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March 2011

THRiVE » northern colorado wellness

No one food can do it all, experts say, but some foods can do a lot for your body. Take a look at some foods that pack a

powerful

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» INSIDE: how to minimize those wrinkles • Another reason not to smoke • events


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Question:

I have tried physical therapy and medication for my painful shoulder, but I’m still experiencing problems. Are there any new surgical options for shoulders?

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Feb. 23, 2011

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10 WAYS

to minimize those wrinkles By Ana Romano gtreporters@greeleytribune.com

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o one wants to feel old. Staying young in the mind is one thing, but as the years pass, many women find that fighting the external appearance of age is not as easy. Every day, women are inundated with a slew of antiaging commercials in a torrent of white noise: Stop the signs of aging! Look 10 years younger! Two simple steps to feeling like you’re back in your prime! What’s a woman to do? Kimberly Barnes, owner of Essentially Bare Laser and Skin Care Clinic in Greeley, and Megan Brauer, aesthetician at Designing Beauty Academy in Greeley, chimed in to help make sense of all the chaos. WHAT NOT TO DO

There are three cardinal sins women most commonly commit against their skin. The first one, Barnes said, is sun exposure. That goes for tanning beds, too, which have the same destructive UVA and UVB rays. “When you are exposed to the sun long-term and don’t use any protection, your collagen and elastin fibroblasts, which give structure and firmness to the skin, start to deplete,” Barnes said. With no structure, fine lines and wrinkles move in to take its place. QUIT SMOKING

Women must avoid smoking if they truly want younger-looking skin. “Smoking depletes oxygen levels in a cell,” Barnes said. “And then they can’t function in a healthy way. You can tell who is a smoker by looking at them because you often see the same effects as sun.”

BODY SOAP IS NOT FOR THE FACE

Never use body soap as a facial cleanser. “That will just dry out your face,” Brauer said. “It won’t help at all.” Instead, it will clog pores and counteract other healthy skin routines.

GET IN THE ROUTINE Photo by Christopher Robbins / ThinkStock

Both skin care experts stressed a daily routine to keep healthy skin.

“A daily cleanser and moisturizer is a key factor,” Brauer said. She said women should be particularly attentive during the winter, when the Colorado air dries any moisture that might be left. “It helps maintain elasticity in the skin,” Brauer said, keeping it young and fresh. FIND THE RIGHT INGREDIENTS

Barnes recommended topical C with L-ascorbic acid in a moisturizer. “It’s phenomenal. It helps to stimulate collagen and can actually reverse signs of aging,” Barnes said. The magical chemical helps with fines lines and wrinkles, brightens the skin tone and improves its texture. KNOW THE WRONG INGREDIENTS

Brauer said the main thing to look for in cleansers is a natural set of ingredients. “It’s the same thing as food with preservatives,” Brauer said. Natural products are healthier for the skin, especially on the face. KEEP YOUR OPTIONS OPEN

Barnes said there are a number of procedures women should keep in mind if they want something more than a daily routine to fight the onset of wrinkles. One option many women like is photorejuvination, which targets fine lines, pigmentation and broken capillaries. “Women start seeing results immediately,” Barnes said. “It prepares and prevents.” DEEP CLEAN

Another option is chemical peels, Brauer said. “It’s a product that peels off two layers of skin for deep exfoliation,” she said, making it a great treatment for people with other skin problems like acne or sunspots. EXFOLIATE, EXFOLIATE, EXFOLIATE

Mechanical exfoliation through a process called microderm abrasion is a similar treatment that removes the top layer of skin cells, Barnes said. “Women see lots of improvement over time with fine lines and pigmentation, but it takes longer.” KEEP AT IT

Women who choose to get a treatment or even get a facial should continue a healthy regimen even if they get a deep clean. “Good home care is essential,” Barnes said. “Product at home increases results in the office by 60 percent.”


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Food Revolution

It’s time to fight back against childhood obesity! Nutrition Services director Jeremy West and nutrition coordinator Kara Goff, RD have been with District 6 for less than a year, but they, along with their nutrition team, have been in makeover mode from start, working to raise the quality of food served in nearly 30 cafeterias. “We started our own revolution. It’s time to fight back against childhood obesity.” West said. Goff points to the “menu makeover” that began at the end of 2009, resulting in new and improved menus, with more healthy choices at all levels. Among those improvements are increasing the overall nutritional integrity of menus, with lower fat and higher fiber content, a greater variety of fresh fruits and vegetables offered every day, fresher and less-processed food items. Goff said the next steps include working to add more items that are made from scratch rather than offering as much processed food, and constantly looking for ways to offer healthful foods that students can be excited about eating.

Adding more fresh, locally grown food

Other improvements in food quality come from a variety of state and local programs. One is Colorado School’s Harvest of the Month program, which features a fresh produce item each month and includes a student-education component as well as ways of incorporating the food in meals throughout the month. Another established effort is the Farm to School program. Over the last two years, the partnership has grown to support local farmers by purchasing directly from them – a program that benefits everyone, both by supporting the local economy and by giving students the freshest food possible.

What makes a healthy meal?

West and Goff set a goal of reducing the percent of total calories from fat in District 6 meals. Schools are required to limit fat calories to 35 percent of the total, but with the recent menu makeover, District 6 meals top out at 30 percent, maximum. That is a significant number when one considers that the district is on track to serve more than 2.5 million meals this school year at 27 sites.

Educating students and parents about healthy habits

With fresh deli offerings and salads mixed in, elementary students have three meal options for lunch each day. “Some of the feedback we’ve gotten is that they don’t want that kind of food, but it varies from school to school,” she said. “Some schools are really excited about it.” She said she is confident that, over time, increasing numbers of students will learn to embrace the healthiest foods offered. That may be the greatest challenge facing school meal staff: Educating students on making good food choices. Parental involvement and support, especially in a time of reduced budgets for classroom initiatives, is key in getting the word out and really teaching students about nutrition. “Parents have got to be at the forefront,” Goff said. Along with additional nutritional improvements, West said menus in the cafeterias next school year will include eye-catching images as well as nutrition information about the food so parents of young students, as well as older students themselves, can identify healthy choices before the students get in line. For the complete article and additional information, please log onto www.greeleyschools.org and click on the news feature “Food Revolution”

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Feb. 23, 2011

MARCH HEALTH EVENTS BLOOD TESTS

« » WHAT: North Colorado Medical Center’s

Wellness Services offers low-cost blood screenings. Open labs are available on the second Wednesday and fourth Wednesday of every month from 7-8:45 a.m. Some immunizations are available upon request and availability. WHEN: 7-8:45 a.m. March 9 and March 23. » WHERE: Union Colony Room, Area C, ground floor, North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., Greeley. » COST: Costs vary. » DETAILS: To schedule an appointment, call (970) 350-6633 at least 24 hours in advance. Walk-ins also welcome. For complete list of blood screenings, go to www. bannerhealth.com/ncmcwellness.

BODY CHECK

« » WHAT: This head-to-toe health as-

sessment gives you the tools to put your health first by receiving a comprehensive set of preventative health screenings. This screening includes: health fair panel (fasting blood work), sleep questionnaire, lung function test, body composition, weight and body mass index, hip and waist measurements, health education with a wellness specialist, EKG with results read by a board-certified cardiologist, bone density screening, peripheral arterial disease screening (education about peripheral vascular disease, stroke, stroke prevention and osteoporosis prevention), ankle brachial index, ultrasound of the carotid vessels and ultrasound of the aorta. Above four screenings are read by a board-certified radiologist. Upon request are a colorectal take-home kit($10) and a prostrate specific blood antigen screening($23). » WHEN: 7-10 a.m. Tuesdays. » WHERE: Summit View Medical Commons, 2001 70th Ave., Greeley. » COST: $175 » DETAILS: Call (970) 350-6070 to schedule an appointment. All results are sent to your personal physician and to you.

COOKING CLASSES

« There will be three classes this month

taught by registered dieticians. Learn about heart-healthy cooking and how to modify unhealthy cooking habits. » WHAT: “How to Shake the Salt Habit,” taught by Nancy Lightfoot, R.D.Learn about the recommended daily sodium intake, how to modify favorite recipes, which foods to avoid and which ones to enjoy often. » WHEN: 6-7:15 p.m. March 7. » WHERE: NCMC’s Cardiac Kitchen, North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., Greeley.. » COST: $10. » DETAILS: Call (970) 350-6633 to register. ----------» WHAT: “Cooking With NCMC Administrator Julie Klein.” Innovations Guest Chef Julie Klein demonstrates easy and healthy recipe modifications. » WHEN: Drop in anytime between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. March 23. » WHERE: NCMC’s Bistro, come in NCMC’s Main Entrance, North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., Greeley. » COST: Cost varies. » DETAILS: Call (970) 350-6633 to register. ----------» WHAT: “Give Your Kitchen a Nutrition Makeover,” taught by Mary Branom, R.D. Learn how to clean out and refresh your kitchen with healthy ingredients. » WHEN: 6-7:15 p.m. March 23. » WHERE: NCMC’s Cardiac Kitchen, North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., Greeley. » COST: $10. » DETAILS: Call (970) 350-6633 to register.

DINNER WITH A SPECIALIST

« » WHAT: A series of presentations on

health topics during a dinner, presented by North Colorado Medical Center. Neurologist William Shaffer, M.D., will bring personalized insight into living with multiple sclerosis. » WHEN: Dinner starts at 6:30 p.m., and

the presentation starts at 7 p.m. March 1. » WHERE: Aims Corporate Center, 5590 11th St. in Greeley. » COST: $10. » DETAILS: Call (970) 350-6633 to register.

HEARTSAVER CPR WITH AED (GREELEY)

« » WHAT: This class covers adult and

infant/child CPR, obstructed airway, the Heimlich maneuver, the use of a barrier device, and AED hands-on training. Upon completion of the course, participants will receive a Heartsaver course completion card. The certification is valid for two years. » WHEN: 6:45-9:15 p.m. March 10. » WHERE: Greeley Family FunPlex, 1501 65th Ave., Greeley. » COST: $48 (save $5 if taken in conjunction with Heartsaver First Aid.) » DETAILS: Call (970) 350-9400 to register.

HEARTSAVER CPR WITH AED (WINDSOR)

« » WHAT: This class covers adult and

infant/child CPR, obstructed airway, the Heimlich maneuver, the use of a barrier device, and AED hands-on training. The certification is valid for two years. » WHEN: 6-9 p.m. March 3. » WHERE: Windsor Recreation Center, 650 11th Street, Windsor. » COST: $48 (save $5 if taken in conjunction with Heartsaver First Aid.) » DETAILS: Call (970) 674-3500 to register.

HEARTSAVER FIRST AID

« » WHAT: This class covers first aid basics,

medical emergencies, injury emergencies and environmental emergencies. The certification is valid for two years. » WHEN:4:15-6:15 p.m. March 10. » WHERE: Greeley Family FunPlex, 1501 65th Ave., Greeley. » COST: $45 (save $5 if taken in conjunction with Heartsaver First Aid.) » DETAILS: Call (970) 350-9400 to register.


Feb. 23, 2011

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Drug may slow growth of early prostate cancer By MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Medical Writer

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new study suggests a way to help men with early, low-risk prostate cancer avoid being overtreated for a disease that in most cases will never threaten their lives. It found that a drug can slow the growth of these tumors in men who opt to be monitored instead of having treatment right away. This is the first time that a drug for treating enlarged prostates also has been shown to help treat prostate cancer in a rigorous study. It may persuade more men to choose active surveillance, or “watchful waiting,� instead of rushing to have treatments that can leave them with urinary or sexual problems, doctors say. However, the results also show that most of these men do very well with no treatment at all. “We’re identifying men who are not likely to need even a pill,� said Dr. Maha Hussain, a University of Michigan cancer specialist. But Americans fear cancer so much that they want some kind of treatment and underestimate the financial and medical risks of treating low-risk cases, she added. She is program chair of a cancer conference in Florida

Online

Prostate cancer info: http:// www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ types/prostate and http://tinyurl.com/ ASCOanswers Risk calculator: http://tinyurl. com/riskcalculator

where the study will be presented later this week. Results were released Tuesday in a telephone news conference sponsored by the American Society for Clinical Oncology. Roughly half of the 218,000 men diagnosed each year in the United States with prostate cancer have low-risk disease — PSA blood levels under 10 and low tumor aggressiveness scores. “The American view of cancer� is that it’s always best to treat, so about 80 percent of these men choose to have that right away, said Dr. Otis Brawley, a prostate cancer expert who is chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society. In Europe, though, most choose watchful waiting — close monitoring and treatment only if the cancer progresses or causes pain or other problems. Doctors know that drugs that shrink the prostate — GlaxoSmithKline PLC’s Avodart and Merck & Co.’s Proscar — can help prevent

prostate cancer. But federal health advisers recently recommended against taking them for this purpose because of potential risks. The new study tested Avodart “not to prevent cancer, but to prevent the progressionâ€? of it in men who already have the disease, which may be a much better use of such drugs, said the study’s leader, Dr. Neil Fleshner of University Health Network and Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto. “We know the vast majority of these men are not destined to die from that cancer,â€? and wanted to see if Avodart could make “watchful waitingâ€? safer, Fleshner said. The study enrolled about 300 men in the United States and Canada with low-risk cancer that was confirmed by a biopsy. They were given daily Avodart or dummy pills and new biopsies 1 ½ and three years later. Prostate cancer got worse in 38 percent of men taking Avodart and 49 percent of those on dummy pills. Final biopsies showed no signs of cancer in 36 percent of men on Avodart versus 23 percent of those on dummy pills. Doctors say this last result shows how tiny many of these cancers were to start with, that they couldn’t even be found when new biopsies

were done. Doctors don’t think Avodart can cure cancers, but it seems to suppress it, said Dr. Howard Sandler, a prostate cancer specialist at CedarsSinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He had no role in the study but is involved with the cancer conference. Researchers gave no details on Avodart’s side effects, but said no new ones appeared in the study. Avodart and Proscar are known to cause sexual problems for some men, but many men over 50 have this anyway and only about 5 percent more do when taking these drugs, said Brawley, who helped test Avodart for cancer prevention. The new study was sponsored by Avodart’s maker, GlaxoSmithKline. Avodart and Proscar cost about $4 a pill; generic versions of Proscar are available for about $2. Proscar is similar to Avodart but has not been tested for treating early cancer as this study did. Sandler said Avodart might relieve some men’s anxiety about monitoring their disease and may make them more comfortable not having immediate treatment. “If it was me, I’d choose active surveillance,� he said. Avodart “has the potential to be an important help.�

Cancer society offers scholarships to survivors Staff reports The American Cancer Society is offering scholarships of up to $2,500 per academic year for young Colorado cancer survivors. The aim of The Cancer Survivor College Scholarship Program is to give financial help to cancer survivors who

were diagnosed before the age of 21, according to a press release. In addition, students must be age 25 or younger when submitting the application. The scholarships will be offered in increments of $2,500 per academic year for a total possible lifetime award of up to $10,000 per student. The scholarships can be

used at an accredited college, university, community college or vocational/technical school. Students who are eligible should be graduating from high school or continuing college in the 2011 school year. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and residents of Colorado who have at

least a 2.5 GPA and will be a full-time student in the fall. The scholarship money will be awarded in May, and applicants must reapply each year. People interested in obtaining an application packet should call 866-500-3272 or 1-800-ACS-2345. Applications are due by Friday.

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Cancer pain

Another reason not to smoke

F

requently, I take time in this column to discuss the health risk associated with tobacco use. The relationship between smoking and many different types of cancer is well established; one would have to live under a rock to not know this fact. But it appears smoking may have an impact on those already diagnosed with cancer and the level of pain the experience. In a study published in the January 2011 issue of PAIN, researchers report they have found evidence to suggest cancer patients who continue to smoke despite their diagnosis experience greater pain than nonsmokers.

Photo by Brand X Pictures

They found that for a wide range of cancer types and for cancers in stages I

interference in their daily activities, as well as a demographics questionnaire. Patients were asked to rate their perceived severity of bodily pain on a scale of 1 to 6 meaning that the pain is very severe, and the degree to which pain interfered with their daily routine, on a scale from 1 to 5, with 1 meaning no interference and 5 meaning extreme interference. Current smokers experienced more severe pain than those who have never smoked, and also reported more interference from pain than either nonsmokers or former smokers. Among former smokers, there was an inverse relation between pain and the number of years since quitting. The longer ago they had quit, the less pain they complained of, suggesting that quitting smoking may reduce pain over time, and the more time away from smoking, the better the pain control. What does this mean to patients and physicians who treat cancer? First, physicians must do more

which pain interfered with a patient’s daily routine. This finding could have a huge impact on our ability to treat and control pain that is experienced in many cancer patients. In this study, researchers found that current smokers would report greater pain, pain interference with the activities of their daily life, and pain-related distress more than former smokers or those who stated that they had never smoked. In this study, investigators surveyed 224 patients with a range of many different cancer diagnoses. Patients completed selfreport exams as measures of pain severity, pain-related distress, and pain-related

to IV, smoking was associated with increased pain severity and the extent to

Family Dentistry 

Practicing in Weld County for over 25 years

 Dr. Hatch

to assist cancer patients to quit smoking after their diagnosis, not only for the health benefits, but also for the pain benefits. It is possible the nicotine addiction and the chemicals in cigarettes interfere with the ability for pain medications to work as well as they should? Although more research is needed to understand the mechanisms that relate nicotine to pain, physicians should aggressively promote smoking cessation among cancer patients. Preliminary findings suggest smoking cessation will improve the overall treatment response and quality of life. Dr. C. Joseph Bennett is a board-certified radiation oncologist, past president of the Citrus County Unit of the American Cancer Society and a member of the Board of Directors and the Executive Committee of the Florida Division of the American Cancer Society. Contact him at 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461 or cjbennett@ rboi.com.

Dr. Vaardahl

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  DDS Sidney Benner, DDS Julie Sharp,

LiveWell Weld County is helping to

LiveWell County choice is helping makeWeld the healthiest the to for our residents creating: makeeasiest the healthiest choicebythe easiest for our residents by creating:

• Active Community Environments LiveWell Weld County is helping to • Access to Healthy Foods make the healthiest choice the Ͳ Active Community Environments • Farm to School Programs easiest for our residents by creating: Ͳ • Worksite Access to Healthy Foods Wellness

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1931 65th Ave., Suite A Greeley, Colorado 970-351-0900 4401 Union Street Johnstown, Colorado 970-443-0925





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3400 W. 16th St. Suite 8-E Greeley

LiveWell is a supporter of Weld County school district healthy eating and active living initiatives!

LiveWellisasupporterof

LiveWellisasupporterof Weld County Department of WeldCountyschooldistrict WeldCountyschooldistrict Public Health and Environment. (970) 304-6470. healthyeatingandactiveliving healthyeatingandactiveliving

(970) 351-0400 www.bennersharp.com

Ͳ Farm to School Programs Active Community Environments Access to Healthy Foods Ͳ Worksite Wellness Farm to School Programs Worksite Wellness


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Behaviors can increase risk of eating disorders Wire reports DENVER - An estimated five percent of Americans will suffer from an eating disorder at some point in their lifetime, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. During National Eating Disorders Awareness Week (Feb. 20-26), Eating Recovery Center (www. EatingRecoveryCenter.com), a national center for eating disorders recovery, encourages people to be aware of behaviors and actions that could increase the risk of a loved one developing an eat-

ing disorder. “Because eating disorders are genetic, an individual who has a family history is much more likely to be sensitive to others’ words and actions surrounding food and body image,” said Kenneth L. Weiner, MD, FAED, CEDS, chief executive officer and founding partner of Eating Recovery Center. “It’s important for families to talk about these deadly diseases and avoid behaviors and actions that could act as eating disorder triggers.” Eating Recovery Center urges families to be aware of

Dr. Randy Hatch Dr. Charles Johnson

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More online

For more information about National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, or to learn why the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) urges individuals to talk about these deadly diseases, visit www.nationaleatingdisorders. org.

these five seemingly harmless behaviors and actions that could increase the risk of a child or loved one developing an eating disorder: 1. The use of food as a reward or a punishment. When parents use food as

a reward or punishment, it can teach their child to turn to food for comfort, tie emotions to eating and permanently affect a child’s relationship with food. 2. The comments you make about your appearance or the appearances of others. Negative remarks about your own appearance or body type, or disparaging comments about the appearances of others, can have a profound effect on a young child, a teenager or even a friend of yours. Keep remarks encouraging to foster an environment of positive

self-esteem and body image. 3. Labeling foods as “good” or “bad” foods. It is important not to list types of foods or entire food groups as “good” or “bad” because of their fat content, nutritional value, sodium amounts or otherwise. 4. Dieting. Not only does dieting keep people from listening to what their bodies need, 95 percent of individuals who go on a diet actually put the weight back on in the next two or three years. Furthermore, for an individual who is genetically predisposed to an

eating disorder, dieting can be a gateway to disordered eating behaviors. 5. Ignoring genetics. An individual with an immediate family member who had anorexia nervosa is 12 times more likely to develop the disease; and four times more likely to develop bulimia nervosa. Individuals with a family history should be especially vigilant of disordered eating behaviors if their loved one is involved in sports — especially those with a focus on weight management such as ballet, gymnastics or wrestling.

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Feb. 23, 2011 ■

WELLNESS

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You can’t wait for one great super food to rescue you. But you can make sure your diet is packed with foods that have a ...

POWERFUL

PUNCH

By Meagan Birely mbirely@greeleytribune.com

I

f I eat this Acai berry, I’ll be healthy. False. Super foods, also known as foods that contain a powerful nutrient punch, seem to be in season right now. But one specific food can not change your entire diet. What foods are good for you? What foods are bad for you? Food research is always ongoing, and as Mary Branom, a registered dietician at North Colorado Medical Center in Greeley, says, you can talk to five different people and get five different opinions about what foods are the best for you. Branom and Elizabeth Long, also a registered dietician at NCMC, agree that there is not just one food that can makeover your health, but rather, it’s about your diet as a whole. “A variety is important,” Branom said. “Certainly foods may be called a functional food or have more powerful components to them that would take them above and beyond the basic nutrition.” Long added to the super food definition, “A super food is technically something that is valued by its native country or has a high antioxidant count.”

Antioxidants have sure got researcher’s attention. Branom defined antioxidants as “a comment of food that protects the body from wear and tear of oxidated stress.” She added damage can be done to the body’s cells by free radicals. Antioxidants can help prevent this damage or repair it. Basically, they are your body’s cells protectors. Researchers can qualify a food as “super” by seeing if it meets certain criteria for an ORAC value (oxygen radical absorbance capacity). Each food is given a value based on nutrients it contains. Dole Food Company Inc. has posted USDA based research on top ranking ORAC foods. Here is a sampling from dolesuperfoods. com of top-rated foods that help a specific part of the body function. Their antioxidant and nutritional value goes above and beyond most.

Right now, according to Long, the current trend is the Acai berry. However, people in the U.S. are not getting the full nutritional value of the berry. It is native to Brazil where the berry is used by surfers for an energy boost. But the berries have a very short shelf life, and it is hard to get them here before they perish. So the Acai berry is often used as flavoring or as a byproduct, which eliminates most of the value. “I don’t encourage the use of Acai berry products,” Long said. “I’d rather have patients eat whole fruits and vegetables.”

Heart

Brain

Blueberries. One serving of blueberries contains high levels of fiber, which helps lower cholesterol, vitamin C and anthocyanins, which helps reduce buildup of cholesterol in the arteries. Blueberries can be eaten by themselves or baked into bread for muffins or coffee cake.

Eyes

Dole lists carrots as the super food for eyes. One serving is the top source for vitamin A. Research shows that this vitamin helps eyes adjust to bright light and to the darkness. Carrots are very versatile in cooking; they can be put in soups, salads, breads and more. Oranges are an easy snack to take on the go, or to give out as a snack at a little league soccer game, but they pack antioxidant power in the vitamin C and foliate. The antioxidant fighters help protect the brain from free radicals that can cause nerve damage.

Skin

A half of a papaya ranks highest in vitamins C and A. As well as boosting your immune health, vitamin C helps skin cells regenerate. Vitamin A also helps to keep your skin nourished. Dole recommends jazzing up the lemonade.

Immunity

Oranges and all of their vitamin C goodness certainly help with immunity, but the top ranking food, according to Dole may surprise you — cashews. Two ounces of cashews provide 10 percent more immune quality vitamins and minerals such as selenium and zinc. These two help boost the immune system response. Cashews also can add a crunch to salads or a chicken dish. While these foods go above and beyond the nutritional requirement, it is important to remember they are not the only ones and to remember the essential role variety plays in your diet. “I really don’t believe in anything such as a super food,” Long said. “It’s kind of a fad, kind of a buzz. No one food is going to provide you with (all your) nutritional needs. It’s really about the diet as a whole. There is truthfully not good or bad foods, there are good and bad food habits.”

I really don’t believe in anything such as a super food. It’s kind of a fad, kind of a buzz. No one food is going to provide you with (all your) nutritional needs. It’s really about the diet as a whole.

Elizabeth Long

registered dietician


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WELLNESS

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■ Feb. 23, 2011

Feb. 23, 2011 ■

WELLNESS

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8

You can’t wait for one great super food to rescue you. But you can make sure your diet is packed with foods that have a ...

POWERFUL

PUNCH

By Meagan Birely mbirely@greeleytribune.com

I

f I eat this Acai berry, I’ll be healthy. False. Super foods, also known as foods that contain a powerful nutrient punch, seem to be in season right now. But one specific food can not change your entire diet. What foods are good for you? What foods are bad for you? Food research is always ongoing, and as Mary Branom, a registered dietician at North Colorado Medical Center in Greeley, says, you can talk to five different people and get five different opinions about what foods are the best for you. Branom and Elizabeth Long, also a registered dietician at NCMC, agree that there is not just one food that can makeover your health, but rather, it’s about your diet as a whole. “A variety is important,” Branom said. “Certainly foods may be called a functional food or have more powerful components to them that would take them above and beyond the basic nutrition.” Long added to the super food definition, “A super food is technically something that is valued by its native country or has a high antioxidant count.”

Antioxidants have sure got researcher’s attention. Branom defined antioxidants as “a comment of food that protects the body from wear and tear of oxidated stress.” She added damage can be done to the body’s cells by free radicals. Antioxidants can help prevent this damage or repair it. Basically, they are your body’s cells protectors. Researchers can qualify a food as “super” by seeing if it meets certain criteria for an ORAC value (oxygen radical absorbance capacity). Each food is given a value based on nutrients it contains. Dole Food Company Inc. has posted USDA based research on top ranking ORAC foods. Here is a sampling from dolesuperfoods. com of top-rated foods that help a specific part of the body function. Their antioxidant and nutritional value goes above and beyond most.

Right now, according to Long, the current trend is the Acai berry. However, people in the U.S. are not getting the full nutritional value of the berry. It is native to Brazil where the berry is used by surfers for an energy boost. But the berries have a very short shelf life, and it is hard to get them here before they perish. So the Acai berry is often used as flavoring or as a byproduct, which eliminates most of the value. “I don’t encourage the use of Acai berry products,” Long said. “I’d rather have patients eat whole fruits and vegetables.”

Heart

Brain

Blueberries. One serving of blueberries contains high levels of fiber, which helps lower cholesterol, vitamin C and anthocyanins, which helps reduce buildup of cholesterol in the arteries. Blueberries can be eaten by themselves or baked into bread for muffins or coffee cake.

Eyes

Dole lists carrots as the super food for eyes. One serving is the top source for vitamin A. Research shows that this vitamin helps eyes adjust to bright light and to the darkness. Carrots are very versatile in cooking; they can be put in soups, salads, breads and more. Oranges are an easy snack to take on the go, or to give out as a snack at a little league soccer game, but they pack antioxidant power in the vitamin C and foliate. The antioxidant fighters help protect the brain from free radicals that can cause nerve damage.

Skin

A half of a papaya ranks highest in vitamins C and A. As well as boosting your immune health, vitamin C helps skin cells regenerate. Vitamin A also helps to keep your skin nourished. Dole recommends jazzing up the lemonade.

Immunity

Oranges and all of their vitamin C goodness certainly help with immunity, but the top ranking food, according to Dole may surprise you — cashews. Two ounces of cashews provide 10 percent more immune quality vitamins and minerals such as selenium and zinc. These two help boost the immune system response. Cashews also can add a crunch to salads or a chicken dish. While these foods go above and beyond the nutritional requirement, it is important to remember they are not the only ones and to remember the essential role variety plays in your diet. “I really don’t believe in anything such as a super food,” Long said. “It’s kind of a fad, kind of a buzz. No one food is going to provide you with (all your) nutritional needs. It’s really about the diet as a whole. There is truthfully not good or bad foods, there are good and bad food habits.”

I really don’t believe in anything such as a super food. It’s kind of a fad, kind of a buzz. No one food is going to provide you with (all your) nutritional needs. It’s really about the diet as a whole.

Elizabeth Long

registered dietician


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nutrition

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n Feb. 23, 2011

Sodium SHAKEDOWN

■■Colorado

health summit looks at how to cut back on sodium consumption

By CATHERINE TSAI Associated Press

ENGLEWOOD — State health officials are looking for ways large and small to gradually get Coloradans to eat less salt without their tastebuds noticing. Last week, they announced tweaks in a health department program that aims to give diners healthier options at restaurants. Later, state health officials may look at whether to change procurement policies to include nutrition standards in state agencies’ food contracts, said Susan Motika, food policy coordinator for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. The goal is to help Coloradans follow new U.S. dietary guidelines calling for most Americans to slash their sodium intake to lower blood pressure and the risk of heart disease and stroke. “We certainly won’t stop people from dying, but wouldn’t it be nice for as long as we live, we live a healthy life,” the state’s chief medical officer Dr. Christopher Urbina said at the health department’s Summit on Sodium. The summit brought together food manufacturers, cooks, health departments and others. The state is dealing with an estimated $1 billion budget gap, but organizers said the summit was funded by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Last month, the federal government said people should limit daily sodium intake to 2,300 milligrams, or about one-third less than the average person now consumes. Those who are 51 and older, AfricanAmerican or suffering

istockphoto

from high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney disease were advised to limit intake to 1,500 milligrams daily. The Colorado Department of Public Health and

Environment’s Smart Meal Seal program uses labels at participating restaurants to identify menu options that meet certain standards, including having less than 1,500 milligrams of sodium

per meal. The health department said last week the limit is dropping to 1,350 milligrams this year and to 1,200 next year. “We’re balancing consumer taste and public

health goals,” said Eric Aakko, the health department’s healthy living branch unit director. The program is being supported with an $860,000 grant from the

Colorado Health Foundation. States and cities around the country are taking different approaches to cutting sodium intake. Massachusetts includes low-sodium standards and other healthy standards in state agencies’ contracts for food and beverages at places like jails and hospitals. New York City has a similar initiative. Meanwhile, companies such as Starbucks Corp. and H.J. Heinz Co. have committed to the National Salt Reduction Initiative to reduce sodium in products by 25 percent over five years — and not just in the highest-sodium products. “If you want to put a dent in sodium intake, you have to reduce sodium in foods like bread that don’t have much sodium per slice but that people eat a lot of,” said Lawrence Appel, director for the Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research at The Johns Hopkins University. Reducing salt has its challenges because it’s a preservative, adds flavor and is integral in making some foods like cheese. Denver chef Frank Bonanno said he’s cut nearly all the salt from his own diet for health reasons. He misses it. His kids haven’t. “To get them to eat things they didn’t want to eat, I tended to put salt and butter on them. Now they’re still eating them because they just trust me that I’m making it the same way,” he said. Bonanno said home cooks looking to cut sodium should avoid processed foods and concentrate on other flavors in a dish. “A big squeeze of lemon goes a long way,” he said.


Feb. 23, 2011

NUTRITION

THRIVEnc

IN A NUTSHELL CRACK OPEN A SNACK THAT IS PACKED WITH NUTRITION By Jill Wendholt Silva The Kansas City Star

Photo by Viewstock

Step away from the vending machine. Or were you going to pull the lever for a packet of mixed nuts? Nuts are an easily portable and tasty snack for busy people on the run. Tuck a bag into a desk drawer, glove compartment, purse pocket or backpack for days when the munchies strike. Recent nutrition studies rank pecans, walnuts and almonds among the most nutritious nuts because they are high in both protein and omega-3 fats. All three are excellent sources of manganese. Walnuts add omega-3 and copper. Almonds are an excellent source of vitamin E. All nuts are high in protein, as well as good fats and fiber, potassium and magnesium. To link to the latest studies on nuts, go to www.nuthealth.org, a site sponsored by the International Tree Nut Council. Despite all the good news about nuts, it still a good idea to avoid tucking into a bowl at a party, or you just might wind up eating more calories than you need. Portion control is the key to enjoying these Spicy Maple-Glazed Nuts. A serving of nuts is roughly 1/4 cup, or a of nuts. We like to use a deviled-egg plate as a serving tray at a party. Two is equivalent to about 1/4 cup. Of course, it doesn really matter if guests know that little trick. Easy-to-see portions help everyone avoid the trap of mindless eating. Back at the vending machine, you might want to check the label for the amount of sodium added. A spice mixture of cumin, cayenne and maple syrup adds a spicy tang without as much salt. Shopping tip: Real maple syrup is an excellent companion for nuts. Regular or light pancake syrup can be used, but watch more closely for

over-browning if pancake syrup is used. Nuts are high in natural fats, so they spoil easily. And they are not inexpensive. Buy them in bulk, then protect your investment by storing them in the freezer for up to 1 year. Serving tips: For a snack mix, combine spiced nuts with raisins, sweetened dried cranberries or chopped, pitted dried fruits, if desired. This nut mixture also is excellent served as a crunchy, tasty topping on salads or sprinkled on yogurt, cereal, pasta or cooked vegetables.

SPICY MAPLE-GLAZED NUTS:

6 (¼-cup) servings 1/2 cup pecan halves 1/2 cup walnut pieces 1/2 cup whole, unblanched almonds 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1/2 teaspoon cumin 1/8 teaspoon cayenne 1/8 teaspoon salt Procedure: 1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Line a 10-by-15-inch jelly-roll pan with parchment paper. 2. Combine nuts in mixing bowl. Drizzle syrup over nuts, then sprinkle with seasonings. Toss to coat nuts evenly. 3. Spread nuts in single layer on prepared pan. Bake 15-20 minutes, or until lightly toasted, stirring midway through. Nutrition data per 1/4-cup serving: 248 calories (76 percent from fat), 22 grams total fat (2 grams saturated), no cholesterol,9 grams carbohydrates, 7 grams protein, 47 milligrams sodium, 3 grams dietary fiber. Recipe developed for The Kansas City Star by professional home economists Kathryn Moore and Roxanne Wyss.

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TRiBUNE MEDiCAL DiRECTORY Acupuncture

WestlAke FAmily physiciAns, pc 5623 W. 19th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 353-9011 Fax: (970) 353-9135 Professionals: Richard Budensiek, DO; Janis McCall, MD; Frank Morgan, MD; Jacqueline Bearden, MD; Angela Mill, MD Website: www.bannerhealth.com

Alzheimer’s/skilled cAre

Bonell Good sAmAritAn 708 22nd Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)352-6082 Fax: (970)356-7970 Web Site: www.good-sam.com

GrAce pointe

1919 68th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 304-1919 www.gracepointegreeley.com

meAdoWVieW oF Greeley

5300 29th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-6800 Web Site: www.meadowviewofgreeley.com

Assisted liVinG

Bonell Good sAmAritAn 708 22nd Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 352-6082 Fax: (970) 356-7970 www.good-sam.com

GrAce pointe

1919 68th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 304-1919 www.gracepointegreeley.com

meAdoWVieW oF Greeley

5300 29th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-6800 Web Site: www.meadowviewofgreeley.com

the BridGe Assisted liVinG 4750 25th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)339-0022

AudioloGy

cArdiAc VAsculAr surGery

Alpine All ABout heArinG

1124 E. Elizabeth Street, #E-101 Fort Collins, CO 80524 Phone: (970)221-3372 Fax: (970)493-9237 3820 N. Grant Avenue Loveland, CO 80538 Phone: (970)461-0225 Fax: (970)593-0670 Web Site: www.allabouthearing.com Professionals: Renita Boesiger, M. A., CCC-A Rachel White, M. A., CCC-A Cheryl Hadlock, M. S., CCC-A

AudioloGy AssociAtes

cBp spine center

1180 Main Street, Suite 7 Windsor, CO Phone: (970)686-9117 Fax: (970)686-5441 Website: www.windsorspinecenter.com Professionals: Dr. Jason W. Haas Dr. Sandra Haas

mirAcle-eAr

peAkVieW medicAl center 5881 W. 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)313-2745 Fax: (970)313-2744 Professional: Dice, Noel G., AuD

unc AudioloGy clinic

Gunter Hall, Room 0330 Greeley, CO 80639 Phone: (970)351-2012/TTY Fax: (970)351-1601 Web Site: www.unco.edu/NHS/asls/clinic.htm Professionals: Diane Erdbruegger, Au.D., CCC-A; Sonie Harris, M.A., CCC-A Jennifer Weber, Au.D., CCC-A

BAlAnce

liFe cAre center oF GreeleyAscent 4800 25th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-6400 Professionals: Cozette Seaver, PT; Leslie Vail, PT

1800 15th Street, #310 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 392-0900 Professionals: James H. Beckmann, MD; Harold L. Chapel, MD; John Drury, MD; Lin-Wang Dong, MD; Cynthia L. Gryboski, MD; Cecilia Hirsch, MD; Paul G. Hurst, MD; Brian Lyle, MD; Randall C. Marsh, MD; Arnold Pfahnl, MD; James E. Quillen, MD; Gary A. Rath, MD; Ahmad Shihabi, MD;

chiroprActic

2528 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)352-2881 Professionals: Robert M. Traynor, Ed. D. F-AAA; Karen Swope, M. A. CCC-A 2404 17th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)351-6620 749 S. Lemay Avenue, Suite A1 Fort Collins, CO 80524 (970)221-5225

cArdioVAsculAr institute (ncmc)

cArdiAc, thorAcic & VAsculAr surGery (ncmc) 1800 15th Street, Suite 340 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4593 Fax: (970)378-4391 Professionals: Lyons, Maurice I. Jr. DO Richards, Kenneth M. MD Tullis, Gene E. MD

cArdioloGy

corporAte heAlth

Greeley medicAl clinic pc 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-2471 Fax: (970)350-2418 Professionals: John Charbonneau, MD Thomas Lynch, MD Raymond Van Den Hoven, MD

dentistry

Greeley dentAl heAlth 1600 23rd Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-4329 www.greeleydentalhealth.com Professionals: Randy C. Hatch, DDS Charles W. Johnson, DDS

sidney Benner, d.d.s. Julie shArp, d.d.s. 3400 W. 16th Street, Suite 8-E Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)351-0400 www.bennersharp.com

roBert kron, dmd scott WilliAms, dmd 3535 W. 12th Street, Suite B Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)351-6095 www.drkron.com

dentistry - hyGene

AABsolutely smiles

1135 N. Lincoln Avenue, Suite 4 Loveland, CO 80537 Phone: (970)622-0970 Fax: (970)622-0971 www.aabsolutelysmiles.com

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Feb. 23, 2011

2011 dentistry - pediAtric

pediAtric dentAl Group

2003 46th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-4600 www.pediatricdentalspecialties.com Professionals: David Strange, DDS, MS Malcolm Strange, DDS, MS Courtney College, DDS, MS Justin Cathers, DDS, MS Gary Belanger, DDS

dermAtoloGy

peAkVieW medicAl center 5881 W. 16th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)313-2734 Fax: (970)313-2733 Professionals: Mary A. Blatner, MD

medicAl clinic At centerrA pc 2500 Rocky Mountain Avenue Loveland, CO 80538 Phone: (970) 619-6558 Fax: (970) 619-6092 Professionals: Michelle D. Wis, MD

eAr, nose & throAt

Alpine eAr, nose & throAt 1120 E. Elizabeth Street, Suite F-101 Ft. Collins, CO 3820 N. Grant Avenue Loveland, CO Phone: (970)221-1177 Professionals: Andrea Biegnski, P.A.C. Chris Eriksen, M.D., Maria Chand, M.D., Marvin Childers, M.D., Sarvjit Gill, M.D., Meg Ricci, PA-C, Matt Robertson, M.D. David Zacheis, M.D.

north colorAdo eAr, nose, & throAt 2528 West 16th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 356-4646 Professionals: Dr. Keith Peterson, ENT Specialist; Dr. Thomas Peterson, ENT Specialist

endocrinoloGy

endocrinoloGy clinic (ncmc) 1801 15th Street, Ste 200 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4676 Fax: (970)-378-4315 www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Nirmala Kumar, MD


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TRiBUNE MEDiCALDiRECTORY DiRECTORY TRiBUNE MEDiCAL Family practice medicine

Family physicians oF Greeley, llp-central 2520 W. 16th St. Greeley ,CO Phone: (970) 356-2520 Professionals: Joanna H. Branum, M.D.; Ann T. Colgan, M.D.; Douglas A. Magnuson, M.D.; Lori A. Ripley, M.D.; Andrew P. Stoddard, M.D.; D. Craig Wilson, M.D.

Family physicians oF Greeley, llp-cottonwood 2420 W. 16th Street Greeley ,CO 80634 Phone: (970) 353-7668 Professionals: Christopher T. Kennedy, M.D.; Daniel P. Pflieger, M.D.; Mark D. Young, M.D.; Stacey L. Garber, M.D. Amy E. Mattox, M.D.

Family physicians oF Greeley, llp-west 6801 W. 20th Street, Suite 101 Greeley ,CO Phone: (970) 378-8000 Professionals: Daniel R. Clang, D.O.; Tamara S. Clang, D.O.; R. Scott Haskins, M.D.; Mathew L. Martinez, M.D.; Chima C. Nwizu, M.D.; Michelle K. Paczosa, D.O.; Jeffery E. Peterson, M.D.; Kyle B. Waugh, M.D.; Charles I. Zucker, M.D.

westlaKe Family physicians, pc 5623 W. 19th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 353-9011 Fax: (970) 353-9135 Professionals: Richard Budensiek, D.O.; Jacqueline Bearden, MD; Janis McCall, MD; Angela Mills, MD Frank Morgan, MD; David Pols, D.O. www.bannerhealth.com

FUneral services

allnUtt & resthaven FUneral services 702 13th Street, Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 352-3366 650 W. Drake Road, Ft. Collins, CO Phone: (970) 482-3208 8426 S. College Avenue, Ft. Collins, CO Phone: (970) 667-0202 2100 N. Lincoln, Loveland, CO Phone: (970) 667-1121 1302 Graves Avenue, Estes Park, CO Phone: (970) 586-3101

GastroenteroloGy

1919 68th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 304-1919 Website: www.gracepointegreeley.com

meadowview oF Greeley

5300 29th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-6800 Website: www.meadowviewofgreeley.com

independent assisted livinG w/services

3620 W. 10th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)356-6964

toUchstone home health dowGin, thomas a., md. centers For GastroenteroloGy 7251 W. 20th St., Bldg J Greeley, CO Phone: (970)207-9773 3702 Timberline Ft. Collins, CO Phone: (970)207-9773 2555 E. 13th Street, Suite 220 Loveland, CO Phone: (970)669-5432 Website: www.digestive-health.net

5312 W. 9th St Drive, Suite 120 Greeley CO 80634 Phone: (970) 356-3922 Fax: (970) 381-8113

hospice

hospice oF northern colorado Administration Office 2726 W. 11th Street Road Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)352-8487 Fax: (970)475-0037

1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-2438 Fax: (970)350-2473 Professionals: Alessi, Grace MD Berntsen, Mark F. MD Cash, Robert L. MD Christiansen, Dana L. MD Currie, James B. MD Ebens, John B. MD Loecke, Steven W. MD Lopez, William Jr. MD Rademacher, Donald R. MD Randle, Michael T. MD Reinhardt, Marcus R. MD Thompson, Keith S. MD Tryggestad, David I. MD Zenk, Daniel R.MD

massaGe therapy

healinG toUch massaGe @ center For women’s health

1715 61st Avenue Greeley, CO Phone: (970)336-1500 Professional: Becci Payne, Certified Massage Therapist

3527 W. 12th Street Suite 104, Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 302-5559 Email: (970) Nswanson33@gmail.com

2105 Clubhouse Drive Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 330-5655 Fax: (970) 330-7146 Web Site: www.rvna.info Professionals: Crystal Day, CEO

Greeley medical clinic pc

2928 W. 10th St. Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)351-8181 Fax: (970)351-0281 Professionals: Gregory D. Denzel, DO

Bells rUnninG/walKinG

rehaBilitation and visitinG nUrse association

2010 2011

neXt care

health and Fitness

healinG helpers, llc

2500 Rocky Mountain Avenue Loveland, CO 80538 Phone: (970)203-7180 Fax: (970)203-7105 Professionals: Pamela Levine, MD

5881 W. 16th Street Greeley ,CO 80634 Phone: (970)313-2700 Fax: (970)313-2720 Professionals: Scott A. Corliss, MD Joseph Corona, MD James W. Ley, MD William J. Oligmueller, MD Brian K. Schmalhorst, MD

1800 15th St., Suite 320 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4475 Fax: (970)378-4429 Professionals: Mark Rosenblatt, MD Ahmed M. Sherif, MD Yazan Abu Qwaider, MD

Grace pointe

6801 W. 20th Street, Suite 207 Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)378-1409

medical clinic at centerra pc

peaKview medical center

north colorado GastroenteroloGy (ncmc)

independent assisted livinG

carinG hearts home healthcare

6801 W. 20th Street, Suite 208 Greeley ,CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-9061

2928 W. 10th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)351-8181 Fax: (970)351-0281 Professionals: Gregory Denzel, DO

1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Professionals: Steven Kading, MD Phone: (970)350-2740 Fax: (970)352-3719 Peter C. Witt, MD Phone: (970)350-2440 Fax: (970)392-4708

home health care

Kenneth m. olds

neXt care

Greeley medcial clinic pc

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medical eqUipment & sUpplies

Banner home medical eqUipment (ncmc) Bonell Good samaritan 708 22nd Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)352-6082 Fax: (970)356-7970 Web Site: www.good-sam.com

FoX rUn senior livinG 1720 60th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-7773 Fax: (970)330-9708 Web Site: www.good-sam.com

inFectioUs disease

Breen, john F., md (ncmc) 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-6071 Fax: (970)350-6702

internal medicine

Banner internal medicine 2010 16th Street, Suite B Greeley, CO 80631 Professional: Steven Kalt, MD. www.bannerhealth.com

Phone: (970)506-6420

paUl home oXyGen 3483-A West 10th Greeley, CO Phone: (970)356-3131

midwiFery care

center For women’s health 1715 61st Avenue Greeley, CO Phone: (970)336-1500 Professionals: Marie Foose, CNM; Janelle Komorowski, CNM Krista O’Leary, CNM Karen Voderberg, CNM

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TRiBUNE MEDiCAL DiRECTORY NEUROLOGY

WEstLakE FaMiLY PhYsiCiaNs, PC 5623 W. 19th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 353-9011 Fax: (970) 353-9135 Professionals: Jacqueline Bearden, MD; Richard Budensiek, D.O.; Janis McCall, MD; Angela Mills, MD Frank Morgan, MD; David Pols, D.O. www.bannerhealth.com

ONCOLOGY

CaNCER iNstitUtE (NCMC) 1800 15th Street, Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 350-6680 Toll Free: (866) 357-9276 Fax: (970)350-6610 Professionals: Elizabeth Ceilley, MD Brian Fuller, MD

GREELEY MEdiCaL CLiNiC CENtENNiaL NEUROLOGY Dr. David Ewing 7251 W. 20th Street, Unit C Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 356-3876

NCMC NEUROLOGY CLiNiC

1800 15th Street, Suite 100B Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 350-5612 Fax: (970) 350-5619 Professionals: Siegel, Jeffery, MD Shaffer, William, MD; Hayes, Todd DO

NURsiNG hOME REhabiLitatiON

CENtENNiaL hEaLth CaRE CENtER 1637 29th Ave. Place Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 356-8181 Fax: (970) 356-3278

ObstEtRiCs & GYNECOLOGY

GREELEY MEdiCaL CLiNiC PC 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-2403 Fax: (970)392-4708 Professionals: Burket, Charles R. MD Colberg, Craig S. MD Kiser, Rick E., MD

CENtER FOR WOMEN’s hEaLth 1715 61st Ave. Greeley, CO Phone: (970)336-1500 Professionals: Stewart Abbot, MD; Marie Foose, CNM; Janelle Wahlman, CNM; Krista O’Leary, CNM Bea Bachenberg, WHCNP; Kecia Doll, Licensed Esthetician; Becci Payne, Certified Massage Therapist

1800 15th St. Greeley, CO 80631 Professionals: Thomas R. Lininger, MD Phone: (970)378-4170 Fax: (970)378-4171 Douglas J. Kemme, MD Phone: (970)353-6722 Fax: (970)353-6434 Michael D. Stone, MD Phone: (970)378-4170 Fax: (970)378-4171

GREELEY MEdiCaL CLiNiC LOvELaNd 2050 N. Boise Ave. Loveland, Co, 80538 Professionals: Samuel A. Shelanski MD Phone: (970)667-7870 Fax: (970)667-4510

ORthOdONtiCs

GREELEY ORthOdONtiC CENtER 2021 Clubhouse Dr., Suite 110 Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 330-2500 Fax: (970) 330-2548 E-Mail: gocpc@doctork.com Website: www.doctork.com Professionals: Dr. Gary J. Kloberdanz

ORthOdONtiC assOCiatEs OF GREELEY, PC

3400 W. 16thSt., Bldg 4-V Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 356-5900 Website: www.dredgren.com Professionals: Burdett R. Edgren, DDS, MS; Bradford N. Edgren, DDS, MS

ORaL sURGERY

NiChOLas, kENtON C. dds GREELEY MEdiCaL CLiNiC 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-2458 Fax: (970)392--4715

ORthOPEdiCs

GREELEY MEdiCaL CLiNiC PC 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-2427 Fax: (970)350-2421 Professionals: Grossnickle, Mark D. MD Hunter, Brett P. MD Seiler, Steven MD Sides, Steven MD Snyder, Joshua MD

MOUNtaiN vista ORthOPaEdiCs 5890 W. 13th Street, Suite 101 Greeley, CO Phone: (970)348-0020 Fax: (970)348-0044 Web Site: www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Randy M. Bussey, MD Daniel Heaston, MD Thomas Pazik, MD Shelly Remley, PA-C Kelly R. Sanderford, MD Steven Sides, MD Linda Young, MD

PEdiatRiCs

PEakviEW MEdiCaL CENtER 5881 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)313-2700 Fax: (970)313-2727 Professionals: Amy Driscoll, MD Meshelle M. Kolanz, MD Chris Moore, MD Robert L. Pedersen, MD Joseph Ryan, MD

PEdiatRiC REhabiLitatiON

baNNER REhabiLitatiON CENtER 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)350-6160 Fax: (970)378-3858

PERsONaL REsPONsE sERviCE

baNNER LiFE LiNE (NCMC) 2010 16th Street, Suite C Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: 1-877-493-8109 (970) 378-4743

PhYsiCaL thERaPY

hOPE thERaPY CENtER (Formerly North Colorado Therapy Center) 2780 28th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)339-0011 Website: www.GCIinc.org Professionals: Chris Denham, PT; Kryste Haas, OT; Kathie Hertzke, PTA; Moni Kohlhoff, PT; Alex Luksik, PTA; Jeanne Rabe, PT; Melissa Richardson, PT; Howard Belon, PhD, Clinical Psychologist

PEakviEW MEdiCaL CENtER 5881 W. 16th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 313-2775 Fax: (970) 313-2777 Professionals: Kirk Henderson Ann Hurst, PT Lindsay Paulson, PT M. Elissa Marshall, OT Ola Simonsson PC-A

POdiatRY

FOOt & aNkLE CENtER OF NORthERN COLORadO P.C.

1931 65th Ave., Suite A Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 351-0900 Fax: (970) 351-0940 Web Site: www. footandanklecolorado.com Professionals: Daniel J. Hatch, D.P.M. Mike D. Vaardahl, D.P.M. 1440 N. Boise Avenue Loveland, CO 80538 Phone: (970) 278-1440 Professionals: Peter D. Schultz, D.P.M.

GREELEY FOOt & aNkLE 2000 16th Street, Suite 3 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)352-4815 Fax: (970)352-5130 Professionals: Dr. Jean Masterson

PULMONaRY/CRitiCaL CaRE

NORth COLORadO PULMONaRY (NCMC) 2010 16th Street, Ste A Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)392-2026 Fax: (970)392-2028 Professionals: David Fitzgerald, DO Kelli R. Janata, DO Robert J. Janata, DO

PROsthEtiCs & ORthOtiCs

haNGER PROsthEtiCs & ORthOtiCs

7251 West 20th Street, Building M Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-9449 Fax: (970)330-4217 2500 Rocky Mountain Avenue, Suite 2100 North Medical Office Building Loveland CO 80538 Phone: (970) 619-6585 Fax (970) 619-6591 Website: www.hanger.com Professinal: Ben Struzenberg, CPO Michelle West, Mastectomy Fitter

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2011 RadiOLOGY

GREELEY MEdiCaL CLiNiC PC 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 350-2423

REhabiLitatiON

asCENt at LiFE CaRE CENtER 4800 25th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-6400 Website: www.lcca.com Professionals: Annie Bennett Leslie Vail

baNNER REhabiLitatiON Phone: (970)350-6160

CbP sPiNE CENtER

1180 Main Street, Suite 7 Windsor, CO Phone: (970)686-9117 Fax: (970)686-5441 Website: www.windsorspinecenter.com Professionals: Dr. Jason W. Haas Dr. Sandra Haas

PEakviEW MEdiCaL CENtER 5881 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)313-2775 Fax: (970)313-2777

RhEUMatOLOGY

GREELEY MEdiCaL CLiNiC/ LOvELaNd 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 2500 Rocky Mountain Avenue Loveland, CO 80538 Professionals: James Levine, DO Phone: (970)350-2433 Fax: (970)392-4768 Garvin C.. Murray, MD Phone: (970)461-1880 Fax: (970)593-9731 J. Stephen Thompson, MD Phone: (970)461-1880 Fax: (970)593-9731

skiN CaRE

kECias skiN CaRE @ CENtER FOR WOMEN’s hEaLth 1715 61st Avenue Greeley, CO Phone: (970)336-1500 Professinal: Kecia Doll, Licensed Esthetician


Feb. 23, 2011

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TRiBUNE MEDiCAL DiRECTORY Skilled care/rehab

NOrTh cOlOradO SPOrTS MediciNe 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)392-2496

SPeech laNGuaGe PaThOlOGy

baNNer rehabiliTaTiON ceNTer 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)350-6160 Fax: (970)378-3858

SurGery

SurGery weSTerN STaTeS burN ceNTer (NcMc) 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-6607 Fax: (970)350-6306 Professionals: Gail Cockrell, MD Cleon W. Goodwin, MD BURN

SurGical aSSOciaTeS Of Greeley Pc (NcMc) 1800 15th St. Suite 210 Greeley, CO Phone: (970)352-8216 Toll Free: 1-888-842-4141 Professionals: Lisa Burton, M.D.; Michael Harkabus, M.D.; Jason Ogren, M.D.; Samuel Saltz, D.O.; Robert Vickerman, M.D.

urGeNT care

Greeley Medical cliNic 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Professionals: Troy D. Bracker, MD Phone: (970)350-2427 Fax: (970)350-2421 Grauerholz, Brent D. MD Phone: (970)350-2425 Fax: (970)350-2447 Major, James C. MD Phone: (970)350-2425 Fax: (970)350-2447

bONell GOOd SaMariTaN 708 22nd Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)352- 6082 Fax: (970)356-7970 Website: www.good-sam.com

Grace POiNTe

1919 68th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 304-1919 Website: www.gracepointegreeley.com

SPeech aNd laNGuaGe

uNc SPeech laNGuaGe PaThOlOGy cliNic

Gunter Hall, Room 0330 Greeley, CO 80639 Phone: (970)351-2012/TTY Fax: (970)351-1601 Web Site: www.unco.edu/NHS/asls/clinic.htm Professionals: Lynne Jackowiak, M.S., CCC-SLP Julie Hanks, Ed.D Patty Walton, M.A., CCC-SLP Mark Guiberson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

SPOrTS MediciNe

MOuNTaiN ViSTa OrThOPaedicS 5890 W. 13th Street, Suite 101 Greeley, CO Phone: (970)348-0020 Fax: (970)348-0044 Web Site: www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Randy M. Bussey, MD Daniel Heaston, MD Thomas Pazik, MD Shelly Remley, PA-C Kelly R. Sanderford, MD Steven Sides, MD Linda Young, MD

SuMMiTView urGeNT care bariaTric SurGery (NcMc)

1800 15th Street, Suite 200 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4433 866-569-5926 Fax: (970)378-4440 Professionals: Michael W. Johnell, MD

Greeley Medical cliNic/ lOVelaNd 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 2500 Rocky Mountain Avenue Loveland, CO 80538 Professionals: Steven M. Dubs, MD Phone: (970)350-2426 Fax: (970)350-2452 Lesley A. Fraser, MD Phone: (970)350-2426 Fax: (970)350-2452 Joseph Livengood, MD Phone: (970)203-7250 Fax: (970)619-6094 Michael E. Peetz, MD Phone: (970)350-2426 Fax: (970)350-2452

2001 70th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)378-4155 Fax: (970)378-4151 www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Thomas Harms, MD Amy E. Shenkenberg, MD Linda Young, MD

urOlOGy

Greeley Medical cliNic 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-2491 Fax: (970)350-2492 Professionals: Gary R, Goodman, MD Stephen Henderson, MD

MOuNTaiN ViSTa urOlOGy 5890 W. 13th Street, Suite 106 Greeley, CO 80634 Professionals: James Wolach, MD Curtis Crylen, MD www.bannerhealth.com

VeiNS

VeiN cliNic (NcMc)

1800 15th Street, Suite 340 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4593 Fax: (970)378-4591 Professionals: Maurice I. Lyons Jr., DO Kenneth M. Richards, MD Gene E. Tullis, MD

2011

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Feb. 23, 2011

2.9%APR UP TO 72 MOS. 1.9%APR UP TO 36 MOS. *

**

ON ALL NEW 2010 & 2011 SUBARU MODELS

2010 SUBARU IMPREZA

2011 SUBARU OUTBACK

UP TO 72 MOS. UP TO 36 MOS.

UP TO 72 MOS. UP TO 36 MOS.

2.9%* 1.9%**

157

$

$595 $0 $157 $595

2.5i

Down Payment Security Deposit First Months Lease Payment Acquisition fee

OR

$18,220 MSRP - $1,111 Ehrlich Discount

$17,109

2011 SUBARU FORESTER UP TO 72 MOS. UP TO 36 MOS.

$2995 $0 $157 $595

$3747 Total Due At Lease Signing

OR

Down Payment Security Deposit First Months Lease Payment Acquisition fee

OR

$24,220 MSRP - $1,610 Ehrlich Discount

$22,610 TO FINANCE

$22,420 MSRP - $2,066 Ehrlich Discount

$20,354 TO FINANCE

0.9%

[1]

157

$

BFA-21 From Factory Allocation

Down Payment Security Deposit First Months Lease Payment Acquisition fee

PER MO. LEASE/36 MOS. 10,000 miles per year.

$4774 Total Due At Lease Signing

2.5i

2.9%* 1.9%** PER MO. LEASE/36 MOS. 10,000 miles per year.

BDA-01 FROM FACTORY ALLOCATION

2011 SUBARU LEGACY

2.5x ALLOY WHEEL VALUE PACKAGE

157

$3995 $0 $184 $595

TO FINANCE

$1347 Total Due At Lease Signing

$

184

$

AJD-11 From Factory Allocation

PER MO. LEASE/36 MOS. 10,000 miles per year.

2.9%* 1.9%**

$1295 $0 $157 $595

UP TO 63 MOS.

BAA-01 From Factory Allocation

PER MO. LEASE/36 MOS. 10,000 miles per year.

Down Payment Security Deposit First Months Lease Payment Acquisition fee

OR

$20,720 MSRP - $1,469 Ehrlich Discount

$19,251 TO FINANCE

$2047 Total Due At Lease Signing 8TH AVENUE

2.5i

*W.A.C. See dealer for complete details. *2.9% APR for up to 72 months, availabe on all new 2010 and 2011 Subaru Models. Cost of financing for 2.9% for 72 months is $15.15 per $1,000 financed. **1.9% APR up to 36 months available on all new 2010 and 2011 Subaru Models. Cost of financing for 1.9% for 36 months is $28.62 per $1,000 financed. [1] 0.9% APR for up to 63 months available on all 2011 Subaru Legacy models. Cost of financing for 0.9% for 63 months is $16.26 per $1,000 financed. Subject to vehicle insurance and vehicle availability. No down payment required. Subaru Impreza, Outback, Legacy and Forester are registered trademarks. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All sale prices are good day of publication only. All offers include all rebates, incentives plus tax, tag, and license with approved credit. Photos for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors. Color and equipment my vary. Offer ends 2/28/11. See dealer for complete details.

Ehrlich Motors, Inc. 8th Avenue & Hwy 34 Bypass – Greeley www.ehrlichsubaru.com • 970.353.7707 • 877.444.0390

HIGHWAY 34 BYP A

SS

THRIVEnc - March 2011  

In this month's THRIVEnc, read about foods that pack a powerful punch, how to minimize your wrinkles, the sodium shakedown and much more.

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