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G R E E N B U I L D I N G & D E S I G N JA N UA R Y + F E B R UA R Y 2 017

TYPOLOGY: Prefab, sustainable houses are in high demand, p. 28

SPACES: Houston has its eye on sustainable design, from a new university art center to inspiring green space, p. 60

THE KEY TO IOT IS ALREADY IN YOUR BUILDING

PHIUS’s Passive Projects Competition winners span the globe.


UP FRONT

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GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

In This Issue January+February 2017 Volume 8, Issue 42

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Defined Design

We take a look at how 55+ TLC Interior Design incorporated universal design concepts to transform an Arizona bathroom.

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Sustainable Solutions

Vectorworks’ new irrigation toolset puts real data in the hands of landscape architects, contractors, and urban planners.

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The growing demand for sustainable, prefabricated houses means more high-end options for homebuyers across the U.S.

Discover the latest innovations from ThermaRay, MacroAir, Newmat, Messana, Rehau, and Duro-Last.

Typology

Inner Workings

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Big Data, Big Buildings

Today’s building tech is not simply about gadgets; it’s about data—and what you can do with it.

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PHOTO: GRANT MUDFORD

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GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Table of Contents January+February 2017 Volume 8, Issue 42

Up Front 12

In Conversation Cynthia Phifer Kracauer

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Event Recap Take a look at the winners of the annual WSLA Awards as well as the latest PHIUS design awards.

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Punch List 72

6 Maxims for Diversity Columnist Lisa Matthiessen shares her insight for building a successful, diverse team.

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Cost-Competitive Passive Building Columnist Katrin Klingenberg of PHIUS talks about “getting to zero” in passive buildings.

Event Preview

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Cities Take Lead in Climate Change Partnerships Representatives from DOE’s Better Communities Alliance share local efforts around climate change partnerships.

Spring 2017 20

Editors’ Picks Curated by gb&d staff

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Spaces | Houston 60

Burst of Creativity

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Great Escape Houston’s expansive Buffalo Bayou Park is a natural escape just steps from the city skyline.

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Sky-high Sustainability The new 609 Main at Texas office tower incorporates green features at every turn.

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Modern, Minimalist, and Home

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PHOTOS: JONNU SINGLETON, COURTESY OF NEWMAT AND PHOENIX HAUS

Rice University’s new Moody Center for the Arts is LEED Silver–certified, with collaborative spaces that inspire thinking outside the box.

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This Houston family made their sustainable dreams come true with help from StudioMET Architects.

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54 The key to the Internet of Things is already in your building.

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Editor’s Note Chris Howe

To kick off 2017, we’re looking for answers. When we set out to to tackle a new issue, we always want to know: What are the problems facing leaders in the green building industry today, and what are the solutions? In this issue, we not only get some great answers, we also continue the conversation around some seriously important questions, like the ones tackled in the January/ February cover story. This issue focuses on buildings and energy, and as such, we sent writer Brian Barth out to dig into one of the biggest questions out there today–what new tech is having the most impact on your company? In “Big Data, Big Buildings (page 54),” answers from leaders at Cushman and Wakefield, Jones Lang LaSalle, and even BOMA may surprise you. And it all starts with a simple lightbulb. Read on to see how the next 80-plus pages tackle topics like big data—just how do we control it once we have it?—passive homes, and prefab housing. As for the latter subject, the home is one of the most important structures we talk about this issue, and it’s the focus of this edition’s Typology section (page 27). Here we examine the growing demand for sustainable, prefabricated homes, as writer Mikenna Pierotti shines a spotlight on successful new companies like LivingHomes and Plant Prefab, Ecocor, and Phoenix Haus. The prefab and modular industry is expected to expand at 15% annually through 2017 in the U.S. alone, according to a study by international business research company Freedonia Group. Christian Corson of Ecocor said, “We really are trying to take a big-picture look at what it is we’re doing, why and how we’re doing it, and

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how we can apply the most sustainable and benevolent methodologies—both internally and externally … We are in 2017. Everyone should have this. Every family deserves this.” Ecocor is both reducing waste and time-to-completion, which adds up to cost savings to the customer, making these types of homes even more accessible. The year ahead may bring more questions, but one thing we know for sure—the possibilities are endless, and we’re inspired by stories like that of Corson’s. We’re also inspired by the winners of the 2016 Women in Sustainability Awards and the PHIUS Passive Projects Competition. Turn to pages 14 and 17 to read more. Sincerely,

Chris Howe, Publisher & Editor-in-Chief

ON THE COVER The key to the Internet of Things may already be inside your building—and it all begins with LED lighting. We talk to the industry experts about the data that’s available now, and how controlling that data has the ability to change the way that we do business.

G R E E N B U I L D I N G & D E S I G N JA N UA R Y + F E B R UA R Y 2 017

TYPOLOGY: Prefab, sustainable houses are in high demand, p. 28

SPACES: Houston has its eye on sustainable design, from a new university art center to inspiring green space, p. 60

THE KEY TO IOT IS ALREADY IN YOUR BUILDING

PHIUS’s Passive Projects Competition winners span the globe.

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GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Editor’s Note Laura Heidenreich

gb&d Green Building & Design gbdmagazine.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Christopher Howe chris@gbdmagazine.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Laura Heidenreich laura@gbdmagazine.com MANAGING EDITOR

Innovative sustainable solutions that have a big effect without being showy are on every page of this issue of gb&d magazine. The efforts of companies like MacroAir (page 46), Newmat (page 42), and ThermaRay (page 44), to name a few, improve the way we experience our day-to-day—whether it’s keeping a brewery cool while we enjoy a beer, making an airport terminal more relaxing on a hectic day, or keeping your hotel room comfortable and quiet. Stories like these and others fill the pages of our first issue of 2017, and they’re an inspiring way to begin a new year to say the least. For proof of just how much the green building and design industry is changing and touching every area of our lives, look no further than the real-life example of Messana Radiant

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Cooling (page 38) and its solutions for keeping spaces comfortable while keeping costs and energy use down. When you think of college dorm rooms, you probably don’t think of the most environmentally friendly practices—unless a pile of pizza boxes being used as an end table counts as recycling (sorry, students, but it doesn’t). While we put together this edition of the magazine, we learned that Chatham University, just outside of Pittsburgh, is taking its environmental ethos to the max with one of the greenest dormitories. As such, the college worked with one of the industry’s leading heating and cooling companies, Messana, to enact their mission for sustainable dorm rooms. Here again, the key to sustainable practices is hidden before our very eyes, with radiant heating panels that are quick and easy to install. In this issue, we also zero in on new irrigation design tools with Vectorworks (page 24), durable roofing solutions that are both green and lightweight with Duro-Last (page 48) and modern windows that are versatile, energy-efficient, and airtight with REHAU (page 50). As always, we’re excited to share solutions like these with a broader audience as we all work toward a greener, more sustainable world.

Sincerely,

Laura Rote lrote@gbdmagazine.com ART DIRECTOR

Kristina Walton Zapata kristina@gbdmagazine.com ACCOUNT MANAGERS

Brianna Wynsma Reid Bogert CONTRIBUTORS

Brian Barth, Monica Kanojia, Russ Klettke, Katrin Klingenberg, Lisa Matthiessen, Mikenna Pierotti, Margaret Poe, Emily Torem, Sarah Zaleski MARKETING INTERN

Ayrie Gomez MAIL

Green Building & Design 1765 N. Elston Ave. Suite 202B Chicago, IL 60642 The Green Building & Design logo is a registered trademark of Green Advocacy Partners, LLC Green Building & Design (gb&d) magazine is printed in the United States using only soy-based inks. Please recycle this magazine. The magazine is also available in digital formats at issuu.com/greenbuildingdesign.

Green Building & Design is a certified B Corp. B Corp is to business what Fair Trade certification is to coffee or USDA Organic certification is to milk. B Corps are certified by the nonprofit BLab to meet rigorous standards of social and environmental performance, accountability, and transparency.

Laura Heidenreich, Associate Publisher

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Up Front Typology Inner Workings Features Spaces Punch List

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In Conversation Cynthia Phifer Kracauer

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Event Recap WSLA Awards and PHIUS Competition Winners

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Event Preview Design & Construction Week, AHR Expo, and Solar Power Northeast

20 Editor’s Picks Curated by gb&d staff

22 Defined Design Bathroom for the Ages

24 Sustainable Solutions Vectorworks Improves Irrigation Design

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UP FRONT

In Conversation Cynthia Phifer Kracauer

IN CONVERSATION with Cynthia Phifer Kracauer

The fight for gender equality has found its voice in architecture

gb&d: What obstacles do women face in achieving equality in the field of architecture?

By Brian Barth

Kracauer: No woman my age has gone through their career without experiencing some of the numerous obstacles in this profession for women, starting with dealing with sexual harassment when you’re young. If you want to have children, there’s the difficulty of getting flexible scheduling and issues associated with that. If you don’t want to work 12-hour days, then you are not going to get promoted, you’re not going to get put on the best projects, and your career is going to stall until you can go back to that level of working. And that’s not really an option for women who have young children at home.

Gender bias in architecture is not something conjured up out of the blue. For anyone who thinks men and women have equal footing in the field, here are some sobering facts: 42% of graduates from the nation’s architecture schools are women, but only 26% of current practitioners are; and just 17% of the principals and partners in architectural firms are women. And for those women who do persist in this male-dominated field, they make just $.76 on the dollar compared to male colleagues in equivalent positions. Something is not right about that picture, and Cynthia Phifer Kracauer, a New York–based architect with nearly four decades of experience in the field, is working to do something about it. Formerly a principal at the New York design firm Swanke Hayden Connell, and more recently, the managing director of AIA-New York’s Center for Architecture, Kracauer became the executive director of the Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation, the profession’s premier women’s advocacy organization, this fall. BWAF’s mission—“to change the culture of the building industry so that women’s work, in both contemporary practices and historical narratives, is acknowledged, respected, and valued”—is pursued through collaborative projects with the nation’s top design, engineering, and construction firms and institutions, including their signature annual event, the BWAF Industry Leaders Roundtable. Shortly after accepting the position, Kracauer spoke with gb&d about her passion for raising the profile of women in architecture and improving their experience in the workplace. In the coming year, she will be launching a new BWAF initiative called Emerging Leaders, where a cohort of early career female architects will be mentored with the goal of preparing them for future “C-suite” roles. gb&d

gb&d: And the disparity in pay certainly doesn’t help. Kracauer: Right. It’s pretty well documented that women make about $.76 on the dollar in architecture. And as your career goes on, the compensation disparity gets wider and wider—it’s like compound interest. And you have to deal with a tremendous amount of unconscious bias in rooms full of men. I’m about to speak on this topic at a national convention of women in construction, so I’ve got my laundry list of less-thanneutral gender tropes ready to go. gb&d: Tell us more about gender bias in the workplace.

PHOTO: COURTESY OF CYNTHIA PHIFER KRACAUER

Kracauer: There is a stereotype about how women are expected to behave. They are supposed to put relationships first, and they are supposed to be nice—that’s the biggest one. gb&d: Whereas men are supposed to be cunning and competitive. Kracauer: Right. Women are supposed to be nice and cooperative, not domineering. This conversation continues on p. 15

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Event Recap The 2016 Women in Sustainability Leadership Awards The winners celebrated another exciting year with a party in LA By Laura Rote

An expert in alternative housing, a CDC leader, and a director of architecture programming at one of the most prestigious universities in Latin America—the faces of this year’s third annual Women in Sustainability Leadership Awards were varied and inspiring. We celebrated these and a dozen more women when we gathered the winners and other industry experts to meet and mingle over cocktails, dinner, and an awards ceremony during this year’s Greenbuild International Conference and Expo on Oct. 4 in Beverly Hills. Speakers for the evening were Rochelle Routman, Chief Sustainability Officer at Halstead International and MetroFlor, and Ana Guerrero, Chief of Staff to Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti. This year’s exciting winners came from all over the globe and continue to inspire with innovative ideas in the field of sustainability. Winners were chosen by a judging panel that included Routman of MetroFlor, Kimberly Lewis of the USGBC, Amanda Sturgeon of the International Living Future Institute, Angela Foster-Rice of United Airlines, Leith Sharp of Harvard University, and Chris Howe and Laura Heidenreich of Green Building & Design.

The 2016 winners are: Lisa Bate, B+H Architects; Liz York, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Mary Tod Winchester, Chesapeake Bay Foundation; Kelly Vlahakis-Hanks, Earth Friendly Products (ECOS brand); Nicole Isle, Glumac; Holley Henderson, H2 Ecodesign; Susan King, Harley Ellis Devereaux; Carolyn Aguilar Dubose, Iberoamericana University; Kathleen Smith, International Living Future Institute; Barbara Deutsch, Landscape Architecture Foundation; Nancy Sutley, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power; Karen Kubick, City and County of San Francisco’s Public Utilities Commission; Barbra Batshalom, Sustainable Performance Institute; Andrea Goertz, TELUS; and Dominique Hargreaves, USGBC-Los Angeles. The celebratory evening was presented by gb&d magazine in partnership with the USGBC with support from the Metroflor Corporation, Steelcase, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, and United Airlines.

Harlan Stone, CEO of Halstead and CFO of Metroflor

For more on this year’s WSLA winners, visit us on the web at www.gbdmagazine.com.

Rochelle Routman, chief sustainability officer at Halstead International and Metroflor

Special thanks to our partners & sponsors

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UP FRONT

IN CONVERSATION with Cynthia Phifer Kracauer Continued from p. 13

Then there are physical standards that don’t exist for men. It’s just not a level playing field for women. It doesn’t mean that women can’t be successful, but what it does mean is that… gb&d: The cards are stacked against them? Kracauer: Yes. It’s clear if you look at how many women are graduating from architecture schools, and then there is this huge drop-off when you look at women architects with 10 years of experience. gb&d: What do you think happens to suck all of these women out of the pipeline?

Winners of the 2016 Women in Sustainability Leadership Awards

Kracauer: We call it the leaky pipeline. If you want to be home at night with your children, you have to get assigned to a project where you don’t travel. That limits the kinds of projects you can take on. So you’re not flying to China every other week. If you can’t do all that traveling, you’re going to get stuck in your career. gb&d: How did you navigate those challenges in your own career?

gb&d’s Laura Heidenreich (left) and Chris Howe (right) with Kelly Vlahakis-Hanks, CEO of Earth Friendly Products (ECOS brand)

Kracauer: First I worked for a multi-state firm based in Philadelphia, and then I worked for Philip Johnson in New York, which was wonderful, but I had to do a lot of traveling. I was the project architect for the Transco Tower in Houston, a 65-story office building. And then I got pregnant and I couldn’t travel. Doctors don’t let you travel after the seventh month or so. This was in the early ’80s when there was very little accommodation for professional women having babies. gb&d: What did you do? Kracauer: I went back to teaching for a few years, and I had my own little practice on the side. Then I had another kid. So I got my childbearing out of the way while I was doing kitchens and family rooms—smallscale residential work. Which is typically how women stay occupied professionally when they are taking care of children. They start their own businesses.

PHOTOS: CH PHOTOGRAPHY

gb&d: How did you make your way back to working in a major international firm and eventually becoming a principal? The 2016 Women in Sustainability Leadership Awards were held in October at the SLS Hotel in Beverly Hills.

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Kracauer: After I had my own practice for about five years, my husband, who was This conversation continues on p. 17

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©2016 Elkay Manufacturing Company

UP FRONT

Math. Science. History. Lead. In some schools, kids are exposed to more than their lesson plans.

At Elkay,® we want to help keep kids and drinking water safe. Our filtered ezH2O® bottle filling stations do just that by removing lead beyond the level required for our NSF/ANSI 53 certification. So let’s put cleaner, healthier water within everyone’s reach. Learn more at Elkay.com/ezH2O.

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UP FRONT

Event Recap 2nd Annual Passive Projects Design Award Winners

The winners of PHIUS’s 2016 Passive Projects Competition are innovative to say the least. Held as part of the 2nd Annual Design Awards Ceremony in Philadelphia, the juried competition recognized outstanding achievements in passive building design across climate zones, project types, and geographic locations. And the winners are: By Laura Rote

IN CONVERSATION with Cynthia Phifer Kracauer Continued from p. 15

working for a big firm, wanted to start his own office, and I was ready to do bigger scale work. So we sort of switched roles. I went and worked for a big firm, and my husband basically took over my practice. We were very lucky in that regard. We have two children—one is 34, the other is 30. We survived. gb&d: You are living proof of what’s possible then. Kracauer: Yes, and I want to help other women do the same, and men. Women talking to women about this is like a little echo chamber. We all remember getting fondled by the water cooler when we were 23, and what that may or may not have meant 30 years ago. But really what culture change is is having the entirety of society, men and women, understand the benefits of having healthier workplaces with flexible time for both parents. It’s also better for the children. It’s just a question of committing to some relatively simple changes. gb&d: What specifically will it take to create more equality in architecture?

PHOTOS: AARON LEITZ PHOTOGRAPHY, BRIBURN LLC, HAUSMAN PHOTOGRAPHY

Kracauer: I think women will be more comfortable in the workplace when there are more female leaders at the top. I recently read a book called Women Don’t Ask, which talks about how women are afraid to negotiate, and that’s a big part of the problem. Part of the problem with pay disparity is that women don’t ask for more money because of a whole bunch of socially programmed behaviors. They are too invested in their relationships to be demanding, for example. There are a whole bunch of stereotypical feminine behaviors that keep women from asking for what they need. gb&d: What is BWAF doing to support women in architecture practice?

For more on this year’s PHIUS winners, visit us on the web at www.gbdmagazine.com.

Best Overall Project & Best Commercial Project: Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) Innovation Center, Basalt, Colorado. Best Project by a Young Professional Under 35: TIE R Residence in Yokohama, Japan & Right-Sized Passive Home in Oak Park, Illinois. Best Single Family Project: Park Passive in Seattle, Washington. Best Multifamily Project & Best Affordable Project: Village Centre Apartments in Brewer, Maine.

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Kracauer: The tagline for the Beverly Willis Foundation is “changing the culture of the building industry,” and that’s really what’s starting to happen. There are firms now that are really trying to make it better. One of the really wonderful things about my job is I get to see how that is playing itself out in lots of different kinds of firms. There are women’s initiatives in some firms, where women get together and they support each other. In some firms they are trying to figure out what kinds of things the firm as a whole can do from a human resources standpoint This conversation continues on p. 19

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Event Preview Spring 2017

IN CONVERSATION with Cynthia Phifer Kracauer Continued from p. 17

to support female employees.

By Laura Rote

gb&d: Presumably the more society moves in that direction, the more the design industry will as well.

DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION WEEK

Kracauer: Yes. Things like sharing child care responsibilities between the fathers and the mothers is good for everybody. But that’s a real culture change. When I was studying architecture in the ’70s, a lot of the schools were just starting to go coed, and there was a lot of social upheaval. Then there was a second wave of feminism, and I think now that there has been a whole generation that has cycled through in a different cultural milieu, a lot of organizations and institutions are looking at the things that have worked, and the things that haven’t worked. gb&d: Are men typically encouraged to participate in the women’s initiatives you mentioned at certain firms?

Design & Construction Week

DETAILS

More than 80,000 design and construction When January 10–12, 2017 Where Orlando, FL professionals will gather at the fourth annual Web designandconstructionweek.com Design & Construction Week. Events take place across two major shows—the National Association of Home Builders’ International Builders’ Show (IBS) and the Kitchen & Bath Industry Show. IBS is the largest annual light construction show in the world, with more than 130 education sessions in eight tracks. This year’s sessions range from advanced green building and universal design to budget management and diversification.

PHOTO: OSCAR EINZIG PHOTOGRAPHY

AHR Expo DETAILS Explore the future of HVAC at the International When January 30–February 1 Air Conditioning, Heating, Refrigeration ExpoWhere Las Vegas, NV sition, with more than 2,000 exhibitors onsite. Web ahrexpo.com This year’s featured exhibitors include everyone from Acme Engineering Products and Dwyer Instruments to Trane and UEi Test Instruments. Product engineers, installers, end-users, reps, and more meet for this three-day, close-up look at the latest products and innovations in the field. Solar Power Northeast

DETAILS

PV leaders, manufacturers, and service providers When February 13–14, 2017 Where Boston, MA from all over the Northeast will join forces at Web events.solar/northeast Solar Power Northeast, formerly known as PV America. The event aims to expand solar business as well as talk policy, and offers low-cost workshops and hands-on training for solar professionals, while networking opportunities abound.

Kracauer: Yes, men are encouraged to participate. The leadership of firms really defines the character of the firm. Architecture has always been very “great man”-centric. The leaders of firms have to recognize that the women in their practice are not just cheaper and more hardworking, but are assets to the practice. gb&d: I understand that one of your top strategies at BWAF is to promote women as leaders, to get them into executive roles. Kracauer: That’s exactly it. We have a number of programs that we do in order to help women get into leadership positions. Every year for the last six years we’ve had a program called the Industry Leaders Roundtable retreat, with very high-level women and men who are leaders in the industry, to discuss and make plans for how to change the culture within architecture. The studio culture that comes out of architecture schools is a gendered thing. It takes a lot of hard work, and a lot of engaged conversation between the men in the office and the women in the office in order to get everybody to understand how to get beyond their gender stereotyping. gb&d: Sometimes even men with the right intentions don’t necessarily help when it comes to concrete changes. Kracauer: That’s true. At the roundtable This conversation continues on p. 23

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Editors’ Picks Curated by gb&d staff

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BOOK PREFABULOUS SMALL HOUSES

PROGRAM TOYOTA & YELLOWSTONE YOUTH CAMPUS

COMPANY DE-METER

PROGRAM CLEAN ENERGY COLLECTIVE

PODCAST DEEPROOTS

PROJECT CUTLERS

This 2016 book showcases inspiring projects from all across the United States. These small, efficient, and beautiful prefab houses run the gamut when it comes to style, size, and building method, whether they happen to be primary residences or even vacation houses. These houses range in size from 400 to 2,000 square feet, and they have been built with modular, SIPs, panelized, log home packages, kit packages, and hybrid systems. sherikoones.com

Toyota donated $1 million to the Yellowstone Park Foundation to support a Yellowstone Youth Campus. The campus will host youth programming and be the first Regenerative Campus of Living Buildings in a national park. The buildings are designed to significantly reduce energy use through high-performance insulation and windows, natural ventilation, and other passive measures. Planned photovoltaic arrays will provide more than 100 percent of campus energy needs. ypf.org

De-Meter allows you to monitor your energy use before you decide to adopt solar energy and track the differences over time throughout the adoption process as well. In addition to energy management, you can design your own solar system for your roof, create a PPA or leasing agreement, and create a competitive bidding market. De-Meter is pushing transparency between solar companies and their customers and helping people truly understand the value behind solar. de-meter.com

The Clean Energy Collective (CEC) is building, operating, and maintaining shared clean energy facilities. CEC delivers clean power-generation through medium-scale facilities that are collectively owned by participating utility customers. Monthly credits for members are automatically calculated and integrated with the utilities’ existing billing system, so it’s an accessible, cost-effective way to get solar. If you rent or own a home that’s not right for solar, this is a great way to adopt clean energy. easycleanenergy.com

DeepRoot’s new podcast, “Remarkable Objects,” was launched in fall 2016 and looks at the intersection of nature and urban design, with eight episodes that showcase interviews with someone working in this field, from designers to professors. Podcast host Leda Marritz talks with guests about their work and experience, and what their efforts mean for the future of cities. Episodes highlight environmental justice, parklets, and more. Follow the podcast on SoundCloud or check out the website. remarkableobjects.com

The Cape, a high-end sustainable housing project, has a new home—Cutlers, within the top 1% of sustainable homes in Australia. The one-story house is carbon-neutral, energy- and water-efficient, and features rammed earth block walls, polished concrete, zero VOC paints, and double-glazing to achieve an 8.2-star energy rating. Its annual running costs fall below $500, 15 to 20% of the running costs of a state average home. The goal is to build all 220 homes at The Cape to the same standard. liveatthecape.com.au

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PHOTO: WARREN REED PHOTOGRAPHY

Cutlers is a new house in a high-end, sustainable housing project in Australia, and it’s within the top 1% of sustainable homes on the continent.


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Defined Design Bathroom for the Ages By Laura Rote

Zero threshold doorways Doorways that have no thresholds or are flat or very low. Thresholds that are flush with the floor make it easy for a wheelchair to navigate through a doorway and prevent tripping.

as the design of products and environments that can be used by all people— to the greatest extent possible—without the need for adaptation or specialized design. Incorporating these ideas results in buildings and spaces that are both accessible to older people and people with disabilities as well as young people and people without disabilities. When it came time to remodel this spacious bathroom in Scottsdale, Arizona, the homeowners in their 70s knew they wanted to make changes that were both aesthetically pleasing and practical, so the space would accommodate them beautifully for the rest of their lives. The challenge? The clients didn’t want to change the bathroom’s basic configuration, as that could require the added headache of moving plumbing. Even so, they wanted a larger shower and plenty of natural and artificial light. They did not want support bars installed yet. The designer on the project—Bonnie J. Lewis, Allied ASID, Assoc. IIDA, CAPS, and founder of 55+ TLC Interior Design, LLC—says being proactive when designing spaces is a must. “Hire a qualified universal design professional to ensure your home is safe and prevent accidents or injury before they occur,” she says. Having a space that incorporates universal design ensures it will accommodate people of all ages and abilities. The NAHB echoes this sentiment, noting that universal design allows all kinds of different people to enjoy the same home, enjoying it even if their needs change drastically in the future. This Arizona bathroom also stands out for its other great features, including eco-friendly elements like low-VOC paint and not one but two Toto Washlets, which eliminate the need for toilet paper. The bathroom was completed in late 2015.

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Visitability A “visitable” home is free of architectural barriers that make it difficult for non-disabled people to accommodate older relatives or friends who need basic accessibility. A visitable home has: • At least one zero-step entrance approached by an accessible route on a firm surface no steeper than 1:12, proceeding from a driveway or public sidewalk • Wide passage doors • At least a half-bath/powder room on the main floor Jack and Jill This usually refers to a bathroom with two entrances and features like double sinks and a toilet outside the shower in a private room within the bathroom. Many Jack and Jill bathrooms are actually shower rooms. In this original bathroom, there were not only double sinks, but double toilets outside the shower and a large whirlpool tub in the main room. As built, the original “Jack and Jill” shower with dual showerheads had narrow doors on either side across from built-in cabinetry, which made the homeowners feel crowded and closed in. The two adjacent water closets had narrow doors and the spaces were small—they’d be inaccessible by a walker or wheelchair. Using the same footprint, a larger, barrier-free shower was created by eliminating the existing whirlpool tub.

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PHOTOS: DECASTRO PHOTOGRAPHY

EVERYONE CAN BENEFIT FROM UNIVERSAL DESIGN. The concept is defined


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IN CONVERSATION with Cynthia Phifer Kracauer Continued from p. 19 Before the renovation, this Arizona bathroom was cramped, with narrow doors and limited accessibility.

retreat we do these really interesting “disentangling your stereotype” exercises. It’s all about exposing your own unconscious biases. gb&d: Tell us about your Emerging Leaders program.

Easy-grip door handles and rocker light switches Lever door handles and rocker light switches are great for anyone with poor hand strength, but who wouldn’t like them? Just think about all those times you’ve tried to open the door or turn on the light when your hands were full. Problem solved.

Wide doorways Doorways that are 32 to 36 inches wide let wheelchairs pass through, give everyone plenty of room to move comfortably, and also allow you to move large items in and out if needed.

Curbless shower Also referred to as a barrier-free shower, a curbless shower is level with the floor that leads to it. You have no edge to step over to enter the shower, eliminating a fall hazard as well as an entry barrier for wheelchairs. In the Scottsdale project, Lewis replaced two smaller shower doors with one 36-inch-wide front entry shower door. Both water closets were also enlarged for accessibility by eliminating two unused storage areas and installing 36-inch-wide doors with lever handles. This enabled the plumbing for the toilets to remain where it was, while only having to move the shower plumbing 12 inches to accommodate the new shower depth.

Kracauer: Emerging Leaders is a project we’re just getting off the ground right now. It will be a selective cohort intended for women who are 5 to 10 years out of school, the time where you are ready to choose your path, if you will—either a path that’s going to lead you to a leadership position, or not. We want to try to equip women for leadership positions by doing negotiation training, public speaking and presentation

“The leadership of firms really defines the character of the firm ... The leaders of firms have to recognize that the women in their practice are not just cheaper and more hardworking, but are assets to the practice.” training, leadership skills development, communication skills—instrumental business-oriented training to make a stronger cohort going in to those promotion decisions. gb&d: What does the negotiation training look like? Kracauer: When you go to business school, you take classes in the strategies of negotiating. You’re setting a goal, you’re setting a floor. And you have to research comparable situations—certainly where salary is concerned. If you don’t know how much people are making, than it’s very difficult to know what your top line could be. What’s great about these active participation programs is that you do role-playing to practice. The trainer sets up scenarios that you act through. gb&d: Sounds invaluable! Kracauer: It’s pretty well understood that women have a lot of anxiety around negotiThis conversation continues on p. 77

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UP FRONT

Sustainable Solutions Improving Irrigation Design

By Laura Rote

WASTED WATER HAS BEEN

a top issue troubling irrigation professionals for years. While the pros have long done the best they can to meet clients’ irrigation needs in a sustainable way, the tools are only just now available to truly predict, measure, and meet precise water needs, whether you’re a landscape archi-

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tect, irrigation contractor, or urban planner. The EPA estimates that as much as 50% of the water applied in landscape irrigation is wasted due to overwatering caused by inefficiencies in irrigation methods and systems. Nationwide, landscape irrigation is estimated to account for nearly one-third

of all residential water use, totaling to nearly 9 billion gallons per day. An efficient irrigation system design can significantly reduce overwatering by applying water only where it is required. Vectorworks began offering the tools to do just that in the fall of 2016, when it released its 2017 product line, which includes Vectorworks® Architect, Landmark, Spotlight, Vision, Designer, and Fundamentals. With Landmark, the global provider of cross-platform CAD and BIM design software has aimed to replace the conjecture and “rules of thumb” of old-school irrigation with scientific data.

VECTORWORKS LANDMARK • CALCULATE physical features and resource availability • CREATE zones of similar watering needs • USE built-in worksheets to analyze for water efficiency • PREVENT water loss and tree rot • SAVE time • SAVE money • YOUR system performs precisely as designed

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PHOTOS: COURTESY OF VECTORWORKS

Scientific data is at your fingertips and helps you ensure you save water, time, and money with Vectorworks’ new irrigation toolset, taking your design from on-screen to real life


UP FRONT

SAVE TIME AND USE AUTOMATED WORKSHEETS

MWELO MODEL WATER EFFICIENT LANDSCAPE ORDINANCE

The new toolset shows complete irrigation coverage so you know exactly where the water is going based on precise calculations.

STREAMLINED DESIGN Irrigation tools are among Vectorworks’ many new features that help to streamline the planning process, including calculating physical features and resource availability. Designers can create zones of similar watering needs with the new Hydrozone tool and use built-in worksheets to analyze for water efficiency, so meeting a site’s water budget allowance is simple. Before designing a project’s landscape, a water budget provides the estimated amount of water to be used. The budget guides the user to make adjustments on water use as needed, while also taking gb&d

into account the amount of rain an area receives or how much is evaporated naturally, or if the plants need a lot of water, and so on. A goal may indicate that you can only use so much water a year, requiring other adjustments be made up front. When you can get your water budget to a certain usage percentage, you can begin to specify the appropriate plants and other water-required features, knowing the project will be water efficient while also earning the project favorable credits toward LEED or SITES ratings. The tools are like an answered prayer for some, says Bryan Goff, director of design + sciences at Grey Leaf Design. Goff helped test the new program for close to a year and provided feedback around his experience, but even he couldn’t predict how the end-product would exceed expectations. “It’s definitely been a missing piece,” he says, adding that most design software focuses in one area, and often irrigation

is forgotten, especially in areas like the Midwest. But in places like California or Texas, irrigation design can be tricky and require adjustments after installation to meet strict mandates, especially as designers relied more on past experience and rules of thumb than scientific data. Vectorworks continues to push the boundaries of what can be accomplished in design software, from more analytics to the nitty-gritty needs of designers, CEO Dr. Biplab Sarkar said in a previous gb&d interview. The new irrigation toolset provides granular data for realistic design outcomes while allowing for better water management. “Imagine that you want to design a golf course or a soccer field, and you want to design your water lines in such a way that it reduces your water consumption and also keeps the flow powerful enough to water everything. The program can help you maximize your water efficiency,” Sarkar says.

THE HYDROZONE TOOL is another improvement, allowing designers to create zones for various water usage or enter plant types and their needs. It’s especially useful in places like California, where the MWELO (Model Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance) dictates strict water budgeting. Without this tool, you’d spend a lot of time entering data in a worksheet, noting surface areas, types of irrigation, how much water plants require, and even the evapotranspiration rate where you live. “All of that ... requires a lot of calculation. I used to work in California and spent a lot of time doing that,” says Lance Fulton, the Landmark planner who also worked on the tools.

+2

NEW BUDGET SHEETS IN 2017

But with the Hydrozone tool and automated water budget worksheets, Vectorworks does it all for you. Whether specifying lateral and main piping, sprinkler heads, drip systems, valves, or other components, automated and manual placement methods enable you to design, document, and estimate proposed and as-built systems efficiently. Two new water budget calculation worksheets are also due this year—one that conforms to the EPA WaterSense program, LEED certification, and SITES certification, and another for users in California. Worksheets vary by regulation or certification, but with Vectorworks, the entire process can be accomplished in minutes.

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UP FRONT

We’re not just one step ahead—we’re 40 STEPS AHEAD of a lot of our competition because of what we can produce, how we can produce it, and we can scientifically prove where we’re at.” - Bryan Goff, Grey Leaf Design

DOING MORE WITH LESS

Users previously relied on Vectorworks for everything except irrigation, according to Eric Gilbey, the product marketing manager – Landscape Industries. “For irrigation they would have to buy a separate CAD program ($4,000–$5,000), and then a third party add-on ($1,000–$1,500). With us it’s all included in the Landmark edition of Vectorworks (MSRP $2,945). You don’t have to pay anything extra. And it’ll give you a more efficient design as well.” The Vectorworks irrigation toolset was developed using real performance data from equipment from vendors that are committed to water efficiency— companies like Hunter, Rain Bird, Toro, Netafim, and Irritrol. “It allows my firm to do things others just can’t,” Goff says. “We’re not just one step ahead—we’re 40 steps ahead of a lot of our competition because of what we can produce, how we can produce it, and we can scientifically prove where we’re at.” When Goff was really able to dig into the design during testing, he

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discovered that the new tools went beyond his hopes of simply placing a sprinkler head in a spray zone, classifying it, and showing a line where the piping goes, for instance. He could see the water coverage based on precise calculations, and he could also account for pressure loss, determine whether larger pipe was needed, determine whether he needed more heads, choose a particular type of head, adjust nozzle size, and more. Where past designers might have said of their design, “It’s close, so we’ll overbuild it,” he could be exact. PREVENTING WATER LOSS, TREE ROT, AND MORE Just this past autumn, Goff was out working on a large residential lot in Minnesota that had sizable plant beds and lawns and even a towering Sycamore tree—an uncommon sight in the region. “With standard irrigation installation, the installer would just come in and use a large rotor head and spray everything—spray down the trunk, they don’t care, it’s about getting the grass wet,” he says. “We’re able to design heads that aren’t

spraying the trunk of the tree so it won’t cause rot or decay. We’re able to design accordingly. On top of that, we’re able to design root feeder systems that properly water the tree based on what an arborist has told us the tree needs.” Where the installers of old would simply “eyeball” the project and do their best to get it right, making adjustments afterward, Goff is able to direct his efforts with proven data. While the latter is sure to become standard, the former often results in overwatered plants, sidewalk spray, and water blowing away across lawns. “We help ensure the system will perform as you design it to perform, so that it will not waste water and not damage any equipment,” says Lance Fulton, the Landmark product planner who worked with software engineers on the new tools. gb&d

THE SLAB TOOL HELPS DRAINAGE THE SLAB TOOL is nothing new. Architects have been using it for years, but now the slab object can also incorporate drainage. The slab drainage tool allows designers to create sloped slabs and flat roofs with tapered components. The feature ensures you’re making the right decision while documenting key data and allowing for easy change management across a given BIM design. “The slab tool now identifies slopes for certain panels, ridges, or valleys, and locates drains to push the water toward. The individual slab components can also abide by slopes or not abide by slopes, dependent on the user. What’s even more, you can use this tool to accommodate a particular draining pattern so you can use materials more appropriately for your green roof. That’s important considering Vectorworks’ commitment to encourage designers to use green building processes wherever possible. Gone are the earlier limitations. “The components can now recognize a virtually sloped roof the way it’s intended to be designed, so the green roof can still be planned out,” says Gilbey.

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FRONT GREEN BUILDING UP & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Inner Workings Features Spaces Punch List

gb&d

30 A New Demographic LivingHomes fills a void with a factory that churns out sustainable, prefab homes

32 From the Ashes Phoenix Haus makes living in a passive house look easy with affordable, prefab homes

34 Partners in Transformation Ecocor combines strong design with manufacturing and sustainability

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TYPOLOGY

This Living Homes house in Santa Monica is a beautiful example of the prefab possibilities.

PHOTO: COURTESY OF LIVINGHOMES

TWO PATHS CONVERGE ON THE WAY TO A BUILDING REVOLUTION BY MIKENNA PIEROTTI

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PREFAB TYPOLOGY

Every revolution begins where we live. Around the kitchen table, at the water cooler, in the garden—new ways of thinking are born where we work, play, and dream. The explosively growing green building industry, what some might call a movement, is no exception. The 2015 Green Building Economic Impact Study by the USGBC and management consulting company Booz Allen Hamilton anticipates the residential green construction market will grow from $55 million in 2015 to $100.4 million in 2018—a 24.5 percent growth year-over-year. The fuel feeding this engine is a growing population concerned both with living more sustainably and creating healthier, safer indoor environments for their families. At the same time, another, often overlooked, segment of the new construction market has also been steadily gaining popularity thanks to its inherent efficiency and flexibility—prefabrication. The prefab and modular industry is expected to expand at 15 percent annually through 2017 in the U.S. alone, according to a study by international business research company Freedonia Group. What do you get when you combine the popularity and passion of green building with the efficiency and flexibility of prefab? Perhaps, just perhaps, you get the start of a revolution. Here, we ask three pioneers in the green prefab industry how they’ve merged the ideals and appeals of these disparate approaches to new construction and how this marriage of standards and processes, technology and ideology, might shape the future. gb&d

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TYPOLOGY

A NEW DEMOGRAPHIC

LIVINGHOMES & PLANT PREFAB

LIVINGHOMES start at $150 to $235 PER SQUARE FOOT, install or foundation costs.

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PREFAB TYPOLOGY

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF LIVINGHOMES

GRANT MUDFORD

More than a decade ago, entrepreneur Steve Glenn noticed a large and growing demographic that didn’t fit into the typical homebuyer mold. These were urbanites who valued both good design and healthy, sustainable products—and were unwilling to compromise. He calls them the “cultural creatives.” “They’re buying Volts and Teslas, organic produce, and IKEA furniture. They read Wired and they do yoga,” Glenn says. “The production of homes has not traditionally been focused on these consumers.” So what is his plan? To get world-class architects to design LEED Platinum level homes using highly efficient prefabrication methods and to market those homes to this urban demographic. Despite one of the worst real-estate downturns in the country's history hitting shortly after his idea came to fruition, Glenn founded LivingHomes, a company dedicated to the design and development of modern, architecturally stunning yet affordable prefabricated homes that are both sustainable and healthy for consumers. Sound impossible? Not to Glenn. Since its founding, LivingHomes has made waves. “Our first home was the first in the nation that was certified LEED Platinum. We built the first multi-family project certified LEED Platinum in northern California; the first LEED Platinum multi-family in Silicon Valley; and the first LEED Platinum in Newport Beach.” gb&d

Plant Prefab spun off from Living Homes in 2016, and the demand for houses coming out of the company's 62,000-square-foot factory in California is clear.

The LivingHomes blend of design genius from architects like Ray Kappe, FAIA; and green functionality, using natural, non-toxic, and sustainably sourced materials; together with the efficiency of building in high-tech factories, quickly made it one of the most experienced LEED platinum home builders in the country. But for Glenn, the niche he saw—to meet the needs of an exacting group of consumers while addressing rising emissions and sustainability standards in cities across the country—couldn’t be completely filled until he controlled both the design and fabrication processes. For the last 10 years, LivingHomes outsourced its fabrication to factories that make other types of homes— from mobile to modular. “We never wanted to own our own factory. But now that we have gotten extremely busy, we realized we needed a facility focused just on high-quality, highly sustainable homes.” At the same time he realized that if he solved his own problem he could solve the problems of a lot of other architects and small developers looking for a more

sustainable, high-quality way of producing these homes. The answer was to spin off yet another company to focus on the design and development of sustainable prefabricated homes, especially in urban neighborhoods and cities where populations are booming and housing is scarce. Thus, in 2016, Plant Prefab was born. And with its 62,000-squarefoot Rialto, California factory, Plant Prefab is on track to be just as successful as LivingHomes. Glenn says they shipped their third home in fall 2016. Glenn’s new business targets any individual, developer, or architect doing single or multi-family custom, high-quality building projects. He says in addition to their custom work, they can work with existing plans and love to talk to clients about how to build more efficiently with prefab. Although not everything can be built modularly in the factory yet, he says, the sky might be the limit tomorrow. And the future is coming faster than anyone could have anticipated. gb&d january–february 2017

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TYPOLOGY PREFAB

FROM THE ASHES PHOENIX HAUS Kate McDonald has her roots in the story of a true American dream. Her grandfather, Anton Cech, a native of northern Germany, emigrated to the U.S. in 1926 and built a successful company from the ground up with almost nothing to his name. His conviction to pursue his dreams lives on in his children and grandchildren. Seeing a growing need for a marriage between Passive House and high-efficiency, low-cost prefabrication methods in the building industry, Cech’s children and grandchildren started Phoenix Haus in 2011. Their goal was to influence the construction industry and create innovative, healthy, environmentally conscious buildings. Today, they’re doing all that and more in the heart of the old American manufacturing industry in Detroit, in a 1900s factory that once served as a stamping plant. “We invested heavily into renovation and expansion that was completed mid-2016. The factory is 18,000 square feet with semi-automated equipment, an overhead crane, and a loading bay for a specialized vertical trailering solution,” McDonald says. Now project manager at her family’s company, McDonald says Phoenix Haus is projected to complete six to eight homes in 2017 alone, which will be their first year of production, and interest has skyrocketed. “Solely from organic growth, without major marketing or PR campaigns, Phoenix Haus receives inquiries almost on a daily basis from around the country.” She says nationally, the trend is growing greener every day. “Currently, demand is greater than supply and Passive House–trained architects and builders are trying to keep up. Since 2005, the amount of certified Passive House square footage has been doubling every year. It surpassed one million in 2016. The

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The PHOENIX HAUS envelope package price translates to roughly $110 PER SQUARE FOOT.

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TYPOLOGY

PHOENIX HAUS BY THE NUMBERS A structure built to Passive House standards lowers electricity usage by around 90% compared to a traditionally built home.

LEED buildings report almost 20% lower maintenance costs than typical commercial buildings.

Since 2005, the amount of certified Passive House square footage has been doubling every year. It surpassed

1 MILLION in 2016.

Stick-built homes can take MONTHS to put together in the field. Prefabricated homes can be built and assembled in WEEKS.

THIS PAGE A house's panels are assembled onsite in Crested Butte, Colorado. LEFT A typical Phoenix Haus prefab home is 2,500 to 4,000 square feet.

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF PHOENIX HAUS

only trend we see coming is for more and more certified Passive House buildings.” A typical Phoenix Haus home is between 2,500 and 4,000 square feet and one to two stories. McDonald says their market is mostly middle-income, with ages ranging from 26 to 55. But in 2017 they’re hoping to roll out pre-drawn template designs that will offer off-the-shelf yet customizable homes that are even more affordable and practical. Although she admits Passive House standards often mean higher costs, even when prefabricated, the return in energy savings—and thus energy bills—is a worthwhile return on the investment. “Currently, there is a 10 to 15 percent cost premium to building to the Passive House standard using prefab. However, when a cost analysis is performed and this premium is amortized over the life of gb&d

the structure, it turns out to be a marginal increase in the investment that starts paying you back the minute you start living in the structure,” she says. McDonald believes that the U.S. building industry has lagged behind many other countries with its resistance to increased standards. But the market, she says, will soon demand change. And businesses like Phoenix Haus will be there to provide. “Passive House is the gold standard when it comes to energy efficiency.” The easiest, most affordable way to provide Passive House on a grand scale is through prefab construction. As we enter an era of climate crises and increased anxiety over energy resources, why wouldn’t we work toward a solution that provides energy independence, healthy and comfortable living, and is good for the environment? gb&d january–february 2017

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TYPOLOGY

PARTNERS IN TRANSFORMATION ECOCOR

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offers environmentally conscious building strategies. They have extensive experience creating beautiful buildings in the Passive House standard. Hundreds of miles away, in sleepy Searsmont, Maine, owner and technical director of construction firm Ecocor, Christian Corson, struggled with the same frustrations that Pedranti did. He has been a leader in the United States Passive House movement for more than six years, founding Ecocor in 2010. “There is almost no other sector of human civilization where we have been doing things virtually the same way for half a century,” Corson says. Ecocor has focused on the design, manufacture, delivery, and assembly of high-performance Passive House buildings, reducing energy consumption for heating and cooling by 80 to 90%, cutting construction waste, and shortening time-to-occupancy since its inception. Although they didn’t begin their prefabrication process until 2013, in just three years they’ve built more than 35 passive homes. And they’re

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF ECOCOR

For architect Richard Pedranti, AIA, CPHC, CPHB, HERS, PHIUS +, LEED, the fact that green building hasn’t yet become the standard in new construction points to a problem inherent in the building construction industry itself. A nearly 30-year veteran of the building industry, Pedranti led a team that worked on the $2.5 billion Tokyo International Forum building and has worked with respected residential architects in some of the finest neighborhoods in New York. So he isn’t afraid to point out the industry’s shortcomings. “We’re still building homes the way we did in the 1930s,” he says. “And that’s a result of our building code. I like to say our code represents the worst house you are legally allowed to build. Because we don’t measure performance, or indoor air quality, or comfort, or the amount of natural resources and energy we use to build and live there.” Pedranti’s firm, Richard Pedranti Architect (RPA), lies in the heart of the Upper Delaware Region and

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PREFAB TYPOLOGY

The average cost per square foot of a SOLSKEN model home is $237.

Ecocor manufactures pre-fabricated, high-performance passive homes in a highly controlled environment.

gb&d

looking to scale up to 50 or 60 passive homes a year, Corson says. Key to that goal will be a new partnership and a new line of model homes. The partnership, grown out of a longtime friendship, seemed a natural extension of Pedranti and Corson’s mutual desire to affect real change in the green building industry and the building construction industry as a whole. The two met at industry conferences and their passion for the same ideals shown through. “It was a natural progression, evolving from a personal friendship to a strategic business partnership, where I would do the design and engineering and Chris would do the construction,” Pedranti says. For them, it all comes down to where and how we choose to live. “It makes no sense to ask our clients to raise their families and children in a home built out of toxic materials. At the same time, not using these materials means the people working for us, on the floor of the factory day-to-day, they stay healthy, too,” Corson says.

So in June 2016, the two companies announced a partnership to design and build the most energy-efficient prefabricated homes in North America—built to Passive House standards, with solar-optimized orientation and high performance windows, using the same sort of sustainable, healthy materials clients had come to expect from both companies. A typical RPA/Ecocor home, called the SOLSKEN line, will contain FSC-certified lumber, zero-VOC insulations, and chemical sealers, with materials manufactured short distances away, reducing embodied energy. In the Ecocor factory, panelized walls, floors, and other components are fabricated with the latest technology in a highly controlled environment, and much of the construction waste is reused in other projects. That means reduced waste and reduced time-to-completion, all cost savings that can be transferred to the customer, making these types of homes even more accessible. “We really are trying to take a big-picture look at what it is we’re doing, why and how we’re doing it, and how we can apply the most sustainable and benevolent methodologies—both internally and externally,” Corson says. “We are in 2017. Everyone should have this. Every family deserves this.” gb&d january–february 2017

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TYPOLOGY

Messana Radiant Cooling sets you free from air conditioning!

RADIANT COOLING AND HEATING get inspired by nature to create Thermal Wellbeing™ in your home or commercial building. ®

Radiant systems are more energy efficient, more comfortable, more attractive, and healthier than any other air-based system. Messana offers a fully integrated radiant cooling and heating system for commercial and residential applications. Radiant ceiling panels (Ray Magic® gypsum, metal and wood), air treatment units and state-of-the-art integrated control system with dew-point and air quality sensors. We also offer full design, support and coordination with engineers, architects and tradespeople.

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4105 Soquel Drive, Ste B Soquel, CA 95073

radiantcooling.com gbdmagazine.com


GREEN BUILDINGTYPOLOGY & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Inner Workings Features Spaces Punch List

38 Messana Radiant Cooling One of the nation’s most sustainable universities chooses Messana for its HVAC needs.

42 Newmat Newmat Stretch Ceiling Systems has the solution for ambient noise and discomfort in airports, museums, and more.

44 ThermaRay A radiant heating system in one Manhattan hotel equals a cozy stay for guests.

46 MacroAir Cooling a large industrial space is a breeze with these large HVLS fans.

48 Duro-Last A Detroit coworking space gets a new, durable roof that’s both green and hardcore.

50 REHAU A D.C. hotel is transformed with REHAU’s energy-efficient windows.

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INNER WORKINGS

Just north of Pittsburgh on nearly 400 acres, Chatham University is doing things differently. There, the Eden Hall campus includes the Orchard Residence Hall that opened in summer 2015, designed by Mithun to be one of the greenest dormitories in the world. But how to cool dorms in a humid setting without expending an abundance of energy? That’s where Messana Radiant Cooling comes in. For decades, countries like Italy, Germany, and China have been using hydronic radiant cooling panels instead of traditional HVAC. The panels are easy to install, energyefficient, and take up less space than air conditioning ductwork, according to Messana co-founder Alessandro Arnulfo. Messana is among the first to introduce hydronic radiant cooling to the states, and its Ray Magic system uses radiant gypsum panels to cool and heat rooms. At Orchard Hall, you won’t see or hear the system, but you’ll know it’s there. You’ll feel it. EXPANDING ON GREATNESS

Messana Radiant Cooling transforms energy performance at a progressive university By Laura Rote

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BUT WHAT IS RAY MAGIC?

The Ray Magic panel is a gypsum panel with pipes inside aluminum transfer plates. The pipes are attached to the supply and return line, and the panels, which come with the drywall already attached, are laser-engraved so that when you hang the panel, you don’t gbdmagazine.com

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF MESSANA

The New Generation of HVAC Tech

From the start, Chatham University— named one of the top 50 green colleges by The Princeton Review—set out to create a campus that was sustainable first. When it comes to the dorms, Chatham wanted to keep students comfortable without wasting energy. Eden Hall’s high-performance buildings are designed to last 100 years, emphasizing a small footprint, operable windows to promote natural ventilation, and geothermal technology to share energy between buildings. When setting out to build Orchard Hall, eliminating HVAC ducts was high on the to-do list, as the wood framed residence hall had height restrictions and a minimal design aesthetic. Radiant gypsum panels are minimal, and more headroom was a major benefit, according to Antonio Pares, principal at Mithun Solomon. Pares says the system also reduced mechanical noise— the rooms are largely silent as the panels have virtually no moving parts.


INNER WORKINGS

Radiant heating panels in the dorm rooms keep students comfortable year-round and are quiet and hidden, with no disruptive maintenance.

HEAT RECOVERY VENTILATION WITH INTEGRATED DEHUMIDIFICATION hit the pipe. “Basically, the panel itself is the drywall. When you install the panel on the ceiling, you don’t see anything. It looks and installs like regular drywall,” Arnulfo says. “The installation is very quick and easy.” You can also do all the molding and painting you want, and Messana can integrate pendant lights as well as sprinklers or speakers in the ceiling if desired. The gypsum ceiling panel has another benefit compared to a traditional radiant floor—low thermal mass, which is key to radiant cooling so the system can react fast if, say, many gb&d

people enter a room at once. This is important considering that humidity can cause condensation. The control system immediately detects this situation and increases the supply water temperature and, consequently, the ceiling temperature rises quickly. Gypsum or metal are the most fast-acting solutions for radiant cooling, but metal costs three to four times more. RADIANT COOLING VS. AIR CONDITIONING

A radiant cooling system can be 20 to 40% more efficient than traditional AC, Arnulfo says. Simulations done at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

In the summer, let’s assume the school wants the building to be conditioned at 74 degrees, so the temperature is set to that. But outside, it’s hot—maybe 100 degrees. Fresh air is needed, but it’s warm, and the cold air inside is dirty because of carbon dioxide. This is where the heat recovery ventilation system, which exchanges the dirty “used” air for fresh air, comes in and helps to decrease the temperature by exchanging those two flows of air. “This system allows you to recover a lot of energy,” Arnulfo says. After the outside air is pre-conditioned through the HRV, it goes into a neutral temperature dehumidifier that extracts the humidity (latent heat) and adjusts the air temperature to the room temperature to be comfortable. january–february 2017

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INNER WORKINGS

TERMS LATENT HEAT Heat that changes the state of matter from solid to liquid or liquid to gas. It’s related to the humidity.

compared traditional AC to radiant cooling in the floor across nine U.S. cities and proved radiant solutions saved 30%. Using radiant, you separate the sensible heating load from the latent load— something you can’t do with traditional AC. Sensible heat is what we perceive as temperature. It’s what we feel when we say, “It’s hot in here.” Latent heat is heat associated with humidity. When using AC, you treat the humidity and temperature with the same device. “This is one of the biggest problems of air conditioning,” Arnulfo says. “Humidity goes much lower than the human body likes, so it’s very difficult in air conditioning systems to treat. The air is too dry. Your skin is uncomfortable. And it’s a waste of energy.” Using a radiant system, you treat the latent heat by using dehumidifiers while you treat sensible heat using radiant panels, maintaining a comfortable environment. AC is where a lot of energy is consumed in summer. “If we want to save energy and reduce our carbon footprint, that’s where we need to focus—reducing the energy consumption in the HVAC device in summer,” Arnulfo says. By contrast, an air conditioning system blows cool air in a room at, say, 55 degrees, while walls stay hot—maybe 85 degrees. “This is a perfectly uncomfortable situation,” Arnulfo says. “You’re

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DEW POINT The temperature at which condensation begins. Condensation occurs if the ceiling surface goes below the dew point.

feeling radiation of the wall. And the air is blowing to you too cold.” The cold air chills you, turns off once it reaches the set temperature, and then you’re hot again because the walls are still hot, Arnulfo says. “In an air conditioning system, you always have this problem of unbalanced thermal exchange. It’s always the wrong proportion between radiation and convection. Too much convection (cold air) and too little radiation (warm walls and ceiling).” ELIMINATING DISRUPTIVE MAINTENANCE

The engineers knew they needed a lowmaintenance solution to heating and cooling the dorms, according to Jesse Agosta, the mechanical engineer with Interface Engineering who worked with Messana at Chatham. “Something that could last and that would provide optimal control and comfort to the occupants,” he says. While geothermal heat pumps in each room were first considered, Agosta said those require air filters in each room that have to be changed every few months. To keep a heat pump working optimally, preventative maintenance is a must, starting with the air filters that contractors install. “That’s a lot of work and a lot of disruption on the occupants,” Agosta says. “Plus the heat pumps are a little louder when they turn on.”

The campus’s highperformance buildings are designed to last 100 years, with operable windows to promote natural ventilation. PREVIOUS PAGE RayMagic has been running at Orchard Residence Hall for more than a year, and already the results are exceeding expectations.

ADOPTION IN THE U.S.

Agosta admits he didn’t accept the technology right away, especially considering Pittsburgh’s humidity. He says it was challenging considering Orchard Hall’s windows—you have to account for students opening them. “Finding a system that didn’t rain or cause condensation that’d lead to mold, that’s a pretty big obstacle to overcome from an engineering standpoint,” he says. While people have been using radiant heating and cooling in Europe for years, professionals in the U.S. are just beginning to consider it seriously. That may have something to do with experiences some 20-plus years ago, after the first stateside attempts, when controls were not as advanced. Back then, some professionals tried to use radiant cooling only to encounter condensation. “With the state-of-the-art control technology we have nowadays, we have the ability to safely control buildings,” Arnulfo says. Condensation occurs only if the temperature of the ceiling drops below gbdmagazine.com

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF MESSANA

SENSIBLE HEAT An expression of the degree of molecular excitation, what we think of when we think of heat. Radiant heat is related only to sensible heat.


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BY THE NUMBERS 39

The percentage of carbon dioxide emissions in the U.S. that are a result of buildings

40

The percentage of building energy use from HVAC systems

42

The percentage of energy radiant cooling systems are projected to save compared to air-based cooling systems

3,500

Water has roughly 3,500 times the energy transport capacity of air

5

A hydronic system can transport a given amount of cooling with less than 5% of the energy required to deliver cool air with fans

15

Studies show that for buildings designed to LEED Platinum standards, the construction cost premium (when compared to a LEED Certified building) is approximately 15%

20

Each building on the Eden Hall campus aims to use less than 20 kBtu/sf/yr

the room dew point. “It’s just like when you get a cold beer out of the fridge and put it on a table and there’s some condensation on the bottle. That means that the bottle temperature is below the dew point,” Arnulfo says. With Messana’s room sensors and controls for every type of climate condition, that doesn’t happen. The humidity and dew point are constantly measured and the system corrects the water supply and activates the dehumidification system as needed. MORE CONTROL

“The control system is the brain of the radiant cooling and heating system. It talks with the heat pump, the generator, the manifold actuators and controls the circulator,” Arnulfo says. Each dorm room has a wall sensor that measures the dry-bulb temperature, the relative humidity, and the mean radiant temperature, so when a humidity spike occurs, the room adjusts. That’s the “magic” of the Messana controls. “The control platform evaluates the minimum gb&d

temperature of the water it can run into the panels so that we don’t have condensation,” he says. Each dorm room could be set for different temperatures or even turned off if unoccupied. The closer the room gets to the set point, the higher the temperature of the water, so less energy is used. “Instead of turning the zones on and off depending on the temperature, we continuously modulate the supply water temperature based on the real heating and cooling needs of the building,” Arnulfo says. It’s a little like driving. Instead of going full speed and braking, you use an accelerator so you don’t use too much gas. “Be gentle on your pedal. It doesn’t make sense to go full speed and then use the brakes,” Arnulfo says. THE RESULTS

Ray Magic has been running at Orchard Residence Hall for more than a year, and even on the coldest or hottest day, you’ll find as much as half of the building isn’t

actively heated or cooled. Instead, Agosta says the building maintains its set point based on its tight building envelope. And when the system needs to turn on, it doesn’t take long to reach the set temperature and stay there. But it’s not just the energy of the building that’s saved with Ray Magic. It’s the energy of the occupants, Arnulfo says. “Putting your employees in the right environmental conditions is a plus and increases productivity.” A Cornell University study found that any temperature below 68 degrees caused workers to make 44% more errors. “Typically, when you do cost analysis, no one considers that the cost of workers is two order of magnitude (x 100) compared to the energy and maintenance costs,” Arnulfo says. “Creating the ideal thermal comfort zone for your employees increases their productivity. Therefore, the focus should move to the comfort. After all, we are still optimizing energy, the most valuable energy— yours.” gb&d january–february 2017

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Wall of Sound Newmat Stretch Ceiling Systems reduce noise at airports, museums, and venues across the U.S. By Emily Torem

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Newmat installed a stretch ceiling system at Washington Dulles International Airport (shown here) as well as at Baltimore Washington International Airport more recently.

light blocking and light reflecting in skylight areas. Of course, sound is also important in airports. In 2007–08, Newmat stepped in to offer a solution at Washington Dulles International Airport in the main terminal where passengers come and go in an underground rail and pedestrian system. Considering that it was underground, the space had significant lighting and acoustical issues. Enter the Newmat Light double-layer system, which was installed between the main concrete beams that created the roof structure. The 45,000-square-foot system was backlit with pipe lighting, and both Newmat Light layers were micro-perforated for acoustical absorption. Newmat most recently worked with the Baltimore Washington International gbdmagazine.com

PHOTOS: PHOTOS: COURTESY BRUCE OF DAMONTE NEWMAT

When it comes to sustainable architecture, it’s essential not to consider factors like energy, lighting, and pollution in a vacuum. A building can be considered eco-friendly from a statistical point of view, but it also has to be a pleasure to inhabit and stand the test of time, especially as Americans spend 90% of their time indoors. To that end, Newmat Stretch Ceiling and Wall Systems creates ultra durable, versatile membranes with acoustical and light diffusing properties that can be custom-fitted to walls and ceilings, enhancing visitors’ experience in a wide variety of buildings. Originally popular in France to encapsulate crumbling plaster from old ceilings, stretch ceilings reached the American market via Pascal Gicquel, now president of Newmat USA. Through the use of a flexible PVC material, available in many finish options and colors, Newmat stretch ceiling systems not only enhance the aesthetics of a room, but can also literally make it more enjoyable by decreasing the cacophony of ambient noises that can be especially overwhelming in places with impenetrable, reflective flooring and ceiling materials. “It has acoustical properties because it’s a tensile material,” explains Tim Greco, president of Newmat Northeast. “When a sound wave hits it, it absorbs it by vibrating instead of reflecting it back.” Newmat USA has enhanced spaces for airports, museums, churches, and just about any space you can think of. Projects like the Queens Museum of Art (2012–13) required renovation of a 105,000-square-foot interior with perfect lighting and acoustics, resulting in an enormous, light-filled atrium. Newmat installed 55 Newmat Acoustic ceilings, (approximately 27,000 square feet) using ACM15/white matte micro-perforated membranes with custom ghost perimeter rails curved where necessary and acoustical insulation backing. The company also installed 110 custom fabricated ceiling panels/ baffles with concealed perimeter angle (approximately 3,000 square feet total) using ACM15/white matte micro-perforated membranes to create the perfect balance between


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Airport to give its ceiling a makeover and its ambience a major boost. “They chose the product because of its longevity,” Greco says. “They also wanted to address acoustical concerns because it was a new buildout; the space has hard floors and stone floors.” Greco explained that micro-perforating the material is an option to maximize the sound-absorbing qualities of the stretch ceilings, which they chose specifically for the BWI project. “We micro-perforate the material with tiny cone-shaped holes, which allow the sound to travel through and get trapped in the plenum, with or without acoustical backing material,” Greco says. The process is not unlike an acoustical guitar, which uses openings and a perforated material (wood) to achieve the same effect. Depending upon the material selected, an NRC (noise reduction coefficient) of up to 1 is possible. The micro-perforation technology Newmat uses was so innovative in its debut in 1999 that it received both a European and an American patent. Gicquel explains that the non-perforated membranes absorb mainly mid- to low frequencies because of their diaphragmatic action, which converts acoustical energy to heat. When low frequency sound hits a solid acoustic membrane, instead of reflecting off the membrane and contributing to a room’s total sound energy, the energy causes the membrane itself to resonate. Perforated membranes allow more high frequency information through, which is attenuated in the cavity with backing materials. At the same time, more energy is reflected than if the backing material were fully exposed, preventing a space that sounds “dead.” Perforated membranes act as a Helmholtz resonator, which effectively tune the absorption based on the dimensions of the perforations and the cavity depth. Micro-perforations allow for the same

benefits as standard perforations while maintaining a uniform and smooth appearance, even at low ceiling heights. EVEN MORE BENEFITS

Newmat ceilings are resistant to mold, mildew, and condensation, even in moist environments, like the company’s very first U.S. project in the Waldorf Astoria Hotel bathrooms. This is an especially valuable quality in buildings with very high ceilings that make maintenance a challenge. “Routine access (and emergency access) to things like lights, sprinklers, and smoke detectors is easily accomplished because all of the Newmat systems are fully accessible. In the case of a panelized system, the client always has access; in the case of a stretched wall-to-wall system, a trained and certified Newmat installer provides the access,” Greco says. Newmat installations can sometimes be done “same day.” “Unlike other ceiling systems, Newmat membranes are extremely light (5 pounds per 100 square feet),” Gicquel says. “As an example, a team of four installers can install 1,000 square feet in one day. In addition, once it is stretched [to fit the dimensions of the space], you are done. There is no spackling, painting, or finishing necessary.” While a monolithic fabric is simplest, the product can be trimmed and joined to fit whatever size or shape it needs to match to cover a more irregular or dome-shaped ceiling. Moreover, it can be designed and supported to mimic organic and undulating shapes, to create a truly unique installation, such as in the 2014 Los Angeles Acura Exhibit, where two large intertwined rings were supported with an aluminum skeleton, onto which printed wood veneer membranes and satin metallic finish membranes were stretched. “I’ve seen firsthand the before and after with our ceiling systems,” says

“ NEWMAT MEMBRANES ARE EXTREMELY LIGHT. A TEAM OF FOUR INSTALLERS CAN INSTALL 1,000 SQUARE FEET IN ONE DAY.” PASCAL GICQUEL, PRESIDENT OF NEWMAT USA gb&d

The French-born Pascal Gicquel, president of Newmat USA, came to the U.S. in 1984. He had knowledge of general construction and worked on small-scale residential renovation and addition projects in Long Island. In 1991, he discovered PVC stretch ceiling systems in France and began to develop a market for them in New York. He started Newmat USA in 1999.

Gicquel, referencing a restaurant project he worked on. “Large numbers of patrons were complaining about their inability to understand the person next to them due to poor acoustics.” Gicquel suggested they outfit their existing drywall ceilings with micro-perforated membrane and acoustical backing. “The owner couldn’t thank us enough,” he says. The dining experience could finally match the excellent quality of the food. Greco’s favorite aspect of Newmat stretch ceilings is when they are implemented in conjunction with light design. “People really underestimate the importance of a nice atmosphere,” he says. “It makes a huge difference in how you feel when you’re in it.” A large, monolithic ceiling system can overlay backlighting to create a soft and ambient glow that really affects the mood, pace, and tone of a space. “A well backlit, acoustical ceiling makes you feel good. It’s just beautiful,” he says. gb&d january–february 2017

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Warm Hospitality A highly effective radiant heating solution allows a Manhattan hotel to offer unrivaled comfort By Margaret Poe

Kevin Kilbride has a question he likes to ask developers, builders, and regular folks alike: Does heat rise? Most people say yes. But as Kilbride explains, it’s the hot air that rises— not the heat. With forced air, anyone seated near a large window, whether in an office, restaurant, home, or hotel, feels the chill, even though the heat is on. No matter how high the thermostat is turned up, the window will remain cold, Kilbride says. IT’S SIMPLY SCIENCE

“The absolute only way to solve that problem is with radiant heat,” says Kilbride, president of ThermaRay, a manufacturer of electric radiant heating systems based in New Brunswick, Canada. “It’s simply a matter of thermodynamics.” Radiant heating can be explained by a core scientific principle: Heat transfers from a hot object to a cooler object. It’s how the sun heats the earth. As a

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building principle, it dates back to Greek and Roman times. That said, it has only been commonly applied to modern construction since the 1980s. ENDLESS PURSUIT OF COMFORT

Comfort was a huge priority for the developer of New York’s Hyatt House, an extended stay hotel in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood that opened in the fall of 2016. Early on in the project, the engineers considered their heating options. “If they used a forced air system, the ductwork would either reduce the height of the ceilings or the floor baseboards would limit access to the curtain wall and window,” says Project Manager Masha Dinaburg, associate at MG Engineering D.P.C. “and curtains over each window would block the forced air, creating a cold zone with condensation on the windows.” The developers needed the floors and windows to all remain warm, but they

couldn’t use a system that blocked views of the Manhattan skyline. Enter ThermaRay. IT’S THE EXPERIENCE

“Radiant heating panels offset the heat loss at the window while making the guest experience pleasant, providing them a gentle warmth while sitting on the bed near the curtain wall and window,” Dinaburg says. “The problem with glass towers is that standard HVAC systems can’t provide comfortable heat at the glass, thus making it uncomfortable for those sitting next to the windows,” adds Kilbride. Comfort is a major benefit of radiant heating, but it’s far from the only one. ThermaRay’s system, which is powered by electricity, is extremely effective at delivering warmth and comfort while saving energy. Unlike a duct-based system, it’s not circulating air, which potentially can transfer dust and allergens throughout a gbdmagazine.com


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TOP 5 BENEFITS OF RADIANT HEATING LOWER capital cost LOWER installation cost LOWER operating cost NO maintenance costs NO replacement costs

building. Perhaps best of all, there are no maintenance costs. That’s because there are no moving parts, no bearings, nothing to rust or corrode. “If you design the radiant heating system right from the start, it will last as long as the building lasts,” Kilbride says.

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF HYATT HOUSE

HOW IT WORKS

The radiant heating systems that are made by ThermaRay are powered by electricity. Hyper-effective panels installed in the floors or ceiling contain coils— much like those in a toaster—that radiate heat. This heats the solid objects in a room, such as furniture, floors, windows, and even people. In doing so, it reduces the difference between your body temperature and objects such as furniture and windows. That chill you feel when you sit by a cold window? That’s the sign of a big temperature difference. “The greater the temperature differential, the cooler you’ll be,” Kilbride says. “Conversely, the smaller gb&d

Comfort in guest rooms at New York’s new Hyatt House in Chelsea is felt but not seen, with hidden radiant heating panels.

“HYATT HAS POSITIONED THEIR MANHATTAN PROPERTY TO BE ONE OF THE MOST COMFORTABLE HOTELS IN THE WORLD.” BILL MERROW, CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER, THERMARAY the temperature differential, the more comfortable you’ll feel.” DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS

Maintaining the design, look, and feel of the Hyatt was very important to the architects. The heating panels themselves are invisible to hotel guests, though they’ll know they’re there in the warm room. Because of the room layout, the Hyatt

required very slim heaters. ThermaRay custom-designed units just 2 inches deep that could be completely hidden by the window valance. Controls in the room allow guests to adjust the temperature. Kilbride says, “Getting the temperature right is becoming increasingly important for developers today—both for pleasing their customers as well as for meeting sustainability standards, such as LEED.” gb&d january–february 2017

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Airflow Blows Down Costs, Eco Footprint The craft brewery business is hot, and so are its boilers. So like those who manage warehouses, dairy barns, automotive service bays, and airport terminals, this Wisconsin beer maker found a way to cool down without adding air conditioning. by Russ Klettke One of the ironies of enjoying a nice cold beer is that it takes a 200-degree boiler to brew it. That presented the Central Waters Brewing Company with a dilemma since the company’s public taproom is adjacent to its operations—warm and all. Fortunately, the solution for craft beer fanatics is in MacroAir’s large HVLS fans, which rotate above them largely unnoticed at Central Waters. Denny Wandtke and Anello Mollica, principals at the Wisconsin-based company, wanted to serve customers their finest brews where the action itself happened, with shiny, hot stainless steel boilers in full view. Having the boilers close to the patrons created an uncomfortably warm environment that Central Waters wanted to eliminate. But the company stands on solidly green operational principles—for example,

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it has solar panels on the roof and uses recycled-content bottles—so mechanically cooling the space presented an issue. Enjoying beer near where it’s made is part of the charm of the craft brewing scene. With brewery-adjacent taprooms, brewers aren’t just running a bar but fostering a community of loyal customers, employees, and local suppliers who feel invested in the business. Based in Amherst, Wisconsin, 140 miles northwest of Milwaukee, Central Waters’ 7,500-squarefoot brewery allows patrons to see part of the process of how their bevy of beers come to be, from boiling to fermentation. “To run air conditioning in a taproom in the summer would be very expensive,” says Wandtke, who oversees the operation’s technical aspects. As a sustainable company that works to operate with a rigorous environmental consciousness, he and Mollica want customers to enjoy the product and feel good about its place in the broader ecosystem. An AC system running at maximum capacity would be antithetical to that. It’s useful to know how deep Central Waters’ environmental practices run: They source locally, which involves gbdmagazine.com


INNER WORKINGS

BY THE NUMBERS $3,000/MONTH

Reduction in energy costs to Riverside Rancheros Equestrian Center (California), where 100-degree outdoor temperatures can affect human and animal comfort.

MacroAir installed large HVLS fans inside a Wisconsin brewery to keep patrons and workers comfortable and keep costs down.

ONE 24’ FAN

A single MacroAir AirVolution model fan used at the Skateland Events Center in San Bernardino, California cools skaters in a 22,000-square-foot recreational facility.

$30,000 A/C SYSTEM NIXED

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF MACROAIR

The Glasbern Inn (Pennsylvania) hosts weddings in a renovated barn that averted installation of an expensive mechanical system and unsightly air ducts by using HVLS fans.

membership in a hops-buying cooperative. The company is one of seven breweries in the Midwest Hops and Barley Coop, established in 2011 to restore hops growing to Wisconsin (most are otherwise grown in the Pacific Northwest). Barley growing is also making a comeback in the Badger State—a trend that Central Waters is a large part of as the biggest customer to Briess Malt, an intermediary processor three miles away. Still, Mollica points out that environmental sustainability isn’t worth much if the business isn’t sustainable. They had to keep the taproom comfortable to draw crowds. The solution was to install MacroAir’s highvolume, low-speed (HVLS) fans. Favored in large spaces where mechanical air conditioning is impractical and high ceilings foster temperature layers, HVLS fans are often found in manufacturing facilities, warehouses, auto dealerships, big-box stores, and athletic facilities, The fans move a large volume of air to substantially increase human comfort. “The air feels fresher and cooler,” says Wandtke. It also feels better to pay smaller energy bills. Pairing HVLS fans with your HVAC system can reduce the costs of heating and cooling by 20 to 30 percent, according to Jim Stahl, applications manager at MacroAir, the company that manufactures the fans used at Central Waters Brewing. “You can gb&d

raise the thermostat at least five degrees in summer, but it feels the same.” As with ceiling fans in residential applications, reversing direction of the fan rotation redistributes warmer air from the ceiling to the floor during the winter months. Wandtke says the brewery has a vaulted ceiling that is 18 to 20 feet high; without the fan, the temperature between the ceiling and floor could differ as much as 22 degrees. Wandtke says their $18,000 investment in the fans, installed in 2014, will generate about $116,000 in savings over a 12-year warranty period. “Those are hard-dollar returns,” he says. “But there are also many ancillary benefits, like heating and cooling the staff and eliminating moisture.” Central Waters also uses two MacroAir fans in its barrel-aging warehouse, a 16,000-squarefoot facility where 3,000 oak barrels contain beer, and the barrels sweat. There, the fans dry the barrel’s condensation that could lead to mold and mildew. Industrial application of these larger fans, which range in size from six to 24 feet in diameter, address human comfort, moisture deposits, and other issues. The largest MacroAir HVLS fan moves 22,000 cubic feet of air and can be located 115

feet from the next fan. In warehouses with forklifts, it can eliminate hazardous slipping conditions from moisture condensing on the floor. At the Valencia Airport (Spain), the MacroAir fans reduce electrical use across its terminals by 1,528 kWh per day, which adds up to an annual savings of $192,700 (40 percent savings); ROI was achieved there in 1.3 months of installation of two fans. Stahl says the product is advanced from previous models of HVLS fans, as it’s less obtrusive visually and aurally. The advancements are from a breakthrough in motor technology that enabled MacroAir to eliminate the gearbox driven motor and replace it with a direct-drive motor. The sound of moving parts is replaced with a whisper of air movement, a distinct benefit over earlier-generation gear-driven fans. The reduced noise features of MacroAir fans are particularly valuable in hospitality settings (e.g., a historic Pennsylvania barn that hosts weddings) or where animals are involved (e.g., dairy barns and equestrian centers). But even if the raucous nature of a taproom might not require silence, comfort is appreciated everywhere—almost as much as the foam on a hearty Wisconsin stout. gb&d january–february 2017

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BY THE NUMBERS The Green Garage used solar thermal panels, not photovoltaics, as they were cheaper to install and allowed for a radiant loop heating system beneath the facility. Details:

5,000

Gallons of water in tanks acting as a battery to maintain heat

90

Degrees minimum temperature of water in the panels before it triggers the pump to circulate the heated fluid to the storage tanks.

Raising the Roof The Green Garage in Detroit needed a tough membrane to keep out the elements and support green amenities. Duro-Last gave it all that and then-some. By Russ Klettke

60 to 70

Degrees of incline in the vertical positioning of the panels, which is roughly set at the latitude of the location, plus or minus 15 degrees.

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Pity the poor roof. It has such a big job to do and gets overlooked (under-looked?) by almost everyone. That wasn’t the case, however, for early planners of Green Garage in Detroit. As they redeveloped this circa-1920 structure, the idea was to create a co-working space for businesses and nonprofits that endeavor to make the Motor City sustainable. Originally an auto showroom and service station, the building went through several phases of use and deterioration—with a roof that needed a serious update. “The old asphalt roof wasn’t in the best shape,” says Matthew Piper, director of communications, operations, and business development for Green Garage. “More than that, we wanted a roof that wouldn’t contribute to heat gain in the building or to the urban heat island effect. It needed to reflect rather than absorb heat.” gbdmagazine.com


INNER WORKINGS

LEFT Duro-Last outfitted Green Garage, a coworking space in Detroit, with a new roof to keep out heat and meet all of the organization’s sustainability needs.

That much was accomplished with a custom fabricated, PVC membrane manufactured about 100 miles north in Saginaw, Michigan, by Duro-Last, Inc.— the world’s largest manufacturer of customfabricated single-ply roofing systems. The white, 40-mil PVC material (0.04 inch thickness) might seem a humble building feature, but how it’s made and what it accomplishes is in sync with what Green Garage stands for. Green Garage houses nearly 50 tenants, each with a goal of revitalizing Detroit in the greenest ways. This includes the Detroit Food Academy, promoting food-related and social entrepreneurship; Fresh Corner Café, providing access to healthy foods; and the Great Lakes Environmental Law Center, a freshwater advocacy organization.

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF DURO-LAST

OPERATING EFFICIENTLY

The building operates on 10% of the water, energy, and waste of comparable structures. It was renovated from 2008 to 2011 with the help of 200 volunteers who assisted private developers Peggy and Tom Brennan in transforming the 12,500-square-foot space. Scrap wood from the renovation was used to build an accent wall, and fallen trees in nearby southeast Michigan make up the wood floor. Just as important, highly efficient walls and windows made for a tight building gb&d

envelope, and the roof needed to be equally green. The Duro-Last single-ply roofing membrane is the only product on the market that can be custommade to fit the entire roofing system, an important feature in and weather resiliency and water tightness. “These are not rolls but customized sheets designed to fit the roof perfectly,” explains Katie Chapman, a Duro-Last sustainability specialist. “That means there is greater consistency in the weld, it allows for faster installation, and generates less waste on-site.” While the product is available in five colors, Green Garage selected white for its Energy Star rating for reflectivity. “We wanted a roof that wouldn’t contribute to heat gain in the building or to the urban heat island effect,” Piper says. “It needed to reflect, rather than absorb, heat.” ROOFTOP PERKS

Green Garage had additional goals. Solar thermal panels were installed on a flat portion of the roof. Ten collectors each weigh about 185 pounds, including the hardware, framing, and water, which circulates heat through radiant loops under the floors of the main building and around the perimeter of the side/annex building. The flat-roof portion also has a working rooftop farm. It’s not a vegetated roof exactly, but has a series of small, recycled

shipping containers from General Motors Co. where lettuce, basil, borage, kale, chervil, and more are grown. “Because we needed to build the new roof on top of the existing one, the roof material also needed to be relatively lightweight for the building’s internal trusses to support it,” Piper says. The Duro-Last product fit this need, adding little weight (0.33 pounds per square-foot) while being resilient to the stresses of the garden and solar features. The roof also incorporated 16 Solatubes, tubular daylighting devices (TDDs) also known as “sun pipes” that bring natural light into the building. Light monitors and skylights were considered, but they added design complexity to the barrel roof and the low insulation values (R5) of skylights and monitors compared poorly to the rest of the roof (R-55). Solatubes, with 21-inchdiameter globes, had a lesser heat-loss effect. As even the smaller TDDs required holes be cut into the roofing membrane, Duro-Last custom flashings were used to fit the tube holes and ensure water tightness. “It’s important for people to have access to natural light while they work,” Piper says. “On sunny days we’ll turn the main lights off in the building and just rely on the light from the windows and Solatubes.” gb&d

ROOFS TO FLOORS, CRADLE TO CRADLE

GREEN GARAGE DETROIT chose DURO-LAST for its roofing membrane because the product satisfied its primary objective—reduced heat absorption in warm months. It reflects up to 88 percent of the sun’s energy, so the building interior requires less energy to be cooled. Additionally, pre-made rack flashings accommodated the thermal panels on the building annex roof, which heat the building in winter. But discerning green designers now take it a step further as they consider the cradle-to-cradle characteristics of building materials. Duro-Last has achieved NSF/ANSI 347 platinum certification, carrying an Environmental Product Declaration (EPD), and material evaluation that assures specifiers that the raw materials in the Duro-Last supply chain are consistent with sustainability goals of building projects. The company also recycles its own manufacturing scrap, plus salvage from roofs being replaced at the end of their useful lives. The company’s take-back program turns old PVC roofing material into roof walkway pads, concrete expansion joints, and commercial flooring. In addition to cutting landfill waste, this has the added benefit of reducing dumpster fees and can help clients achieve points in LEED, Green Globes, and Living Building Challenge

certification programs.

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Updating a Midcentury Marvel An architectural gem in the heart of the nation’s capital was in desperate need of a revamp. REHAU enhanced guest comfort and boosted energy efficiency while keeping historical integrity intact. By Margaret Poe Ever since she bought the Capitol Skyline Hotel in Washington, D.C. two decades ago, Mera Rubell knew the windows had to go. She always had her eye on replacing them with a quieter, more energy- and cost-efficient solution. But potential fabricators balked at their curved design, a key element of the hotel’s modernist style. “The roundness challenged everybody, and the costs were crazy,” Rubell says. A solution didn’t appear until 2015. That’s when she brought her quandary to First Finish Inc., the 1963 general contractor on the project. Year the Capitol First Finish Inc. specializes in hotel renovations and complex design Skyline Hotel build projects, such as the Skyline was built renovation. The team needed to bring the hotel into the 21st century with a high-performance window solution. 203 And they couldn’t compromise the Number of architecture—or the views. “This is a case where a window was almost Rooms like a window wall looking out to the city,” Rubell says. “It was important 7 we got it right.”

BY THE NUMBERS

PRESERVING A CAPITOL VIEW

Number of floors

The Capitol Skyline was built in 1963 by Morris Lapidus, the architect behind the renowned Fontainebleau 3 MONTHS Hotel in Miami Beach. One of only Duration two buildings he built in the district, the Skyline is an architectural gem of window in its own right. Rubell, who was replacement friends with Lapidus, knew the hotel was a treasure. And she was adamant project that any renovations preserve the architectural and historical integrity of the building. Half of the guest rooms have a direct view of the Capitol, while others look out on the Washington Monument and the Nationals stadium. “We took the view very, very seriously,” Rubell says. The original aluminum, single-pane windows caused a number of problems, Rubell says, from heat loss in the winter to the high volume of noise transmitted from traffic below. New windows were clearly needed. But the hotel’s midcentury design posed some obstacles. The First Finish Inc.

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PHOTOS: COURTESY OF REHAU

THIS PAGE REHAU’s System 4500 is a uPVC window that is versatile and energyefficient, and it transformed the look and feel of the Capitol Skyline Hotel.

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With REHAU’s welded corners, water can’t get in when it rains, as weak spots in windows are eliminated.

ALUMINUM VS. VINYL

For commercial projects, aluminum windows have long been the gold standard. But the times are changing, says Cole Jensen, commercial account manager for Amerimax Windows & Doors. “I have seen vinyl becoming more popular,” he says. Polymer solutions like REHAU’s, which have a foothold on the European market, are increasingly sought out in the United States due to their high performance and energy efficiency. Today, the U.S. produces 15 billion pounds of vinyl annually—70% of which is used in the building and construction industry.

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team brought in Amerail Systems, led by owner Alan Schaal, to solve the problem. Together they knew any solution would need to accommodate the radius of the curved glass, which drove them to a vinyl solution. “I saw right away this was not an aluminum window application,” Schaal says. “I recognized immediately due to the complexity of the manufacturing and installation processes, that this was not a cost effective aluminum window application. It had to have a unique product, and that’s exactly what the REHAU 4500 brought to the table.” THE SOLUTION

The System 4500 is a uPVC window that’s versatile and energy-efficient. “Over half the building exterior is covered in windows. To allow the facade to function, we needed the flexibility of the uPVC product,” says Bryan Higgins, executive vice president at First Finish. The System 4500 windows feature compression-seal technology and steel reinforcement, optimizing their performance. “The steel reinforcement allows it to withstand the same amount of structural capability as an aluminum window, but you’re getting much better energy efficiency,” says Ralph Childs, commercial sales manager for REHAU. That’s because aluminum conducts energy much more readily than uPVC, resulting in greater heat loss and sound transfer. The fusion-welded corners offer another benefit over the original windows. As the

team tore down the original structure, they found water damage that had seeped in through the openings. “With welded corners there’s no way for the water to get in through any weak spot in the window,” says Cole Jensen, commercial account manager for Amerimax Windows & Doors, the window fabricator. PEACE AND QUIET

In the hospitality industry, keeping guests comfortable is key. And deviations in comfort level—especially sound and temperature— are the biggest thing to avoid, according to Childs. With the old aluminum windows, temperatures fluctuated and traffic and other sounds made their way into the rooms. Today, guests can enjoy the view of fireworks at the nearby Washington Nationals ballpark, but they don’t have to endure the sound effects. The window replacement, which took about three months, coincided with a full renovation of the iconic hotel, which has welcomed the D.C. political class over the decades. “Guests are thrilled with the rooms,” she says. The project has “resulted in very positive bookings and happy guests.” And best of all for Rubell, the renovation stayed true to Lapidus’ original vision. “The building looks like when it was first built,” Rubell says. “When you’re dealing with a brilliant architect who got it right the first time, as an owner you have an obligation to do everything you can to preserve and bring back the original design.” gb&d gbdmagazine.com


GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Inner Workings Features Spaces Punch List

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54 Big Data, Big Buildings The future of the Internet of Things is here—and it all begins with a simple LED lightbulb.

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BIG DATA, BIG BUILDINGS Today’s building tech is not about gadgets; it’s about data, and the key to unlocking that data is already in your building.

BY BRIAN BARTH

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THE NEXT PHASE OF THE LED REVOLUTION IS TYING [THE LIGHTS] INTO THE NETWORKS IN THE BUILDING, SO YOU CAN USE LIGHTING TO COLLECT DATA IN THE BUILDING.”

cation tools and all kinds of things in MIKE ALEXANDER, light fixtures.” While technolASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT FOR SUSTAINABILITY SERVICES AT CUSHMAN AND WAKEFIELD ogy companies are indeed developing mind-boggling data in the building,” says Alexander. “LEDs applications that are starting to transform draw so little energy that you can actually the built environment, Alexander cautions power the bulbs with an Ethernet cord, so against overhyping the present-day possibileventually we’ll no longer need traditional ities, at least when it comes to the commerwiring. Companies like Cisco have really got cial real estate sector. For starters, he says into the networked lighting solutions space— with innovations like wiring buildings with they’re starting to put sensors and communi- Ethernet cables rather than electrical wire, gbdmagazine.com

PHOTOS: ISTOCK

W

What new technologies are being implemented today in the buildings that form the skylines of the world? We asked industry leaders what’s next in the evolution of smart buildings, and everyone is pointing to big data. The big question is how to control it. Mike Alexander, the associate vice president for sustainability services at Cushman and Wakefield, has his finger on the pulse of emerging building technologies as much as anyone. But he says the story of the year in building technology is not some flashy new gadget that no one has ever heard of. It’s a device invented decades ago and widely known to everyday consumers: the LED lightbulb. Alexander says the last year has seen a massive increase in LED technology in buildings owned by the largest commercial real estate firms. And that’s no mundane development, he adds. It’s truly ushering in the era of “smart buildings,” which are vastly more energy- and resource-efficient than their predecessors. “In the past, LED lighting was more of a specialty thing, but we’re now seeing a lot of projects doing LED retrofits on a large scale,” he says. “Even though the payback analysis was good two years ago, the upfront costs were still really high, so the sticker shock was holding people back. Now the costs have finally come down, so it’s finally here in a mainstream way.” Indeed, the original LED bulbs cost in the neighborhood of $100; these days, LED bulbs that

cast an equivalent amount of light as a 75-watt incandescent bulb cost under $5. Then there are the operational savings of LEDs. LED lighting uses about one-tenth of the energy as incandescent bulbs, and about half the energy used by compact fluorescent bulbs to produce the same amount of light. To put that in perspective, lighting accounts for about 18% of energy use in commercial buildings. So if the skylines of the world are now making the switch, it truly is a headline-worthy revolution in sustainability. But Alexander says the most exciting part of the picture is what comes next. Because LEDs contain what amounts to a tiny computer chip, they pave the way for a host of so-called smart building technologies to follow them in any building where they are installed. In effect, a building lit with LEDs is a building pre-wired for all the sexy new “Internet of Things” technology that is quickly becoming available. A recent Forbes article called LEDs the “Trojan horse” of the IoT, because sensors— motion, temperature, occupancy, and so on—embedded in LEDs could be used for applications ranging from thermostat and window blind controls in office buildings to smart parking apps in parking garages to smart labels on food products, where sensors are used to determine when grocery store items are past their best by date. “The next phase of the LED revolution is tying [the lights] into the networks in the building, so you can use lighting to collect


FEATURES

but owner-occupied buildings have more of an opportunity to take the risk. Commercial real estate owners want to wait until the risks are known and vetted.”

JLL DIVES INTO THE IOT IN REAL ESTATE

“building codes right now are having a hard time stomaching that idea, so there’s a bit of a speed bump in getting the new technology deployed. We’re still in the learning phase.” Another hurdle has to do with the fiscal reality of the industry—new technologies are inherently risky and have to be proven as financially viable before they’re widely adopted. “In commercial real estate we are very conservative,” Alexander says. “We want to be different than the next guy, but we also want to make sure we’re not the first guy to do anything. Everyone has their finger on the pulse of the new technologies, gb&d

BUILDING LEADERS are just beginning to scratch the surface of what’s possible with big data—from fault diagnostics to more efficient HVAC controls.

Risky or not, commercial real estate companies are inevitably involved in vetting new technologies—even if it’s just to provide the best possible advice to building owners and investors. Darlene Pope, senior vice president of energy and sustainability services at the Fortune 500 commercial real estate services firm Jones Lang LaSalle, says that while there are kinks in rolling out smart building technology, building owners are eager to do so because of the potential impact to their bottom line—which in most cases also equates to sustainability impact. Pope, who oversees JLL’s Smart Building Program, says the company is already rolling out advanced building controls across its 3.4 billion-square-foot international portfolio. “As opposed to simply replacing light fixtures and putting in more efficient light bulbs, we are also layering advanced lighting control systems that can integrate with things like security and access controls, so the building is operating based on real-time occupancy information, as opposed to anecdotal information, or a time schedule, or people flipping lights on and off manually. All these systems can then communicate with each other through the Internet of Things—the IoT is now the major driver for building operations and building management, and it is creating a much more efficient workplace.” The IoT approach goes beyond the efficiencies created by advances in hardware over the last several decades—more efficient HVAC components, for example, or better insulating materials—and uses software to program the building for next level efficiency. That programming can be for the physical components of a building—lighting, HVAC, and other mechanical systems—but it can also be for how the space is used. In other words, smart buildings aren’t just about cutting-edge technology, they’re about using existing technology to improve decision-making for businesses, which often translates to a reduction in resource use. january-february 2017

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DEFINING BIG DATA

A Q&A with Darlene Pope, SVP of energy and sustainability services at JLL, on the nuts and bolts of smart(er) buildings

GBD: How do you define smart building technology? DP: It is the web-based applications of IoT (Internet of Things) technology just like we are seeing in our cars, homes, hotels, and airplanes. It’s all around us—the challenge is how do we apply those same technologies in an office environment? GBD: Ultimately that boils down to data collection, right? How is JLL collecting data on the buildings you manage? DP: It’s not one specific technology. You can get that data in multiple ways, whether it’s Bluetooth, or RFID, or you use cellular technology to identify who is where when. Even when people log in on their laptops, you know somebody is there. The point is all these devices are connected to a network somehow, and that underlying network is what gives us the ability to collect data, send it up to a data warehouse, and then analyze and import that data to whoever needs it in whatever form they need it in. GBD: What are some of the more exciting things that data allows you to do? DP: You get the ability to drive business intelligence through the collection of all the data. It gives us the ability to correlate different data feeds with other data feeds. For example, do buildings with a higher EnergyStar score have a higher occupancy rate? Do buildings with lower EUI (energy use intensity) have better productivity numbers? There is a famous Harvard study on the impact of indoor air quality on cognitive function. By getting multiple data feeds we can now start to correlate what things impact other things. GBD: Sustainability impacts the bottom line in many ways, and it sounds like Big Data is the key to quantifying that for building owners. DP: Yes, we can correlate more energyefficient buildings with higher rental rates, higher employee engagement and satisfaction. There are a lot of things we can demonstrate now. People have always said that green buildings are better assets, that they are more valuable than traditional buildings. Now we can actually pull that data and prove it.

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To illustrate why using technology to bet- Building Engines and Electronic Tenant ter plan how building space is used, Pope Solutions as two products he is personally and her colleagues at JLL have coined the familiar with. Brierley’s favored products “3-30-300 principle.” The average expenditure are those that combine a broad array of of JLL’s clients on energy each year is $3 per building information on a single platform, square foot; annual real estate expenses are or at the very least can “talk” to other about $30 per square foot, per year; and types of software that building managers annual expenses for their workforce come typically use. to about $300 per square foot. What those “The products and technologies that are figures make clear, says Pope, is that using going to be the most successful at improvless real estate per employee is where the ing operational efficiencies are those that greatest impact on the bottom line comes integrate and correspond with other softfrom. And by not lighting, heating, cooling, ware packages and programs,” Brierley says. maintaining, or otherwise making use of “Many buildings have individual systems for real estate that isn’t truly needed, tremen- a particular aspect of their operation, but dous reductions in energy efficiency and that system doesn’t necessarily talk to, say, resource use are realized. the accounting software package, or inte“Smart building technology allows us to grate with payroll, and things like that.” operate buildings based on where people are and what their immediate needs are for lighting and HVAC and things like that,” Pope says. “But we can also better advise our clients on how much space they really need. Brian Capelli, vice chair of BOMA and If they understand who needs what space vice president of operations for the Clevewhen, they can actually reduce their over- land-based REIT Forest City, says the emergall real estate footprint by condensing more ing technologies for monitoring building people into less space, or moving to more of activity are revolutionizing the industry. a mobile workforce, or providing real-time One of the overlooked advantages, accordbooking of desks and conference rooms. It’s ing to Capelli, is fault diagnostics—the ability to detect exactly where within an all about data-driven business decisions.” enormous property energy leakage is occurring. The IoT approach, where sensors are embedded in virtually all forms of building hardware, means building automation softSmart buildings rely on data collected from ware can detect exactly where a component countless devices and sensors embedded is deviating from its design parameters. In within mechanical systems, computer net- some cases, the system can auto-correct works, and other components found in any the problem; at the very least, the building modern building—and even from mobile de- manager is notified, and a work order is vices carried by employees, such as key fobs, generated so the technician can investigate. access cards, and phones. But of course the “In the old days, you would get a demand raw data is useless without a way to filter it report from your utility company where you and pull out relevant information. So while might be able to see your peak energy use smart building infrastructure is more and during each day of the week,” Capelli says. more commonplace—that is, the means to “That was helpful—at least you could see on collect the data—and portfolio managers the weekends if your building was ramping are full of ideas about what they want to do down as it should when it’s not occupied—but with the data, some of the most important it really didn’t tell you what was driving your new developments in building technology energy use each and every day.” are those that translate raw data into actionForest City has implemented smart able information. building technology in several properties Software programs to do just that have across its portfolio, with many more in the been flooding the market, says Robert Bri- pipeline. Capelli says the company is seeing erley, a BOMA Fellow and senior vice pres- healthy 13% to 14% ROI on the new technolident of real estate management services ogy. “We are in the early rollout, but so far at Colliers International, who mentions it has been a great investment.” gb&d

FAULT DIAGNOSTICS

BUILDING DATA DELIVERABLES

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GREEN BUILDINGFEATURES & DESIGN

Up Front Typology Inner Workings Features Spaces Punch List

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60 A Burst of Creativity The Moody Center for the Arts at Rice University is taking collaborative and open spaces to the next level.

62 Great Escape Buffalo Bayou Park is a green oasis within view of the Houston skyline.

66 Sky-high Sustainability Across more than 1 million square feet, 609 Main at Texas is an example of just how eco-friendly big buildings can be.

68 Modern, Minimalist, and Home StudioMET Architects maximizes space and natural light for a family committed to living more simply.

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A BURST OF CREATIVITY

Rice University’s new Moody Center for the Arts shows off an open concept and collaborative spaces

The possibilities are endless—that’s the guiding principle behind the new, two-story Moody Center for the Arts at Rice University in Houston. The LEED Silver project opens to the public in February 2017 as a collaborative center for the arts, sciences, and humanities. The cross-disciplinary building establishes a new arts district on campus, with proximity to the Shepherd School of Music and the James Turrell Twilight Epiphany Skyspace, but it’s also a place

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where the public can be inspired, with public shows and free admittance year-round. Los Angeles-based Michael Maltzan Architecture designed the 50,000-squarefoot, $30 million center as an experimental platform for making and showcasing works across disciplines, as well as a flexible teaching space to encourage new creations and techniques, and an outlet for creative partnerships. Rice University (population 6,623) just so happens to have one of the top graduate

architecture programs in the United States, so how the new building looks is no small deal. The Moody Center for the Arts features bold geometric shapes with an invitation to look a little closer, as anyone can peer into the collaborative spaces. Outside, a towering lantern and starburst column serves as a focal point and is just one example of how the center itself is a beacon, shining light on creativity and encouraging students, artists, and the public alike to think outside of the box.

THE DESIGN Openness is key to the Moody Center, inside and out. Floor-toceiling glass makes up most of the first floor, so anyone passing by is immediately drawn in. Upstairs, arcades created by the second floor’s cantilevered massing create shaded walkways. Not only is it comfortable for folks passing through on warm days, it also makes the brick-clad upper story look like it’s levitating. Large picture windows punctuate the articulated brick façade, drawing a plethora of light inside. gbdmagazine.com

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF MICHAEL MALTZAN ARCHITECTURE, INC.

By Laura Rote


SPACES

THIS PAGE The new Moody Center for the Arts has three large lanterns that light up at night, and two are supported by starburst columns.

In addition to all of that natural light, three large signature lanterns light up the area at night. Two can be seen at each end of the northern arcade, supported by the “starburst” columns, and the third houses the center’s coffee lounge. Once inside, your gaze is pulled in multiple directions, as you can glimpse many collaborative spaces. On the first floor of the Moody you’ll find the 150-seat theater for performing arts, the Skylight Gallery and Central Gallery for exhibitions and experimental performances, two media arts galleries, the Creative Open Studio, and a lab that includes a wood shop, metal shop, paint booth, rapid prototyping areas, and student classroom. Outside the Skylight Gallery is an outdoor projection wall. Along the building’s north façade, a wide set of stairs rises from the first floor and turns back toward the Moody’s interior, creating an interior amphitheater that serves as an informal social space. The second floor features a breakout area, classrooms, studios, a technology lending library, audiovisual editing booths, the coffee lounge, and administration spaces. Maltzan, founder and principal of Michael Maltzan Architecture, Inc., says the entirety of the design is focused on transparency. Take the double-height Creative Open Studio, for example. He views it as an interior quad—a place where many different students and makers can come together to collaborate or view gb&d

projects. “This interior landscape brings the most diverse programmatic functions into contact with one another, while opening views out to the campus,” he says. “This emphasis on transparency extends to the building’s exterior, whose brick-clad upper story seems to float over an entry level encased in floor-to-ceiling glass. With pedestrian paths cutting across the site’s open lawn and into the building, a set of stairs on the north facade turning back to form an interior amphitheater, and the cantilevered mass of the second story creating covered walkways below, the Moody will be one of the most active social spaces on the Rice campus and a welcoming facility for all.” THE PURPOSE Considering the Moody was created to embrace work of all kinds, it also has flexible teaching spaces and places where visitors can access artists from all over the world. Beginning in February and continuing through the semester, the Moody will host artists like Olafur Eliasson—known for large-scale installation art that plays with light, water, and air temperature—and New York City’s

PROJECT Dusan Tynek Dance Theatre as part of its inaugural season of programming, which the public is invited to enjoy. Rice University’s president says the new center is another shining example of how the college and the wider community are one. “We are proud of our strong reputation in the sciences, engineering, and the professions and equally proud of our success in the arts and humanities, which contribute in essential ways to every education and every intellectual endeavor,” says David Leebron, president of Rice University. “The Moody Center is a stake in the ground for our continuing arts commitment, and we look forward to welcoming everyone from Houston, across the nation, and abroad to the Moody.” gb&d

LOCATION Houston SIZE 50,000 square feet COMPLETION 2017 COST $30 million

TEAM ARCHITECT Michael Maltzan Architecture CONTRACTOR Linbeck LIGHTING DESIGN Horton Lees Brogden

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GREAT ESCAPE A $58 million park restoration brings nature back to the city of Houston

By Laura Rote

Before the 160-acre Buffalo Bayou Park was completed in 2015, few Houstonians visited the swath of land from Shepherd Drive to Sabine Street, between Allen Parkway and Memorial Drive, just west of downtown Houston. Today, locals and visitors alike flock to the park for its trails, public art, kayak and bike rentals, and other amenities. “Buffalo Bayou Park has had a significant impact on Houston’s quality of life and economic vitality. It provides a major green space in the heart of the city,” says Anne Olson, president of the Buffalo Bayou Partnership (BBP). BBP is the nonprofit behind revitalizing the area. The park truly offers something for everyone—hiking and bicycle trails, a two-acre dog park, an event space, coffee shop and cafe, and plenty of room to stretch out, have a picnic, or just relax. It’s also where locals and visitors can explore many meadows, prairies, and woodlands. Olson says simply having such a beautiful, expansive green space in the city has stimulated real estate development in nearby neighborhoods. gb&d

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NASH BAKER

PROJECT LOCATION Houston SIZE 160 acres COMPLETION 2015 COST $58.5 million

TEAM ARCHITECT Page LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT SWA and Reed Hilderbrand CONTRACTOR Millis Construction LIGHTING L’Observatoire and artist Stephen Korns PROJECT MANAGER Guy Hagstette ARTISTS John Runnels and Anthony Thompson Shumate

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GETTING THE PARK For many people, this project was a long time coming. The park’s development started in 2010, when Houston’s Kinder Foundation provided BBP with a $30 million catalyst gift. The partnership then raised an additional $23.5 million, and the Harris County Flood Control District contributed another $5 million for the project. The park was completed in fall 2015. “Our design and construction team were excellent,” Olson says. “SWA was the lead designer along with Page architects, Reed Hilderbrand landscape architects, and Millis Development & Construction. Guy Hagstette served in the capacity of project manager and did an incredible job.” Olson says the public played a large role in developing the park, too, as locals provided input at community meetings. “Before the park’s restoration, the area was mainly poorly maintained green space with deteriorated hike and bike trails. There were very few amenities—park benches, drinking fountains, lighting, etc. Very few Houstonians visited the park.”

The team behind the park was committed to keeping the space natural, planting more than 14,000 trees and replacing half the lawn with woodlands, prairies, and meadows while still having amenities to draw people in. BBP reintroduced native landscapes in wetlands, woodlands, meadows, lawns, and perennial gardens. The topography is also special. “It’s one of the only sites in Houston that has sloping lawns and small hills. The designers took advantage of the site’s unique topography,” Olson says. To top it all off, there’s the stunning view of the downtown skyline. “You feel out in the natural world in a very urban space.” Special paving that absorbs water was incorporated into the two visitor center parking areas in the park, and BBP made a conscious effort to install trash receptacles where park visitors can put recyclable trash, keeping with the mission of sustainability. THE FUTURE OF BUFFALO BAYOU PARK There’s a lot to look forward to at the park, too, especially given the events that gbdmagazine.com


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THIS SPREAD A team of architects and planners have renovated Buffalo Bayou Park to include expansive hiking and bicycling trails, a lakefront venue available for private events, an environmental art installation, and more.

will be held at the park’s newly opened Cistern—an amazing underground space (pictured, middle right) that’s as large as a football field. “With its 221 25-foot concrete columns, the space reminds visitors of the cisterns in Istanbul,” Olson says, adding that it will be the home of many art installations in the future. In May 2016, the Buffalo Bayou Park Cistern opened to the public. The 87,500-square-foot underground water reservoir was built in 1926 as one of the first drinking water reservoirs for Houston. It supported the municipal water system’s goals of fire suppression and drinking water storage for many decades. BBP re-discovered the site in 2011 when it was developing the park project. With research, 3-D modeling by SmartGeoMetrics, and community input, BBP developed a plan to repurpose the Cistern into a public space that could also host rotating environmental art installations. The partnership secured grants exceeding

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$1.7 million from The Brown Foundation to bring the space up to code and make it accessible to the public. The Cistern can also be viewed through an art installation unveiled in late 2016 called Down Periscope, by New York artist Donald Lipski. You can see the installation on top of the Cistern when you’re in the park or log on to the website (downperiscopehouston.com) to peer in and see it from anywhere. While the park is already being enjoyed in all its glory, Olson says coffee breaks are on the way to visitors, too. In spring 2017, the final phase of the Silver LEED Certified Sunset Coffee Building is set to be complete. gb&d gb&d

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SPACES LIVE LEARN

Underfloor air distribution, rooftop gardens, LED lighting, and more make this tower stand above the rest.

SKY-HIGH SUSTAINABILITY A new office building in downtown Houston is packed with green features

By Laura Rote

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PROJECT

RENDERINGS: COURTESY OF 609 MAIN AT TEXAS

LOCATION Houston SIZE 1.1 million square feet HEIGHT 48 stories COMPLETION January 2017

An office tower in downtown Houston is reaching new heights when it comes to sustainability. The 47-story 609 Main at Texas has a rainwater harvesting system, a constant air purification system, and LED lighting, among countless other features, making it a shining example for buildings of the future. The 1.1-million-square-foot office tower is seeking Gold or Platinum LEED certification when the project is complete by the end of January 2017. The building takes up a full city block and has not one but two rooftop gardens, widely used recycled construction materials, and an extensive network of sensors and controls to measure the building’s performance. “We are excited about bringing to market the next-generation building that represents the culmination of the technology, efficiencies, and amenities for the workplace of tomorrow,” says Hines Managing Director Philip Croker. “Underfloor air distribution, 10-foot ceilings, state-of-theart conference center, world-class gym, hospitality-driven building lobbies, and significant street-level retail options all contribute to a building that delivers the best possible home for companies looking to focus on employee recruitment and retention.” Even before 609 Main officially opened its doors, multinational tenants like Kirkland & Ellis, Hogan Lovells, Orrick, and United Airlines signed on to call it home. The building is entirely office space, with the exception of retail on the ground floor. For brands looking to commit to sustainable missions, the move was common sense. “Hines believes having sustainable building technology is not only the right thing to do in this environment, but also the right answer for the tenants within the building. These technologies all provide a better home for businesses through increased daylight, indoor air quality, ultra-efficient building systems, and water harvesting and recycling technology, to name gb&d

just a few,” Croker says. Oh, and did we mention the five electric car charging stations? Heating and cooling are a breeze at 609 Main, too, considering the high-performance building envelope, with double-pane low-e glass and insulated glass units. The building’s temperature overall is controlled using an underfloor air delivery system. With minimal ductwork and no mechanical equipment in the ceiling plenum, such a system saves up to $7 per RSF (rentable square foot). As for the overall feel of the building, it’s a beauty, with a nearly 15,000-square-foot ground floor lobby that has retail areas and floor-to-ceiling glass, a water feature, and even a green wall. From here you may also access downtown via a tunnel system, so no worries on those rainy, muggy days. The second floor— awash in natural light—includes an 8,500-square-foot conference center and 7,000-square-foot fitness center. gb&d

TEAM ARCHITECT Pickard Chilton Architects DEVELOPER Hines LEASING Colvill Office Properties

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MODERN MINIMALIST, AND HOME

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StudioMET grants one Houston family’s wishes by reducing waste and making the most of the space By Laura Rote

In West University Place, Texas—just southwest of Houston’s city center in the metropolitan area—the two-story, 3,200-square-foot Emory House is proof that less is more. The exterior of the house is striking—a combination of corrugated metal, ipe Brazilian wood, and concrete panels with a thin, flat roofline. Inside, you won’t find frivolous decor, but instead a clean, modern space filled with natural light. The house reflects what matters most to the residents—the environment and each other. The Agrawals wanted an efficient home on a small lot that had green space for their children to play. They searched their neighborhood for real estate, but when they realized what they wanted didn’t exist, they decided it was time to go the custom route. So they searched for a lot on which to create the house of their dreams, and then they brought in StudioMET, AIA Houston 2016 Firm of the Year, to make that dream a reality. Having an efficient, eco-friendly home was at the top of the to-do list. “We are not ignorant to the fact of how much waste and energy humans create and use,” says homeowner Neha Agrawal. “We have a very long view and want to do our part to improve the chances of our future generations to have a clean and healthy place to live.” Before the move, the Agrawal family lived in a 2,450-square-foot townhouse with many small rooms over various floors in the Houston Museum District. They wanted a house that allowed them to spend more time together in the same space. “Our conscience movement to minimize waste and energy has naturally led us to a minimal lifestyle, which has actually forced me to change my perspective on where I place value—quality over quantity,” Agrawal says. “By modeling this, I hope I’m passing this on to my kids.” Doing more with less was the driving ethos for this project, according to Yoonchul You, the project’s lead architect. You maximized space on the tight lot, tucking a grass paver system that provided structural support as a driveway but also allowed the grass to grow into the back of the lot; it also served as a mini soccer pitch. A small patio extends the living space outside as well, further opening the space.

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PROJECT LOCATION Houston SIZE 3,200 square feet COMPLETION 2015 HONORS Houston Modern Home Tour & PaperCity Design Award for Sustainable Design

TEAM ARCHITECT StudioMET LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT StudioMET in collaboration with clients CONTRACTOR Modern Concept Construction SOLAR Texas Solar Outfitters

Corrguated metal, ipe Brazilian wood, and concrete panels make up the outside of this West University Place, Texas house. Inside, floor-toceiling windows bring in plenty of natural light.

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The importance of natural light Architect Yoonchul You says natural light should be integrated into all projects, and this Houston house was no exception. “Light, air quality, and spatial proportions affect how the space is experienced, and with a project of this residential scale, light affects how you live and function in the space,” You says. “It’s also critical to think about how the light quality will change over time and how it affects the space. And if windows and glazing are appropriate, it can help minimize the utility bill. Windows and a sliding wall of glass brought light into the common space, too.”

Agrawal’s favorite thing about the house is how low maintenance and energy-efficient it is. The energy bills now are about the same as they were in their former, smaller house, and the new home’s bills are expected to decrease even more since the homeowners activated solar panels in the fall. The couple expects a return on their investment in about 10 years. The Agrawals went above and beyond when it came to sustainable features inside the new house, too, with an emphasis on togetherness. The first floor is an open concept

living, dining, and kitchen area, while a yoga terrace overlooks the backyard. Upstairs are the private bedrooms, master suite, and family room. The wood floors on the stair treads and upper floor of the house were found and repurposed through Habitat for Humanity. “The homeowners are very environmentally conscious and wanted to find a way to reuse good wood floors that would have otherwise been left in a landfill,” You says. Agrawal says the family aims to be mindful of waste, pollution, and energy consumption in every area of their lives. They used cloth diapers when their kids were babies—switching to biodegradable diapers when life got hectic—and they still use cloth napkins and dishrags, recycle everything, wash and reuse Ziploc baggies, and hang-dry their clothes, to name a few everyday things that almost anyone could do. She says they also chose easy to maintain countertops (Caesarstone) and floors (polished granite) that require no chemicals to clean—all you need is soap and water. The family also has an electric car and a hybrid, the former of which they can charge at home. Agrawal suggests anyone on the fence about making similar, serious changes to their house should do a projected cost-analysis to see if it makes financial sense. At the end of the day, though, she says going green justifies the decision, even if it’s a little more expensive. “What you cannot put a price on is your values and desires for sustainable living.” gb&d

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Up Front Typology Inner Workings Features Spaces Punch List

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How to Build a Team LEED Fellow Lisa Matthiessen talks diversity in the workplace.

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The Future is Passive Columnist Katrin Klingenberg, PHIUS, shares insight around the possibilities of passive buildings.

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Change Starts at Home The DOE’s new Better Communities Alliance looks at climate change action on the local level.

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Making Sustainability Stick An NAHB program manager shares a quick checklist for making sure green benefits last in your building or home.

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Person of Interest Future Earth’s Paul Shrivastava works with teams across the globe to solve the world’s biggest sustainable challenges.

80 On the Spot More with Cynthia Phifer Kracauer, of the Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation.

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How to Build a Team 6 Maxims for Diversity

Lisa Fay Matthiessen FAIA | LEED Fellow

Working parents know how to prioritize and get work done quickly and well. Workers who are not constantly competing and trying to move up the ladder can be wonderfully steady and solid, bringing calm professionalism to your team. Older workers have an ability to take the long view. Women have emotional intelligence and are collaborative. And yes, you also need those smart, young whippersnappers.

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Our industry lags in diversity. Most of us have heard the dismal statistics about the under-representation of gender/ethnicity/age/ etc. in our white male– dominated world of design and construction. In my career, I have built teams that outperform the norms by a huge margin, the most recent being a team of 25 MEP engineers and sustainability experts that was more than half female, and more than half non-white. In doing so, I have learned that diversity, in and of itself, brings huge value. Diversity causes other good things, including collaboration, respect, teamwork, flexibility, and stamina. Diversity is crucial to the creation and maintenance of a productive team. Here are a few hard-earned precepts I want to share:

1

IT TAKES ALL KINDS.

Yes, those bright young things are ambitious, inexpensive, and hard-working. But if you want a team that can function in the long run, mix it up!

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GET OVER YOURSELF. We

like the familiar, like working with people who look like us and think like us. If you truly want to hire diversity, be prepared to hire people who make you uncomfortable. Be prepared to stare down your own inherent biases. Your negative reaction doesn’t mean someone is not as good as you; they are just different. Consciously, intentionally, you must ignore your kneejerk reactions and consider that the best candidate might be the one who makes you uncomfortable.

3

HIRE DIVERSITY. It is not

enough to say you want diversity; you have to go get it. Don’t listen to naysayers lament how difficult it is to find designers who are women or of color; that’s just an excuse. Diversity is out there; go find it.

4

HIRE DIVERSITY INTO HIGH PLACES. “Wow! I

have never met a managing principal who is female! That is so cool!” How many times have I heard this? Seeing a woman in a leadership role makes it easy for women—and candidates

of other under-represented groups—to believe they will find acceptance and support. And don’t worry that diverse leaders will discriminate

important than the work. I did not listen, and set about hammering as fast as I could to prove my worth. I did not know to set my ego aside so

When your colleagues are encouraged to express themselves, you create a happier workplace. against men; we did not get to positions of leadership without knowing how to get along in a white male– dominated industry.

5

BRING ALL OF YOUR SELVES TO WORK. At

first, I did not want my gender to be a defining characteristic. I wanted to be just an architect, not a female architect. However, I learned that I could not partition off my life; my responsibilities to my community and family competed with those as an architect. I learned that the most effective way to fulfill all my jobs is to stop trying to separate them. I am at my best when I bring all of me to my job. When your colleagues are encouraged to express all of themselves at work, you will create a much greater diversity of perspectives, and a much happier, more balanced workplace.

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that I could learn. After a few shouting matches and botched door frames, I began to understand her wisdom. Clients come and go, but your work colleagues are with you all day, every day. Think about this as you build your team. It might seem that your priority is to do whatever it takes to please your clients. In truth, the best way to run a business is to do good work. And the best way to do good work is to build a strong and happy team.

As an architect with Zimmer Gunsul Frasca, Lisa Fay Matthiessen led the greening efforts for the Bren School of Environmental Science Management at UCSB. She founded and developed the sustainability services group at Davis Langdon. She also co-authored the Cost of Green reports. With Integral Group, Lisa founded and developed the successful LA office of this industry-leading MEP firm.

PUT YOUR COLLEAGUES FIRST. Years ago, I

worked as a carpenter. My supervisor told me, day one, that the relationship between the two of us was much more

2014 HONOREE

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The Future is Passive Cost-competitive passive building is a crucial component of getting to zero

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Answering architectural luminary Ed Mazria’s call for a zero carbon certification, PHIUS+ Source Zero certification is currently the only building certification program available in the U.S. The program currently only applies to operational energy usage, but will incorporate embodied energy in future iterations. In addition to the PHIUS designations, the Innovation Center also achieved a number of other distinctions, including LEED 2009 BD+C: New Construction Platinum certification and anticipated recognition for International Living Future Institute (ILFI) Net Zero Energy certification and Living Building Challenge Petal designation. This project is a stellar example of the synergies between PHIUS+ and complementary programs to achieve holistic green building practices. Both the ILFI and LEED programs recommend PHIUS+ as a proven and integrated design approach capable of achieving the reduced operational energy demand goals of both programs. As a testament to the successful collaboration between PHIUS and the USGBC, projects certified under PHIUS+ 2015 are able to earn a minimum of 31.5

GETTING RESULTS

With over a year of occupancy data now in the books, the Innovation Center’s measured results confirm that the building is carbon zero on the basis of operational energy usage as predicted in the models. Thermal comfort is also achieved and validated by sensors tracking mean radiant surface temperatures—no small feat for a building in a cold climate zone with relatively small yet efficient heating and cooling systems. While the Innovation Center is a high-profile commercial example, passive building strategies are crucial to the economics of zero energy and carbon design for all building types from new construction to retrofits. Passive building is revolutionizing traditional building concepts and best practices because it is the most economical way to design buildings that are comfortable to live in, healthy, resilient, net zero, and energy independent. As such, passive buildings not only help to mitigate climate change, but they also adapt to it. THE FUTURE

In the not-so-distant future, passive buildings will function as the linchpin of a microgrid system. These well-insulated structures can act as “batteries” by passively loading their thermal mass with excess heat, allowing them to coast through the night or even dayslong power outages without needing additional energy from the grid. Smart grid-tied

technology could even communicate with smart hot water heaters and sense that there is “room” to store energy in a water heater at low temperature in an effort to help smooth out renewable overproduction during daytime hours when energy demand is low. Due to the low energy loads of passive buildings, a modest size on-site renewable energy system is capable of producing more energy than the building consumes. Thus the home or business owner can either store the excess energy in batteries for later use or sell it back to the grid on the new “enernet” energy internet market for additional income stream. As the cornerstone of the microgrid system, passive buildings enable ultimate energy flexibility and promote the democratization of the energy grid. Passive buildings are poised to be a game changer in the way we power and operate our communities going forward, and projects like RMI’s Innovation Center demonstrate that a viable, vibrant, and resilient future is possible today.

Katrin Klingenberg is the executive director of Passive House Institute US (PHIUS), which she co-founded in 2003. A German-born and trained architect, she drove the development of the new climatespecific, cost-optimized PHIUS +2015 Passive Building Standard and now directs the technical and research programs of PHIUS.

KRAMENA VIA PHIUS

If you’re wondering what to expect from passive buildings in the next 10 years and beyond, look no further than the Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) Innovation Center in Basalt, Colorado, winner of Best Overall Project in the 2016 PHIUS Passive Projects Competition (see page 17 for more). Similar in size and program to about 90% of all U.S. commercial office buildings, the Innovation Center is the first project in the world to achieve both the PHIUS+ 2015 Passive Building Standard and PHIUS+ Source Zero certifications. The term “passive building” first began being used in the early ’90s, and Amory Lovins, cofounder and chief scientist at RMI, was one of the first scientists to use it. He argued that the cost-competitive aspects of passive building would be key to tapping into additional efficiency potentials of our technological and economic systems. He talked about the progress of the passive building movement in Europe in his 1999 book Natural Capitalism and explored the more recent

DISTINCTIONS

points under the LEED v4 BD+C: Homes program as well as most of the prerequisites under the Energy and Atmosphere and Indoor Environmental Quality credit categories.

2015 WSLA WINNER

PHOTO: KATRINA

Katrin Klingenberg Executive Director Passive House Institute US | PHIUS

strides made by PHIUS in the 2011 bestseller Reinventing Fire. The groundbreaking RMI Innovation Center takes the lessons and research of the previous decades and combines it with current passive building principles and green design. The result is the ultimate cost-optimized building— demonstrating the potential for achieving an energy-independent, renewables-fueled, and carbon-neutral future.

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Change Starts at Home Cities take center stage in climate change partnerships, policy, and action

Sarah Zaleski U.S. Department of Energy Monica Kanojia The Hannon Group

Community resilience has become a top tier priority for many local governments in the face of climate change, aging infrastructure, and an evolving energy landscape. American cities and their leaders have emerged as pioneers in the fight against climate change by adopting ambitious carbon reduction goals, implementing building efficiency policies, and reimagining the way energy is produced and used in their communities. CITIES AS FRONT LINES OF ENERGY INNOVATIONTION

Recognizing that by 2030, 87% of U.S. energy will be consumed in cities, the DOE is helping cities and counties accelerate clean energy innovation. State and local leaders have already been thinking outside of the box in collaboration with the building community to develop cost-effective solutions that equal greater energy savings. Mayors are embracing the clean energy revolution and gb&d

propelling it forward by passing progressive legislation to facilitate energy savings, improve resiliency of power systems, and make communities more economically competitive. Through DOE’s Better Buildings Challenge, more than 40 cities and counties have reduced energy consumption in their buildings by addressing financing, organizational, and informational barriers. Savings has exceeded $24 million since the program began in 2011, and cities are seeing significant transformation and growth as a result. Take Atlanta, which has more than doubled its energy savings commitments from private sector companies as well as expanded to the multifamily sector, growing its square footage to 100 million from 50 million in four years. On the West Coast, LA, San Diego, and Chula Vista are well-known now for building bridges between technology and buildings, creating a robust community of professionals who can take city energy performance to the next level. DOE has developed a growing portfolio of programs and resources to assist local governments in their quest to harness clean energy to improve the energy independence, public health, and economic development of their communities. Through programs like SolSmart, Climate Action Champions, and Clean Cities, DOE provides access to technical assistance through National Labs, guidance documents, replicable best practices, and tools that build local capacity to plan for and implement clean energy solutions. For instance, SolSmart provides communities with fully funded, experienced staff to

help improve local government programs and processes such as reviewing and providing feedback on zoning requirements and streamlining the permitting process for solar PV systems. While the number of programs and resources available to local governments has grown exponentially over the last few years, there was not a holistic platform to advance integrated solutions across clean energy technologies and leverage the combined efforts of government, nonprofit, philanthropic, and private sectors— until now. Now local governments have a one-stop shop to access information on existing clean energy programs and a designated space to discuss and advance their goals with peers, DOE, and other impactful organizations supporting local outcomes. THE BETTER COMMUNITIES ALLIANCE

The Better Communities Alliance (BCA) aims to deliver energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable transportation solutions that create cleaner, smarter, and more prosperous communities. Forty cities and counties representing more than 40 million Americans have joined BCA since its launch in 2016. The BCA has also partnered with nearly 30 national organizations that have pledged to work with DOE to align their resources and expertise with the clean energy needs of communities. Ranging from national philanthropic grant makers like The Kresge Foundation, Energy Foundation, and Surdna Foundation; local government associations and networks such as the National League of Cities and C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group; global engineering

firms like Arup and Hatch; consumer product firms like Philips Lighting; and energy leaders like American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, this group will work with DOE to accelerate the pace of clean energy innovation locally. BCA has also launched a web portal with programmatic information, technical assistance opportunities, and resource databases from across DOE’s local government programs. BCA will work with each community to identify goals and curate a customized portfolio of tools, guidance documents, and technical assistance for their needs. This includes tailored analytical support through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to enhance use of data in achieving energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable transportation outcomes through policy and planning. DOE will also co-host workshops with National Labs, affiliate organizations, and local leaders to discuss opportunities in key areas and strategize around integrated solutions. THE FUTURE IS CLEAN

Mayors across the U.S. are launching multi-pronged efforts to achieve ambitious climate and energy goals. The bold leadership, thoughtful planning, and notable innovation we are seeing at the local level are helping to illuminate the path to a cleaner, resilient, more prosperous tomorrow. Sarah Zaleski is a policy advisor for the energy department focusing on energy efficiency and renewable energy. Monica Kanojia is a consultant with the U.S. Department of Energy.

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3 Ways to Make Sustainability Stick Keep your high-performance building standing tall and make sure green benefits last

Eric Tilden Program Manager | NAHB

Making sustainability stick is a major aspect of residential green building, and it all boils down to the occupant. Builders and architects can design and construct a beautiful high-performance home, a monument to green building, and it’s all for naught if the occupant neglects to change the air filter or leaves the outdoor hose running to overwater their native azaleas. When it comes to the long-term sustainability of a home, the homeowner needs to be engaged. As a child, I remember the old infomercial for the Ronco Rotisserie Oven that played on TV when I stayed up too late at night. It had the famous catchphrase, “Set it and forget it!” This is what people do to their homes, though a home is not a rotisserie oven. The catchphrase should be, “Set it and develop a pattern of good practices and maintenance to ensure optimal performance

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of my home and in turn reduce my environmental impact.” But of course that’s not as catchy. And yet the theory remains the same. In order for the high-performance home to stay that way, it must continue to be high performing well into occupancy. This requires an established pattern of good operation and maintenance practices by the homeowner. So, how do you engage these individuals and make sustainability stick? Just dust off your old copy of Malcolm Gladwell’s Tipping Point and re-read how beloved kids’ show Blue’s Clues achieved a high “stickiness factor.” We can take a clue from this show for preschoolers as to how we— as homeowners, homebuilders, or designers—can make the practice of sustainability stick. The same ideas and practices are included (some are mandatory) in the ICC/ ASHRAE 700-2015 National Green Building Standard™, the first residential green building standard to undergo full consensus and approval by the American National Standards Institute. TELL A STORY

Blue’s Clues told a story each episode, and the person watching felt like they were a part of that story. The same goes for a home. A green home is a story, and the occupant is the most important part. By providing the homeowner with a list of their home’s green features and a narrative detailing the

importance of maintenance and good practices in retaining the home’s green attributes, it gets them invested. They know not only how it was designed and built, but also how and why it’s important to take advantage of these green features. They’ll better understand the relationship between themselves, their home, and the environment. Instead of simply installing CFLs or LEDs, you can provide an explanation of the benefits of using each. This allows homeowners to understand why these benefit both them and the environment, especially in the long-term. It shows them how they can directly affect the story of their own home, all the way down to the lightbulbs they choose.

GET INVOLVED

Blue’s Clues got the viewer directly involved in the learning experience from the beginning. The show encouraged children to utilize and demonstrate the lessons of each episode. Similarly, firsthand training of homeowners is a requirement for any home seeking certification, and it gets the occupant directly involved from day one. As we all know, many people don’t read instruction manuals. They get tossed aside for everything from DIY furniture to TV remote controls. When it comes to complex systems like a programmable thermostat, the resident may read the instructions but still be confused. Hands-on practice with HVAC filters, thermostat gbdmagazine.com


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IN CONVERSATION with Cynthia Phifer Kracauer Continued from p. 23

ation, but just by virtue of practicing you’re able to lose some of the anxiety. Women don’t have as much of a problem with negotiation on behalf of other people, but with negotiating for themselves. Women want to be nice, but negotiating and nice are two challenging ideas to hold in your head at the same time. gb&d: What else are you working on?

Developing a pattern of good practices like creating a checklist of monthly to-dos makes sustainability easy. programming, water heater settings, and even recycling and composting practices gives the resident a solid foundation of involvement and experience. They weren’t simply handed another manual—they were directly involved in the learning process.

chance of maintaining their high-performance status, and homeowners can see the continued benefits of owning a green home. Maybe should see what other shows from our childhood can teach us about the building industry. Bob the Builder, anyone?

REPETITION, REPETITION, REPETITION

Blue’s Clues repeated each episode five times in a row, Monday through Friday. This helped the lessons from each episode stick. You could do the same with sustainability in the home. Providing a checklist of recurring maintenance practices for the resident encourages them to establish a pattern. They complete the same checklist again and again, and eventually, checking the A/C filter once a month becomes habit. With simple practices like these, homes have a better gb&d

Eric Tilden is a program manager of sustainability and green building at the National Association of Home Builders, one of the largest trade associations in the United States. He participates in the development of proactive strategies for addressing sustainability issues, growing the market for highperformance homes, and advancing NAHB’s leadership role in the green building industry.

Kracauer: One thing is equal pay for equal work. One would think that should be the law by now. We also do a lot of mentoring. We make ourselves available to a number of other organizations, like the AIA and an organization called Women Executives in Real Estate, which has a lot of architects. As far as changing the culture, we use the Leaders Roundtable to highlight best practices and get people exposed to firms that are using best practices. gb&d: Any firms that you’d like to honor for their work in closing the gender gap? Kracauer: Definitely. Firms like Perkins + Will are at the forefront of creating healthy, supportive workplaces. SOM (Skidmore Owings & Merrill) is also working on it actively. One of the firms doing a wonderful job on the engineering side is Arup. With engineering firms there are so few women— it’s not even a leaky pipeline, they just aren’t getting women into engineering schools. At the end of the day, these kinds of changes are about having a population that is sustainable. As a species, we have to be able to accommodate women having children. gb&d: In many ways, resolving gender issues is crucial to the future viability of any business—in other words, it’s about sustainability. Kracauer: Exactly. Historically, when men have children it’s like a bonus for them; and when women have children, it’s a detriment. That’s a pretty antiquated way of thinking. In terms of creating a better world for our children, whether one is focusing on environmental sustainability, or climate change, or whatever, the underlying value is preserving our planet for future generations. But we also have to produce those future generations! gb&d: Which means we need to find a way for women to be good mothers and contribute professionally in a significant way. This conversation continues on p. 81

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Person of Interest Paul Shrivastava

gb&d: What does the mission of Future Earth mean to you personally? Shrivastava: I interpret the mission as bringing science-based hope and decision-making capabilities to resolve global sustainability challenges. gb&d: How are you working to meet the organization’s biggest goals?

“Science can provide only some answers; it is not a panacea for all problems. We need to also make personal, economic, social, and political changes.” Interview by Laura Rote

Future Earth’s 2025 vision lays out ambitious goals for a more sustainable world, and as executive director of the international organization, Paul Shrivastava challenges us all to make changes. Launched in 2015, Future Earth works closely with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the World

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Shrivastava: We have set up the secretariat (which oversees the dayto-day operations of the program, from research to coordination to communications) to facilitate the work of 50,000 scientists. Over the past two years we successfully transitioned from an interim secretariat to a permanent global secretariat. We established five global hubs (Boulder, Montreal, Paris, Stockholm, Tokyo) and four regional centers (Cyprus, Kyoto, Montevideo, Norwich, UK), hiring more than 30 staff. Additionally, we are planning to open three regional offices in Africa and one in South Asia. Five years funding of the secretariat has been agreed to with the Global Hubs Consortium. Our vision and research strategy are clear, and a two-year implementation plan was approved by the Governing Council last July. More than 20 core projects have transitioned into Future Earth and are working collectively to operationalize eight approved Knowledge Action Networks (KANs). We helped shape several large funding packages in our KAN areas, including Food-Water-Energy Nexus in Urbanization from Belmont Forum members, and for Planetary Health from Welcome Foundation. Critical administrative processes, systems, and policies are now in place. gb&d: Given the report that current plans to reduce greenhouse gas

emissions around the world will likely not be enough to achieve international targets for combating climate change, what must be done? Shrivastava: Science can provide only some answers; it is not a panacea for all problems. We need to also make personal, economic, social, and political changes. Going beyond science to integrate culture, arts, law, and humanities to develop holistic solutions. We cannot continue to build a throw-away consumer society of 9 billion, so new models of progress and the good life are needed that encourage living in harmony with nature. gb&d: Will the world be able to cut greenhouse gas emissions to the level they need to be to make a difference? Shrivastava: This is not likely in the short-term. But in the mediumto long-term, this is feasible with new scientific and technological solutions coupled with reformulated values and social practices. gb&d: Is there one thing the world could do that would have the most significant impact around climate change? Shrivastava: I just paraphrase the ideas of Albert Einstein and Mahatma Gandhi—that if there was one thing that could make a significant impact it would be for the world to become vegetarian. And I would add we do not even need to become complete vegetarians, just for a day or two per week could make a huge impact. gb&d: Who can you point to in the world of sustainability today as inspiration? Shrivastava: To me, sustainability inspiration comes from outside the gbdmagazine.com

PHOTO: COURTESY OF FUTURE EARTH

Meteorological Organization, among many others.


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Future Earth members participate in Core Project Days in Bern, Switzerland.

environmental movement— Gandhi, Buddha, Christ, and great aboriginal knowledge traditions around the world inspire us to reflect on human-nature relations. I am also inspired by art to deepen emotional connections between humans and nature. gb&d: What keeps you doing this important, challenging work? Shrivastava: It is a lot of fun, and the people are so passionate. Their passion is contagious. At the end of the day I feel exhausted but also enlivened and energized. Yes, it may sound contradictory, but I am living on this bimodal way for the past two years. And then there is hope—the hope that collectively we are doing positive things to ensure a healthy future of earth. gb&d

FUTURE EARTH’S 2025 VISION

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Deliver water, energy, and food for all, and manage the synergies and tradeoffs among them, by understanding how these interactions are shaped by environmental, economic, social, and political changes.

Decarbonise socio-economic systems to stabilize the climate by promoting the technological, economic, social, political, and behavioral changes enabling transformations, while building knowledge about the impacts of climate change and adaptation responses for people and ecosystems. Safeguard the terrestrial, freshwater, and marine natural assets underpinning human well-being by understanding relationships between biodiversity, ecosystem functioning and services, and developing effective valuation and governance approaches.

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Build healthy, resilient, and productive cities by identifying and shaping innovations that combine better urban environments and lives with declining resource footprints, and provide efficient services and infrastructures that are robust to disasters.

7

Promote sustainable rural futures to

feed rising and more affluent populations amidst changes in biodiversity, resources, and climate by analyzing alternative land uses, food systems, and ecosystem options, and identifying institutional and governance needs.

Improve human health by elucidating,

and finding responses to, the complex interactions among environmental change, pollution, pathogens, disease vectors, ecosystem services, and people’s livelihoods, nutrition, and well-being.

8

Encourage sustainable consumption and production patterns that are equitable by understanding the social and environmental impacts of consumption of all resources, opportunities for decoupling resource use from growth in well-being, and options for sustainable development pathways and related changes in human behavior. Increase social resilience to future

threats by building adaptive governance systems, developing early warning of global and connected thresholds and risks, and testing effective, accountable, and transparent institutions that promote transformations to sustainability.

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On the Spot Cynthia Phifer Kracauer Cynthia Phifer Kracauer, the subject of this issue’s In Conversation interview on page 13, gives us a closer look at what makes her tick, and what she thinks would make the world a better place, in our questionnaire. AN ARTICLE YOU RECENTLY SHARED

NBC Defines Top 5 “Useless” Majors

WASTEFUL HABIT YOU’RE TRYING TO KICK

Plastic grocery bags.

MOST FULFILLING HOBBY THE PERFECT CITY WOULD HAVE

Sewing/knitting.

Clean air and water, parks, and streets for dogs and people.

MOST MEMORABLE HOMETOWN HAUNT

ONE TECHNOLOGY ON THE HORIZON THAT CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

GREATEST PROFESSIONAL PET PEEVE

Driverless cars.

YOUR TOPIC IF YOU WERE ASKED TO GIVE A TED TALK

Gender bias.

THE NEXT BIG IDEA WILL COME FROM

Women.

BUILDING YOU WOULD SAVE IF THE WORLD WAS GOING TO END

The Parthenon.

A CENTURY FROM NOW HUMANITY WILL:

Still go see the Parthenon. ONE BOOK EVERYONE SHOULD READ

Moby Dick.

MOST MEMORABLE MENTOR OR TEACHER

My eighth grade English teacher, Mr. Hadley. HARSHEST CRITICISM YOU’VE EVER RECEIVED

Peter Eisenman

FAVORITE MODE OF TRANSPORTATION

On foot.

MOST MEANINGFUL PROJECT YOU’VE COMPLETED

FDNY Fire Training Academy, post 9/11.

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Lunada Bay, CA

I’m not peevish.

INDUSTRY JARGON YOU WOULD BANISH

Most of it.

ENVIRONMENTAL COME-TO-JESUS MOMENT

Three days in Beijing.

YOUR PERSONAL DEFINITION OF SUSTAINABILITY

Intelligent building and systems design that balances efficiency and economy with the minimum of resource extraction. WHAT YOU’D PITCH TO THE PRESIDENT IF YOU HAD 30 SECONDS

Equal pay for equal work. WHAT YOU’D TELL THE GREEN MOVEMENT IF IT WAS YOUR CHILD

Congratulations, you’ve done a great job making good practices part of our conventional practices. THE BOLDEST IDEA IN SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

Historic preservation. CURRENT PROJECT YOU’RE MOST EXCITED ABOUT

Pioneering Women in American Architecture (website/book).

MOST USEFUL INDUSTRY EVENT

Good tours.

BUILDING TREND YOU HOPE WILL NEVER GO OUT OF FASHION

Historic preservation. WAY TO MAKE THE ENVIRONMENT A NON-PARTISAN ISSUE

It will always be partisan if there are opposing interests: greed versus conservation. FAVORITE PLACE YOU’VE TRAVELED

So many ... Florence, Paris. MOST IMPACTFUL EXPERIENCE IN NATURE

Whales playing with our boat in Hawaii, glaciers in Alaska, the night sky in the Indian Ocean. YOUR FIELD’S BIGGEST HURDLE TO IMPROVING ITS PRACTICES

Sluggish clients.

EXPLAIN “GREEN” TO A KINDERGARTNER

When we say something is “green” we mean that the activities make things grow, rather than kill things. THE FIRST STEP TO BECOMING A STEWARD OF THE ENVIRONMENT

Exist in a state of nature. CAUSE YOU’D SUPPORT IF YOU HAD A BILLION DOLLARS

World peace.

ONE QUESTION INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS SHOULD ALWAYS ASK THEMSELVES

Are you doing any harm? PUBLICATION YOU HOPE WILL NEVER DIE

The New York Times.

SOCIAL MEDIA—HELPING OR HURTING?

IN CONVERSATION with Cynthia Phifer Kracauer Continued from p. 77

Kracauer: Deciding to be an architect as a woman should not mean having to decide not to have children. I look at the culture change that occurred around energy efficiency and sustainability as a really wonderful example of how culture can change. The energy codes were changed, our standards of practice in terms of insulation and curtainwall construction and debris removal, and so many other things, have changed. Human resources also have to be sustainable. gb&d: Perhaps making gender equality part and parcel to sustainability is the way forward?

“Sustainability is one of those great cultural shift successes that gives me hope that the culture can change, and things can be better. So I’m actually very optimistic.” Kracauer: Sustainability is one of those great cultural shift successes that gives me hope that the culture can change, and things can be better. So I’m actually very optimistic. Though the election has made me a little nervous. But one of the things that’s been very interesting about it is that it has revealed the tremendous amount of gender bias against Hillary. It has brought it to the surface and everybody is really talking about it, which I think means the culture will change. Once you peel off the nasty outer coating and start looking at the blood pumping underneath, you begin to actually affect real change. gb&d

Hurting. It’s messing with the kids, and it’s creating a society that is branding itself, rather than relating face to face with each other. THE THOUGHT OR IDEA THAT CENTERS YOU

My daughter is going to have a baby.

january-february 2017

81


PUNCH LIST

Directory & Index

ADVERTISERS D Duro-Last, Inc., 48 Duro-Last.com 866.735.8824 G Greenbuild, 14 Greenbuildexpo.com 972.536.6456 M MacroAir, 46 Macroairfans.com 866.668.3247 Messana Radiant Cooling, 38 Radiantcooling.com 855.729.6244 N Newmat Stretch Ceiling and Wall Systems, 42 Newmatusa.com 631.261.1498 P PHIUS, 17 Phius.org 312.561.4588 R REHAU, 50 Rehau.com/us-en 800.297.6371 T ThermaRay, 44 Thermaray.com 866.457.4600 V Vectorworks, 24 Vectorworks.net 410.290.5114

82

january–february 2017

PEOPLE & COMPANIES # 55+ TLC Interior Design, LLC, 22 A AIA, 13 Agosta, Jesse, 40 Alexander, Mike, 56 Amerail Systems, 50 Amerimax Windows & Doors, 52 Arnulfo, Alessandro, 38 B Baltimore Washington International Airport, 42 Bate, Lisa, 14 Batshalom, Barbra, 14 Better Communities Alliance (BCA), 75 Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation, 13 Brierley, Robert, 58 Brennan, Peggy, 49 Brennan, Tom, 49 Brown Foundation, 65 Buffalo Bayou Park, 62 BWAF Industry Leaders Roundtable, 13 C Caesarstone, 70 The Cape, 20 Capelli, Brian, 58 Capitol Skyline Hotel, 50 Central Waters Brewing Company, 46 Chapman, Katie, 49 Chatham University, 38 Childs, Ralph, 52 Cisco, 56 Clean Energy Collective, 20 Corson, Christian, 34 Cushman and Wakefield, 56 D DeepRoot, 20 De-Meter, 20 Design & Construction Week, 19 Deutsch, Barbara, 14 Dinaburg, Masha, 44 Dubose, Carolyn Aguilar, 14 E Ecocor, 34 Emerging Leaders, 13 F First Finish Inc., 50 Forest City, 58 Foster-Rice, Angela, 14 Fulton, Lance 26 Future Earth, 78 G Garcetti, Eric, 14 Gilbey, Eric, 26 Gicquel, Pascal, 42 Glenn, Steve, 31 Goertz, Andrea, 14 Goff, Bryan, 25 Greco, Tim, 42 Green Garage, 48 Grey Leaf Design, 25 Guerrero, Ana, 14

H Habitat for Humanity, 70 Halstead International, 14 Hagstette, Guy, 64 Hargreaves, Dominique, 14 Heidenreich, Laura, 14 Henderson, Holley, 14 Higgins, Bryan, 52 Howe, Chris, 14 Hyatt House, 44 Hydrozone, 25 I International Air Conditioning, Heating, Refrigeration Exposition, 19 Interface Engineering, 40 International LIving Future Institute, 14 Isle, Nicole, 14 J Jensen, Cole, 52 Jones Lang LaSalle, 57 K Kanojia, Monica, 75 Kappe, Ray, 31 Kilbride, Kevin, 44 Kinder Foundation, 63 King, Susan, 14 Kitchen & Bath Industry Show, 19 Klingenberg, Katrin, 74 Kracauer, Cynthia Phifer, 13 Kubick, Karen, 14 L Landscape Industries, 26 Lapidus, Morris, 50 Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 38 Leebron, David, 61 Lewis, Bonnie J., 22 Lewis, Kimberly, 14 LivingHomes, 31 M Matthiessen, Lisa Fay, 72 McDonald, Kate, 32 MetroFlor, 14 MG Engineering D.P.C., 44 Michael Maltzan Architecture, 60 Millis Development & Construction, 64 Mithun, 38 Mollica, Anello, 46 Moody Center for the Arts, 60 N NAHB International Builders Show, 19 O Olson, Anne, 63 P Page Architects, 64 Pares, Antonio, 38 Park Passive, 17 Passive Projects Competition, 17 Phoenix Haus, 32 Plant Prefab, 31 Piper, Matthew, 48 Pope, Darlene, 57

Q Queens Museum of Art, 42 R R Residence, 17 Ray Magic, 38 Reed Hilderbrand, 64 Rice University, 60 Richard Pedranti Architect, 34 Right-Sized Passive Home, 17 Rocky Mountain Institute Innovation Center, 17 Routman, Rochelle, 14 Rubell, Mera, 50 S Schaal, Alan, 52 Shrivastava, Paul, 78 Sharp, Leith, 14 SmartGeoMetrics, 65 Smart Building Program, 57 Smith, Kathleen, 14 Sarkar, Dr. Biplab, 25 Solar Power Northeast, 19 Stahl, Jim, 47 StudioMET, 69 Sturgeon, Amanda, 14 Sutley, Nancy, 14 SWA, 64 Swanke Hayden Connell, 13 T Tilden, Eric, 76 U United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, 78 United Airlines, 14 USGBC, 14 V Village Centre Apartments, 17 Vlahakis-Hanks, Kelly, 14 W Wandtke, Denny, 46 Waldorf Astoria Hotel, 42 Washington Dulles International Airport, 42 Winchester, Mary Tod, 14 Women in Sustainability Leadership Awards, 14 World Meteorological Organization, 78 Y Yellowstone Park Foundation, 20 York, Liz, 14 You, Yoonchul, 69 Z Zaleski, Sarah, 75

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gb&d Issue 42: January/February 2017  
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