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s n o i p m a e g h h t n C of i R w o h S nd a t oa g , og rs h ow duce h s o g r n i p r b u Feat lam


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T H E FENCE P O ST CHAM PIONS OF T H E S H OW RING 2012

K BAR K CLUB LAMBS

4th Annual Open House/Private Treaty Bid Sale Saturday, April 14, 2012 Kent, Kathy, Abbie, Alyssa, Cody & Taya Hambleton 308-550-0501 or 308-550-0418 • www.kbarkclbulambs.com

Directions - From Subway in Fullerton go west 4 miles on Valley Road to North Ember Road. Then North 1/2 mile. Lunch will be served all day.

Res. Champion 4-H Breeding Ewe at the Nebrask State Fair.

Grand & Res. Supreme Champion Ewe Lambs at the National Western Stock Show in Denver

Lambs Sired by:

Backdrop-Run & Gun 320X All Luck (79) Picasso Art (Miller) X Lt. Den X JK Dually-Jam (Burson) XMirage Dynasty - (Miller) Lt. Dan - Bob Cat (High Hill) 44 - Lt. Dan X Rock X 907 Miller All Bids open at 10:00 a.m. Bids need to be in by 3:00 p.m. There will also be a pen of load and go wethers. Grand Champion Breeding Ewe at the Hall County Fair.

If you are not able to attend we will be able to take phone bids.

Indiana State Fair Class Winner.


THE FENC E P OST CH A MP IO N S O F TH E SHOW RI NG 2012

The top barrows and gilts from 24 litters will be at the sale. No replacement gilts will be left at home.

If you are unable to attend our auction... Come see us or call and we will take your bid to the sale.

Check us out at www.thepigpage.com

CONSISTENTLY AWARD WINNING

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All Show Species

Starters, Growers and Finishers Medicated or non-Medicated • Bulk, Totes or sacked Custom Formulas Available; Nutritionist on Staff

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Discounts offered to all our 4-H feeders - sign up today!

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T H E FENCE P O ST CHAM PIONS OF T H E S H OW RING 2012

Pfeiff Suffolks and Hamps By Robyn Scherer, M.Agr. | Staff Reporter


THE FENC E P OST CH A MP IO N S O F TH E SHOW RI NG 2012

A young registered Suffolk lamb lays in the

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ut in a small town roughly 85 miles South of Limon, Colo., lamb cries can be heard as two new lambs are born on an early morning. These lambs live in Olney Springs, and are part of a 100ewe flock that is Pfeiff Suffolks and Hamps. “I’m not really sure why, but I had always found sheep interesting. My family ran commercial cattle and had a dairy when I was younger. I always loved being around livestock and sheep were something I could do on my own,” said Lance Pfeiff, owner of Pfeiff Suffolks and Hamps. When he was just 10-yearsold, Pfeiff received his first two lambs — bottle babies from a local commercial sheep producer. His parents, Penny and Tim Pfeiff, decided that these babies would be good for their young son to raise so he could decide if he really liked sheep. “After having the bottle lambs I decided that I wanted to try lambing my own ewes,” said Pfeiff. The family then purchased three ewe lambs from a local club lamb operation, and in 1998, Pfeiff started showing sheep. This is when he knew he was hooked. “My favorite thing about raising sheep is the thrill of competition — whether it is me showing or watching others show my lambs. I think it is the show ring that has kept me interested in sheep,” he said.

barn, where it is protected from the wind and cold.

The first few years, the family kept a flock of 15 ewes for club lamb production. In 2002, the flock size was increased, and in 2004, the quality of the flock was upgraded. “We purchased 25 bred ewes that were mostly older McGolden genetics. These ewes are the grandmothers of most of our current flock,” said Pfeiff. The registered Suffolk part of the operation was started in 2000, when he purchased several ewes from a dispersal sale. In 2007, he leased 120 registered ewes. “We kept the top end of the ewe lambs out of this lease and they are really starting to move our registered Suffolk program forward,” said Pfeiff. The flock is now established at around 100 ewes, and the quality of the sheep is constantly being improved. “I enjoy the genetic selection piece of raising any type of livestock,” said Pfeiff. He continued, “My main goal for the operation is to keep improving the quality of lambs we are producing. Over the last few years we have made tremendous strides in this area, but we still have a lot of work to do.” continued on page 6

“My favorite thing about raising sheep is the thrill of competition— whether it is me showing or watching others show my lambs. I think it is the show ring that has kept me interested in sheep,” Pfeiff said.

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T H E FENCE P O ST CHAMP IONS OF T H E S H OW RING 2012

A ewe waits while the lambs are sorted off to be evaluated for their show potential.

Pfeiff sorts through the club lambs, looking for prospects to show potential customers.

Even though Pfeiff is the owner, the sheep are located at his parent’s house, where his father takes care of the animals. Pfeiff works full-time in Fort Collins, and commutes on the weekends in the spring to work with his lamb operation. “The biggest challenge right now is finding enough time to get everything done with the sheep. I live in Windsor, so that means busy weekends this time of year trying to get everything done,” he said. The criteria for his genetic selection are very strict, due in part to the unique management of the operation. “With my dad having to do the daily chores, it’s important to have sheep that are easy to maintain, are good mothers and can maintain on grass in the summer. We expect all of

our ewes, even the registered Suffolks, to meet these criteria or they are quickly sold. Having sheep that are structurally correct is also very important to me,” said Pfeiff. The ewes are out on pasture from May through November, and are fed from December through April. They are kept near the house to lamb in the spring, and ewes that are close to lambing are brought into their barn to protect the babies from the elements. The club lambs are usually weaned in March and April, and the majority are sold to young people to be shown in jackpot shows, county fairs and state fairs. The registered Suffolk lambs are kept and shown, or sold to other breeders. The rams are sold as range rams for others to use on commercial operations. This genetic selection process can be both challenging and rewarding, as the final product will not be


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Animal care is very important to Pfieff, who makes sure the animals have access to clean, fresh water all the time. The barn is where most of the lambs are born, so they are protected from the elements.

A young club lambs stands with two ewes from the flock. All together, Pfeiff has about 100 ewes.

known for nearly a year when the animals are shown. “The best part of having sheep is getting to see how my genetic selections pay off,” he said. The selections he has made have paid off. Pfeiff sold the lambs that became the Champion lamb at the 2011 Missouri Day Livestock Show, the Champion market lamb at the 2011 Crowley County Days Livestock Show, the Reserve Champion market lamb at the 2011 Arkansas Valley Fair, and the second place wether-dam at the 2011 National Western Stock Show. “We have also had numerous class winners at Southeastern Colorado county fairs over the last few years,” said Pfeiff. The registered Suffolks, which are ones he has kept to show, have also had success. He had the Champion Ram at the 2011 NWSS, the Champion Lamb Flock at the 2011 NWSS, the Reserve Champion Ram at the 2012 NWSS, the Reserve

Champion Ewe at the 2012 NWSS, and Champion Flock at the 2012 NWSS, and numerous class winners at the Wyoming and Colorado State Fairs the last several years. Showing the sheep is more than about winning banners, however. “Having show sheep in particular allows me to educate the public about agriculture and help get youth excited about agriculture,” he said. Educating the public about agriculture is something Pfeiff did all the way through college, when he served as a Ram Handler for Colorado State University where he majored in animal science, agricultural business and business administration with an emphasis in accounting. He traveled with CAM all over Colorado, and attended numerous events promoting agriculture. “There are a lot of misconceptions about agriculture in general, and how livestock are treated and their

importance in everyone’s daily lives,” he said. He continued, “It’s important to get youth excited because they are the future. If there is no one in agriculture in the future, we won’t survive.” Pfeiff plans to continue the genetic progress of his herd, and move them. “My future plans are to move the sheep to Northern Colorado so I can be more actively involved in the day to day operations. I intend to keep the flock numbers where they are, but continue increasing the quality,” he said. He added, “Long term I hope to establish flocks that are nationally competitive.” Even though he enjoys competing with the sheep and the genetic selection process, the best part of the operation is sharing the time around the sheep with his family. “My fondest memory of showing sheep is probably just the time I have gotten to spend with my family attending shows,” he said. V

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T H E FENCE P O ST CHAMP IONS OF T H E S H OW RING 2012

AGLAND OFFERS SHOW FEEDS SPECIFICALLY FORMULATED TO MEET THE REQUIREMENTS OF ALL SHOW CLASSES.

SHOW PIG FEEDS •

Agland Show Pig feeds will take you from weaning to weigh in. The Agland show pig feeding program is a 3 step program that combines the best nutrients available with afforadable ingredients to optimize winning with profitablility

STARTER •

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Contains Tylosin for maintaining weight gains and feed dfficiency in the presence of atrophic rhinitis.

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SHOW GOAT FEEDS •

Formulated with high fiber and optimal energy to maintain body composition without over conditioning while developing frame and lean muscle mass.

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Formulated with protein and energy sources for optimum performance and apperance while encouraging appetite and increased rate of weight gain. Also, supports desirable hoof health and apperance •

Contains Lasalocid for the prevention of coccidiosis.

“Affordably Feeding Your Passion For Winning” 260 Factory Road P.O. Box 338, Eaton, CO 80615 970-454-4000 1-800-433-4688 www.aglandinc.com


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Producing Show Champions for 30 Years & Counting

Where the Hogs are Smokin’ Hot!

Our breeding program includes many top and champion genetics including Double Dare, War Paint, Can’t be Denied, Iroquios, Tongue & Groove and many more.

We support the 4H and FFA.

We Sell Breed and Seed Stock Too!

CALL US

Bill Cobban 307-679-9874 • Scott Lym 307-679-0328 Josh Oliver 307-679-0685

Show PIGS//Show LAMBS//Show GOATS

Jager Show Pig Sale Saturday, April 7, 2012 1 P.M. at the Pam Jager farm, Hazard, Nebr. From the flagpole on the main street of Hazard, Nebr., 1.5 miles east on 777 Rd., then 1/2 mile north on 470th Ave. Watch for signs in Hazard.

SELLING 100 HEAD OF CROSSBRED SHOW PIGS AI SIRED, GENETICS

The “Absolute Best Set” of pigs we have ever raised and offered buyers! Visit our websites for winners lists and more information: www.jagershowpigs.com • www.centralnebsource.com Pam Jager, 308-379-6618, or Rick Lammers, 308-325-7146 www.lammersgenetics.com ALSO: Selling 12 Head of Crossbred Show Lambs From Jager Club Lamb and Meat Goats From Guest Consignor Rick Lammers. 2011 BUFFALO COUNTY FAIR KEARNEY, NE This champion gilt was bred to “Rename” ( a proven champion producing boar at Upperhand genetics). Her pigs sell on the sale.


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The 32nd Annual Casper College Lamb and Pig Sale Where: Grace Werner Agriculture Pavilion Casper College Campus When: Saturday, April 14th—Viewing at 10:30 a.m. Sale at 1:30 p.m. How Many: 60 Pigs and 35 Lambs will be offered for sale Sold in the 2011

Casper College

Sale

Grand Champion at the Lewis and Clark County Fair 3rd Overall at Montana State Fair Shown By Katherine Argento Raised by Hornecker Club Lambs

Sold in the 2011 Grand Champion Gilt at the Energy Classic Grand Champion Casper FFA Alumni Jackpot Grand Champion Laramie County Bred and Fed Raised by Burkett Show Pigs

Casper College

Sale

Clinic with Jason Groene - High School Ag Education Instructor and swine expert at 9:00 am. *swine project selection* *feeding/management of your swine project*

Lamb Consignors: Cooper Club Lambs-Riverton, WY Heeg Club Lambs-Shepherd, MT Hensley Club Lambs-Gillette, WY Hickey Livestock-Brush, CO Hornecker Club Lambs-Casper, WY Meyer Club Lambs-Torrington, WY Oldham Club Lambs-Lander, WY Lamb Consignors: Custis Show Pigs-Saratoga, WY Blacks Show Pigs-Gillette, WY Torpedo Show Pigs-Pueblo, CO Markworth Show Pigs-Casper, WY Burkett Show Pigs-Hillsdale, WY

Casper College Agriculture

More Information

e

Contact Information: Heath Hornecker Office: 307.268.2525 Cell: 307.760.6480 hhornecker@caspercollege.edu Clyde Schaneman, GRI

Dale Nerud

Steve Ruhl

631-6211

631-5052

631-1739

Produced by the Ag Marketing Class

www.thepigpage.com www.clublambpage.com www.caspercollege.edu/agriculture


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BAUMGARTNER CLUB LAMBS Private Treaty Bid Sale

April 7, 2012 Open house beginning at 11:00am • Initial Bids due by 1:30pm Location: 2093 WCR 47 Hudson, CO 80642 • Lunch provided

Lambs like this sell!

No Lambs Sold Prior To The Sale. Call to view lambs prior to sale day.

2011 Accomplishments: Res. Ch Suffolk WCF Res. Ch AOB WCF Ch Breeding SEWCF Res. Ch Park County Div. Ch Boulder County 4 State Fair Sale Qualifiers

Rohn , Jodie and Cody Baumgartner Justin and Lauren Baumgartner Matt, Amanda and Blake Boshell (303)536-9579 Rohn Cell 970-324-3382 Visit us at www.baumgartnerclublambs.com or On facebook under Baumgartner Show Lambs Baumgartnerclublambs@hotmail.com

Call 970-785-1126 or Stop By!

970-785-1126 | 16256 N HWY 85, Platteville, CO

www.hpcattlesupply.com Livestock | Horse Pet | Farm & Ranch

“your localone-stop-shop” forallyour show supply needs. Show feeds for all livestock classes from Purina, Showtec and more...

grooming supplies from Sullivans and Weavers.


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T HE FENCE P OST CHA M PIONS OF T H E S H OW RING 2012

A litter of Hampshire appearing crosses spend time in the nursery.

S&D Showpigs I

n a farrowing barn in the middle of corn country in Southwest Nebraska, piglets grunt and squeal as they fight for their place on the sow’s udder to nurse. These little babies, just a fraction of the size of the sow, will one day become show pigs for men and women across several states. S&D Showpigs, located Northeast of Imperial, Neb., raises and sells six different breeds of pigs including crossbreds, Yorkshires, Durocs, Chester Whites, Berkshires and Spots. However, the roots of this operation started in Colorado.

The Dean family lived in Cortez, Colo., where Doug and Kaye raised three children, Kassie, Krystle and Scott. Doug and Kaye showed cattle and sheep in 4-H for more than 10 years, and after graduation from Colorado State University, became 4-H leaders where they helped their members show at all levels from local shows to national ones. “Our own children grew up on the road showing animals before they were old enough to enter the showring,” said Doug Dean. The family had a sheep flock at the time, and the two


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This Yorkshire piglet is one of six different breeds S&D Showpigs raises.

Berkshire piglets play with each other while in the Berkshire piglets nurse from their mother.

farrowing house.

The piglets will stay on the sow for approximately 21 days.

older daughters were active in showing sheep and cattle. Scott, however, decided that he wanted to show pigs. “We let him get his first pig to jackpot when he was 6, so I guess you could say that was the start and what made us decide to get into pigs. We purchased the first gilts for him to keep to breed in 2000, and farrowed the first litter in a converted van box, at our farm in Cortez,” said Dean. He continued, “With Kassie gone to college and Krystle about to finish high

school, the farm took a turn when we got the opportunity to sell the ewes and invest in four farrowing crates and raised decks that we could put into the converted lambing barn. What were once sheep corals were hastily converted to sow pens, as numbers seemed to expand before our very eyes.” One evening, on the way home from a jackpot show in Sterling, Colo., Doug and Kaye discussed the possibility of moving closer to Kaye’s family in eastern Colorado, and finding a pig farm for them to buy. Even

though they thought Scott was asleep, he wasn’t. “When I mentioned that we could wait for him to finish high school then put the place up for sale and try to find a pig farm, he sat straight up and said “I’d move tomorrow if you bought a pig farm,” Dean said. Five months later, they bought an old farrow-to-finish operation and began working on the place to clean it up and make it functional. Since much of the equipment was old and worn out, the family purchased continued on page 14


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The Dean’s are looking into building up a set of boars, and this is one of their first crossbred boars.

newer equipment and fixed the problems that they found. The sows were moved in December of 2006 and began farrowing in early 2007. Now, the family farrows pigs from January through March, and from July through September. The pigs that are born in the early months are sold to showmen in Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming, Kansas, New Mexico and Iowa and the fall litters to Texas and Oklahoma. From the very beginning, Scott has been part of the operation, helping his mother to do the daily chores and farrowing the pigs. “Kaye and Scott took on the responsibility of the day to day operation of the new farm as I continued to work in Cortez working a two week on and two week off schedule,” said Dean. The family believes that pigs were good animals for Scott to learn from, and for youth all across the country.

“Pigs are an animal that responds to humans, much the same as a dog, so it makes it a good fit for youth to learn from. Not only the responsibility of daily chores, but that of husbandry and the understanding that we were put on this earth to care for all things which may not be able to care for themselves. This type of compassion taught through animals give youth a powerful lesson that can be used through life. We have always said that raising good pigs is just a step in raising great kids,” said Dean. The Dean family focuses on raising pigs that can be competitive, but practical as well. “Scott always has had an eye for genetics and even in the first grade used to take boar catalogs to school to read for extra credit. His mom and I jokingly referred to his piles of Seedstock Edge, Purple Circle magazines and boar catalogs


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Duroc piglets rest under a heat lamp. The heat lamp keeps them from chilling, while allowing the sow to stay cooler.

as his “Piggy Porn.” Now, Scott reviews and evaluates boars for genetic potential to make advancements to the sows in the herd. We currently A.I. all of our sows, which gives us the availability to the broadest and latest genetics in the market,” said Dean. Scott was able to do an internship with the National Swine Registry, and this has helped him to know what the trends will be. “The summer internship that Scott was able to complete last year as a fieldman for the National Swine Registry gave him a valuable lesson and ability to see the direction of the industry from not only the eyes of the NSR but the eyes of the elite producers from around the country. His eye for genetics became even more sharply focused. He will continue to visit a large number of herds to keep abreast of the trends and genetics as he

Pigs are an animal that responds to humans, much the same as a dog, so it makes it a good fit for youth to learn from. Not only the responsibility of daily chores, but that of husbandry and the understanding that we were put on this earth to care for all things which may not be able to care for themselves. This type of compassion taught through animals give youth a powerful lesson that can be used through life. We have always said that raising good pigs is just a step in raising great kids.

builds his sow herd,” Dean said. As S&D Showpigs moves forward, the business itself will change. The family recently bought another sow operation in Lisco, Neb., where they hope to expand the genetics of their program. “This was once a 700 sow iso-wean unit, with 128 farrowing crates in four farrowing rooms, a gestation barn, a breeding barn, a boar housing unit with a semen lab and a feedmill. This will give us the ability to increase our sow herd to 200-250 sows over the next two to three years,” said Dean. He continued, “This will also allow us to put together a small battery of boars that we will be able to offer semen on to the Plains and Intermountain Region. With the addition of this unit we will become S&D Genetics, as we offer more service, more breeding stock, and more great experiences for families with pigs.”

All of the changes that are happening are exciting for the Dean family, but the real reason they stay in the business is due to the families they meet, and the kids they get to work with. “My favorite thing is seeing the shy smiles of new kids entering the showring, and the powerful handshake of experienced showmen when they purchase the pig they think will be the one. The people, always friends outside the showring, are stiff competitors inside the ring,” he said. He added, “I love watching a child become an adult at the end of a pig whip. I also see the friendships made across the country, just over the pen fence.” V

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T HE FENCE P OST CHA M PIONS OF T H E S H OW RING 2012

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T HE FENCE P OST CHA M PIONS OF T H E S H OW RING 2012

Benjamin Sheldon with Pueblo and her January 2012 litter.

Sheldon Show Hogs By Carolyn White Cedaredge, Colo.

B

enjamin Sheldon of Hotchkiss, Colo., was only 14 when his mother, Wendy, stitched up a 4-dayold piglet with sewing thread as he held it still. “The sow had stepped on the neck, pushing it into the dirt and leaving a gash clear down to the esophagus,” he recalled. “I’ll always remember Mom saying ‘maybe it’ll live’ after she’d finished.” Eight months later, that pig — named Stitch — went on to take 4th at the Delta (Colorado) County Fair. “You could barely see the scar. It healed really well because when they’re young, the skin is tender like a peach.” Ben, 26-years-old, was born into the farming life: his father, Ralph, along with Grandfather, Benjamin (whom he is named after) started the Sheldon Dairy, which serves the North Fork Valley, in the late 1950s. Although the family — which includes younger brothers Jeremy and Adam and sister Leah — has always raised

pigs as well as cattle, it wasn’t until Ben was 12 that his “dad started tinkering with showquality hogs,” mostly to sell to 4-H kids. “We’ve done Hampshires, Yorks, Duroc’s or combinations of the above,” he explained. Hampshires are his favorite, however, “because of the better disposition.” His current breeding sow, Pueblo, is so gentle that while she was farrowing this past January he was able to climb into her pen and help with the 11 piglets. (Sows can also be extremely protective and dangerous.) She is well-accustomed to being around people, having taken first place in her class in 2008 at the Delta Fair. The judge told Jeremy, who was showing her at the time, that if she’d weighed a few more pounds she would have taken Grand Champion. It took a lot of time and attention to get her ready for the arena. “Show pigs become pets because they’re handled a lot. They’re


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Photos

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Pueblo with her last litter.

courtesy of Amanda Sheldon

Macy Gurule showing at the Montrose County Fair in 2011.

very much like dogs,” Ben concluded. Originally from Scotland, Hampshires were first imported to America from Hampshire, England during the early 1800s and are known for their large size, muscling, hardiness, and “easy keeping” tendency, meaning that they forage well for food. They are identified by the broad white strip, or belt, that encircles the midsection. When it comes to being a show ring winner, however, a pig must have exceptional conformation including longer legs, strong muscle definition, a good frame and wide, square hips and shoulders that match. “We have a lot of people who buy stock from us every year,” Ben’s wife, Amanda, added. Thanks to his good reputation, requests for piglets often come six or seven months in advance although “a lot depends on how well the hogs (specifically purchased from them) do at the fairs.”

With an average gestation period of three months, three weeks and three days, the Sheldon’s have to time the litters — two per sow a year — to correspond with the Montrose, Colo., fair which is held the last week in July, as well as the one held in Delta during the second week in August. (Benjamin’s hogs have also made appearances in Gunnison, Mesa, Ouray and Garfield counties.) Rather than keeping boars, which he’s done in the past, Ben says it’s less-expensive to do artificial insemination and he prefers to “use a Hampshire-cross (or exotic breeds) there, too.” In addition, this helps him to keep his show stock affordable. The most recent batch, in fact, sold out right away. What’s the secret for growing the best “market class” hog for the arena? “Everybody has their own secret recipe when it comes to a formula,” Ben said, admitting that “it’s a carefully-guarded secret.”

The young couple — who married this past September 17th — is currently shopping for a place of their own in the Hotchkiss area with enough land that they can start expanding their business. (They also raise calves for show and Amanda — who is the granddaughter of ranchers Kenneth and Evelyn Lane of Montrose, Colo., —- wants to add a small herd of ewes to the mix.) The pair is particularly interested in the “Bred and Fed” fair category, which means that the animals must be both born and raised in Delta County as opposed to being brought into the area from big-time, outof-state breeders. “All it takes is a heated barn,” her husband added ... and of course a lot of handling with care. From the sound of things, those piglets that were born in January are going to be well worth watching for later this summer. For more information on Sheldon Show Stock, please e-mail Amanda_Sheldon@tds.net. V


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Does from SRS Acres eat hay during the winter months. The does will be out on pasture from late spring through fall.

SRS Acres By Robyn Scherer, M.Agr. Staff Reporter

I

n South-Eastern Nebraska just South of Lincoln in a little town called Martell, 25 Boer goats nurse their kids. The goats belong to Scott and Rita Sieck, and are part of the family business called SRS Acres. SRS Acres started in 2006, when the Sieck family decided to only raise Boer goats. Previous to that, they raise both dairy and Boer goats, and decided that meat goats were a better fit for what their family needed. “We wanted a name that our children could identify with and include them, but yet at the same time allow them to create their own identity,” said Rita Sieck. It was at this time that the family sold their dairy goats, and purchased 10 additional Boer goats to raise with the two they already had.

“Our first goals varied a bit. I was going for pretty, showy things and my husband, having a leveler head, went for profitability. Today our goals have merged to raising a good quality animal with the least resistance. This means we cull does that do not produce a kid that can be showed and possess a mothering ability,” said Sieck. She continued, “A kid that can be showed should be structurally correct and possess the ability to feed a family, and if they can come in a pretty package — extra points!” The biggest issue the family faces is with feed prices. “The cost of grain has quickly pushed us to be as efficient as possible. We want to keep our numbers to a size that we can support the goats off our own land year round with the supplement of grain, decreasing in the summer,” she said.


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Logan and Bayne with their 2011 FFA market wethers — Grand and Reserve Market Show.

Teaching their three children, Logan, Bayne and Mason is what is most important to the Siecks. “We concentrate on teaching our children everything we know or learn, as we feel that it will only help their futures, so that they will be able to add this to their list of support for themselves,” she said. She added, “We have told our children that you may never be able to compete with an animal that costs five times the amount we have in our animals, but you all can learn the same and you always can strive at showmanship. Showmanship costs you nothing, and yet that is where your profits are. We have been very successful with the breeding does shown along side the market wethers in 4-H/FFA and open class, but the proudest is that all of our children have won a showmanship class.”

Having this daily responsibility has helped the kids to learn to care for the animals, and how each of their jobs is important. “I’ve learned the value of the almighty dollar, to appreciate things we are blessed with, to use the resources you have to the highest potential possible, and to enjoy what I have and the life I am given. I can see this in the goats and the they act, to not have a fear in the world, but yet depend on me completely. You usually get out of this what you are willing to put in, the more you look into and work at it, the more you can find and get out of it,” said Logan Sieck, who is the oldest at 16 and the only daughter. The children are involved in the day-to-day operations, and enjoy having the goats. “My favorite part about showing goats is the opportunities that

they provide for me. There is never a dull moment in our household with them in our life. I like the responsibility that they require, because my brothers and I possess a never-ending respect for animals. From stepping into the show ring to cleaning stalls, they have given me chances to meet many new people,” said Logan Sieck. Bayne Sieck, who is 14, likes showing against his siblings. “My best memory of showing goats is the year my younger brother — who has a different training style of working with his animals, walked into the ring with the same animal that he ‘worked’ with and beat my sister and I completely! At first we were a little miffed, but now I can say it was pretty cool to see him and his goat work like a team that day,” he said. continued on page 22


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T HE FENCE P OST CHA M PIONS OF T H E S H OW RING 2012

Does eat from the hay bunk. Keeping feed off the ground and clean is healthier for the goats.

This sign, made by a family friend, hangs on the outside of the barn.

The youngest at 10, Mason, also loved that day. “She just did everything I wanted her to, and it felt good since I am the smallest,” he said. Producing a quality market animal is what SRS Acres strives for. “Since we can not feasibly have two herds, one for selling when markets are high and a herd for show kids, we strive for marketable show kids. This encases herd health, as if the goats health is failing, so will the kids. If we see kids coming up with weak pasterns, or bad backs or teeth, etc., we need to change something in the breeding,” Rita Sieck said. The family makes small changes every year, and looks forward to kidding season to what if their selections have worked. “Kidding is our favorite time. New life is the coolest gift one can experience. Kidding also provides the answer to your breeding selections. It is always a treat to see what you may get, or provide opportunities for our children to learn something new. I love watching those little ones bounce around, and they are small enough to pick up at that time. It’s a real sense of accomplishment. Goats are the size that I am comfortable working with, and do not waiver on sending any of my children in the pen with,” said Rita Sieck. The family business is truly about family, and everyone contributes. “It usually takes all of us to get the job done in an efficient manner, and you get to learn


THE FENC E P OST CH A MP IO N S O F TH E SH OW RI NG 2012

so much about each other at those times. Even though winning is fun, working together is our favorite,” said Rita Sieck. Once the children are grown, Scott and Rita plan on continuing to raise goats. “As we look beyond the children showing, I see the competitive nature still standing and continuing to produce show stock. I still see us in the goat business, and possibly incorporating a lottery goat class locally similar to a pick a pig project or such. As we feel strongly about the farming future,” said Rita Sieck. Teaching young adults about agriculture is one of the most important things to Scott and Rita. “While both of us were raised on farms in rural Nebraska, we recognize a pressing priority to teach youth the importance of agriculture, before it’s too late. These lessons learned today will be used throughout a lifetime and these animal experiences double as life lessons from childhood to adulthood, whether it be the sense of pride in accomplishing those small hurdles or the hurt of the circle of life, it will make each of them a stronger person, with character and a strong sense of work ethic,” Rita Sieck said. V

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Young goat kids are given access to an area away from the does where they can have special feed.

A goat kid nurses from his mother. Kids are usually weaned at 3-4 months, at which time they are sold to be shown. Structural correctness and mothering ability are two of the criteria the Sieck family uses when selecting their breeding stock.


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T HE FENCE P OST CHA M PIONS OF T H E S H OW RING 2012

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