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GOLDSTREAM Animals in focus The Royal B.C. Museum showcases top wildlife photography from around the world. Entertainment, Page A15

NEWS GAZETTE

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Hockey legacy

The saga of Victoria’s Patrick family, who helped shape of the game of hockey we know today. Sports, Page A16

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Friday, December 30, 2011

2011 A year in review

Top West Shore stories in a year that saw political upheaval, an unprecedented environmental disaster and municipal triumphs

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GOLDSTREAM NEWS NEWS GAZETTE GAZETTE -- Friday, Friday, December December 30, 30, 2011 2011 GOLDSTREAM

A year in review 2011

With SD 62 trustees Denise Riley and Dianna Seaton, Education Minister George Abbott donned a Santa hat to announce new schools funding. Edward Hill/News staff

$100M, two new schools Edward Hill News staff

Edward Hill/News staff

A gash is visible on the fuel tank that released gasoline and diesel into Goldstream River in April. The driver will make his first appearance in January on charges of impaired driving.

Disaster at Goldstream Edward Hill News staff

A Columbia Fuels tanker crash outside Goldstream Provincial Park prompted a multiyear cleanup effort, caused the province to revise how it handles traffic emergencies, and sowed uncertainty for future fish runs in its wake. On April 16, at about 6 p.m., a tanker b-train heading south to Victoria plowed into a rockface on the Malahat Drive and dumped 42,000 litres of gasoline and 700 litres of diesel into Goldstream River. The fuel killed hundreds, if not thousands, of fish as it flushed into the estuary in Finlayson Arm. Provincial and federal government agencies, environmental contractors, Columbia Fuels officials and First Nations representatives descended on the river system. “There are literally hundreds and hundreds of dead fish in the lower end of the river,” Tswaout First Nations fisheries manager Dan Claxton said two days after the crash. “It’s just devastating to see that many fish gone. If you look under the banks and logs, there

are lots of dead fish.” The vast majority of the fuel evaporated over the initial days and weeks, although traces remained trapped under rocks in the river, and a number of side channels held pockets of fuel for months. Columbia Fuels is financing a long-term monitoring and remediation effort at the river, in concert with the Ministry of Environment and local First Nations, who traditionally fish the river for food. By the end of 2011, most of the residual fuel was indeed gone, but the full scope of the disaster in terms of habitat recovery won’t be understood for years. “For the First Nations people who rely on chum for food and cultural uses, it is a disaster. For the hatchery (volunteers) who put all this effort into making this a productive stream, it’s a disaster,” remarked Graham Knox, manager of the environmental emergency program with the Ministry of Environment in late April. “For the fish it’s a disaster. To what extent is to be determined.” The highway was closed for 22 hours after the spill, trap-

ping drivers on either side of the Malahat. In June, a review released by the Ministry of Transportation admitted mistakes had been made in traffic control response and communication efforts. “When there’s a lack of communication, people don’t know what decision to make,” said Transportation Minister Blair Lekstrom. “They (drivers) would rather know, ‘this is an uncertain incident, the time frame could vary to a great degree.’” Columbia Fuels reimbursed several hundred trapped drivers for hotel stays and meals. The driver of the Columbia Fuels truck, James Smith, 34, of Nanaimo, was charged with driving while impaired, driving with a blood alcohol level above 0.08, and dangerous operation of a motor vehicle, in relation to the incident. Crown laid the charges on Oct. 12, nearly six months after the crash. Smith will make his first appearance Jan. 19 at Western Communities Courthouse. Additional charges have yet to be laid for the act of dumping fuel into the river. editor@goldstreamgazette.com

It was a Halloween that school district officials won’t soon forget. On Oct. 31 amid a capacity audience the gym in Belmont secondary, Education Minister George Abbott announced news the West Shore had been waiting years to hear — the province would fund the building of two new high schools, one in Colwood and the other in Langford. “I’m delighted to say that the Sooke School District will get not one, not one and a half, but two new high schools,” Abbott quipped. School district trustees and staff had been pressing their business plan with the ministry for years. It

calls for a school at the old Glen Lake site near City Centre Park and the other in Royal Bay. SD 62 plans to sell the current Belmont property to help finance the $100 million project. “This is the most amazing day I’ve had as superintendent. It’s probably the most amazing day I’ve had in my 30 years in the Sooke School District,” SD 62 superintendent Jim Cambridge said shortly after the announcement. “It is the future of our district. I couldn’t be more happy.” Although long planned in the community, Belmont students highlighted the sorry state of aging and overcrowded Belmont in June with a highly publicized walkout and protest.

Life sentences for teen killers from Langford Sam Van Schie News staff

Two Langford teens were each given an adult sentence of life in prison for one of the worst youth crimes in Canadian history. Cameron Moffat, 19, and Kruse Wellwood, 18, were considered young offenders when they lured their Pacific Secondary schoolmate Kimberly Proctor to Wellwood's Happy Valley Road home, where they tortured, raped and killed her They subsequently burned her body under a bridge on the Galloping Goose trail. The horrific details of their crimes were laid out in a two-day sentencing hearing in March that

made headlines across the country. Video and audio recording of police interview with the teens were also released publicly. The Proctor family believed the maximum sentence allowed in Canada wasn't enough for the teens. They lamented the absence of a death penalty in Canada and during the federal election called for tougher laws for youth crimes. In September, Proctor's aunt was in the running for a $150,000 grant through the Aviva Community Fund to bring student safety programs in high-risk B.C. schools. Her campaign through Aviva was unsuccessful, though she continues to collect donations towards her cause.

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Friday, December 30, 2011

GOLDSTREAM NEWS GAZETTE

A year in review 2011

Craigflower bridge rebuild given OK In September, Ottawa gave the goahead to spend $10.7 million in Capital Regional District gas tax money to replace Craigflower bridge. The existing timber trestle, built in 1933, is expected to be torn down in June 2012. The new bridge is scheduled to open about six months later. The current two lane bridge carries 18,000 vehicles per day between Esquimalt, View Royal, and Saanich. The new version will have three lanes and bike lanes. Gas tax funds will cover the bulk of the project cost. Sannich will cover 60 per cent of the remaining bill with View Royal contributing the remaining 40 per cent.

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After years of trying to find a location for a proposed community centre, Highlands has its spot. Highlands land owner Fred York has offered to donate 20-acres of his land at the intersection of Millstream and Finlayson Arm roads, but in turn he wants to be able to subdivide the remainder of his property, about 70 acres. The lands offered up are a prime spot for the community centre, and council agreed to the deal. The District is in the process to rezone the land, but the deal won’t go through until the remaining York land is also rezoned. The community centre will cost nearly $500,000, but the majority of that will be covered by a provinicial grant. The grant will cover up to up to $400,000, and it expires March 2013, putting the pressure on Highlands to get the centre built.


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GOLDSTREAM GOLDSTREAM NEWS NEWS GAZETTE GAZETTE--Friday, Friday,December December30, 30,2011 2011

A year in review 2011

Colwood Coun. Judith Cullington was instrumental in establishing the $3.9 million Solar Colwood project. Edward Hill/News staff

Colwood, a solar city Sam Van Schie Edward Hill/News staff

Dennis Maloney, health and safety manager with Downs Construction inspects the air quality in Savory shortly after the fire. Students were out of the school for three weeks.

Savory school hit with arson Charla Huber News staff

Fire ripped through the administration wing of Savory elementary on Sept. 11, just days after the school opened for the school year. About 155 students from kindergarten to Grade 6 were relocated to temporary classrooms at Crystal View and Happy Valley elementary schools for about three weeks while Savory was cleaned and repaired. The extensive cleanup operation saw the admin wing sealed off from the school to halt the spread of asbestos, and

every surface and object in the remainder of the building was wiped free of soot. Students’ personal school supplies weren’t saved due to insurance issues, prompting a wave of donations from the public, including $5,500 in school supplies from Monks Office Supply. “It’s quite overwhelming and it’s astounding at how people want to help in this situation,” principal Klaus Benker remarked in September. “It’s been so stressful for the children and their parents.” Police arrested two Langford teens for the fire after other

youths came forward with information. Both are charged with arson. Jordan Deluca, 19, is scheduled to have a trial date set in January. His co-accused is a 16-year old male who can’t be named. He will likely have a court appearance in January. The fire, the second arson in the school’s 45-year history, and the second in the administration area, caused about $50,000 in damage. The repaired and refurbished administration wing should be open when school resumes in January. reporter@goldstreamgazette.com

News staff

Solar Colwood, and the $3.9 million federal grant that supports it, was announced in January with the goal of helping retrofit 1,000 homes with solar hot water or ductless split heat pump systems over four years. The crux of the program is to subsidize the cost of the home retrofits, but it will also cover the cost of installing several charging stations for electric cars and upgrading Colwood fire hall with a solar hot water system and a solar photovoltaic roof panel.

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For the West Shore, 2011 can be remembered as the year without junior B hockey. The Westshore Stingers team was nothing more than a name this year as it took a hiatus from the Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League after falling apart in 2010. News in the fall came out that four friends and businessmen,

Kory Gronnestad, Ken Carson, Dave Horner and Derrick Hamilton, bought the franchise rights to run a junior B team on the West Shore, but have openly stated the team will not be called the Westshore Stingers. The owners are gearing up to organize and operate a team to come out full force in 2012. The team will reveal its new name next fall in time for the hockey season. “The team was for sale and

we thought it made sense,” Gronnestad said in September. “We didn’t buy the Westshore Stingers, we bought the rights to operate a West Shore junior B team. This is a brand new team ... a fresh start.” The former Stingers team was put on a six-month leave from the VIJHL after a player revolt in November 2010 led to player dismissals. The team was unable to find enough players to continue.

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Solar Colwood was initially hailed as costing taxpayers nothing, but it was later revealed it would cost the City $31,400 over four years, about $5 per household. This revelation turned into a political landmine that exploded in the fall municipal election, with several candidates vowing to shut the program down if elected. Nobody campaigning against Solar Colwood was elected and the program is forging ahead. To date, contracts have been signed for 45 home retrofits, of those 19 are for solar hot water and the remainder are ductless split heat pump systems.

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Friday, December December 30, 30, 2011 2011 -Friday,

GOLDSTREAM NEWS NEWS GAZETTE GAZETTE GOLDSTREAM

A year in review 2011

A long road for View Royal Sam Van Schie News staff

Traffic is now moving swiftly through the heart of View Royal along Island Highway, but earlier this year a $7.4 million road improvement project was the bane of commuters. When the project started, delays caused by single lane alternating traffic during construction times were promised to be no longer than 10 minutes, but in reality vehicles waited two and three times that. BC Transit had to re-route its buses, and the Trans-Canada Highway saw about 500 more vehicles during rush hours — pushing daily traffic jams back as far as the Millstream Interchange on weekday mornings. Construction began in July 2010 and was expected to be fully complete by March. But the road wasn't back to two lane traffic until mid-June, and off-road elements of the project — such as landscaping and work in Portage Park — continued into the fall. “We stayed to the purpose, and unfortunately it took longer then expected,” View Royal Mayor Graham Hill said in June, when the roadway went back to two lanes. “What we have now is a road with a vision of the future and type of travel we want to see in our community.”

Edward Hill/News staff

To the backdrop of disco lights and cheering friends, Matt Dignan, with a Special Olympics bowling team, delivers a strike at Langford Lanes on the opening ceremony day in October.

Where skaters meet bowlers Edward Hill News staff

Sam Van Schie/News staff

View Royal director of engineering Emmet McCusker shows off the town’s new stormdrain system built as part of the Island Highway Improvement Project. Island Highway is now complete with left-turn lanes, dedicated bus pullouts and generous cycling lanes. The centre medians serve

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It stretched from a spring to a fall opening, but Langford’s Sportsplex opened in 2011, capping off the build-out of City Centre Park. The Westhills ice arena opened Aug. 31, in time for the minor hockey season and giving sweet relief for West Shore hockey teams and figure skaters struggling to get ice time. The adjoining bowling centre opened in late October with 20 lanes, reintroducing the game of 10 pin to the Capital Region.

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“Recreation for families is the No. 1 thing we wanted to do. This is the culmination of that,” said Langford Mayor Stew Young during the official opening ceremony in Eagle Ridge arena. The $14.1 million Sportsplex, paid with federal, provincial and City money, touts an groundbreaking energy recovery system, which promises to capture 100 per cent of heat expelled from the ice plant. “This system will recover all the heat and use a number of creative ways to heat the entire building,” said Greg Hillman, with Accent Refrigeration.

Jeneece Place broke ground at Victoria General Hospital in April, the culmination of an impressive fundraising effort spearheaded by Saanich teen Jeneece Edroff. The 8,500 square foot, eight bedroom house will serve as accommodation for families that need to stay in Victoria while their children at receiving care at VGH. Edoff has stayed numerous times in a similar facility — Ronald

McDonald House near the BC Children's Hospital — while receiving treatment in Vancouver for neurofibromatosis, which causes tumors for form on her nerve pathways. Edoff wanted to see a similar facility built in VGH, where at least 1,000 kids and youth from outside Victoria are admitted each year. In 2009 Edoff made it her goal to raise $5.5 million to make her dream a reality. She's raised more than $4 million to date, and fundraising efforts are ongoing. Jeneece Place is expected to open in January.

Rugby moves to Langford Rugby Canada announced in August that its headquarters and high-performance training centre would move to Langford. Canadian Rugby Centre of Excellence, being built beside Bear Mountain Stadium, will house Rugby Canada administrative and business offices in a 6,000-square-foot facility. Eagle Ridge arena will host a highperformance training centre. Canada’s top male and female

rugby players are expected to arrive early in the new year. “The rest of the world has gone very professional in rugby and we made the decision that if Canada is going to keep pace, we need to be training 12 months of the year,” rugby director Trevor Arnold said in August. “Langford stepped up and said we could go there, and we’re very excited about it.”


www.goldstreamgazette.com www.goldstreamgazette.com••A7 A7

GOLDSTREAM GOLDSTREAMNEWS NEWSGAZETTE GAZETTE- -Friday, Friday,December December30, 30,2011 2011

A year in review 2011

Change at Colwood council

Police crackdown on Malahat drivers Edward Hill News staff

Sam Van Schie News staff Sharon Tiffin/News staff

After a heated civic election, Carol Hamilton was elected mayor of Colwood, the City's third mayor in as many elections. A former councillor, Hamilton replaced Dave Saunders who resigned his seat after a single term, and was joined at the council table three newbie councillors and three incumbents. Voters turned their back on their longest serving councillor, Ernie Robertson, who was unseated after campaigning on a platform to end municipal programs and axe city staff, to help keep taxes down. Angering and Colwood Mayor confusing voters, Carol Hamilton the Colwood campaign saw the odd and supposedly coincidental duelling all-candidate meetings, booked on the same day at the same time. Elsewhere on the West Shore, Langford and Metchosin voted in all the same candidates who had represented them in the previous term. Langford Mayor Stew Young easily won a seventh term. In View Royal, Coun. Andrew Britton took a run for the mayor’s seat, but came up short and his empty seat was taken by Ron Mattison, a former councillor who had taken a term off. All the other incumbents were re-elected. Highlands was able to forgo an election all together, because nobody challenged the incumbents. Langford recorded the lowest voter turnout in the province, while Metchosin had the highest.

Randall Garrison holds an Orange Crush, referring to the NDP winning the Official Opposition after his own win of the Esquimalt-Juan de Fuca.

Esquimalt-JDF rides NDP’s orange wave Edward Hill News staff

NDP MP Randall Garrison squeaked past his Conservative challenger to take Esquimalt-Juan de Fuca in May’s federal election. A one-time Esquimalt councillor and Camosun criminology instructor, Garrison was part of Jack Layton’s “orange wave” that swept the New Democrats into the Official Opposition in Ottawa. Randall defeated his main rival Troy DeSouza by a mar-

gin of about 400 votes. Both men were running for a third time in Esquimalt-JDF. DeSouza, campaigning on a promise to build an interchange at McKenzie Avenue, found broad support on the West Shore, but voters in Esquimalt and Saanich put Garrison over the top. He took over from former Esquimalt-JDF MP Keith Martin (Liberal), who declined to seek a seventh term due what he called the poisoned atmosphere of debate in Ottawa. editor@goldstreamgazette.com

Former dump cleaned up Charla Huber News staff

Millstream Meadows is no longer a toxic dumpsite, nor does it resemble one. Once muddy, murky craters, the 13-hectare site is now a level gravel field and is on the homestretch of its $10 million cleanup. The site in Highlands has 36 wells keeping watch for remaining contaminants and

will be sold when deemed safe. “We do this to ensure the water quality is good and no contamination moves back into the area,” said Mary Anne Fillipone, manager for the Capital Regional District's environmental programs, in October. The land was a used as a regional septage and sewage dumpsite from the 1940s until 1984.

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Homicide going to trial Langford’s single homicide of the year will likely go to trial in B.C. Supreme Court in 2012. Joseph Knelsen, 44, is charged with first degree murder in the death of Gordon Berg. Berg was found deceased in a Mill Hill area home on March 7. Knelsen went though a preliminary hearing in October, which found there was enough

evidence for a trial. In a separate incident, the death of 34-year-old Amanda Lee Langford on July 2 at Goldstream Provincial park campsite remains unresolved. Her death is considered suspicious, but the police and coroners service have yet to release findings from their investigations.

Animal antics in Metchosin Charla Huber News staff

Over 2011, the Metchosin Volunteer Fire Department had some unusual experiences with animals. In June, a bald eagle’s wingspan touched onto two power lines, causing the bird to burst into flames. The large bird ignited a grassfire when it hit the ground near the intersection of Happy Valley and Rocky Point roads.

A rare event, Metchosin firefighter Capt. Eric Meredith said its the first proven case of a bird starting a grassfire in Metchosin. In late October, the Metchosin fire department was called out to help with a panicky horse stuck in a chicken wire fence at a home on Neild Road. Fortunately the firefighters knew exactly what tool they’d need — a bra. They used it to blind and calm the horse, which was then untangled from the wire.

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Drivers on the Malahat faced vastly increased police surveillance last summer in a bid to stem fatalities and collisions on the highway. Officers from the CRD Integrated Road Safety Unit were a constant presence on the Malahat Drive, and issued several thousand tickets to speeders and unsafe drivers under the “Making the Malahat Safer” campaign. “It’s our goal that no family has to have a policeman give them the gut-wrenching, life

changing news that a loved one is never coming home again as a result of a crash on the Malahat,” said Staff Sgt. Frank Wright, CRD IRSU. “We know we have to be consistent with enforcement or people will just go back to their old habits after the campaign.” In the past four years nearly 200 people have been injured and seven people have died on the Malahat Drive in car collisions. The commercial vehicle safety and enforcement branch was also out in force to ensure commercial vehicles were following safety regulations.

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GOLDSTREAM NEWS GAZETTE

Friday, December 30, 2011 Friday, December 30, 2011 -

EDITORIAL

GOLDSTREAM NEWS NEWS GAZETTE GAZETTE GOLDSTREAM

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Edward (Ted) Hill Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Goldstream News Gazette is published by Black Press Ltd. | 117-777 Goldstream Ave., Victoria, B.C. V9B 2X4 | Phone: 250-478-9552 • Fax: 250-478-6545 • Web: www.goldstreamgazette.com

OUR VIEW

Resolutions mean change I

f you get to the heart of the matter, New Year’s resolutions are all about one thing: Changing what’s negative in our lives for what’s positive. We often tell stories about people who decide they’re determined to change their ways. January is a good month for those in the fitness business and a bad time to be selling any of the various vices that so many of us pledge we can to do without. Of course, most of these personal promises are doomed to fail. There’s more to adopting a new lifestyle than simply switching wall calendars. Popular resolutions often involve our personal health, our relationships or our career. We tell ourselves we will eat less, sleep more and cut down on smoking, drinking and salty foods, that we will be more caring about others and spend less time with people who only seem to bring us down. We’ll get promoted or find a new job or go back to school. These are all noble goals that help make early January such an optimistic time. They’re also all attainable if you can avoid the disappointment that can come when you’re focused solely on the short term. Remember: there’s nothing wrong with aiming high as long as you don’t expect too much too soon. Take for example those who decide to take up running as a way to improve their health. If you’ve been a couch potato chances are you won’t be running in any spring marathons. If you listen to those who teach beginning runners, sometimes the best goal is to just get out even if that means more walking then running. It takes time to develop new habits. But once you do they can be tough to break, which is why you might as well choose the habits you really want. Change will happen. On a personal level, the next step is always the first one you need to take to get a little closer to whatever goal you set. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@goldstreamgazette.com or fax 250-478-6545. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Goldstream News Gazette is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

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brings about the next topic. ith New Year’s Eve this weekend, many people Famous dead people will find themselves thrust The Eurozone crisis into social situations. And and the U.S. Republican whether you’re a social party leadership race are butterfly or wallflower, inevitable conversations it helps to have someif you’re talking to your thing to say after you’ve dad over the holidays. But resolved that the weather when you’re hanging with is pretty mild for this time pals, someone is bound to of year. bring up the latest gossip To help you either from the world of enterchange the topic or add tainment. to the chit chat, here’s a Assuming you’re not quick look at some of the Jim Zeeben debating the authenticnews that might make its The last word ity of MIA (is she really a way into cocktail party tigress fighting for fellow conversation this weekTamils or a pop princess cashing in end. on her parents’ heritage?), celebrities made news for many reasons World economy in 2011. If you’re stuck in a corner of a If you’re not equipped to opine on party with a group of people talking who made the best guest appearabout this, you want to re-think the ance on Glee, drop a few names to kind of parties you go to. Seriously, though it’s a topic that’s show you were paying attention. Among the more notable passon many people’s minds, it’s not a ings, such as Amy Winehouse, Steve lot of fun in dissecting this magniJobs and Christopher Hitchens, tude of a bummer. If you must chat 2011 was the final year for Col. Potabout debt and the definition of an ter of M.A.S.H. (Harry Morgan) and economic depression, you could the guy who penned Family Circus point out that Greater Victoria’s (Bill Keane). unemployment rate of 6.1 per cent Others who died include Elizais slightly better than the national beth Taylor, Andy Rooney, Joe rate of 7.4 per cent. Frazier, Jack LaLanne, Betty Ford, Although this is likely to lead Macho Man Randy Savage and Peter to various theories about housing Falk. bubbles. Better to avoid financial The full list is too big to include advice from the guy holding a plate everyone but there should be of cocktail wienies. enough names here to add someSlip away and mingle with the folks talking about celebrities, which thing to the mix.

Also, worth noting on a local level, 2011 marked the death of Alex Campbell the founder of homegrown grocer Thrifty Foods. Drinking and driving There were a few curve balls in December regarding provincial laws on impaired driving. In 2010, the government introduced some of the country’s toughest laws against drinking and driving. Then, on Nov. 30, B.C. Supreme Court Justice Jon Sigurdson ruled that those laws were unconstitutional. That led to a fair amount of confusion about what level of alcohol consumption was acceptable before someone could get behind the wheel. But, if someone at a party you’re at thinks they can now push the limit, please remind them that Justice Sigurdson changed his mind two days before Christmas. The tough rules are back in place, at least until next June. Which is why, if you plan on having a few drinks while you’re out, one of the most important conversations will happen before the party starts. Make sure you have a safe way to get home so it’s not something you have to think about when you’re just hitting your stride defending the ethics of unfriending someone on Facebook. Have a Happy New year! editor@saanichnews.com —Jim Zeeben is the editor of the Saanich News.

‘Avoid financial advice from the guy holding a plate of cocktail wienies.’


www.goldstreamgazette.com www.goldstreamgazette.com •• A9 A9

GOLDSTREAM GOLDSTREAM NEWS NEWS GAZETTE GAZETTE -- Friday, Friday, December December 30, 30, 2011 2011 

Levées kick off year of celebration Erin McCracken News staff

When Esquimalt and Victoria residents ring in the new year, they will have more than one reason to celebrate. Esquimalt will turn 100 years old in 2012, and to mark the occasion municipal council will don their best historic fashions for the municipality’s New Year’s Day levée. Residents are also invited to dress up for the traditional levée, one of more than a dozen open houses hosted that day throughout the Capital Region. “I just thought it would be fun and exciting to do something special at the levée, and how much more special would it be to start off the year in 1912 garb,” said Mayor Barb Desjardins. Likewise, the City of Victoria’s levée will get a festive boost to kick

off the first of many celebrations marking the municipality’s 150th anniversary. In addition to cups of java and baked goods, anniversary balloons, stickers, pins and mugs will be handed out in honour of the anniversary. “It’s an early reminder to people that we’ll be celebrating this year,” said Coun. Charlayne Thornton-Joe, who will be acting mayor during the levée.” It’s an incentive to get up early.” The Jan. 1 levées began in Canada in 1646 and Victoria in the 1800s. The word levée has French origins, meaning ‘to rise,’ especially from sleep. In addition to open houses hosted by several municipalities on the South Island, military reserve units in Victoria and Saanich are once again welcoming the public on the first day of the new year.

At Government House, more than 1,000 people will pay a visit to B.C.’s Lt.-Gov. Steven Point and his wife Gwendolyn. In Saanich, the event will again feature young musicians from the Greater Victoria school district’s string orchestra, and coffee, tea and cookies will be served. But the time may come when the levée will need to be modernized to appeal to a wider cross section of residents. “Year to year I see these things ebb and flow (in attendance numbers),” said Saanich Mayor Frank Leonard, adding the levées are typically attended by elderly residents. “I’m open to suggestions on how it could change.” The Langford Legion is keeping up the levée tradition for the West Shore, which has the ever-popular “moose milk” drink on offer.

Levées across Greater Victoria ■ HMCS Malahat, The Wardroom, 20 Huron St., 9 to 10 a.m. ■ City of Victoria, City Hall, 1 Centennial Square, 9 to 10:30 a.m. ■ Government House, 1401 Rockland Ave., 10 a.m. to noon. ■ Canadian Scottish Regiment, Bay Street Armoury, 715 Bay St., 10 to 11 a.m. ■ 11 Victoria Field Ambulance, 11 Service Battalion and 12 Military Police Platoon, Lt.-Gen. E.C. Ashton Armoury, 724 Vanalman Ave., 10:30 a.m. to noon ■ District of Sooke, council chambers, 10 a.m. to noon p.m., 2205 Otter Point Rd. ■ Corporation of Oak Bay, Monterey Recreation Centre, 1442 Monterey Ave., 1 to 2:30 p.m. ■ Township of Esquimalt, municipal hall, 1229 Esquimalt Rd., 1 to 2 p.m. ■ District of Saanich, municipal hall, 770 Vernon Ave., 1 to 2:30 p.m. ■ Royal Canadian Legion in Langford, 761 Station Ave., 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

OPINION

Plenty of British Columbians have needs K

udos to the advocates and families of people with developmental disabilities who have spent countless hours trying to get their concerns heard. Now if only similar attention could be brought to the many other neglected social concerns in B.C. Some changes have been made at Community Living B.C. (CLBC). Some new funding has been generated. It’s a testament to the effective advocacy of family members and supporters, and they know the hard work isn’t over yet. Other community members should be so fortunate. Plenty of British Columbians have needs as great as those being served by CLBC, but without the organized network

protection program at age 19 of families and advocates to help every year with no consistent them bring their issues forward. family connection or support? Parents of children who have Who advocates for a better a developmental disability are day for all the young people who rightly upset when their child live through trauma and abuse, finishes school at 19 only to learn and then shuffle through multiple there are no programs available foster homes, only to for them due to long waiting lists. A child Shane Picken find themselves abruptly on their own in a world sits at home losing and nobody prepared them many of their learned Dave Stigant for? skills. A parent ponders Guest column Who speaks for aging whether to quit a job family members caring to care for their adult for a spouse with Alzheimer’s children. It’s a terrible thing. disease with virtually no support But it’s certainly not just young for the caregiver? Who stands people with developmental alongside the family member disabilities experiencing such a ashamed to talk publicly about cruel reality. Who stands up for their child’s stigmatized illness those other children? — mental health, addiction, brain Who, for example, organizes injury? public opinion for the 500 or so So many issues face British children who leave B.C.’s child

Columbians after years of pareddown social support. We need a social strategy that addresses all those needs, not one that merely puts out the biggest fire. We applaud the hard-won successes of community-living advocates, but needs are needs. We are a better society and spend less money to boot when we provide the supports people need, regardless of what label they carry. Research has told us many, many times that when we invest in prevention and intervention services, we spare ourselves vast expenses a few years down the line on crisis care for people who have poor health, more involvement with the police and justice systems, less education

and lower incomes. We absolutely support the need to have adequate community supports for people with developmental disabilities, but we can’t stop there. For anyone facing difficulty in daily functioning, it makes good economic sense to provide the support people need to be healthy, engaged members of their community. Shane Picken is president of the Federation of Community Social Services of B.C., which represents 137 community social service agencies. Dave Stigant is chair of the Board Voice Society of B.C., a non-profit that represents the viewpoint of B.C.’s volunteer boards of community-based social services.

LETTERS Effort, talent, work will be rewarded Prosperity is quite distinctly a ground up process, not top down; millions of people bartering, trading, creating, selling and working to better their individual lives. A fellow named Dunsmuir came out to Vancouver Island from Scotland as a paid employee to manage coal mines and became one of the 10 wealthiest men in the world during his lifetime. Bill Gates started in his father’s garage and became one of the 10 wealthiest men in our contemporary world.

I am sorry to say I knew a very wealthy Victorian who owned a museum and a hotel who died penniless in a care facility. Huge corporations die just as small companies replace them. What a pity that the Occupy movement bemoans the wealth of others. There will always be those who make more money than you do. Effort, talent and work will be the end results of an individual’s life. If you think governments will better your life, think again. Prosperity starts with individuals, not collectivization. Governments redistribute wealth, they don’t create it. I suggest a great holiday

read to my fellow Victorians: The Rational Optomist by Matt Ridley Please note: I do not believe a life spent accumulating wealth is necessarily a life well spent. Patrick Skillings Victoria

Monarchy should pay its own way I hope that Canada becomes a free and sovereign dominion of its own. The best time for this would probably be when the Queen and Prince Charles pass away. In the meantime, I feel that

as one of the richest families in the world, they should pay for their royal visits out of their own pockets; airfare (Canadian Forces), hotel, food, security and the extra police costs, especially in a recession. People who claim to be true supporters of the Royal Family can send cash, cheque or money order to Buckingham Palace on top of mandatory taxes. I hope for separation from Britain some day. We can still be friends, but a foreign head of state is not a great idea, because we have different values. Sean Murray Victoria

Letters to the Editor The Goldstream News Gazette welcomes your opinions and comments. Please keep letters to less than 300 words. Please enclose your phone number and your municipality of residence. Send your letters to: ■ Email: editor@ goldstreamgazette.com ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, Goldstream News Gazette, 117-777 Goldstream Ave., Victoria, B.C., V9B 2X4


A10 • www.goldstreamgazette.com

Friday, December 30, 2011

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March 2, 6, 9 & 10 – Victoria Grizzlies home games at Bear Mountain Arena.

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Support your Victoria Rebels at Bear Mountain Stadium @ City Centre Park . FMI: victoriarebels.com Aug. 1 – BC Day: watch your Goldstream News Gazette for local activities. Aug. 3 to 12 – Stinking Fish Studio Tour & Sooke Fine Arts Show. Aug. 11 – Bulldog GREEN recycling depot, Belmont Secondary, 9am to noon. FMI: www.bulldoggreen.ca Aug. 12 – Subaru Sooke International Triathlon. FMI: triseries.ca August (Date TBD)– Medieval Village at Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site. Aug. 24 – Nominations close for WestShore Community Awards Nominations. FMI: www.westshore.bc.ca Time for back to school shopping!

Sept. 4 – Back to School! Sept. 8 – Bulldog GREEN recycling depot, Belmont Secondary, 9am to noon. FMI: www.bulldoggreen.ca Sept. 9 – English Car Affair in the Park with Old English Car Club at Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site. Sept. 9 – Metchosin Day, Metchosin Municipal Grounds, Happy Valley Road. Sept. 9 – Highland Fling, family picnic, entertainment and games at Caleb Pike Homestead. FMI: www. calebpikeheritagepark.org Sept. 16 to 18 –Luxton Fair at the Luxton Fairgrounds. FMI: www.luxtonfair.ca Sept. 22 – Fort Rodd Hill Lantern Tour with historic reenactors portraying different periods from the fort’s past. Call 478-4389 for ticket info. Savour the flavours at your local farmer’s market.

calendar of EVENTS

May to August – Highlanders soccer, Bear Mountain Stadium. FMI: www.victoriahighlandersfc.com July – Langford Summer Festival July 1 – Happy Canada Day! Join Westshore celebrations at Fort Rodd Hill & Fisgard Lighthouse National Historic Sites. July 8 – Vintage Cadillac Car Show of classic Caddies and LaSalles at Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site. July 14 – Bulldog GREEN recycling depot, Belmont Secondary, 9am to noon. FMI: www.bulldoggreen.ca July 28 to Aug. 6 – Stinking Fish Studio Tour featuring artists and artisans of Metchosin and East Sooke. FMI: www. stinkingfishstudiotour.com July 28 to Aug. 6 –Sooke Fine Arts Show. July 21 – Parks Day. Make a splash at Thetis or Matheson Lakes!

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www.goldstreamgazette.com • A11

GOLDSTREAM NEWS GAZETTE - Friday, December 30, 2011

CALENDARS

events in the Westshore throughout 2012 April

May

June

April – Racing starts at Western Speedway. FMI: www.westernspeedway.net April – Don’t forget to vote for the Black Press Best of the City awards! April 1 – April Fool’s Day April 7 – Kinette Easter Egg Hunt, 10am at Juan de Fuca Rec. April 8 – Easter Egg Hunt at Caleb Pike House, Highlands. April 14 – Bulldog GREEN recycling depot, Belmont Secondary, 9am to noon. FMI: www.bulldoggreen.ca April 20 to 22 – Home & Garden Expo at the Juan de Fuca Rec Centre. April 28 & 29 – Showcase of the Arts at the JdF 55+ Seniors Activity Centre.

May – Metchosin Farmer’s Market, 11am to 2pm Sundays through October. FMI: www.metchosinfarmersmarket.blog.com May 13 – Mother’s Day Paint-in at Hatley Park. May 12 – Bulldog GREEN recycling depot, Belmont Secondary, 9am to noon. FMI: www.bulldoggreen.ca May 19 & 20 – 15th annual Historic Military Encampment at Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site. May 19 to 21 – Luxton Pro Rodeo at the Luxton Fairgroumds. FMI: www.members.shaw.ca/luxtonrodeo May 26 & 27 – Fired Up! Pottery show & sale, Metchosin Community Hall. www.firedup.ca May 26– Goldstream Station Market opens, Saturdays to Oct. 13. FMI: goldstreamstationmarket.ca May 27 – Highlands Market opens10 a.m. to 1 p.m., last Sunday of the month to Sept. 25, Caleb Pike Heritage Park.

Support your Victoria Shamrocks at Bear Mountain. FMI: www.victoriashamrocks.com To June 3 – Bike to Work Week. FMI: www.biketowork. ca/victoria/btww June 9 – Bulldog GREEN recycling depot, Belmont Secondary, 9am to noon. FMI: www.bulldoggreen.ca June 10 – Island Chefs’ Collaborative Food Festival at Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site. June 17 – Saunders Subaru Victoria Triathlon & Saunders’ Family Walk at Elk Lake. FMI: www.triseries.ca June 23 – Colwood Rotary Art & Wine Festival at Fort Rodd Hill. School’s out! Head to Esquimalt Lagoon or Witty’s Lagoon.

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October – Black Press Women in Business Gala. FMI: adminassist@vicnews.com Oct. 8 – Happy Thanksgiving! Oct. 13 – Bulldog GREEN recycling depot, Belmont Secondary, 9am to noon. FMI: www.bulldoggreen.ca Late October – The annual Ghosts of Victoria Festival offers some special spooky activities around the region. Late October – Head to Goldstream Park for the fall Salmon Run. Oct. 31 – Happy Halloween! Watch for local events in the Westshore. Support your Victoria Grizzlies Junior Hockey team at Bear Mountain Arena. For tickets and schedule visit www.victoriagrizzlies.com

Nov. 4 – Fall back: Daylight Savings Time ends. Nov. 9 to 11 – Head to the local rink for the West Shore Classic Hockey Tournament. Nov. 10 – Bulldog GREEN recycling depot, Belmont Secondary, 9am to noon. FMI: www.bulldoggreen.ca Nov. 11 – Take in Remembrance Day ceremonies at Veterans Memorial Park. Late November – Stinking Fish Winter Studio Tour, Metchosin and East Sooke. FMI: www. stinkingfishstudiotour.com Watch for Santa’s arrival at Westshore Town Centre. Local artists & artisans gear up for the holiday season – check your Goldstream News Gazette for local events

December – Save your change for the annual Black Press Pennies for Presents fundraiser. December – Westshore Chamber of Commerce annual Christmas Festival of Lights Fire Truck Parade. FMI: www.cityoflangford.ca Early December – Keep your eye out for the Island Equipment Operators’ annual Lighted Truck Parade. FMI: www.ieoa.ca Dec. 8 – Bulldog GREEN recycling depot, Belmont Secondary, 9am to noon. FMI: www.bulldoggreen.ca Dec. 25 – Merry Christmas! Dec. 31 – Farewell 2012, Welcome 2013! The holidays are coming – time to make your list and check it twice!

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A12 • www.goldstreamgazette.com

Friday, December 30, 2011

coastal living

- GOLDSTREAM NEWS GAZETTE

FEATURE SECTION

HOME

GARDEN

REAL ESTATE

around town

Maritime Museum set to explore What Lies Beneath The ocean, covering more of the Earth’s surface than earth itself, affects our weather, food sources, and ultimately, everday life. But what lies beneath this huge abyss? New technology, deep-sea diving and observatories on the ocean floor have offered a porthole into this vastly unexplored environment. Leading the way is Ocean Networks Canada through their VENUS and NEPTUNE Canada underwater ocean observing systems located off Vancouver Island. Join the Maritime Museum of BC and Ocean Networks Canada on a journey into the unknown depths of the deep ocean. This exciting new exhibit opens Jan. 12 from 1 to 3 p.m. and is included in general admission. A speaker series runs in conjunction with What Lies Beneath. Visit mmbc.bc.ca for times and dates or call 250-385-7222 for more information.

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As we bid farewell to 2011, Greater Victoria galleries welcome 2012 with a whole host of new exhibits. The Royal BC Museum welcomes a special exhibit this winter – ideal for fans of photography and wildlife. The best 108 images from Wildlife Photographer of the Year – an international competition that had more than 41,000 entries from 95 countries – are on display at the museum through April 9. This visually striking exhibition showcases photographs in 17 categories, with each photo and caption telling the inspirational, astonishing and sometimes humorous stories of our fascinating natural world. “This is like the Oscars of wildlife photography,” said Martin Cooper, the only Canadian winner, from Burnaby. “It’s important that we have special contests and museum exhibitions like this, to remind us of the rich wildlife in our urban areas as well as out in the wilds.” The annual Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition is run by London’s Natural History Museum and BBC Wildlife Magazine. The competition uniquely combines the work of gifted amateurs, professionals and young photographers.

Paquette, and Victoria’s famous florals, artfully arranged by Laura Harris and Elka Nowicka.

Also downtown, West End Gallery hosts its British Columbia Group Show. Catch a glimpse of the West Coast in the works of Phyllis Anderson, Steven Armstrong, Rod Charlesworth, Richard Cole and Patricia Johnston. Explore the whimsical side West Coast life as featured in works by Greta Guzek, Paul Jorgensen and Grant Leier, historic houses and remembered holidays treasured in the paintings of Pierre Giroux and Paul

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From top left: Eclectic: Visual Poetry poster image; Royal BC Museum: Thomas P Peschak, Giant Beachcomber; Legacy Gallery: Hubert Norbury, Bay Parkade Entry 1960.

Dr. Anita Lau, O.D.

Legacy Art Gallery explores Victoria’s architecture with the Emergence of Architectural Modernism II: UVic and the Victoria Regional Aesthetic in the late 1950s and ‘60s. Showing through Feb. 26, the show explores through plans, drawings, photographs and architectural models how, during the late ‘50s and ‘60s, a small number of legacy architectural firms changed Victoria’s built environment with forward-looking planning and bold new architectural forms. At the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, the extraordinary, contemporary Coast Salish art collection of Victoria residents George and Christiane Smyth opens Jan. 6. Victoria Collects: The Salish Weave Collection is a companion exhibition to Victoria Collects, opening at the gallery on Feb. 6. Cont. on next page


www.goldstreamgazette.com • A13

GOLDSTREAM NEWS GAZETTE - Friday, December 30, 2011

not for profit Through Jan. 2 – Third-annual Great Gingerbread Showcase in support of Habitat for Humanity Victoria, at the Inn at Laurel Point. To Jan. 3 – The Spirit of Giving continues at The Bay Centre. Dec. 31 – Run Through Time – New Years Eve Fun Run, a 5k run, 3k walk and 1k Kids Run, starting at 6 p.m. Organized by the Runners of Compassion for their Shoes for Youth program and other local charitable organizations. Register at Frontrunners, 1200 Vancouver St. or at the event at 5 p.m. Jan. 1 & 2 – Braefoot Community Association Christmas Tree Recycling, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the lacrosse box at 1359 McKenzie Ave. Proceeds support programming for loWest End Gallery: Richard Cole, West Coast

cal youth. Jan. 2, 7 & 8 – Vikes Cross Country & Track team tree recycling at Centennial Stadium. Jan. 3 – Newcombe Singers Choir welcomes new members, especially in the Tenor/ Bass range. All welcome; ability to read music an advantage, but not a necessity. FMI: www. newcombesingers.com or Joan, 250-4805087. Jan. 6 – Fantastic Fridays at St. Luke’s Hall, 3821 Cedar Hill Cross Rd., featuring Messy Church. Free, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Familyfriendly time full of fun, games, food, crafts, music and stories; dinner provided. FMI: 250-477-6741 or www.stlukesvictoria.ca Jan. 7 – 1st Garage Sale of 2012, Oak Bay United Church, corner Granite & Mitchell,

10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Furniture, household goods, jewellery, books, art & children’s boutique. FMI-250-598-5021. Jan. 7 & 8 – Lions Society Chip in for the Kids, in support of Vancouver Island children with disabilities, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at: Hillside Shopping Centre; Broadmead Village; Westshore Town Centre; BC Forest Discovery Centre; Tillicum Centre; Safeway (Fort & Foul Bay); Sooke Home Hardware; University Heights. A pick-up service is available Jan. 8 for a minimum $10 donation. Register for pick up at www.ocean985.com or www.1031jackfm.ca

Send your non-profit events to jblyth@telus.net

SATURDAY DECEMBER 31st ONLY!

Cont. from previous page Describing themselves as “activist collectors,” the Smyths’ mission is to promote the works, not just passively acquire and display them. The Salish Weave Collection includes 20 recent works – representing carving, painting and printmaking – by Canadian Coast Salish artists Susan Point, lessLIE, Maynard Johnny Jr., Dylan Thomas, John Marston, Luke Marston, Angela Marston and Chris Paul. Opening Jan. 9 at Oak Bay’s Eclectic, with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m., is Visual Poetry. In conjunction with St. Michael’s University School, the gallery will host a special show featuring original artwork and poetry by SMUS Senior School students to raise money for two global charities focused on creating opportunities for youth. The exhibition, fittingly entitled Visual Poetry, features creative writing and art students in Grades 11 and 12 combining their talents, with the artists illustrating the poets’ words. All funds generated will be shared between War Child Canada and the Amma Organization, specifically its primary and secondary schooling projects in India. The exhibition continues through Jan. 14.

THE SHOPPERS OPTIMUM POINTS

Looking ahead, the Oak Bay’s Red Gallery celebrates its first anniversary with a special show Feb. 1 to 29. In nearby Cadboro Bay, Goward House opens a special exhibit of work by young emerging artists from Frank Hobbs Elementary, Arbutus Middle School, Lambrick Park Secondary and Mount Douglas Secondary School. A reception Jan. 8 from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. will open the exhibit. In the West Shore, Coast Collective Gallery presents Beginnings, Jan. 11 to 22 followed by the intriguing Art from the Attic, Jan. 25 to Feb. 5, concluding with the first annual Collective Art Garage Sale Feb. 4 and 5.

1.

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A14 • www.goldstreamgazette.com www.goldstreamgazette.com

Friday, Friday, December December 30, 30, 2011 2011

- GOLDSTREAM NEWS GAZETTE

Building permit numbers down for region Figures show changes in type of construction Roszan Holmen News staff

The value of building permits throughout the Capital Regional District slumped 15 per cent between September and October. The decline is even sharper, at 38 per cent, when comparing October 2011 to the same month last year, according to new figures by Statistics Canada. A dip in large projects after a busy summer is mostly to blame, according to the Vancouver Island Construction Association. Municipal statistics from Oak Bay, Victoria and Saanich, however, provide a more nuanced picture of the overall decline. The number of building permits issued in Oak Bay is down in 2011 from 2010, but it’s substantially higher than any other year since 2007. A total of 747 permits have been issued so far this year, at a value of about $34 million. Last year saw 815 permits issued, valued at nearly $93 million, thanks largely to the Oak Bay beach hotel development.

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Workers from Advantage Crane take down the crane has been used since August 2010 in the construction of the Oak Bay Beach Hotel. The multi-million dollar hotel-condominium project boosted building permit figures in the municipality for 2010.

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GOLDSTREAM NEWS GAZETTE - Friday, December 30, 2011 

News staff

Two men convicted of causing an elderly horse to suffer will be sentenced by a judge on March 23, 2012. David Whiffin and Clayton Cunningham were found guilty of causing unnecessary pain and suffering to an animal, and of not providing proper care in the case of Jalupae the Appaloosa in provincial court on Dec. 13. Judge Sue Wishart said the men caused the horse to suffer by failing to properly feed it and give Jalupae the dental treatment needed. The men hanged the horse on Sept. 15, 2009 and buried it on Whiffin’s Brentwood Bay property. The maximum penalty for causing unnecessary suffering is five years in jail, or a $10,000 fine plus 18 months in jail. editor@goldstreamgazette.com

Laura Lavin News staff

Visitors to the Royal B.C. Museum can experience nature like never before: through the lenses of photographers from around the world. The visually striking Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition showcases photographs in 17 categories, including Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year, Underwater World, Wild Places and Photojournalist of the Year. Each photo and caption tells the inspirational and sometimes humorous stories of the fascinating world of nature. “It’s pretty exciting,” said Martin Cooper, the only Canadian winner, from Burnaby, B.C. “I went to the premier in London and it was a black tie affair and to be here in the B.C. museum and experience it again is brilliant. They’ve done a wonderful job presenting this at the museum.” Cooper’s photo was chosen from among 41,000 entries from 95 countries by a judging panel that included some of the world’s most respected nature photographers and wildlife experts. “Wildlife Photographer of the Year is truly a treat and not just for photography buffs — there is a beauty and majesty in the photographs that will appeal to all,” said RBCM CEO Pauline Rafferty. Now in its 47th year, the annual

Fred Pierce, a volunteer with the Royal B.C. Museum, uses his flashlight magnifier to read the label for one of the images, In The Flick Of A Tail, on display in the exhibit Wildlife Photographer of the Year. Don Denton/News staff

competition is run by London’s Natural History Museum and BBC Wildlife Magazine. This is the premiere exhibition of 108 winning images, and the only scheduled stop in North America. The exhibition runs until April 9. Cooper’s winning image is of a coyote on a stretch of railway tracks near his home. “That morn-

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ing I was waiting for a beaver in the creek, this was a bonus,” he said. Cooper is an amateur photographer who dusted off his camera a few years ago after moving from England to Canada. “Over the past five years it’s become a passion again — I love every second of it,” he said. The Wildlife Photographer of the

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Year exhibition at the Royal B.C. Museum includes 108 photographs displayed on backlit panels with detailed captions telling the story behind the image and technical details on the photographic equipment used by each photographer. See www.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca for more information. editor@goldstreamgazette.com

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A16 A16 • • www.goldstreamgazette.com www.goldstreamgazette.com

To submit sports story ideas or comments, e-mail sports@goldstreamgazette.com

Friday, Friday, December December 30, 30, 2011 2011 --

SPORTS

GOLDSTREAM GOLDSTREAM NEWS NEWS GAZETTE GAZETTE

Enjoy a safe & happy New year

100 years of hockey in Victoria Travis Paterson News staff

From his office in Washington, D.C., president Dick Patrick of the Washington Capitals recalls the home of his grandfather Lester Patrick on Linden Avenue in Fairfield. “It was before my time, but my father told me stories,” Dick says. His father Muzz was born and raised in Victoria, a Canadian boxing champ turned pro hockey player. Muzz, and brother Lynn, won the Stanley Cup while playing for Lester, when the latter coached the New York Rangers in 1940. Lester had previously won the Stanley Cup, his name engraved multiple times upon it. But even though 1940 was the first time Muzz and Lynn won hockey’s holy grail, it was also the second time their name was engraved on it. “I guess back in 1933 there wasn’t really a protocol for what to do with the Stanley Cup,” said Dick. “The story my dad told me is, after the Rangers won it, Lester kept it in his basement for the summer. (Muzz and Lynn) wanted their names in it too. Being teenagers, they etched their names into it with a nail. “They got in a lot of trouble for that.” Back in 1911, brothers Lester and Frank were supported by dad Joe Patrick when they used the family’s lumber fortune to create the Pacific Coast Hockey Association and build two arenas, one in Vancouver and one in Oak Bay. The league ran successfully until 1926. Lester then moved on to the more promising NHL and grew to become one of New York’s most legendary characters, the Silver Fox. He was a newspaper darling and ran the New York Rangers and then Madison Square Gardens. Lester returned each summer and never sold his house in Fairfield. In 1949 he formed the Victoria Cougars minor hockey team.

Frank followed a similar route, coaching the Boston Bruins in the 1930s before retiring to Vancouver. Each passed away in 1960. The Patricks not only shaped the modern game, their name rose to the height of hockey royalty. But Lester and Frank were only two of six from their generation. Also living in James Bay were brother Ted and sisters Lucynda (Cynda), Dora and Myrtle. It was said that if Ted hadn’t suffered a serious leg injury in a childhood accident, he too would have won the Stanley Cup.

Proud to be Patricks Away from the rink, but still in Victoria, the family continued to flourish. Cynda Patrick followed Joe’s and Grace’s religious upbringing, and married reverend John Wesley Miller. Sharon Tiffin/News staff “Cynda was a church Gordon Miller, one of the two remaining family heads from the Patrick organist and vocal solofamily, stands at the Victoria Arena monument on Cadboro Bay Road. ist, not uncommon in that The monument is across the street from where the Patrick Arena once day when you were marstood, where the Victoria Cougars won the Stanley Cup in 1925. Inset: ried to a minister,” says The original arena in Oak Bay seated 3,500 and was made entirely out Gordon Miller, grandson of Cynda and one of Victoria’s of wood. It was destroyed by fire November 11, 1929. remaining Patricks. It started in Oak Bay ter at Oak Bay United. “My father was named Miller says the family continues Frank Patrick Miller, after my to honour the Patrick heritage. great uncle. My father carried a When the Patrick family came For example, his sister is named keen interest in the family (geneto Victoria, they came with a Cynda and he has a son and alogy) and led the historian patridream to start a professional daughter with Patrick and Patriarch position in the family.” hockey league. cia in their names. That keen interest is part of On Jan. 2, 1912, Lester Patrick’s “The extended family still gets an ongoing pride in the Patrick Victoria Senators hosted the together regularly, on the Island name, which Miller admits is due New Westminster Royals at the and Mainland. We still feel a in part to the family’s hockey brand new arena, which was later strong family connection. I think fame. known as the Patrick Arena, in “Was there pressure to be inter- it’s safe to say it’s the notoriety of Oak Bay. the hockey Patricks that is part ested in hockey? Yes. And we Monday (Jan. 2) marks the of what keeps us together. Do we all follow it, to an extent,” Miller 100th anniversary of that game, says. “Was there pressure to play? talk about hockey when we get one that transformed the Patrick together? Not much.” No.” family name into hockey royalty. Miller grew up in Ottawa and Some things have passed It wasn’t just the first game in Vichis migration to Victoria is paraldown, however. Like his grandtoria. It was the first game of the lel to that of the Joe and Grace’s mother, Miller is a musician, a PCHA, which existed until 1926 more than 100 years ago. piano instructor and music maswhen it merged with the Western

Canada Hockey League. Thirty-seven years later, in 1949, during the excitement over the new Memorial Arena construction, Victoria Daily Times sports writer Archie Wills ran a summary of hockey history in the city. He revisited an original game report, describing how the red, white and blue coloured Senators lost that first game 8-3 to the dazzling Royals in their black and orange jerseys.

They shaped the game Despite giving so much to the game, there will be little fanfare for the Patricks on the PCHA’s centennial anniversary. The WHL Victoria Royals will play at home that day against the Calgary Hitmen, but that’s only by coincidence. Since the passing of Frank and Lester in 1960, their role in changing the sport has been relegated to the historical archives. But it was during the summers in the family home on Michigan Street that Frank would return from running the Vancouver Millionaires. He and Lester were rarely satisfied with the flow of the game, and often made changes, shaping the game as it’s known today. Frank is credited with introducing the blue line/offsides and raising the stick in celebration of a goal, and Lester with installing the red line. These rules were necessary, as the PCHA used forward passes, which the NHL didn’t adopt until 1928-29. Together, they hashed out even more rules, including numbers on jerseys, an assortment of penalties and the penalty shot. Lester’s Senators became the Aristocrats and eventually the Cougars. It is said, in Victoria sports writer Eric Whitehead’s book The Patricks: Hockey’s royal family, that when Lester sold the Cougars team to Detroit (Cougars/ Falcons/Red Wings), the buyers were shocked when he revealed the contracts were 100 per cent verbal.


www.goldstreamgazette.com A17 www.goldstreamgazette.com •A17

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HOMES FOR RENT LANGFORD- 4 bdrm home, 3 bath,approx 3000sq ft. $1700+ utils. Equitex 250-386-6071.

METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

or fax 250-746-4799 Attn: Phil Humber.

PAWN SHOP Online: get cash fast! Sell or get a loan for your watch, jewelry, gold, diamonds, art or collectibles from home! Toll-Free: 1-888435-7870 www.PAWNUP.com

SIDNEY, 3BR, Great location, Recently reno’d, garage, fenced yard, $1350. Dean 250-857-2210 ref.

BUILDING SUPPLIES

phumber@promac.bc.ca

FINANCIAL SERVICES

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

FAST RELIEF the First Night!! Restless Leg Syndrome and Leg Cramps Gone. Sleep Soundly, Safe with Medication, Proven Results. 1-800-7658660. www.allcalm.com NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division.

- BUYING - RENTING - SELLING -

www. bcclassiďŹ ed.com

JAMES BAY, char home, 1 large bdrm, 1050 sq ft, 1.5 blks from harbour, $1250 H/W & heat incl’d, 250-881-3659. MALAHAT 1 & 2 BdrmsPanoramic views. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, firewood. $700-$1200 inclusive. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references. 250-478-9231. MCKENZIE AVE- in Tuscany Village (walking distance to Uvic), 2 bdrms, 2 bath. $1600. Jan 1. Call (250)472-6833. OAK BAY Junction. Feb. 1st. 1-bdrm in quiet, senior’s 55+ building. $660. Heat, h/w incl. N/P. Share purchase required. 1678 Fort St. (250) 595-4593.

WE’RE ON THE WEB Thousands of ads online updated daily 250.388.3535

SIDNEY- 2006 1 level 3 bdrm, 2 bath executive home w/gas F/P, attached dbl garage, close to downtown. $2500. Avail Now. (250)652-7707. SIDNEY: OCEAN view, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, close to town, $1950/mo. 1-877-353-5552 or info@whitetreecondos.com

ROOMS FOR RENT FURNISHED ROOM for right person. Female preferred. 3 mos or more lease. Vic West/ Esq. $435./mo. inclds utils, phone, light brunch in morning. Please call 250-380-1575.

SHARED ACCOMMODATION COLWOOD, UNFURN’D room available, incls all utils, $450. (Avail immed). 250-858-6930.

SUITES, LOWER 1 BDRM- grd floor. NS/NP. Quiet. Priv ent, incls utils, waterfront on Witty’s Beach, south view, unfurnished, $750 or furn’d, $850. 250-478-0056. CEDAR HILL Golf course- 1 bdrm, private entrance, off street parking, W/D, utils included. NS/NP. Available Jan 1. $800. Call (250)595-0505. COLWOOD LOWER suite, 1 bdrm, 1050sq ft, single $900, couple $950. (250)955-8757.

TRANSPORTATION AUTO FINANCING DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0� Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc

SMALL ADS, BIG DEALS! www.bcclassiďŹ ed.com


www.goldstreamgazette.com A18 •www.goldstreamgazette.com

BEATERS UNDER $1000

CARS 2009 HYUNDAI Elantra. 1owner, only 14,000 Kms, still on warranty, excellent condition, $18,500. 250-360-0892.

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL SCRAP BATTERIES Wanted We buy scrap batteries from cars, trucks & heavy equip. $4.00 & up each. Free pick-up anywhere in BC, Minimum 10. Toll Free 1.877.334.2288.

AUTO SERVICES $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

CASH PAID FOR ALL VEHICLES in

TRUCKS & VANS

all conditions in all locations

250-885-1427

$0-$1000 CASH

Watch for our Auto Section

InMotion At the Speedway Reader’s Rides Driver Ed Tips By the Water

For Junk Cars/Trucks

Call us first & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Don’t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped!

Will tow away any car or truck in 45 mins. FREE!

TowPimp.com 250-588-7172

WHERE BUYERS AND SELLERS MEET

toll free 1-888-588-7172

fil here please

AR N

AUTO FINANCING

TO G IN

? E V I R D

LE

TRANSPORTATION

IIn your community i newspapers

KIDS

TRANSPORTATION

Friday, December 30,30, 2011 - GOLDSTREAM Fri, Dec 2011, GoldstreamNEWS News GAZETTE Gazette

SERVICE DIRECTORY CLASSIFIED ADS WORK! Call 250.388.3535

#OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

CONTRACTORS

FURNITURE REFINISHING

HANDYPERSONS

HAULING AND SALVAGE

MOVING & STORAGE

PRESSURE WASHING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

BEETLES RESIDENTIAL Renovations Ltd. Bathrooms, decks, painting, landscaping and handyman services. Fully insured and guaranteed. Free estimates. Call 250-889-4245. MALTA HANDYMAN. BBB member. Best rates. Please call (250)388-0278.

✭BUBBA’’S HAULING✭ Honest & on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service.(250)478-8858.

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

HAULING AND SALVAGE

CARPENTRY. ALL TRADES. 40 yrs exp. Free Estimates. BBB. Ref’s. 250-361-6304.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX

250-477-4601 PENNIE’$ BOOKKEEPING Services for small business. Simply/Quickbooks. No time to get that paperwork done? We do data-entry, GST, payroll, year-end prep, and training. 250-661-1237

CARPENTRY BENOIT CONSTRUCTION. Reno’s & Additions. Windows, Doors, Decks. 250-479-0748. QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

CARPET INSTALLATION DARCY’S CARPET & LINO. Install, repairs, laminate, restretch, 35 yrs. 250-589-5874. MALTA FLOORING Installation. Carpets, laminates, hardwood, lino. BBB 250-388-0278

QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

DRYWALL AARON’S RENO’S Drywall, taping, texture. Insured/bonded. Free est. 250-880-0525. MALTA DRYWALL & Painting. Residential/Commercial. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

ELECTRICAL 250-361-6193. QUALITY Electric. Reno’s plus. Visa accepted. Small jobs ok. #22779 AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991. NORTHERN SUN Electric Comm/Res. $35/hr. Work Guaranteed. Any size job. (250)888-6160. Lic#13981.

CLEANING SERVICES

WATTS ON ELECTRIC, Residential, Commercial, Renovations. #100213. 250-418-1611.

ANNA’S CARPET CLEANING Truck Mounted, Bond, Insured Winter Special! 250-886-9492

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE

HOUSEKEEPER EXPERIENCED, reliable. References. 250-920-6516, 250-881-7444. MALTA HOUSECLEANING. BBB. Best rates. Residential/Comm. 250-388-0278 NEED A House cleaner for the holidays? Reliable, friendly & trustworthy. Kim 778-440-3875

COMPUTER SERVICES A HOME COMPUTER Coach. Senior friendly. Computer lessons, maintenance and problem solving. Des, 250-6569363, 250-727-5519.

BUBBA’S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Call 250-478-8858.

FENCING ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637. MALTA FENCING & DECKS. BBB member. Best rates. Please call (250)388-0278.

WE’RE ON THE WEB

GARDENING 10% OFF! Fall Cleanups, Pruning, Hedge & Shrub Trimming. Hauling. 250-479-6495. DPM SERVICES: lawn/gard, cleanups, pruning, hedges, landscapes, irrigation, pwr washing, gutters 15yrs. 250883-8141. OVERGROWN GARDEN? Cleanups. Pruning roses, fruit tree, hedges. John Kaiser 250-478-7314, 250-812-8236.

CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164. FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

PREPARATION FOR Fall, Winter & Spring. Professional garden & landscape services. Maintenance, design & installations. Call (250)474-4373.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

IFIX HANDYMAN Services. Household repairs and renovations. Free estimates. Call Denis at 250-634-8086 or email: denisifix@gmail.com MALTA DRAIN Tiles. Replace and Repair. BBB member, best rates. (250)388-0278.

PAINTING A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 25 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220.

Peacock Painting

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

DIAMOND DAVE Gutter cleaning, gutter guard, power washing, roof de-mossing. Call 250-889-5794.

QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

250-652-2255 250-882-2254

RENOS BY Don, 25 yrs exp. New, renos, repairs, decks, fencing, bathrooms, kitchens. Senior discounts. Licensed, Insured, WCB, 250-588-1545.

15% SENIORS DISCOUNT

INSULATION

YOUR PERSONAL Interior Painter. No Job too Big or Too Small. Call Gilbert today for free quote. (250)886-6446.

GUTTER CLEANING, repairs, de-mossing. Windows, power washing. 250-478-6323.

MALTA BLOWN insulation & batting. Removal. Best rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

GUTTER CLEANING. Repairs, Maintenance, Gutterguard, Leaf traps. Grand Xterior Cleaning Services. WCB Insured. Call 250-380-7778.

MASONRY & BRICKWORK C.B.S. Masonry Brick, Stone, Concrete, Paving, Chimneys, Sidewalks, Patios, Repair, Replace, Re-build, Renew. “Quality is our Guarantee” Free Est’s & Competitive Prices. (250)294-9942, 589-9942 www.cbsmasonry.com

PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter cleaning, repairs, upgrades & maintenance. WCB, Free est. 250-881-2440.

HANDYPERSONS

WESTSHORE STONEWORKS

AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397. PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

Custom Stone Fireplaces, Walkways & Patios. Custom Facing. Call for all your stonework needs.

(250)857-7442

RUBBISH REMOVAL MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

STUCCO/SIDING PATCHES, ADDITIONS, restucco, renos, chimney, waterproofing. Bob, 250-642-5178.

TILING A1. SHAWN The Tile GuyRes/ Comm/ Custom/ Renos. 250-686-6046

MALTA HOUSE Renos & Repairs. BBB member. Best rates. (250)388-0278.

AL’S V.I.P. Gutter Cleaning. Gutter guards, all exterior, power washing, roof de-mossing, spray, windows. Package deals! Insured. (250)507-6543.

SENIOR HANDYMANHousehold repairs. Will assist do-it yourselfers. Fred, 250888-5345.

MALTA MOVING. Best Rates. BBB Member. Residential/ Commercial. (250)388-0278.

WRITTEN GUARANTEE Budget Compliance

PLUMBING EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104. FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

UPHOLSTERY

FIBRENEW.COM Home, Auto • Leather Repair • Dashboards • Bumpers

Visa MC

250-891-7446 UPHOLSTERER work. Your fabric 250-480-7937.

or

NEEDS mine.

WINDOW CLEANING DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping Roofs, Pressure Washing, Roof Demossing. Call 250361-6190.

KERRY’S GAS & PLUMBING SERVICESRepair, maintenance & install. 250-360-7663.

CLASSIFIED ADS MEAN MORE BUSINESS

PLASTERING

FOR YOU!

PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fireplaces. Bob, 250-642-5178.

250.388.3535


www.goldstreamgazette.com • A19

GOLDSTREAM NEWS GAZETTE - Friday, December 30, 2011 

Select your home. Select your mortgage. Oak Bay 250-370-7601 Victoria 250-483-1360 Westshore 250-391-2933 Sidney 250-655-0632 Chatterton Way 250-479-0688 www.vericoselect.com

This Weekend’s

OPENHOUSES

Published Every Thursday

Check the page number below in Real Estate Victoria or visit www.revweekly.com

Find more details on the Open Houses below in the Dec. 29 - Jan. 4 edition of 5-881 Nicholson St., $549,000 Saturday Dec 31 12-2 DFH Real Estate Wendy Herrick 250-656-0131

1001 Foul Bay Rd, $860,000 403-827 North Park St, $249,900 Saturday Dec. 24 & Dec 31 1-2 Sutton Group West Coast Realty Larry Lineham, 250-661-7809

Saturday Jan 8 2-4 Macdonald Realty Ltd Eleanor V Smith 250 388-5882

pg. 15

Saturday Dec 31st & Sunday Jan 1st 2-4 Royal LePage Coast Capital Maggie Thompson, 250-889-5955 pg. 10

10 Helmcken Rd

Daily noon-4 (exc Dec 25, 26th & Jan 1) Pemberton Holmes David Hale 250 812-7277

Saturday Dec 31st 1-3 Royal Lepage Coast Capital Realty Bob Krueckl 250 477-5353

Thursday & Friday 1-4 Pemberton Holmes Greg Long, 250-384-8124 pg. 8

4942 Cordova Bay, $1,049,000 pg. 2

Wed Dec 28, Sat Dec 31 & Wed Jan 4 1-3 Pemberton Holmes Ltd Kevin Starling 250 889-4577 pg. 24

pg. 26

Call for Open House Hours Century 21 Queenswood Chuck Meagher 250 477-1100

pg. 7

Sudoku

28. Am. immigration island 29. National Council on Disability (abbr.) 31. Same birthdate sibling 32. 2,000 pounds 33. A light stroke 38. Relating to a horse 39. A subterfuge 40. Unwholesome atmosphere 41. Dining, coffee and card 42. Cunieform tablets found in 1974 46. Scratchy 49. Invests in little enterprises 50. Foot-shaped shoe form 51. Scarlett’s home 52. Genus alosa 53. New Jersey university 54. Paper bag 55. Before 57. Castilian knight El ___ 59. Denmark

To solve a Sudoku puzzle, every number 1 to 9 must appear in: • Each of the nine vertical columns • Each of the nine horizontal rows • Each of the nine 3 x 3 boxes

Remember no number can occur more than once in any row, column or box.

bcclassifieds.com

Today’s Solution

36. A winglike structure 37. Having defined limits 43. A brother or sister 44. A small shiny ornamental disk 45. True firs 47. No. Am. republic (abbr.) 48. Bacon-lettuce-tomato sandwich 49. Most guileful 52. Casual trousers 55. Abba ____, Israeli politician 56. Papier-_____, art material 58. Am. costume designer Edith 60. Stand up 61. Operatic songs 62. Talk incessantly DOWN 63. Shock treatment 1. Mimic 64. Form a sum 2. Journey on horseback 65. Norweigan currency (abbr.) 3. Linen plant 4. Dashes Today’s Answers 5. Single Lens Reflex 6. Golf ball stands 7. A particle of dirt 8. Clear blood fluids 9. Female sheep 11. Utters 12. Tern genus 13. Small sofa 14. Shrimp sauteed in butter and garlic 19. Leoppold and ____ 21. Top of motor vehicle 24. Securing devices 25. Highly incensed 26. Earnest entreaty 27. Rent

pg. 12

Saturday & Sunday 12-4 Pemberton Holmes Ltd Nancy Vieira 250 384-8124

608 Fairway Ave

Crossword ACROSS 1. Dog’s bark 4. Fall back (time abbr.) 7. Point midway between S and SE 10. Heap 12. Gross revenue 14. Smallest merganser 15. Mild yellow Dutch cheese 16. Small integer 17. Restore to health 18. Banishments 20. Layers of rock 22. Hill (Celtic) 23. Male cat 24. Past tense of 60 across 26. Humans as a group 29. Introduces a further negative 30. Area of conflict 34. A licensed accountant 35. Deep distress or misery

3818 Trailhead, $249,900

304-611 Brookside, $219,000

5149 Cordova Bay, $1,249,900

pg. 5

1959 Fairfield Rd., $859,000

pg. 6


A20 • www.goldstreamgazette.com

Friday, December 30, 2011 - GOLDSTREAM

NEWS GAZETTE

Boxing Day

t u o w Blo … S E U N I T SALE CON

70

%

Financing Available!

OFF

First Come! First Serve!

Microfi Mi fib bre S Sectional ti l with ith 2 Recliners R li • 2 Colours

3 CHOCOLATE 4 LIGHT BROWN

Pub Table + 6 Stools

Leather L th R Recliner li with ith Pop-up Storage Armrests • 2 colours

Reg. 1198

Reg. $998

398

$

698 Reg. $1198

$

50

398

$

%

OFF

1036 High Profile Pocket Coils Coil i

Eurotop t P Pocket k t Coil C il with foam encasement and wool blend fibre

$

698

10 Year Full Warranty.

Reg. 1398

Our Huge 40,000 sq.ft. Warehouse means FAST Delivery on In-Stock Items!

Voted

Best City

of the

Follow & Join us for the latest commercials, promotions & monthly flyer!

1

VICTORIA NEWS

   

17th

9 % ! 2

Furniture & Mattress Ltd.

HOME OF • NO DOWN • NO INTEREST • INSTANT FINANCING – Furnishing the Island since 1977 | Locally Owned & Operated teed

Mon-Fri 9-9 • Sat 9-6 • Sun & Hol 12-5

715 Finlayson St., Victoria | 250.388.6663 | www.doddsfurniture.com

HUGE SAvings

HUGE SALE!

T he Sale Everyone Waits For Up To All Year Long!

Limited Quantities!

Dec.30,2011 GoldstreamGazette  

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