Life is a Highway!” the 2014 Youth Civic Leaders Summit.

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

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Greene County “Reaching Out” Report

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4-H Report for Greene County

Greene County 4-H Team Takes First in Junior Horses 4-H’ers from all across the state tested their horse judging skills Saturday, March 15, at the University of Missouri campus. Ben Gallup, 4-H youth specialist with MU Extension, said 10 classes were available for participants to judge. Stephens College, the Missouri Junior Paint Horse Club and Rocky Mountain horse owners assisted with the event. To qualify, participants must understand the breed standards and explain how they place the horses in a class. The top three overall winners in the Junior Horses category were Mikayla Peterson, Greene County, first; Kristyne Eckhoff, Bates County, second; and Colton Warren, Boone County, third. The Greene County team took top team honors as the overall winner in 4-H Junior Horses category. Team members are Mikayla Peterson, Nicole Berger, Cara Driskell, Ella O’Connor, Rory O’Connor and Brooke Wieder. In the 4-H Senior Horses group, the Greene County team won third-place honors. Members include Jessica Cobban, Mattie Cobban, Serena Peterson, Bailey Skinner and Taylor Wieder.

Congratulations to the Greene County Horse Judging program! The junior team was 1st out of 16 teams and the senior team was 3rd of 15 teams! Congratulations to Mikayla Peterson, high individual in the junior division, Ella O'Connor, 4th high individual, Brooke Wieder, 6th high individual, and Cara Driskell, 17th high individual in the contest. In the senior division, Jessica Cobban was 5th high individual, Serena Peterson was 11th and Mattie Cobban was 17th.

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

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Greene County “Reaching Out” Report

Last Updated March 27, 2014

Nutrition Specialist Local Food System Work 

Creation of Community Food System Coaching Toolkit to be used in SW Missouri Counties. The document will be useful in engaging communities around food system issues, and helping them address hunger, health, sustainability, and food access issues. Ozark Regional Food Policy Council: Greene County Extension continues as an active member of this council, planning and implementing work from the 20-county community food assessment. This forum includes over 50 Greene County organizations working to address and provide solutions for building our local food system. In March, a brochure was created to better communicate our work. Several grants were written, awarded, and projects started to address key recommendations from our assessment. Economic Development through Local Food: Local Food as a Driver for Economic Development is the focus for a committee I am working with to bring a series of educational events to Greene County. In March, funding was received from Community Foundation of the Ozarks. USDA Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) Grant: Pam works 75% on this grant, and is developing materials to assist rural communities with developing Food Policy Councils; and to address Food Insecurity issues in SW Missouri counties. This work is being done in collaboration with five other states in the North Central Region of Cooperative Extension. These materials will be used in SW Missouri beginning in 2014.

Chronic Disease Self-Management Programs: This six-week series was held in Springfield during March. We have great outcome data on this class. For example, it helps participants improve health outcomes, reduces health-care visits, and improves quality of life measures. Pam taught nine classes in March, and 94 participants received education through this 2-hour workshop.

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

Healthy Lifestyle Initiative (HLI) is a University of Missouri Extension program. Pam works with communities to develop healthy community policies and environments that support access to healthy food and opportunities for physical activity. Collaborations include members of Duitsman local government, public health agencies, business leaders, local food & farm groups, schools, churches, etc. The committees work to create positive environmental changes and impact lifelong health. In addition to planning, community programs and initiatives are on-going. This month, a HLI 5-K community fun run was held.

Hy-Vee Sponsored Health Bash: this two-day event provided opportunity for MU Extension education and resource delivery. MU Extension logo appeared in Hy-Vee flyers marketing the two-day event. Sixty-seven participants received nutrition education, and several hundred received information on MU Extension.

MU Extension Programming Planning and Integration: Pam is working on this statewide team to integrate our healthrelated programs with research; maximize our impact in communities; develop sustainable resource generation; and elevate MU Extension’s value. This team met four times during the month of March.

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Greene County “Reaching Out” Report

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Family Nutrition Education Program Becky Roark      

Republic WIC Clinic—24 clients Well of Life Food Pantry— 160 families Central Assembly Food Pantry—105 families Roark Shady Dell Early Childhood Center—65 students Boyd Elementary School—215 students Amazing Kidz Day Care—15 students

Sherri Hull 

 

Victory Mission Family Ministries Food Pantry – Display & Discussion about “Nutrition Facts Panels”; 125 Participants Republic WIC Clinic, lessons on “Whole Grains” 32 clients Completed series of lessons at Walnut Grove Elem. PK-6th grade – 152 students; Bois D’ Arc Elem 4th-5th grade – 100 students; Campbell Small Wonders PK – 45 students Began series of lessons at Sequiota Elem. K-4th grade 300 students

Wood

Hull

Nevatt

Jenni Nevatt This month I completed a series of lessons for 99 of Carver middle school's sixth and seventh graders. In addition to basic nutrition information, students learned about food safety and were able to evaluate their hand washing skills. Also in Springfield, I presented the Dietary Guidelines to 499 sixth, seventh, and eighth graders at Pipkin middle school. Students were able to broaden their understanding of these four simple steps toward healthier lifestyles. The last day of the month I will teach a class for about 10 MSU students. Participants will learn meal planning and food budgeting skills.

Family Nutrition Education Program 2160 W. Chesterfield Blvd. Suite F200 Chesterfield Village, Springfield, Mo. Tel: 417-886-2059 Call the office to inquire about nutrition education.

Fossett Online at http://extension.missouri.edu

DeFord

Edmondson

Williams Page 24


Donation period runs from October 1 to Sept. 30

2014 Contributors to “Friends of Greene County Extension” Corporate Level Master Gardeners of Greene County Sanford & Associates

Benefactor Level Patron Level William & Virginia Darr George Deatz Friends of the Garden Ann Hall Joe Jenkins

Sponsor Level Greater Ozarks Hosta Society Greene Co. Soil & Water Conservation District RDW Family & Community Fund Jim & Nancy Tucker

Contributor Level Carl Allison David & Stacey Burton Ramona Burton Marla Calico Dr. Greenthumb/Greg Peterson Family Rusty Hathcock Gaylen & Dedra Jones Jack Kaiser Old Missouri Bank Ryan Lawn & Tree Jody & Barbara Norman Randall & Linda Sheridan Springfield Watergarden Society Gene Wallace

Friends Level John & Lisa Bakerink

Glenn & Beverly Blake Shelby Bradley Alice Counts Bob Cirtin Billie Sue Fuller Mary Gallagher James Garton Paul & Della Goodwin David & Linda Hall Avis Holloway Richard & Yvonne Jarvis Jeff Jones Mary Sue Joplin MFA Agri Services Pauline Marsh Steve & Marlu McElhany Dellene Nelson Steve & Pam Squibb Kathryn Steinhoff Ronald & Sue Carroll Terry Lee & Julie Viorel Chris & Colette Wilbers

Minuen Odom Cathy & Alex Primm Crystal Quade H. James Roper Second Wind Companies Stewart Farm Elizabeth & Paul Taylor Randy Underwood Leslie Wilde

Associate Level

Join Friends of Greene County Extension

Jodie Adams Cindy Arrowood Mr./Mrs. David Bailey Robert & Jana Belk Mardell Bontrager Keith & Malia Bucher Carr Stock Farms, LLC Kim Chaffin Steven Counts Kathleen Goff Douglas Green Fred & Elaine Hamburg Harrison Farm Dulcinea Fisher-Smith William Hosman Rita Johnson Bob & Barbara Kipfer Dorothy Miller Frieda Morris Edie Nelson Albert Niewald Gladys O’Dell

Since 1914, Greene County residents have sought help in agriculture, gardening, 4-H youth, nutrition, families, business and community development from Extension. Members of “Friends of Greene County Extension” contribute financially to make it possible for Extension to continue having a positive impact on the quality of life in Greene County. To learn how you can help by contributing go to extension.missouri.edu/ greene or call (417) 881-8909.

Total Cash Contributed: $20,769.65


Greene County “Reaching Out” Report

Last Updated March 27, 2014

Extension/Partner Meetings st

Office located inside the Springfield-Greene County Botanical Center 2400 S. Scenic Ave., Springfield, Mo. 65807 Tel: (417) 881-8909 Fax (417) 823-4818 Office hours: Monday - Friday * 8 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

rd

County Commission meetings: 1 and 3 Mondays of month; confirm agenda and meeting at http://www.greenecountymo.org/commission. Commission building, Springfield, at 9:30 a.m. Park Board Meetings: Second Friday of each month at 8:30 a.m. Call 864-1049 to confirm location of meeting. 4-H Leader’s Council Meetings: 3rd Thursday of each month (except July) from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., at Redeemer Lutheran Church, 2852 S Dayton Ave, Springfield. Master Gardeners of Greene County— board meeting: First Monday of each month at 4:00 p.m. at the Botanical Center. Master Naturalists Board Meetings: The board meets at 5:30 p.m. at the MDC regional office, on the second Wednesday of the month. Master Gardeners of Greene County-membership meeting: Second Tuesday each month at 6:00 p.m. at the Botanical Center. Greene County Farm Bureau — Second Monday of the month at Farm Bureau 2530 S Campbell Ave, Springfield. Starts at 7:30 p.m.

Greene County Extension

Corporate Sponsors  

 

Sanford and Associates, CPA, Springfield, Mo.: (417) 886-2220, www.adifferentcpa.com Master Gardeners of Greene County: http://www.mggreene.org Meyer Communications, KWTO 560 AM / KTXR 101.3 FM: (417) 862-3751 www.radiospringfield.com/ American Business Systems, Springfield, Mo.: (417) 866-5083, www.ambussys.com Sunshine Valley Farm, 8125 E State Highway AD, Rogersville, ph (417) 753-2698, http://www.sunshinevalleyfarm.com/ Springfield-Greene County Park Board, Ph 417-864-1049, www.parkboard.org

Can I Help? Lorri can help customers with material needs, soil tests or program registrations. Contact her at the Greene County Extension Center, (417) 881-8909. Lorri Winters joined Extension in 2005.

Lorri Winters Office Manager

Videos on YouTube Watch the videos posted to our channel at www.youtube.com/MUExtension417.

On Facebook Get regular updates about programs and news from MU Extension in southwest Missouri. Find us at facebook.com/MUExtension417. Each “Reaching Out Report” is used by Greene County Extension specialists to concisely communicate activities, contacts and events to members of the Greene County Extension Council, Greene County Commission and residents of Greene County. For more about this report contact the editor, David Burton, at (417) 881-8909.

Online at http://extension.missouri.edu/greene

March 2014 Reaching Out Report  

Reaching Out Report is the monthly newsletter of the Greene County Extension Council. This month's issue sets a record at 26 pages. Learn wh...

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