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Collective

G R E AT E R

GREEN

B AY

CHAMBER

|

SPRING

2017

ECONOMIC GROWTH PLAN: A STRATEGIC MOVE FOR BROWN COUNTY


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SPRING 2017 | ISSUE 17 PUBLISHED BY THE GREATER GREEN BAY CHAMBER FOR CHAMBER MEMBERS VISIT THE GREATER GREEN BAY CHAMBER AT: GREATERGBC.ORG

PRESIDENT Laurie Radke WRITER Jen Hogeland ART DIRECTOR Jong Vang Collective Impact is published quarterly by the Greater Green Bay Chamber, 300 N. Broadway, Ste. 3A, Green Bay WI 54303. Collective Impact is supported by advertising revenue from member companies of the Greater Green Bay Chamber. For information about the advertising rates and deadlines, contact sales at 920.593.3418. Collective Impact (USPS 10-206) is published quarterly for $18 a year by the Greater Green Bay Chamber, 300 N. Broadway, Ste. 3A, Green Bay, WI 54303. Periodicals postage paid at Green Bay, WI. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Collective Impact, 300 N. Broadway, Ste. 3A, Green Bay WI 54303. PH: 920.593.3423. COMMERCIAL LITHOGRAPHY

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Collective IMPACT | Spring 2017


FROM

THE

CHAMBER

PRESIDENT

Vested caretaker of the region’s economic development strategic plan

O

ver the past five and one-half years I’ve served as president of the Chamber, we’ve strived to take purposeful and methodical steps to enhance the prosperity of Greater Green Bay. To that end, we’ve evolved the Chamber’s mission and vision to encompass economic and workforce development.The Chamber also played a very vested role in establishing Achieve Brown County and supporting Live54218. And soon, a very visible example of our commitment to prosperity will be unveiled in the economic development strategic plan for the Greater Green Bay region. This work will very prominently guide our region’s economic growth over the next five years.

And by “our,” I am referring to work throughout the region, by the nearly 300 voices that participated in our strategic planning process.We brought together people across industry sectors, including education, business, government, community groups, economic development representatives and municipalities to give form to the plan.The plan is not, by any definition, the Chamber’s economic development plan.As with Achieve Brown County, we have served – and are serving – as the convener and the connector. It is the region’s plan, one created by a community that was fully engaged in the process through roundtables including meetings by sector so peers could build off one another, one-on-one employer interviews and other meetings with key stakeholders. A resounding message that came through loud and clear throughout the process? Our community cares and wanted to be heard, which is why we dedicated a full year to the plan’s creation. I could sense the growing synergy and excitement as we progressed through the meetings and people got “caught up” in the opportunities to capitalize on what makes our region economically competitive and appealing. I’d like to address the “elephant” that might be lurking off to the side right now: that this is a well-intended plan, that people are excited and passionate about the plan but only will be for a while. Let me assure you, we already have

developed a dashboard of metrics that will hold us accountable. The metrics are representative of each initiative’s goal and go far beyond development measures of the days of old. Where we have landed is in the establishment of 11 strategic priorities that rose out of the quantitative analysis of demographic and economic characteristics (see the feature article for the list of 11 strategies).They run the gamut from building on our region’s manufacturing strengths to aligning more strongly with the Green Bay Packers, accelerating downtown and urban development to attracting, retaining and developing talent as we face a mass exodus of baby boomers from the workforce. And for each of those initiatives, we’ve created working groups led by a champion to build in accountability. Some of the items in our implementation matrix we will achieve more quickly than others. Realistically, more of them are undertakings that will require longer-term work. But I must emphasize that all are critical; we can’t piecemeal our efforts because all the priorities are intertwined.Together, they create synergy and balance for our economic vitality and sustainability, and all are action-oriented in nature.

of job growth, for example. Our success will be measured by several metrics that provide more depth and reflect true growth, gauging everything from retaining talent – which is huge – to further encouraging innovation and entrepreneurship, for example.The plan is also mindful of the fact that each of our municipalities have strategic plans.The 11 initiatives we have created provide them the big-picture framework for efforts they can replicate and implement in their plans and ultimately, create a halo effect. That’s because we are moving forward with the mind-set that the efforts in one community will benefit the greater good and shine on all the others in our region – which is how the world sees us.

— Laurie Radke

President, Greater Green Bay Chamber

Our plan is one of economic growth and prosperity that goes beyond indicators of years gone by, often putting all “eggs in one basket”

Spring 2017 | Collective IMPACT

3


STRATEGIC

PLAN

GREATER GREEN BAY CHAMBER

UNVEILS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIC PLAN By Jennifer Hogeland

A

fter a year of roundtable discussions, focus groups, oneon-one employer interviews and meetings with key stakeholders, the Greater Green Bay Chamber, along with a strategic planning executive committee, is ready to share an economic development strategic plan developed for Brown County. This strategic plan includes 11 initiatives expected to guide the region’s economic growth over the next five years. Peter Zaehringer, vice president of economic development for Advance, the economic development program of the Greater Green Bay Chamber, and others began working on the project in March 2016. Over 12 months, Zaehringer and a newly formed strategic planning executive committee met with more than 300 community partners. They heard from the business community, elected officials, academic leaders and more. They also engaged TIP Strategies, an economic development consulting firm in Austin, Texas, to help create a plan tailored to the community.

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Collective IMPACT | Spring 2017

Peter Zaehringer, vice president, economic development Greater Green Bay Chamber

“Every community doesn’t have the same needs and wants,” says Zaehringer. “I knew a plan for this area needed to be all-inclusive, from participation to execution. This is what Greater Green Bay is all about.” This is the first county-wide economic development strategy. Zaehringer explains that by using a holistic approach to economic growth, it will be easier to get everyone to buy into, participate in and benefit from the strategy. “A community is typically only successful in economic development if everybody participates,” adds Zaehringer. Zaehringer suggests there was nothing wrong with the Greater Green Bay area—the community has seen growth—but to date it hasn’t been a coordinated effort. “The point of the strategic plan is that growth is intentional, not accidental. Intentional growth typically occurs faster,” he says.


THE

POINT OF THE STRATEGIC PLAN IS THAT GROWTH

IS INTENTIONAL, NOT ACCIDENTAL. INTENTIONAL GROWTH TYPICALLY OCCURS FASTER

— PETER ZAEHRINGER

Spring 2017 | Collective IMPACT

5


STRATEGIC

PLAN

STRATEGY PHASES

Zaehringer explains this economic development strategy has been broken down into three stages — the discovery phase, the opportunity phase and the implementation phase.

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Collective IMPACT | Spring 2017

1

The discovery phase involved data collection from local and regional leaders through roundtables, focus groups, several dozen One on ones update presentations to Chamber & Advance Boards, strategic planning executive committee meetings, and an employers survey. We also collected additional data through several local, regional and national data sources, as well as speciďŹ c economic development databases.


3

An implementation matrix or work plan was developed, outlining the projects, partners involved, milestones, timelines and accountabilities. “We will know over the next five years what we are going to do. This is the most sustainable way to economic growth,” he adds.

YOU HAVE TO MAKE TOUGH DECISIONS WHEN COMING UP WITH THE FINAL INITIATIVES, BUT THE GOOD THING IS WE MAKE THOSE TOUGH DECISIONS TOGETHER

A central theme of the strategic plan is talent. Zaehringer explains one of the challenges facing Brown County is a low employment rate.To keep talent here, he reveals the strategic plan needed to focus on quality of place rather than quality of life. “Quality of life is why you like it here. For some it could be ice fishing, snowshoeing or it could be the Packers. Quality of place is more about variety and vibrancy—this is one of the critical components to retain and attract talent to our communities. They want a walkable or bikeable community. A lot of our initiatives are focused around that.”

2 During the opportunity phase, the strategic planning executive committee developed 11 initiatives they believe will positively impact Brown County. Goals include supporting innovation, expanding higher education, building on manufacturing strengths, developing talent, recruiting new business and more. “You have to make tough decisions when coming up with the final initiatives, but the good thing is we make those tough decisions together,” adds Zaehringer. He says the biggest difference will be seen in the implementation phase. There will be work to do. “At the end of the implementation phase, we will have mutually agreed upon projects to work on,” says Zaehringer.“We have to identify what our priorities are and who the partners are that will work together on a particular project.” Spring 2017 | Collective IMPACT

7


STRATEGIC

PLAN

MEASUREMENT AND EXECUTION

Z

aehringer brought together community leaders and asked what economic development success looks like to them. Based on the responses and expert advice, it was decided they’d measure the strategic plan by employment growth, high-wage employment growth, capital investment, number of business startups, business recruitment and relocation, educational attainment and tax base growth. While there was great support behind the development of the strategic plan, Zaehringer says it’s critical to keep the momentum going.

The initiatives will be prioritized. Communities or partners for each project will be identified. “The Greater Green Bay Chamber is going to help drive the strategic plan, but it will require teamwork,” says Zaehringer. “I said from the beginning, this is going to be very much a Packers-organization type of plan—from the planning to the level of participation to flawless implementation.The Packers stand for excellence.There is no reason we shouldn’t embrace the same in economic development.”

“We will work hard to be the engine of the plan and keep the energy behind the plan. If we keep people engaged, we will be just fine,” he says.

Roundtable

8

Collective IMPACT | Spring 2017


Greater Green Bay Chamber embraces new economic development approach By Jennifer Hogeland

I

n 2011, Brown County completed a LIFE (Leading Indicators for Excellence) Study — a study to get an accurate understanding of the community’s strengths and shortcomings. Through the study, the community revealed it wanted an economic development strategy and a plan for growth.The Greater Green Bay Chamber hired Peter Zaehringer, vice president of economic development, to respond to the community’s plea. Zaehringer believes in a holistic approach to achieve sustainable economic growth. He explains economic development has changed significantly over the last 10 years. “It used to be very transactionally driven,” he says. “The classic, old school economic development model had two goals — retaining existing employees and adding new employees. Economic development used to be all about deal making. The biggest shift happened over the past few years, during times of low unemployment. Talent has become the new economic development ‘currency.’ Developing, keeping and attracting talent has become the number one goal.” Zaehringer explains the recession contributed to the current economic development approach. Companies couldn’t finance many of the projects because of the recession, and at the same time universities, communities and other organizations became more and more involved in economic development. “By developing relationships with area educational institutions—St. Norbert College, University of Wisconsin — Green Bay, Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, Bellin College, Medical College of Wisconsin and others, we learned about many great opportunities,” he says. “Throughout this process we worked with various stakeholders from business, education, government, community organizations and other leaders to ensure broad voices are heard. Economies are dynamic, and our strategy must reflect this, from start to finish. This is what a holistic approach looks like.”

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“Economic development impacts everyone in our area, from companies to employees, from educational institutions to students, from quality of life to variety and vibrancy. All of this is coming together in our plan,” he adds.

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I

n the coming months, the Greater Green Bay community will have three unique opportunities to invest in its future.The success of any one of these will significantly enhance the local economy. The success of all three opportunities would be a game changer. Converging at just the right time in our history are:

ENGINEERING FUELS GREATER GREEN BAY’S FUTURE:

NOW IS THE TIME By Dr. Gary L. Miller

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Collective IMPACT | Spring 2017

1.

The Chamber Strategic Framework

2.

The Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Innovation Center

3.

New engineering programs at UW-Green Bay


T

hese represent connected, broadbased community efforts to organize around a future Greater Green Bay that leverages our ever-changing manufacturing and health care sectors, the international brand of the Green Bay Packers and a new higher education partnership between Northeast Wisconsin Technical College (NWTC) and UW-Green Bay to make the third largest city in Wisconsin one of the most exciting places in the country to live, work, be an entrepreneur, innovate and raise a family. These great community efforts are now merging with the potential for unprecedented acceleration of the local economy. In May, the Chamber will release the results of months of intensive work to develop a forwardthinking strategic framework for Green Bay and Brown County. Directed by Tip Strategies of Austin, Texas, the effort involved the widest possible collection of business and education leaders in Green Bay. The group studied information on all aspects of the economic, social and educational profile of the region. The result is an impressive forward-thinking strategy for how to significantly advance the economy of this region in the next decade. The report will make a clear call for the development of a vibrant innovation culture in the region. This is needed to meet the demands of the rapidly changing knowledge economy and to meet the very dynamic workforce needs of the future. To support this, Brown County partnered with dozens of business leaders and Governor Walker to propose the creation of the STEM Innovation Center. The Center would be a

nexus for county-based science programs, higher education STEM research and academic programs – including engineering at UW-Green Bay – and youth STEM programs such as The Einstein Project, all focused on expanding innovative thinking in the region. The dream is that STEM Innovation Center would be the first of a number of projects in the Phoenix Innovation Park (the name I favor!) The development of a regional innovation economy guided by the Chamber Strategic Framework, supported by the Packers’ Titletown development, the new partnership between NWTC and UW-Green Bay and the STEM Innovation Center will transform Green Bay and Brown County. The fuel for all of this? Engineering. The need for an in-region source of engineers in the area has been known for decades. With the strong and enthusiastic support of the UWGreen Bay Council of Trustees, the Greater Green Bay Chamber, the local engineering community and key legislators, UW-Green Bay will move ahead in the fall with a proposal to add the bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering to our three current engineering technology programs. We have the right business partners to support new engineering programs. Our current engineering faculty hold graduate degrees from some of the best programs in the country. Demand for our engineering technology programs continues to grow. Our partnership with NWTC expands regional access to higher education. The new STEM Innovation Center will provide a unique nexus of engineering and science education at all levels. The Einstein Project taps the pipeline of youth interested in science, technology, engineering

and mathematics in this area. The new TurboCharge program of the Green Bay Area Public School District, NWTC and UW-Green Bay will offer every Green Bay student access to 15 college credits before high school graduation. Now is the time to bring all this together. Engineering programs, expansion of The Einstein Project and the STEM Innovation Center will require an initial investment by the community. Over the next four years we will need a community investment of an estimated $10 to $12 million to launch these three projects. We will be asking everyone in the community to contribute in some way to the future of this region.

THE TIME IS NOW.

Gary L. Miller, chancellor UW-Green Bay

Spring 2017 | Collective IMPACT

11


A STRATEGY FOR FUTURE GROWTH

G

reater Green Bay is one of the best places in the country to work, play and live.Whether it’s sports, the arts, entertainment or overall quality of life - Greater Green Bay has something to offer for everyone. However, as the world has become smaller and the economy global, we have to compete with places we have never dreamed of. People are more mobile than ever before, and opportunities exist everywhere in our country and beyond.

Peter Zaehringer, vice president economic development, and Laurie Radke, of president of the Chamber, put in place a team that is best positioned to prepare a strategy that embraces this new reality. A strategy that goes way beyond the traditional economic development measurements such as job creation or investments. The strategy is a holistic approach to economic development, something that has never been done in Brown County, a mutually created, long-term strategy focusing on talent, innovation and place.

It becomes increasingly challenging to keep and attract talent in this globally competitive environment. Professionals (young and experienced) are now seeking places that offer options that keep them interested and engaged longer, educational options, career options, vibrancy and variety – in short a quality place. Our own development, the Titletown District, was designed with much of this in mind as a complement to our community’s efforts in this area.

While this process included literally hundreds of leaders from local communities, businesses, nonprofits and other stakeholders, the Greater Green Bay Chamber made the right decision to partner with a firm with more than 20 years of experience, that specializes in these types of strategies.Their experience will not only avoid pitfalls, it will also give us access to the many best practices already successfully implemented around the country, and critically important data to guide our decision-making.

Years ago people would follow companies (for jobs), but the tide has shifted and employers now follow talent.Yes, talent is the new currency in the global economy, and this paradigm shift calls for new ideas, collaboration, communication and synchronized efforts.

Many of our local business leaders, elected officials, residents and other stakeholders have been involved in this process from the beginning to ensure that this plan reflects Greater Green Bay’s values.

TALENT

IS THE NEW CURRENCY IN THE GLOBAL

ECONOMY, AND THIS PARADIGM SHIFT

CALLS FOR NEW IDEAS, COLLABORATION,

COMMUNICATION AND SYNCHRONIZED EFFORTS.

12

Collective IMPACT | Spring 2017

I fully support the Chamber’s efforts to bring our leaders together in an effort to competitively position our area for future success, and I ask you to do the same. Why am I asking you to support this effort? Because I know how important it is to plan for the future, for a team to come together for a common cause, starting with the smallest details — all the way up to flawless execution – mediocracy is unacceptable. The Chamber has brought together a team of experts that stands for integrity, hard work and a winning culture. Something we can very much relate to. Sincerely, Mark Murphy Green Bay Packers president & CEO


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIC PLAN INITIATIVES As the strategic planning executive committee considered the goals of the economic development strategic plan, they identified 11 initiatives that would positively impact all of Brown County.

’S PLAN C I G E TRAT UDE: THE S IVES INCL gths. . T g stren ustries and ind facturin INITIA

anu ers ion’s m employ g g e r in t e is h sets. nt f ex tion as ents. a Build o eeds o c n m u t d s e e e h t v . in er 1 espond to n’s high ses and 2. R ecruit new busineds scope of the regio 3. R xpand the size an develop talent. elopment. urship. 4. E ttract, retain and wn and urban dev ion and entrepreners. 5. A ccelerate downto ystem for innovat e Green Bay Packe 6. A uild a robust ecos alignment with th ences. 7. B ncourage greater events and confer 8. E levate the role of d inclusiveness. nnectivity. 9. E nsure diversity an tion access and co 10. EEnhance transporta .

11

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13


A STRATEGY FOR

ECONOMIC GROWTH

B

ringing a community together to shape the future of Greater Green Bay is not an easy task. Discussing projects, timelines and accountabilities are topics the private sector asks of its strategy all the time. However, knowing that an economic development strategy will impact an entire civic system and must work for everyone in our great community — is on a whole other level. The Greater Green Bay Chamber, under the leadership of Peter Zaehringer, vice president of economic development, and Laurie Radke, president, has done exactly that. Identifying elements such as existing natural and man-made assets, infrastructure, industry, education, history and local values can be achieved relatively quickly and is often the “easiest part” of an economic development strategy.The approach the Chamber has chosen was specifically tailored to the Greater Green Bay area and intended to be inclusive, holistic

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Collective IMPACT | Spring 2017

and all-encompassing.This approach is the most sustainable and will help make transformational economic change happen. Let’s not forget this is the first time a regional countywide strategy has been developed in Brown County.And while this is a tremendous accomplishment, by doing so, we have just caught up to many competing communities in our region, state and country. It is critical that we continue to think outside the box, look and move forward strategically and collaboratively. Much work is still ahead of us to retain and attract more talent that we all so desperately need in our region.The strategic plan has given us a platform we all support and believe in. Future growth is not ambiguous anymore; it has become intentional. Every single recommendation in this plan is strategically aligned and includes specific projects, development, education and quality of place. No marketing strategy will make our

young talent stay here; no marketing strategy will attract new talent to our area. It is the sum of various strategically aligned initiatives that will help make our great communities a place for opportunities, for investments and growth — and this strategic plan will help us reach that place much faster. Mike Haddad, president & CEO, Schreiber Foods


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GREEN BAY YMCA  www.greenbayymca.org  920 436 9622 Spring 2017 | Collective IMPACT

15


CYBER SECURITY By Rep. Mike Gallagher (WI-08)

In addition to its aggressive targeting of state secrets, China’s ongoing theft of American intellectual property to benefit Chinese companies costs the United States billions of dollars per year. In fact, the leadership of the Blair-Huntsman Commission deemed this theft “the greatest transfer of wealth in human history,” and one that has surely damaged our economic competitiveness.

Mike Gallagher, representative, Wisconsin’s 8th congressional district

E

arly last year, I received a letter in the mail from the U.S. government stating my military records had been compromised. It has now been reported this was the result of a Chinese hack on the Office of Personnel Management.This breach — described by some as a “cyber Pearl Harbor”— compromised the personal information of more than 18 million Americans.

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Collective IMPACT | Spring 2017

The list of foreign and domestic cyber aggressors goes far beyond China. This past year we learned that Russia was responsible for hacking into U.S. systems in a brazen attempt to interfere with our elections.We also learned recently that foreign nations — including China, Russia and Iran — are seeking to penetrate our core telecommunications and energy infrastructure. Yet the increasing cybersecurity threat is not just impacting the federal government or large corporations. By the numbers, American small businesses are the most impacted by cybersecurity breaches. More than 70 percent of cyberattacks occur at businesses with fewer than 100 employees, according to the House Small Business Committee. Cyber thieves targeting small businesses seek to find vulnerabilities, hold proprietary data hostage and penetrate systems to steal intellectual property, Social Security numbers, health and financial records, and anything with financial value.


Addressing these cyber vulnerabilities isn’t cheap. According to the National Federation of Independent Business, 50 percent of small businesses in the United States reported being a victim of a cyberattack in 2014 with an estimated cost of $20,751 per attack.These statistics hit too close to home in a place like Northeast Wisconsin, where small businesses are the bread and butter of our economy. Breakthrough®Fuel in Green Bay experienced three attempted foreign cyberattacks in just six months. With its customers’ data at risk, Breakthrough quickly recognized the need to hire a full-time director of cybersecurity to protect its own data and that of its clients. Such steps are necessary for companies like Breakthrough to stay competitive in the 21st century, but they can be costly and timeintensive.This is why it’s critical that we educate and provide resources for our businesses to start investing in their own cyber defenses. Businesses can start by taking some simple and relatively inexpensive steps to protect themselves, such as:

• Installing antivirus, threat detection, and firewall software and systems. • Encrypting company data, and installing security patches to make sure computers and servers are up to date. • Strengthening password practices, including requiring the use of strong passwords and two-factor authentication. • Educating employees on how to recognize an attempted attack, including preparing rapid response measures to mitigate the impact of an attack in progress or recently completed. Cyberspace is the new domain of geopolitical competition which is why at the national level, we need to think creatively about how we modernize our own cyber capabilities, recruit talented cyber warriors, and work with businesses and the government to protect our data. Countries like China and Russia will continue to evolve and advance their cyber capabilities, and so we too must evolve, advance our own cyber defenses and become the world’s undisputed cyber superpower.

We should also think about cybersecurity through the lens of education as we strive to educate the next generation of coders and engineers. If we are going to maintain our competitive advantage in the global economy, then it’s critical that we modernize our workforce and encourage our students to pursue STEM subjects. We must put our best and brightest young minds to work in these fast-changing fields. Ten years ago we didn’t have Twitter, iPhones or Uber.The digital world is a new and quickly evolving frontier bringing enormous risks and opportunities.While we may not know what the future will bring, if we in Northeast Wisconsin make the right choices now, then in 10 years we can be at the leading edge of cyber innovation and economic prosperity.

MEMBER

Spring 2017 | Collective IMPACT

17


KEEPING DOCTORS CLOSE

GREATER GREEN BAY CHAMBER

PUSHES FOR LEGISLATION TO KEEP DOCTORS CLOSE By Jennifer Hogeland

W

Dr. Alan K. David, chair of family medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin

isconsin faces a shortage of physicians in the upcoming years.The Wisconsin Hospital Association estimates 100 additional new physicians per year will be needed to keep pace with demand.

He explains the curriculum is designed to be a three-year MD curriculum, saving a year of tuition. It also reduces indebtedness if the student chooses to go into family medicine or psychiatry. Indebtedness is a factor in specialty choice.

Dr. Alan David, chair of family medicine for Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW), says several changes in health care contribute to the shortage.

The challenge is retaining students in the area. MCW estimates two-thirds of medical students stay in the region in which they perform their residency.

“A lot of things are shifting out of the hospitals, whether it is to surgery centers or to ambulatory settings that now have more capabilities and are less costly than hospital-based care in those settings. There is also a greater interest in preventive care, and better chronic disease management that is increasing the need for primary care physicians,” says David.

“The data shows an overwhelming percentage of students practice within 75 miles of the place they did their residency training,” says David. “If they have to go to Madison, Milwaukee, Chicago or Minneapolis, they may come back but it will be a smaller percentage of people coming back than if they trained in Green Bay or other sites in northern Wisconsin.”

In response, the MCW established a campus in Green Bay in 2015 and Wausau in 2016.The Green Bay area campus was the first new medical college to open in 100 years in Wisconsin. Admissions are geared toward students in Wisconsin and specifically northern Wisconsin, who are interested in needed specialties.

Unfortunately, sponsoring a residency program poses a problem for some hospitals, including HSHS St. Vincent Hospital and Bellin Hospital.

“We look for students who have a sense of maturity—they know they want to stay in Wisconsin and to train here,” says David.

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Collective IMPACT | Spring 2017

David explains back in the late ‘60s, when hospitals looked for ways to fund residencies, Congress decided the expense would be added on to a hospital’s Medicare reimbursement. This has since become a more than $10 billion add-on to Medicare.


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Spring 2017 | Collective IMPACT

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Collective IMPACT | Spring 2017


KEEPING DOCTORS CLOSE

IT

IS THE

NO. 1

FEDERAL PRIORITY FOR THE

CHAMBER

BECAUSE WE KNOW HOW IMPORTANT IT IS TO RETAIN THE STUDENTS FROM THE

MEDICAL COLLEGE

WISCONSIN—GREEN BAY

OF

HERE IN OUR COMMUNITY

TO HELP ADDRESS OUR DOCTOR SHORTAGE

— JAYME SELLEN

T

o control costs—and the number of residents—hospitals were given caps.

“A three-year timeframe from the time the hospital started a residency and started billing for a resident rotation was implemented. At the end of the third year a cap was set on the hospital—it couldn’t have an unlimited number of residents and expect all to be funded,” adds David. If a hospital wanted more residents than the cap, the hospital or the health system locally would have to cover the cost. “Hospitals would prefer to use Medicare CMS funding,” says David. Some hospitals submitted bills for a rotating resident in the past and didn’t realize the three-year rule was in place, Years later, they discovered they had been given a low cap and could not change that to allow funding a new larger residency program. David reveals the hospitals in Wisconsin, Ohio, Nevada and other states have been working with legislators to add a recommendation to a bill that would direct CMS to look at hospitals with low caps and allow them to start over in order to fund a new residency. The Greater Green Bay Chamber has been working with the MCW and health care providers to alert local congressional delegations of this issue.

“Last session, all members of our federal delegation sign onto a bill that Congressman Reid Ribble authored,” says Jayme Sellen, director of government affairs for the Chamber. While the bill didn’t pass, she is optimistic they’ll have more success with the new session. “It is the No. 1 federal priority for the Chamber because we know how important it is to retain the students from the Medical College of Wisconsin — Green Bay here in our community to help address our doctor shortage,” says Sellen.

“If we just produce more medical students in the northern half of the state but we don’t allow them to complete their medical training here, it becomes a self-defeating proposal. I don’t mean it will fail, it just won’t have as much of the desired effect if most of them have to leave and train elsewhere,” says David.“Medical school is one part and the resident opportunity is another part.We are working hard to provide people interested in a medical career all the educational opportunities possible here in Green Bay and the surrounding region.”

Sellen explains the community also realizes the importance of supporting residency programs. The Chamber initiated a grassroots campaign and generated thousands of emails thanking legislators in D.C. for supporting the bill. “Prior to this, I couldn’t get 100 emails sent to legislators,” says Sellen.“Citizens are so engaged in this issue that we sent more than 5,300 emails thanking our legislators for supporting it and continuing to support it. I think that speaks volumes on how important this is to the area.” If medical students leave the region to finish training, David suggests they’ll be heavily recruited by health systems in those areas. The opportunity to fix the regional physician shortage is lost.“Recognizing it’s very difficult to change federal law, we have been working with Green Bay hospitals to move a family medicine residency forward without Medicare funding but it is difficult,” he says.

Jayme Sellen, director of government affairs, Greater Green Bay Chamber

Spring 2017 | Collective IMPACT

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PSYCHIATRY RESIDENCY RESPONDS TO LOCAL NEED By Jennifer Hogeland

I

n response to a growing need for psychiatrists in Northeast Wisconsin, the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) established a new psychiatry resident program set to begin July 2017.The MCW partnered with Veterans Affairs, Winnebago Mental Health Institute and the Wisconsin Resource Center to develop the program. Psychiatry residents will rotate between the VA clinic, Bellin Mental Health and Brown County’s Community Treatment Center. “We cannot overstate how much we appreciate the partnership and collaboration with the community to move the psychiatry resident program forward. We’ve been completely embraced by the community,” says Dr. Jon Lehrmann, Charles E. Kubly professor in psychiatry and behavioral medicine, chair and professor, psychiatry and behavioral medicine. The MCW reveals there is a shortage of 192 psychiatrists in the state, and 59 percent of current practicing psychiatrists are age 55 and older. Families who use the services of a child psychiatrist must travel to Madison or Milwaukee twice a week for treatment.

The college’s goal is to increase the number of psychiatry grads in the area by 42 percent over the next four years. By establishing the psychiatry resident program, MCW-Green Bay is taking a step forward by providing opportunities in the region, which will ideally keep the students in the area when their rotation is complete. “We wouldn’t exist without local physicians to teach and mentor our students and welcome them to the community,” adds Dr. Matthew Hunsaker, founding dean for MCW-Green Bay. “The Green Bay campus is a community-based campus with a great amount of integration into area hospitals.

Collective IMPACT | Spring 2017

driy Popov

MCW REVEALS THERE IS A SHORTAGE OF 192 PSYCHIATRISTS IN THE STATE, AND 59 PERCENT OF CURRENT PRACTICING PSYCHIATRISTS ARE AGE

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Copyright : An

55 AND OLDER.


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IT’S TIME TO BUILD By Rep. John Macco

Claude Allouez Bridge

I

t’s time to build a new bridge in southern De Pere. I know it, you know it, local governments know it and businesses know it. Now is the time we make our voices heard in Madison and Washington, D.C. to make them know it.

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Collective IMPACT | Spring 2017

WE’VE DONE THE STUDIES, KNOW THE PROBLEMS, NOW IT’S TIME TO BUILD...


roundabouts, varying speeds and two business districts is a recipe for tragedy. The question is, how can we do this? It has to be an all hands on deck approach.The first step is to have local businesses and governments work with the Greater Green Bay Chamber to agree on the best placement of the bridge. Because of the leadership of County Executive Streckenbach and the Greater Green Bay Chamber, we’re well on our way to accomplishing that step. Few times are public policy problems so obvious, but anyone who travels around Downtown De Pere witnesses daily the current problems in our transportation system in Brown County. This isn’t a De Pere problem or even a Brown County problem; this is a Wisconsin transportation problem. Creating a beltway around Brown County will allow for a seamless transfer of goods and people. Future economic development in the area is dependent on this project. There is a concern of safety with the current system. The movement of cars, freight and pedestrians over a bridge that includes two

The next step is done by your state legislators, Congressman Gallagher and our senators to advocate for the project. We’re on our way to accomplishing this, but we’re far from the finish line. This project must be seen as a priority in Madison and Washington, D.C. I sit on the Transportation Committee and the Audit Committee, and we’ve uncovered a lot of the endemic problems in the Department of Transportation. However, I believe with the new hire of Secretary Ross they are headed in the right direction of how we can get more of these priority projects completed.

I said last year and I will say it again, the time is NOW to build a new bridge in southern De Pere. We’ve done the studies, know the problems, now it’s time to build, even if I have to buy a shovel myself and start digging on weekends.

John Macco, representative, Wisconsin State Legislature

Spring 2017 | Collective IMPACT

25


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Š2017 United HealthCare Services, Inc. Insurance coverage provided by or through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or its affiliates. Administrative services provided by United HealthCare Services, Inc. or their affiliates. Health plan coverages provided by or through UnitedHealthcare of Wisconsin, Inc. MT-1109082.0 17-3698

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Collective IMPACT | Spring 2017


THE WISCONSIN REINS ACT: KEEPING REGULATIONS IN CHECK By Lucas Vebber, Wisconsin Manufacturers & Commerce

Copyright :Viorel Sima

W

hether it is workforce issues, supply issues or increasing sales, businesses have a lot to deal with every day. One area of growing frustration requiring more and more time is regulatory compliance. As bureaucrats continue to grow the regulatory state, Wisconsin businesses are forced to foot the bill. In Wisconsin, we have made a number of improvements in recent years to add more public involvement and legislative oversight to the regulatory process, but there is more work to be done. One proposal that will go a long way to keeping bureaucrats in check is known as the “Regulations from the Executive In Need of Scrutiny” or “REINS” Act.This reform, which is based on a similar federal proposal, would give state legislators new oversight powers over administrative agencies in Madison. The Wisconsin Administrative Code is tens of thousands of pages long, and it grows almost every day. The REINS Act would help to keep these ever-growing regulations in check in several important ways, giving more certainty to businesses and holding bureaucrats accountable.

1. The bill would require state legislators to

affirmatively vote to approve any regulation that costs $10 million or more in compliance costs to the general public, businesses and local governments.This means the most expensive and costly of rules written by unelected bureaucrats would receive the highest level of oversight from your elected legislators.

2. To ensure agencies are not cooking the

books on cost estimates for regulations, this proposal would give the state legislature the ability to require an independent costestimate for regulations. Currently, agencies write their own estimates, and there is no mechanism for the legislature to challenge those estimates.This reform will help keep agencies honest, and ensure elected officials have the most accurate information when they review newly drafted regulations from state agencies.

Momentum in favor of this reform continues to build in Madison.We have a real opportunity to enact meaningful change that will improve our state’s business climate. Reforming government and empowering our elected officials with new tools to keep the bureaucracy in check will provide more certainty to the regulated community and more opportunities for the public to weigh in on new regulations.

3. This legislation empowers the state legislature to require agencies to hold a public hearing at the beginning of the regulation-drafting process. Under current law, agencies are only required to have a hearing once a regulation has been written, when it is often too late to have any kind of meaningful impact on the regulation.The REINS Act would allow the legislature to require any agency to have a public hearing and accept public comments before any rule drafting even begins, ensuring the public’s voice is heard early in the drafting process.

The REINS Act has been introduced in Madison as Assembly Bill 42 and Senate Bill 15. Both bills enjoy a significant amount of support in the legislature, as well as broad support amongst the business community. This proposal also enjoys support from Gov. Walker who included a very similar version of the REINS Act in his recently introduced biennial budget proposal.

Lucas Vebber, director of environmental & energy policy, Wisconsin Manufacturers & Commerce

Spring 2017 | Collective IMPACT

27


CHAMBER MEMBER ANNIVERSARIES 45 YEARS

10 YEARS

Konop Companies

Apartment Association of Northeast Wisconsin Inc. Apple Creek Campground

35 YEARS

Besaw & Associates Realty Ltd.

Clarity Care

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Family Services of Northeast Wisconsin Inc.

Fox Valley Metal-Tech Inc.

Fox Communities Credit Union

Graymont

Marcus Corporation

Heartland Business Systems

Schenck SC

Howard-Suamico Business & Professional Association Howe Community Resource Center

30 YEARS

James N Morrison & Associates

Advanced Disposal

Metzner’s Culligan Quality Water Inc.

BE’s Coffee & Vending Services

Perret Homes Inc.

Realtors Association of N.E. Wisconsin

Seroogy’s Chocolates

Rivers Edge Apartments

UW Oshkosh College of Business

25 YEARS

5 YEARS

Lakeland University, Inc.

Cineviz LLC Feeding America – Eastern Wisconsin

20 YEARS

Grand Central Station

McDermid Accounting & Consulting LLC

Pizza Ranch

Technology Architects Inc.

Remedy Intelligent Staffing

Ticket King

ReStore – Green Bay Rhyme

15 YEARS

Vandervest Harley-Davidson of Green Bay

H.J. Martin and Son Inc.

Velocity Machine Inc.

NEWCMG, LLC

28

Collective IMPACT | Spring 2017


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