Business Connect May 2017

Page 1

May 2017

Home Grown

Roche family builds 30-year construction legacy pg. 16

Downtown Greeley growth continues with new businesses springing up all the time pg. 20 pg. 4

Greeley Family sells healthy meals in jars

pg. 8

Who’s Next: Law Honorees

pg. 27

Best Law Firm winners


I M P O RTA N T N O T I C E ! I M P O RTA N I M P O RTA NTT

OWN A BUSINESS? NO OT T IIC EE!! N C YOU MUST OBTAIN A OWN A BUSINESS? OWN A BUSINESS? NEW BUINESS YOU MUST OBTAIN A YOU NEW MUST OBTAIN A LICENCE BUINESS

NEW BUINESS LICENCE LICENCE

AS OF JANUARY 1, 2017, EVERY PERSON/ COMPANY DOING BUSINESS IN THE CITY OF GREELEY IS REQUIRED TO OBTAIN A BUSINESS AS OF JANUARY 1, 2017, EVERY PERSON/ LICENSE. THIS LICENSE REPLACES THE COMPANY DOING BUSINESS IN THE CITY OF CURRENT SALES TAX LICENSE WHICH IS NO AS OF JANUARY 1, 2017, EVERY GREELEY IS REQUIRED TO OBTAIN APERSON/ BUSINESS LONGER VALID THE CITY OFTHE GREELEY. COMPANY DOING BUSINESS IN CITY OF LICENSE. THISIN LICENSE REPLACES THE

City of Greeley CURRENT SALES TAX LICENSE WHICH IS NO GREELEY IS REQUIRED TO OBTAIN A BUSINESS 970-350-9733 • Email: greeleysalestax@greeleygov.com LONGER VALID IN THE CITY OF GREELEY. LICENSE. THIS LICENSE REPLACES THE www.greeleygov.com/government/finance/business City of Greeley CURRENT SALES TAX LICENSE WHICH IS NO 970-350-9733 • Email: greeleysalestax@greeleygov.com State Colorado LONGER VALID INof THE CITY OF GREELEY. www.greeleygov.com/government/finance/business 303-238-SERV (7378) City• www.colorado.gov/pacific/tax of Greeley State of Colorado

Greeley Finance | Sales Tax 970-350-9733 • Email: greeleysalestax@greeleygov.com 303-238-SERV (7378) • www.colorado.gov/pacific/tax 1000 10th Street, Greeley, CO 80631 • Monday - Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. www.greeleygov.com/government/finance/business Finance | Sales Tax 970-350-9733 telGreeley • 970-350-9736 fax • greeleysalestax@greeleygov.com

State of• Colorado 1000 10th Street, Greeley, CO 80631 Monday - Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 303-238-SERV (7378) • www.colorado.gov/pacific/tax 970-350-9733 tel • 970-350-9736 fax • greeleysalestax@greeleygov.com

Greeley Finance | Sales Tax 1000 10th Street, Greeley, CO 80631 • Monday - Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 970-350-9733 tel • 970-350-9736 fax • greeleysalestax@greeleygov.com 2 I Business Connect I May 2017


Features

PG. 16

PG. 20

Roche family comes together to continue 30-year construction legacy

Five New Businesses in Downtown Greeley, with two more on the way.

PG. 4

PG. 24

PG. 8

for sustainable growth

Greeley Family sell meals in a jar

PG. 27

Who’s Next: Law Honorees

Winners: Best Law Firms

PG. 13

May-June Calendar of Events

PUBLISHER Bryce Jacobson EDITOR Randy Bangert CREATIVE MANAGER Kyle Knoop BUSINESS MANAGER Doug Binder MANAGING EDITOR Sharon Dunn ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Bruce Dennis

Challenge yourself and your team

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Darian Armer Katarina Velazquez Kyra Kudick Sales MANAGER Stephanie Mighell

PG. 30

On the Move BUSINESS CONNECT 501 8th Avenue, Greeley, CO 80631 P.O. Box 1690 For all editorial, advertising, subscription and circulation inquiries, call (970) 352-0211. Send editorial-related comments and story ideas to: rbangert@greeleytribune.com

Creative supervisor For display advertising inquiries, contact: Amy Mayer bdennis@greeleytribune.com Lead Designer Nichole Mathiason

2017, May, Issue 3. Published by: Greeley Publishing Co., publisher of The Greeley Tribune, Windsor Now, the Fence Post, Tri-State Livestock News, and Energy Pipeline

May 2017 I Business Connect I 3


Greeley Family opens up health-conscious store that sells meals in a jar

By Katarina Velazquez kvelazquez@greeleytribune.com 4 I Business Connect I May 2017

Miles Kiefer fills the jars with ingredients as he prepares soup for Mason Jar Meal Company earlier this year at his new store front at, 3610 35th Ave., unit 8 in Evans


A

local family took the convenience of healthy eating one step further, capitalizing on the trend of meal delivery kits filled with market-fresh ingredients and doorstep-delivered dinners. Miles Kiefer, founder of Mason Jar Meal Company, prepares dishes ranging from Colorado green chili to veggie soup, all free of gluten, soy, dairy, nuts and preservatives. He then pressure cooks the meals and packs them into recyclable Mason jars he guarantees last up to a year. No, we’re not in Boulder. Kiefer initially started the business about a year ago as an -Mark online delivery service that catered to a smaller crowd, but he found a growing demand for the two-minute meals in a jar. That’s why he and his parents, Mindy and Mark, opened a storefront in Evans, 3610 35th Ave., Suite 8, called Mason Jar Meal Co. & Café — as a way to connect the

community to healthy eating options. The shop made its debut earlier this year, and the Kiefers decided to tie in a café element to their business to attract a variety of customers. The café serves all-natural soups and sandwiches, with some breakfast burritos and fresh cinnamon rolls on the menu, too. The Kiefers are the name behind Country Creations, which operated in downtown Greeley for 11 years, making varieties of braided breads and other goodies to sell in the grocery freezers and for fundraisers. The bakery no longer operates. “Healthy” doesn’t attract new customers quite like “fresh cinnamon rolls” Kiefer does, so the “devilish treats” serve as a gateway to get people through their door, Mindy said. “When you say healthy, people think ‘Oh, it must not have any flavor,’ ” she said. “You have to have a way to be able to talk to people. (The café) has given us a ton of opportunity to share the story of

“Our food system is broken. We want to be a part of the solution.”

Miles Kiefer, middle, laughs as his parents Mindy Kiefer and Mark Kiefer glance at him while sitting in the new cafe for Mason Jar Meal Company earlier this year in Evans. Photos by Josh Polson/jpolson@greeleytribune.com. May 2017 I Business Connect I 5


Miles Kiefer, owner and creator of the Mason Jar Meal Company and Cafe, carefully prepares the jars to be sealed at his new store front at 3610 35th Ave., unit 8 in Evans. Kiefer started his business a year ago using online orders to fuel and fund his operation.

our business and talk to people about it.” Miles puts his own twists on all of his recipes. He searches for substitutions and comes up with ways to add flavor to his food while remaining healthconscious. For example, he makes chicken chowder without using any cream or milk as a base; he uses potatoes instead. He’s a self-taught cook, but has years of home-cooking experience under his belt and has been in the food manufacturing business for more than 10 years. “Not everything works to fit into a jar or a can, so you have certain restraints of what you can make,” Kiefer said. “You take popular meals that you know of and start playing with those. I also look up recipes and start to tweak them to what best fits our menu.” Kiefer was living in Tennessee for a year, where he said he and his roommates each were spending more than $25 per day eating out. He then started to cook meals in large batches for all of them to save some money and time — and to get some veggies and nutrients back into their diets, too. He wanted to find a way to get the food he 6 I Business Connect I May 2017

was making to last longer, so fast food could be avoided as much as possible. That’s when he discovered pressurecooking. Kiefer explained the pressurecooker is what sterilizes and seals the jars and keeps the fresh ingredients edible for several months — even up to several years. He used to cook out of a rented commercial kitchen, but behind his family’s new café sits his new foodmaking lair and large cooking machine. Kiefer said he’ll keep experimenting with different recipes, and he plans to change up Mason Jar Company’s

Mindy Kiefer smiles as she organizes the front cafe area at Mason Jar Meal Company in Evans.


menu every few months based on the foods’ popularity. Butternut squash and chicken curry meals were most recently added to his menu. “The (online) business kept growing,” he said. “I never had the idea of a café. It was more meant to be just an internet delivery kind of thing, but this space happened to open up and it had the ability to house a café.” Mark said he was impressed by the Mason jar meals his son created because he often finds himself in a hurry to find food once his lunch break hits. He said often, many others in the work force also feel rushed to find a quick meal, so they head to the local corporate fastfood chain. That’s why, he said, so many Americans have unhealthy diets. He says he hopes his family’s business can play a small factor in turning that around and create nutritional options to combat corporate chains. “Our food system is broken,” he said. “We want to be a part of the solution.”

Where to go: Mason Jar Meal Co. & Cafe

is open from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. The store is located at 3610 35th Ave., Suite 8 in Evans. For more information on the menu, prices and more, go to www.mjmeals.com/. For more information on the business’ storefront and café, go to www.facebook.com/MasonJarMealCo/.

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May 2017 I Business Connect I 7


Law Honorees The Greeley Tribune and Business Connect are highlighting the up-and-coming leaders across Weld County as part of a new series called Who’s Next. The goal of the Who’s Next series is to honor some of the most dedicated young people working to shape our cities in Weld County every day. The honorees you see on the following pages were nominated by their peers for the outstanding work they are doing in law, and were celebrated at our second Who’s Next event on April 27. View more online at www.greeleytribune.com/whos-next-honoringlaw 8 I Business Connect I May 2017


Lee J. Morehead

Senior Associate Otis, Bedingfield & Peters, LLC Age: 33

Lee J. Morehead was originally interested in aerospace engineering before he discovered public speaking in middle school and junior high. He joined the debate team in high school and discovered he loved the art of the argument. “There are not a whole lot of professions where arguing is a good skill set except for being a lawyer,” Morehead said with a chuckle. “It was a natural progression to go into law.” He is the president of the Weld County Bar Association, was a 20 Under 40 Weld County Business Leader honoree and was also named to the 40 under 40 with BizWest in northern Colorado. He was also on the law review at his law school, something only top students are invited to participate in. Aside from his many accolades, Morehead said he really enjoys helping people. “I look at lawyers as being problem solvers. When people in the community have issues I like helping them solve those issues.”

Robert Casey

Attorney and Partner Stout Law Firm Age: 31

Robert Casey remembers being 8 years old watching a Scared Straight documentary and thinking it was a very negative view of people incarcerated. “I decided I wanted to advocate for those who might end up there,” Casey said. “I’ve always had a strong passion for criminal law.” An attorney and partner at Stout Law Firm, Casey said Greeley is a great place to practice law with great judges. “They give you an opportunity to practice in a way that allows you to represent your clients to the best of your ability,” he said. “There is access to the courts, to the jails, everyone around here even on the other side is really working to do their best job. I love it out here.” Casey credits his partner, Stephanie Stout, for making him a better lawyer. “I’m lucky to have her around to watch her in court and work on cases with her. Anyone would consider themselves incredibly lucky to be in my position.”

May 2017 I Business Connect I 9


Audrey Trevino Attorney Trevino Law Firm, LLC Age: 25

Audrey Trevino grew up watching her dad work as a lawyer. “He had his own law firm for more than 20 years,” Trevino said. “I grew up admiring the work he did, thinking he was just the coolest. My dad is one of my biggest role models.” Trevino has interned with him since sophomore year of college. “I really got a taste of what it’s like. Law is such a noble profession.” Trevino was born and raised in Greeley and loves practicing in the town where she was raised. “I really love giving back to my community. This was the community that shaped me.” She attended law school in Arkansas but knew she always wanted to come back and serve the Greeley and Weld County community.

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10 I Business Connect I May 2017


Ben whitney

Chief Deputy district attorney Age: 37 Like most kids Ben Whitney wanted to be at least a dozen different things when he grew up. One of those choices was a lawyer. “It was really something I wanted to do from a young age,” Whitney said. He enjoys the investigative component as well as the research and digging for answers. In Greeley specifically he enjoys the size of the legal community. “You get to know everybody pretty well from both sides,” Whitney said. “The size lends itself to familiarity and collegiality you don’t necessary get in a bigger place.” Whitney said he is most proud of his work on cases with child victims. “They’re very difficult cases but very rewarding to get to stand up and be an advocate for somebody who often doesn’t have anybody else on their side. They’re the most vulnerable and emotionally draining, but also the most rewarding.”

Anthony Perea

Chief Deputy district attorney Age: 39 Anthony Perea originally thought he wanted to practice corporate law, but after interning at a large firm while attending the University of Denver college of law and working for the legal department of a large bank, he realized corporate law was not for him. It was then he decided to become a prosecutor. Perea said he enjoys practicing in Greeley because it offers a small-town feel with big cases. “By prosecuting cases here in the 19th Judicial District you can have an immediate and direct impact on the community and victims of crime,” he said. Perea said being able to help a victim’s family get justice for their loved one is something in which he takes great pride. “I can sum it up by quoting John Wooden, ‘You can’t live a perfect day without doing something for someone who will never be able to repay you.’”

May 2017 I Business Connect I 11


Thea Carrasco

Chief Deputy District Attorney Age: 35 Robert Casey remembers being 8 years old watching a Scared Straight documentary and thinking it was a very negative view of people incarcerated. “I decided I wanted to advocate for those who might end up there,” Casey said. “I’ve always had a strong passion for criminal law.” An attorney and partner at Stout Law Firm, Casey said Greeley is a great place to practice law with great judges. “They give you an opportunity to practice in a way that allows you to represent your clients to the best of your ability,” he said. “There is access to the courts, to the jails, everyone around here even on the other side is really working to do their best job. I love it out here.” Casey credits his partner, Stephanie Stout, for making him a better lawyer. “I’m lucky to have her around to watch her in court and work on cases with her. Anyone would consider themselves incredibly lucky to be in my position.”

Erin Rossiter Public Defender

As a public defender Erin Rossiter works to defend and protect the rights of residents in Weld County who have been accused of crimes and can’t afford a legal representative. She also volunteers for C.A.S.A., an organization that advocates for abused and neglected children. “Through long hours and an eye-popping amount of cases, she guides and represents clients through legal proceedings,” said Jonathan Craig, her nominator. “In the current climate of immigration uncertainty she works with clients across the spectrum to inform them of their rights and repercussions of legal outcomes.”

12 I Business Connect I May 2017


MAY - JUNE 2017

Events Calendar May 4

May 17

GREELEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, leads group, 7:30 a.m., at the Chamber, 902 7th Ave., Greeley. This group meets every Thursday morning to share and create business leads for our group’s members. Details: (970) 352-3566.

WINDSOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, networking at noon, noon- 1 p.m., Colorado in Motion, 1455 Main St., Suite 160. Come and enjoy meeting other Windsor Chamber members as well as seeing Colorado In Motion’s office and see what they do and what they can do for you. Bring some of you business cards to pass out when you meet other Chamber Members. Details: (970) 686-7189

May 4 GREELEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, young professionals networking, 5:30-7 p.m., Sears Real Estate, 2021 Clubhouse Drive, No. 100., Greeley. Greeley Young Professionals is our 21-39 networking event. Come and join us and meet other young professional in the Greeley area and build business relationships! Free. Details: (970) 352-3566.

May 10 GREELEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, business before hours, 7-8:30 a.m., North Range Behavioral Health, 1300 N. 17th Ave., Greeley. Enjoy a delightful breakfast and networking with other chamber investors. Everyone in attendance gets a 15 second commercial on who they are and what they do. Free to members; $20 nonmembers. Details: (970) 352-3566.

May 11 GREELEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, leads group, 7:30 a.m., at the Chamber, 902 7th Ave., Greeley. This group meets every Thursday morning to share and create business leads for our group’s members. Details: (970) 352-3566.

May 18 GREELEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, leads group, 7:30 a.m., at the Chamber, 902 7th Ave., Greeley. This group meets every Thursday morning to share and create business leads for our group’s members. Details: (970) 352-3566.

May 20 EVANS AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, business after hours, 5-7 p.m., Butters, 2170 35th Ave., Greeley. Details: (970) 330-4204.

May 20 EATON AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, local business trade show, 10 a.m.- 2 p.m., Eaton Rec Center activity room, 224 1st St., Eaton. Details: Jennifer Rohn at eacc@brokenboxr.com

May 2017 I Business Connect I 13


MAY - JUNE 2017 E May 23

May 25

EAST COLORADO SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER, business startup orientation, 6-7:45 p.m., Carbon Valley Regional Library, 7 Park Ave., Firestone. Ready to start a business in Colorado? This comprehensive Business Startup Orientation has been designed as a starting place for anyone who is considering jumping into business for the first or seventh time. This seminar will provide you with a Colorado Startup Guide, free library resources to support your business, web resources, as well as a general overview of things to consider when starting a business. Presenter: Jesse Esparza. Register online at coloradosbdc. org or call (970) 352-3661.

GREELEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, business after hours, 5-7 p.m., Greeley Stampede, 600 N. 14th Ave., Greeley. This event happens every fourth Thursday. Enjoy hors d’oeuvres and network with other Greeley Chamber investors. You can also win door prizes. Free to members; $20 nonmembers. Details: (970) 352-3566.

May 25 GREELEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, leads group, 7:30 a.m., at the Chamber, 902 7th Ave., Greeley. This group meets every Thursday morning to share and create business leads for our group’s members. Details: (970) 352-3566.

May 25 GREELEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, Chamber 101, 4-5 p.m., Greeley Chamber of Commerce, 902 7th Ave., Greeley. Free. Details: (970) 352-3566.

14 I Business Connect I May 2017

June 1 GREELEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, leads group, 7:30 a.m., at the Chamber, 902 7th Ave., Greeley. This group meets every Thursday morning to share and create business leads for our group’s members. Details: (970) 352-3566.

June 1 GREELEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, young professionals networking, 5:30-7 p.m., Greeley Stampede, 600 N. 14th Ave., Greeley. Greeley Young Professionals is our 21-39 networking event. Come and join us and meet other young professional in the Greeley area and build business relationships! Free. Details: (970) 352-3566.


Events Calendar June 7

June 15

GREELEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, business before hours, 7-8:30 a.m., J&T Country Feeds, 4835 10th St., Greeley. Enjoy a delightful breakfast and networking with other chamber investors. Everyone in attendance gets a 15 second commercial on who they are and what they do. Free to members; $20 nonmembers. Details: (970) 352-3566.

GREELEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, Chamber 101, 4-5 p.m., Greeley Chamber of Commerce, 902 7th Ave., Greeley. Free. Details: (970) 352-3566.

June 8 GREELEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, leads group, 7:30 a.m., at the Chamber, 902 7th Ave., Greeley. This group meets every Thursday morning to share and create business leads for our group’s members. Details: (970) 352-3566.

June 8 EVANS AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, business after hours, 5-7 p.m., Skip Carlson’s Farmers Insurance office, 2986 W. 29th St., Greeley. Details: (970) 330-4204.

June 15 GREELEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, leads group, 7:30 a.m., at the Chamber, 902 7th Ave., Greeley. This group meets every Thursday morning to share and create business leads for our group’s members. Details: (970) 352-3566.

June 15 GREELEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, business after hours, 5-7 p.m., Sears Real Estate, 2021 Clubhouse Drive, No. 100, Greeley. This event happens every fourth Thursday. Enjoy hors d’oeuvres and network with other Greeley Chamber investors. You can also win door prizes. Free to members; $20 nonmembers. Details: (970) 352-3566.

June 22 GREELEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, leads group, 7:30 a.m., at the Chamber, 902 7th Ave., Greeley. This group meets every Thursday morning to share and create business leads for our group’s members. Details: (970) 352-3566. To include your business news in the Business Connect sections, contact Sharon Dunn at sdunn@greeleytribune.com or call (970) 392-4439.

To feature your business event here, contact Bruce Dennis at 970-392-4429 or bdennis@greeleytribune.com

May 2017 I Business Connect I 15


Home Grown ­—

Roche family comes together to con By Darian armer For Business Connect Photos by Josh Polson jpolson@greeleytribune.com. Tom Roche stands alongside his three sons at the entryway to Roche Constructors offices in west Greeley.

16 I Business Connect I May 2017

F

rom the time he was 10 years old, Tom Roche knew he would one day work in his father’s construction business. He worked summers doing clean-up on projects and spent time at the office of Roche Constructors, Inc. in Greeley. “I experienced everything early on and I enjoyed it,” he said. What he didn’t plan for was how quickly he would have to begin the succession plan to assume the presidency of his father’s company.


ntinue 30-year construction legacy Roche was a senior at Pittsburg State University, in Pittsburg, Kan., in 1984 when a plane carrying his father, Patrick T. Roche, and five other Greeley business people, crashed in Scottsdale Ariz., killing them all. A management team was hired after the accident to manage the company for the next 10 years while Roche completed his degree in construction engineering and worked his way through the ranks of the company. He spent time as an estimator, project engineer, superintendent, vice president and in 10 years, in 1994, was named president. He

then proceeded to acquire all the stock back from the employees and has continued to manage and grow the company ever since. “Working my way up was always the plan,” Roche said. “We knew I would assume the presidency at some point. But I believe holding the other positions has made me much more effective.” But before Roche assumed control and grew the company to the national business it is today, his father, Patrick, laid the foundation. May 2017 I Business Connect I 17


Tom Roche, with his three sons, has built his father’s business, Roche Constructors, into a 30-year success story with a national reach. But, he says, Greeley is home.

Roche’s family lived in Southern California, where Patrick worked for Sears Roebuck and Co. as a project manager building stores. In 1969, Patrick wanted to move to a better place to raise his family. So he took a job with Hensel Phelps in Greeley, packed up his family and moved. It didn’t take long for Patrick to strike out on his own, founding Roche Constructors, Inc. in 1971. The company started out building houses and moved to commercial buildings where it continued to grow. “We built literally hundreds of houses,” said Roche. “Then we started building movie theaters, apartment complexes and small restaurants. Greeley was really growing in the ‘70s.” In 1986, Roche moved to Las Vegas for a project. “I went to build just one project for us and wound up being there for eight years,” he said. He ended up opening an office for the company there where they performed a large volume of work in southern Nevada and Southern California. It seems that expansion has become routine 18 I Business Connect I May 2017

for the company. About 10 years ago the company began doing work in Texas, resulting in another corporate office opening in Austin, Texas, two years ago to support clients and projects. Fifteen years ago, the company also opened another corporate office in Westminster. “We wanted to create a more convenient location for our people (who) work in the Denver area,” Roche said. But the headquarters in Greeley is the first, true home of Roche Constructors. “It’s where I grew up. I like it here,” said Roche. “This is my home and my company’s home and I would never consider relocating.” Today, Roche Constructors has completed work in about 30 states and employs roughly 200 full-time employees plus hundreds of subcontractors on various projects. For now, that’s enough. “If the need arose, anything is possible. Right now we’re comfortable with focusing on Texas, Colorado and Southern Nevada,” Roche said. “We also travel for our existing clients and travel just about anywhere else in the U.S. for specific projects.”


Roche used to travel somewhere every week for work, but now he says he travels far less and does most of his work by phone, thanks to senior management in place in corporate offices. He also has help from his family. His sister, Sandra, works in the Las Vegas office as a corporate attorney, while two of his three sons also work for the company. His oldest son, Patrick, is a deputy district attorney for Weld County. His son, Andrew, (A.J.) works for Roche Constructors as the director of business development, while his youngest son, Thomas, works for the company as a project superintendent. And while he said he could see his sons running the family business someday, Roche is in no hurry to start a succession plan anytime soon. “I don’t have any defined plans in place,” said Roche. “I don’t plan on doing anything different anytime soon.” Roche has completed a lot of high-profile projects, some of which were valued at over $100 million, but one he is very proud of is Roche Constructors construction of FlatIron Crossing mall in Broomfield. “That was a very high-profile, very complex project that was built on a very aggressive schedule,” Roche said. “The whole thing was a success.” There are numerous major construction projects accredited to Roche Constructors, from Target stores to the Aims Community College PE & Recreation Center expansion. Current projects include a Walmart Supercenter and a Walmart Neighborhood Market in Texas, as well as an elementary school and Natural Grocers in Nevada and Colorado. Those are just to name a few. “We’ve literally built a couple hundred projects in Greeley,” said Roche. “We built the Greeley Public Safety Facility and police headquarters. That came out really nice.” As for the future, Roche said there are always challenges, but he’s optimistic in Roche Constructors’ ability to overcome any one of them.

“I never know what’s coming. Sometimes we can plan for challenges that might come up,” he said. “I can say we are well prepared to address any challenges we can expect to encounter. From my perspective, nothing could get in the way of us continuing to grow and continuing to be a successful and viable construction company.” Although Roche Constructors may be a construction company, at the end of the day it’s about the people for Roche. “I like working with our clients. I like creating projects from a blank piece of paper and taking it through to completion. I like helping our employees and providing opportunities for people,” Roche said. “I really like hiring new college graduates and in a few years seeing them be very successful. For me, it’s the people I’m dealing with daily. I enjoy being provided opportunities and I enjoy giving them.”

By the Numbers 1971 - When Patrick Roche founded Roche Constructors.

1994 - When Tom Roche was named president.

200 - Number of employees 30 - The number of states in which Roche is licensed.

2 - The number of Tom

Roche’s sons who will likely succeed their father in the business.

1 - Home office, in Greeley. May 2017 I Business Connect I 19


Downtown Greeley

gets five new businesses so far this year, at least two more on the way Debbie Casdorph leans on her front counter surrounded by some of her costume creations in her shop, Mystic Threads, 910 9th Ave., in downtown Greeley. Mystic Threads is just one of the new shops opening up in downtown Greeley. Photo by Josh Polson/jpolson@greeleytribune.com.

By Katarina Velazquez For Business Connect

D

ebbie Casdorph isn’t entirely sure she would have opened a store in downtown Greeley a few years ago. The area wasn’t exactly bustling with business, nor was it the go-to place for folks to hang out. She admitted her business probably wouldn’t have made it without the frequent passers-by downtown gets today. Casdorph, a Greeley resident of 25 years, opened a costume studio and alteration shop called Mystical Threads at 910 9th Ave. She creates custom costumes — think cosplay or Halloween — by hand, and she can alter 20 I Business Connect I May 2017

pretty much any piece of clothing for her customers. Mystical Threads is one of five new businesses that set up shop in Greeley’s historic downtown so far this year. The others include Azúcar Espresso Bar, 731 10th St.; Mainstay Physical Therapy, 815 9th St.; The Golden Tree, 920 9th Ave.; and Aunt Helen’s Coffee House, 800 8th Ave. Suite 101. Casdorph said the Downtown Development Authority’s dedication to revitalizing downtown and effort to make it a happening place is what drew her to open her first business there mid-February.


Bianca Fisher, associate director of the DDA, said downtown has become a diverse and competitive place for businesses to locate. The past year has boasted more openings than closings for downtown businesses, and she attributes that to the variety of restaurants, retail shops and entertainment options that cater to all types of Greeley audiences. That wasn’t necessarily the case even eight years ago, when she started with the DDA, she said. “I remember when businesses used to just come and go,” she said. Jessica Malouf, owner of Mainstay Physical Therapy, is opening her second private practice office in Greeley after conducting studies to see where her work was needed. She opened her original office in Fort Collins about a year ago, and she will open

her Greeley office officially Wednesday. Her area of expertise is treating dizziness and vertigo in children and adults. Malouf said one of the reasons she chose a downtown location is because it’s an area that attracts all types of demographics and age groups. She hopes to help different types of clients in the area, and opening an office downtown can help expose her to all of them, she said. Fisher said there’s not much retail space left in the downtown plazas at 8th through 10th streets — about three vacant spaces she could immediately think of. She said that’s a good problem to have because it means the businesses that have come in are staying, but it also limits the amount of businesses that can come in. “Everything has been steady and there hasn’t been a lot of turnover, meaning the

“Now just seems like the right time to be downtown,” - Debbie Casdorph, Mystical Threads

Debbie Casdorph pulls back some of the dresses and costumes she’s created at her shop in downtown Greeley. Photo by Josh Polson/jpolson@greeleytribune.com. May 2017 I Business Connect I 21


People walk by The Golden Tree, 920 9th Ave., in downtown Greeley. The store is owned by Salah and Danielle Mahdaoui, who import all products sold in the store from Morocco. The store opened in February, and the Mahdaouis sell Argan oil, ceramics, lamps, backpacks, jewelry and more. Photo by Katarina Velazquez/kvelazquez@greeleytribune.com>

businesses here are rooted down and doing well,” Fisher said. “That speaks to a healthy economic climate.” She said there’s been talk about moving non-retail shops up to second-level offices to free up some ground space for retail, but that’s not set in stone and is entirely left up to the property owners. Fisher said there are four businesses that have left the downtown area this year, most of which were connected with other new developments happening in the area. Those businesses are Samafale Halaal Store, 1519 8th Ave.; Baseline Engineering, 710 11th Ave., Suite 105; Dog Grooming by Dames, 918 1/2 9th Ave.; and Goodwill Career Connection Center, 1012 11th St. She said 22 I Business Connect I May 2017

there are two new shops on their way, too. Evergreen-based Fader Skateboard Shop likely will open this month on the corner of 9th Street and 9th Avenue, across from the Rio Grande Mexican Restaurant, according to a sign on the storefront’s door. Free Leaf is another business that will open in the old dog-grooming salon at 918 1Ž2 9th Ave. Free Leaf’s owners sell teas and crafts at Greeley’s Farmers’ Market, and Fisher said they’re jonesing to open a storefront downtown. Fisher also hinted there are two potential sizable property sales in the works she can’t reveal until the sales close, per usual protocol. Then there are the veteran businesses, Fisher said, that have stuck around through


the good and bad times downtown, such as Patrick’s Irish Pub, 907 8th Ave., and the Rio Grande, 825 9th St. Rio Grande has been a downtown destination since 1996, according to manager Ambrette Gilkey. She’s been working at the Rio for about 10 years, and said she’s seen remarkably more customers walking through the door in the past year. She guessed that had to do with downtown’s steady growth, and as a Greeley native, she said it’s exciting to see some life back in the 9th Street Plaza. “We’ve definitely been waiting for this,” Gilkey said. “It’s great to talk to people that have never been downtown or to see the ones that are coming back.” Casdolph is still admittedly unsure about how her costume business will do — what new business owner isn’t? — but at least for now, there are enough people popping their heads into her place out of curiosity. She thinks she’ll see even more traffic when Friday Fests start up again in June, considering she got some exposure at the DDA’s Blarney on the Block event. “Now just seems like the right time to be downtown,” she said.

Aimee and Bob Hutson sit at a table in their new shop, Aunt Helen’s Coffee House, 800 8th Ave., in downtown Greeley. Photo by Sharon Dunn/sdunn@greeleytribunecom

A sign marks the entrance to Azucar Espresso Bar, 731 10th St., another of the new shops opening up in downtown Greeley. Photo by Josh Polson/jpolson@greeleytribune.com. May 2017 I Business Connect I 23


Challenge yourself and your team to sustainable growth By john benjamin For Business Connect

“Control your own destiny or someone else will.” — Jack Welch

P

redicting the future is easy. Every year Jack Welch would make us predict the next five years of growth and commit to targets for the next three years. The first year I did this, I spent hours studying, calling coworkers and friends trying to figure out the future, only to be told that my analysis was great and that my target was 22 percent — this despite data that showed 15 percent would be a legitimately tough target. You’ll never win that battle with the CEO. So I buckled down and our team made the 22 percent goal through a lot of blood, sweat and tears. 24 I Business Connect I May 2017

The next year was different, knowing no matter how hard I worked on an analysis I was going to be told what the future would be. Instead of fighting that I took that extra three months while my peers worked valiantly on a prediction that would be overturned and worked on a plan to achieve 23 percent growth. No more predicting the future, I was now going to set an expectation for my extended team while others were analyzing and planning our strategy. In some ways, you could say our goal was the future. We developed a model and followed it every year for seven years and never undershot our goal. How did we do it? We had confidence as a team that we could make our goal. Do your team members believe in themselves? Have they ever overcome an obstacle? If not, then maybe as a manager you need to challenge them more. We played the “What if” game. We started challenging ourselves and looking for opportunities, both big and small, that fit our “sweet spot.” Do you know what your company’s sweet spot is? The sweet spot is that customer or project in which your unique set of skills and

• •


• •

products really outshine the competition. To find your sweet spot look at all the projects and new clients you got over the last several years and look for a theme among them. There is a theme; you just need to ferret it out. This game helped us to see there was more than enough opportunity for us to hit our target. Then set a strategy to dominate that sweet spot. How do you put fear into your competitors when they are after the same project that you are? Our strategy included pricing, product offering optimization and a marketing plan undergirded by the sales team. We established a rhythm of sales call and proposal reviews that kept everyone focused on the goal and created a strong atmosphere of accountability. We knew by September whether we would make our goal or not. If the future looked bleak, we had time to re-evaluate and redeploy. Customer schedules and plans do change and that is beyond

our control. But refining our strategy is within our control. Our budget needs for the most part were modest as our growth rate of 23 percent did not require much more money than a 15 percent growth model. It just took a little more planning. Research has now proven that a growth rate of between 20 percent and 25 percent is very sustainable through good and bad times. I would direct you to Jim Collins’ book, “Great by Choice,” in which he presents a very data-driven approach to sustainable growth. How do you predict the future? Set a target and then go about solving the riddle of how to hit it. I know you’ll discover that you are a great prognosticator. — John S Benjamin, founder of the Business Engineering Consortium, contact him with your questions or comments at john@BusinessEngineeringConsortium.com.

Be inspired. Be empowered. Be successful.

May 2017 I Business Connect I 25


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WINNER

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OTIS, BEDINGFIELD & PETERS, LLC By Darian armer For Business Connect Otis, Bedingfield & Peters, LLC may have some of the most experienced attorneys around, but they also understand their clients on a different level as many of them have owned their own businesses as well. “We have attorneys that have owned their own businesses and know what it’s like to do that from a practical standpoint, including the ins and outs of running a successful business,” said Jennifer Vannoy, Otis, Bedingfield & Peters, LLC firm administrator. Understanding where their clients are coming from is one thing, but some attorneys at Otis, Bedingfield & Peters LLC truly know their clients, having grown up with them. “I love that my clients are my friends and my friends are my clients,” said Fred Otis, attorney. “Some of whom I went to grade school with and were customers of my dad’s men’s wear store.” Attorney Tim Brynteson echoes Otis’ sentiments about practicing in the northern Colorado area. “I enjoy working with business owners and individuals in a tight-knit community where people know and care about each other. They are truly interested in helping each other succeed, reach more customers and do things right,” said Brynteson. “You

also feel like you are a part of Colorado history by practicing here in Greeley. Water, agriculture and different kinds of land use issues were pioneered here in Greeley by our earliest pioneers.” Otis, Bedingfield & Peters LLC claim to live law, with a mission statement that expresses the firm’s efforts to provide the finest legal services through a commitment to integrity, excellence and building lasting relationships. Practice areas for the firm include real estate law, business law, environmental law, oil and gas law, estate planning, commercial litigation, probate/trust litigation, appeals and tax law. Aside from knowing their clients the firm also knows the northern Colorado community and understand the importance of giving back. The firm’s employees volunteer through a wide variety of boards and organizations and provide 50 hours of pro bono service per attorney per year. “It is extremely important when we are a part of this community to participate in things that matter to our clients and to us personally,” said Vannoy. “It’s a part of who we are and a value of the partners of this law firm. They pass those values on to the employees.” May 2017 I Business Connect I 27


WINNER

Best Law Firm

By Darian armer For Business Connect Coan, Payton & Payne, LLC has northern Colorado covered. With law offices in Greeley, Fort Collins and Denver, the firm has attorneys ready to serve clients in a number of capacities all over the Front Range. The Coan, Payton & Payne firm serves as more than just attorneys, acting also as advisers and advocates to ensure success on their clients’ behalf. “We have a team of high performers (who) truly care about the results they achieve for their clients,” said Michael Payne, attorney and partner at Coan, Payton & Payne. “We offer a depth of expertise to the business community in northern Colorado that is unlikely to be found even in a large firm, all while keeping that personal relationship with the client.” Areas of practice include agricultural law, aviation law, business succession, business and corporate law, bankruptcy and reorganizations, employment law, commercial litigation, creditors’ rights, estate planning, intellectual property, international trans28 I Business Connect I May 2017

actions, land use planning, zoning law, mergers, acquisitions, natural resources, real estate law, probate litigation, oil and gas law, wealth preservation and tax law, and legal services for the banking industry. “The region offers a unique mix of projects – from large-scale corporate developments to small companies opening their doors for the first time. We have the privilege of watching our clients grow in this community and assisting them along the way with their legal needs,” said Payne. Coan, Payton & Payne attorneys and staff also give back to the many communities they live and work in by volunteering with a large number and variety of public and non-profit boards and organizations. “Our attorneys and staff live in the same communities in which they work, and volunteering makes those communities stronger and helps pave the way to a brighter future,” Payne said. “Community service is our way of giving back to the communities that support us.”


On the

Move

May 2017 I Business Connect I 29


Dr. Bryan Ericson

a retired Greeley oral surgeon, has joined Greeley Rotary Club. Ericson began his practice of oral surgery in September 1968 after serving one year as an Army oral surgeon at a field hospital in Vietnam. He retired from practice Jan. 1, 2000. Ericson was married — his wife is deceased, and they had three children. He has served on several board of directors and committees of various community and professional organizations including president of some. He has co-led 13 Habitat International work trips to Central and South America. He is a Fellow of Aims Community College, served nine years on the Aims Foundation board and is a Rotary Paul Harris Fellow. To learn more about Rotary call Mark Llewellyn (970) 590-4911 or mark@ markllewellyn.com.

Dr. Esther Mondo

has joined Banner Medical Group to provide cancer treatment at NCMC in Greeley, McKee Medical Center in Loveland and Sterling Regional MedCenter in Sterling. She will specialize in lung, head and neck, bladder, gastrointestinal and prostate cancers, as well as melanoma and bleeding and clotting disorders. Mondo graduated from medical school at Thomas Jefferson University in Pennsylvania and completed her residency and fellowship at the University of Rochester in New York. She is board 30 I Business Connect I May 2017

certified in internal medicine, hematology and medical oncology. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, call (970) 810-4121 for NCMC, (970) 820-4640 for McKee Medical Center and (970) 522-0122 for Sterling Regional MedCenter.

Nate Wallshein

an attorney with Otis, Bedingfield & Peters, LLC, 1812 56th Ave., was appointed to the board of the Matthews House. The Matthews House is an organization that empowers young adults and families in transition to navigate difficulties on the road to self-sufficiency. Many individuals in the program do not have a significant support system nor the skills necessary for living independently. The Matthews House provides resources and relationships necessary for those to take control of their lives and shape positive futures for themselves.

Dustin Kennedy

will be taking on the role of Eaton Agronomy Sales and location manager for Agfinity in Eaton. Kennedy grew up in Riverton, Wyo., and went to the University of Wyoming. Kennedy was the owner/manager of SK Soil Solutions LLC in Casselton, N.D. This was a full-service agronomy operation including dry and liquid fertilizer, NH3, seed, seed treatment, crop protection products and custom applications. He worked closely with a


third party for precision agriculture for the operation. The Agfinity Eaton Agronomy Team looks forward to continuing the great relationships with many of the growers in the area and is here to continue to provide top level service, competitive pricing and will always strive to earn the business. Agfinity is a locally owned and operated cooperative that has been serving the needs of northern Colorado since 1905.

Kristi Helzer

joined the staff of the West Greeley Conservation District last month as the conservation education and outreach coordinator. A Weld County native, Helzer has worked in a variety of capacities throughout her career. According to a news release, she was the copy writer and promotions director at KFKA radio assisting with ag programming; a marketing assistant at Bonnie Dean & Associates, and the first marketing/communications director for United Way of Weld County. Then she moved into a similar position with the Weld Library District before starting her own marketing and event planning business, Kristi’s Kreations. She founded the networking group, Northern Colorado Women in Business, almost a decade ago, the release stated. She and her husband Richard farmed and had a 100-sow farrowing operation southeast of Kersey, while she was employed with Monfort’s Kuner Feedlot in cattle feeding and herd health. After starting their family she went on to teach communications classes at Aims Community College and University Schools.

Rolando Contreras

has joined Sears Real Estate as a broker associate. Contreras has been selling real estate in northern Colorado for 11 years. He specializes in residential, helping both English and Spanish-speaking buyers and sellers. He and his wife Sandra have lived in Greeley for 22 years and they have two children. Call him at (970) 324-7090 or rolando@ searsrealestate.com.

— If you, your colleagues or employees are On the Move, send a notice and photo to Business Connect Managing Editor Sharon Dunn, sdunn@greeleytribune.com or call (970) 392-4439.

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Jim Neufeld Commercial Broker 970-506-2941 jneufeld@remax.net May 2017 I Business Connect I 31


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