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A CAMPAIGN TO SAVE DEBBIE REYNOLDS DRIVE In Las Vegas, streets are often named after casinos. And casinos are often imploded. Those twin practices sometimes mean our street names outlive their namesakes (see: Desert Inn Road and Sands Avenue). These legacy names offer a rare and whimsical connection to history in a town that tends to value the shiny new thing. At least that’s the perspective of a group trying to keep Debbie Reynolds Drive from being renamed. The short street between Convention Center Drive and Desert Inn Road was named for the Hollywood star and Las Vegas performer’s namesake Debbie Reynolds Hollywood Hotel, which lasted about six years in the 1990s. The building was imploded in 2015, and local developer Lorenzo Doumani plans to build an $850 million nongaming luxury resort called Majestic Las Vegas in its spot. His bid to rename the street Majestic Plaza Place will be considered by the Clark County Planning Commission on August 20. The organization Eat More Art Vegas (EMAV), launched a petition to “Save Debbie Reynolds Drive” on GoPetition.com on August 8. At press time, it had 250 signatures. “Debbie Reynolds Drive is one of the few landmarks honoring a female Vegas icon,” says Sarah O’Connell, founder of EMAV. “The Vegas mystique that draws tourists isn’t just about nightclubs and mega hotels; it’s about the entire Vegas story. And that story has been written in the imagination of most Americans by our local culture scene, which includes iconic entertainers.” –C. Moon Reed

WEEK IN REVIEW WEEK AHEAD EV E N T S T O F O L L OW A N D N EWS YO U M I SS E D

Boys work on dribbling skills during the Troy Brown Jr. basketball camp at Hoop City on August 10. More than 100 children, ages 8-14, signed up for the free camp. Brown, a native Las Vegan and Centennial High School graduate, now plays for the Washington Wizards. (Steve Marcus/Staff)


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Cover Story: Your guide to Psycho Las Vegas

CULTURE

Kacey Musgraves, comedy at the Plaza and more

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News: Which animals recently went extinct? News: A Nevada tribe hopes to stop Yucca Mountain VEGAS INC: First Legal president Don Fritsch

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STORIES FROM LAST WEEK STATEMENT ON THE STAND Two Americans used their medalwinning moments at the Pan American Games on August 11 to draw attention to social issues back home. During their medals ceremonies at the sports festival in Lima, Peru, fencer Race Imboden took a knee and hammer thrower Gwen Berry raised her fist. Both could represent the U.S. at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. WHITE SUPREMACIST ARRESTED Conor Climo, 23, who was arrested August 8 in Las Vegas for possession of an unregistered firearm, in the form of the component parts of a destructive device, waived his right to remain silent and told FBI agents about a plot of his that would have included an eight-man sniper squad killing scores of Jews at a synagogue or another “area of opportunity.” He told the agents that in late 2017, he began to communicate with members of a Neo-Nazi group. EPSTEIN GUARDS SUSPENDED Two guards assigned to watch Jeffrey Epstein the night he apparently killed himself in jail have been placed on leave, and the warden has been removed as federal authorities investigate the financier’s death, the Justice Department said August 13. Epstein was taken off suicide watch July 29 and was supposed to have been checked on by a guard every 30 minutes. But investigators learned those checks weren’t done for several hours before he was found dead on August 10, according to a person familiar with the case. NEW HELMETS ONLY An arbitrator on August 12 ruled against Oakland Raiders wide receiver Antonio Brown in a dispute over whether he would be permitted to use his old helmet. Brown had been frustrated by an NFL policy outlawing the helmet he had used throughout his career. He had reportedly tried to sneak it into practices and challenged the league on the issue. On August 13, Brown’s agent, Drew Rosenhaus, said the All-Pro receiver found a new model of his preferred helmet.

VIGIL HONORS EL PASO MASS SHOOTING VICTIMS Francis Garcia, center, speaks August 7 during a vigil in Downtown Las Vegas. The event was organized to give people an outlet to mourn the lives lost when a gunman opened fire four days earlier at a packed Walmart in El Paso, Texas. Although the scene of the massacre is about 750 driving miles southeast of Las Vegas, the anguish was apparent for Garcia, whose voice reverberated through a megaphone. “We’re surrounded with people who’ve had hate injected in their heart,” she said, later breaking into tears. The event was sprinkled with political grievances. Parts of speeches targeted President Donald Trump, his rhetoric, his administration’s immigration policies, the gun lobby and divisive politics. (Steve Marcus/Staff)

THE BATTLE OF BEARS EARS CONTINUES Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah is facing a new round of controversy. Designated by President Barack Obama in 2016, the monument was reduced to less than a quarter of its size a year later by President Donald Trump. Now, the Bureau of Land Management’s proposed plans for the oversight of the monument and the Final Environmental Impact Statement are drawing pushback. The Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition “strongly opposes” the plans and the FEIS. It “urges the original boundaries of the monument be incorporated in the planning process to avoid desecration of sacred sites, resources and traditional cultural properties,” according to a press statement. The coalition wants the planning process to halt until a court can review the monument’s decrease in size. Meanwhile, in a press release, BLM Utah State Director Ed Roberson says the plans will protect natural and cultural resources “while enhancing recreational opportunities and ensuring access to traditional uses.” The governor of Utah has 60 days to review the plans and FEIS. There is a 60-day public comment period on proposed target shooting plans, and a 30-day protest period that ends August 26. More information is available at blm.gov. –C. Moon Reed


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(excluding umbrella and leggings) (Wade Vandervort/Staff)

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PSYCHO LAS VEGAS BRINGS THE NOISE TO MANDALAY BAY BY SPENCER PATTERSON

PSYCHO LAS VEGAS August 16-18, times vary, $109/day, $249/festival. Psycho Swim: August 15, noon, $35. Mandalay Bay, vivapsycho.com.

hen Psycho Las Vegas lost its Saturday-night headliner, Megadeth, just two months before the festival, organizers Evan Hagen and Ronnie Exley didn’t panic. They surveyed the scene for possible replacements, and less than two weeks later they’d confirmed one with arguably more buzz: the reunited Original Misfits. And though a close connection—a former Psycho lighting director now runs lights for the Misfits—helped, Hagen says it wouldn’t have happened without support from the festival’s new partner and home base: Mandalay Bay. “Mandalay and MGM [Resorts, parent company of Mandalay Bay] really helped make this lineup happen,” Hagen says. “They gave us the opportunity to take a chance on something and go a little out of the box to make it happen.” Psycho offered refunds after Megadeth canceled (the band scratched most of its tour schedule when frontman Dave Mustaine announced he’d been diagnosed with throat cancer), but Hagen said only a handful of ticket holders dropped out. “We knew Megadeth was our largest headliner, so in Psycho tradition we had to take it to the next level to make it right.” From August 15-18, Psycho will look to take its fourth-year Vegas endeavor to the next level as well. After three years at the Hard Rock Hotel, the event—built loosely around heavy, psychedelic and metallic music— makes the move to Las Vegas Boulevard, becoming the first major music festival to inhabit a single Strip resort. “The opportunity came twofold, with the potential sale of the Hard Rock [to Virgin Hotels] and the growth of the festival,” says Sid Greenfeig, vice president of entertainment and booking for MGM Resorts, who booked Psycho alongside Erin Calhoun, MGM’s executive director of booking. “They were looking for an opportunity where they could grow it even more, the stars kind of aligned and we were able to successfully bring it over.” The long weekend kicks off with Thursday’s Psycho Swim party at Daylight Beach Club (noon-10:30 p.m.), then continues Friday through Sunday at four distinct venues: Mandalay Bay Events Center, known for hosting arena headliners like Maroon 5 and Toby Keith; the intimate House of Blues; Mandalay Bay Beach, which stages music alongside the sand and surf of the resort’s sprawling aquatic area; and Rhythm & Riffs Lounge, an open stage set amid the casino itself. Though walks between stages will take longer than during Psycho Las Vegas’ Hard Rock Hotel run, access to on-site amenities—already one of the fest’s strong suits—should improve further at the much larger Mandalay Bay. “When you think about all the conventions that go through there—Toyota, Amazon—these are big-time conventions, and that property does a great job with them,” Greenfeig says. “Fans can check out our restaurants, shop, maybe stay at the hotel. You can be as immersive as you want.” And that, Hagen says, involves the bands on the bill, too. “It’s nice to have everyone in one area, the convenience of having a room on-site,” he says. “The bands also get to stay on property, which is a big plus for fans. At most festivals, the artists are backstage. Here, you can walk out of your hotel room and see your favorite band throwing dice at the craps table. You can interact with them. Psycho is like a giant backstage, and everyone is invited.”


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Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats bring a heavy-rock rainbow back to Psycho By Annie Zaleski hen bands start touring, they usually work their way from small clubs to bigger venues. But when U.K. hard rockers Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats began touring in earnest, their first real road trek involved opening multiple European arena dates on Black Sabbath’s 2013 reunion tour. “For them to take us out on a tour like that was huge for us,” frontman Kevin Starrs tells the Weekly. “Obviously we were terrified, because it’s Sabbath. Seeing Tony Iommi—he’s a pretty intimidating character on the face of it. But once you get to know these people, they’re all really nice guys. It was a great way for us to connect to a new audience.” For Starrs, who founded Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats in 2009, opening for Sabbath was something

Starrs (far left) and Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats (Ester Segarra/Courtesy)

of a dream come true. Although he grew up a fan of continue to follow his band around. “We get this The Beatles, Alice Cooper and Van Halen, hearing whole stoner-rock, stoner-doom thing, which I find Black Sabbath “changed a lot of things for me” and quite hard to relate to,” he says. “To me, we’re just a introduced him to the possibilities within metal hard rock band. We’ve got melody; we’ve got guitar music. “Once I got into Sabbath, it was like a whole solos, riffs. We don’t sing about getting high or new world.” driving across deserts. There’s more to it than just Unsurprisingly, Starrs has taken inspirastoner stuff.” tion from Sabbath when crafting Uncle Acid’s Such eclecticism makes Uncle Acid a UNCLE ACID & music. “Ozzy’s vocal melodies are really unTHE DEADBEATS natural for the equally diverse Psycho Las Sunday, 5:30 p.m., Vegas. Starrs says he’s looking forward to derappreciated,” he says. “And obviously he’s Events Center. massively influenced by The Beatles as well. catching The Original Misfits and proggy I recognized that as soon as I heard Sabbath. Portland’s Danava (“I think they’re the best I thought, there’s more to them than just behard rock band in America”), although it ing a heavy metal band. They’ve got this other part to might be hard to top Uncle Acid’s appearance at 2016’s them as well.” inaugural Psycho Las Vegas. In a neat twist, that gig One could say the same about Uncle Acid. The also involved a memorable encounter with a musical band’s most recent album, 2018’s sprawling Wasteidol who lived up to expectations. land, incorporates the entire continuum of heavy “Buck Dharma from Blue Öyster Cult came into music influences—thrash metal, the New Wave of our dressing room, just as they were leaving, and said, British Heavy Metal, ’70s hard rock, Van Halen-style ‘Here, you boys can have this bottle of whiskey.’” So did riff-jumping and piledriving prog. they drink the whiskey, or keep the bottle? “We drank Despite that diversity, Starrs says misconceptions it pretty quickly,” Starrs laughs.


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11 (Amy Harris/AP/Photo Illustration)

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CATC H A L L T H R E E P S YC H O HEADLINERS I F Y O U CA N BY SPENCER PATTERSON

(Friday, 9:30 p.m., Events Center) The English doom metal masters, who headlined Psycho’s middle night at 2016’s first Vegas edition, might embody the festival’s sonic ethos better than any other band. Since debuting in the mid-’90s, leader Jus Oborn (guitar/vocals) and a revolving cast of supporting characters that now includes his wife Liz Buckingham (guitar), Simon Poole (drums) and Haz Wheaton (bass) have released nine albums, including stoner-rock favorites Come My Fanatics… (1997), Dopethrone (2000) and Witchcult Today (2007). Live, Electric Wizard’s pairs its hypnotic, relentless riffs with footage from old horror films for a heavy experience unlike any other.

(Saturday, 9:30 p.m., Events Center) Tapped to replace Megadeth atop the secondnight lineup, this throwback version of the Misfits brings original vocalist Glenn Danzig— who headlined last year’s Psycho fest with his other band, Danzig—back to the fest, along with founding guitarist Jerry Only and longtime bassist Doyle Wolfgang von Frankenstein, plus drummer Dave Lombardo and rhythm guitarist Acey Slade. The horror-punk patriarchs have performed fewer than 10 times (including a 2017 MGM Grand Garden Arena gig) since returning to the stage in 2016, stuffing their sets with classic cuts like “Last Caress,” “Night of the Living Dead,” “Hollywood Babylon” and “Halloween.”

(Sunday, 9:30 p.m., Events Center) Considering ducking out early on the festival’s final night? Don’t. These Swedish prog-metal mainstays are playing just one U.S. show in 2019, and this is it. The band, which began releasing music in 1995, now comprises leader Mikael Åkerfeldt (guitar/vocals) plus Martín Méndez (bass), Martin Axenrot (drums), Fredrik Åkesson (guitars) and Joakim Svalberg (keyboards). Several Opeth albums are considered progressive metal benchmarks, including Still Life (1999) and Blackwater Park (2001), and the band is preparing to release its first studio LP in five years, In Cauda Venenum, on September 27—in both English and Swedish language versions.


(Angela Owens/Courtesy)

(Courtesy)

(Friday, 2:35 p.m., House of Blues) Like your sludge metal laced with horror imagery, Satan worship and strident anti-facism? These doomy D.C.’ers have you covered.

(Thursday, 2 p.m., Psycho Swim at Daylight) The five-year-old Nashville trio fuses soaring space-rock with proggy metal flourishes for a kaleidoscopic sonic journey.

(Sunday, 2:35 p.m., House of Blues) The Connecticut cult band—best known for gothy, shoegazey, droney 2008 debut Deathconsciousness—is prepping third album Sea of Worry for release later this year.

(Friday, 10 p.m., House of Blues) Philly hardcore veterans Domenic Palermo (Horror Show), above, and Aaron Heard (Jesus Piece) have struck gold with this shoegaze-y project, which sprinkles in hints of the aggression for which they’re known.

(Angela Ownes/Courtesy) (Peter Beste/Courtesy)

(Courtesy)

BY CASE KEEFER AND SPENCER PATTERSON

(Courtesy)

WE RECOMMEND DISCOVERING (IF YOU HAVEN’T ALREADY)

(Saturday, 5 p.m., House of Blues) Sixteen years after the release of its first album, this Portland outfit continues to produce emotive, instrumental post-rock anthems, most recently on 2017 LP Chalice Hymnal.

(Friday, 12:15 p.m., House of Blues) Debut album Good to Feel (2018) belongs in a time-capsule as an example of late-2010s hardcore— blazingly fast with a heavy, metallic edge and a bit of challenging noise.

(Sunday, 11:30 p.m., House of Blues) The Belgium-based Neurosis acolytes spare no expense for their shows, which include unnerving visuals and often find frontman Colin H. van Eeckhout pushing the performance-art envelope.

(Thursday, 1 p.m., Psycho Swim at Daylight) Gothic grunt metal might be the best way to describe this Portland act, which combines Iron Maiden-esque instrumentation with Cure-leaning vocals.

(Jake Ballah/Courtesy)

PSYCHO ACTS

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(Stephan Vanfletern/Courtesy)

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(Saturday, 8:30 p.m., House of Blues) Pennsylvanian Thomas Fec brings hazy, heart-stirring psych-pop—and memorable visual projections—to the stage with his band, Black Moth Super Rainbow, or when he performs under his nom de plume, Tobacco.

(Saturday, 1:35 p.m., House of Blues) These Toronto-based masters of modern death metal are almost guaranteed to pack the most riffs into a single set.


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Braithwaite (far left) and Mogwai (Anthony Crook/Courtesy)

MOGWAI’S STUART BRAITHWAITE TALKS PSYCHO, NOSTALGIA AND STEVIE RAY VAUGHAN BY ANNIE ZALESKI

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he Scottish post-rock kingpins of Mogwai have had a busy summer touring the European festival circuit, playing their first music-themed cruise and launching a U.S. tour highlighted by a Psycho Las Vegas appearance. The Weekly caught up with guitarist Stuart Braithwaite to chat about the upcoming gig here and more.

What are you most looking forward to at Psycho Las Vegas? I’m really excited about seeing the Misfits. And just playing a different event. Especially in Europe, we play quite a lot of the same events every couple of years, so just to go somewhere totally new is something really fun.

years later. I don’t really think of these things myself, but I’ll quite often see on Instagram or Twitter somebody saying that our record’s 20 years old, or 10 years old or something. It doesn’t feel that long. The passage of time changes in your mind as you get older.

Is Mogwai working on new music? We’re workAs a band still creating new music, it is weird ing on a soundtrack for a show. I think it’s going to look back? The culture of nostalgia, I think, to be on early next year. It’s quite is good in a lot of ways. Things don’t heavy, a lot of it. The thing we were go out of vogue in the way they did MOGWAI working on today was more plaintive before. But there can be a tendency Sunday, 3:50 p.m., and kind of beautiful, but I think most to live in the past. Apart from one Events Center. of it’s pretty harsh. I think people are time, where we played our first going to enjoy it. [Then] we’re going album because we got an offer we to start to think about making another couldn’t refuse, we veer away from record as well. that, because I’d rather people were excited about what we’re doing now. Mogwai will mark 25 years as a band next year. Is that on your radar at all? I don’t know Mogwai has played Vegas several times. Do if we’re going to do anything particularly, but you have any memorable experiences here? we’re definitely keeping it in mind. We did celWe played one time at the Hard Rock Cafe, and ebrate 20 years with some shows and a compithe soundcheck was so loud one of Stevie Ray lation, [so] it seems almost too soon to do that Vaughan’s guitars fell off the wall. That was quite again—to pat ourselves on the back again five awkward.


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The far outliers among Psycho’s diverse 2019 lineup Psycho Las Vegas might primarily be considered a metal and psych festival, but since its inception, founder Evan Hagen has mixed in some of his favorites in other fields for added flavor. Past examples have included comedian Brian Posehn and Afro-soul act The Budos Band in 2016; Ethio-jazz godfather Mulatu Astatke and masked synthwaver Gost in 2017; and African desert-blues collective Tinariwen, Cambodian-rock band Dengue Fever and Stranger Things electronicists Survive last year. This weekend should be no different. San Francisco’s Monophonics will bring sunny soul music to the Rhythm & Riffs Lounge Thursday at 11 p.m. and again Saturday at 9:45 p.m. French electronic producer Perturbator will look to turn the Beach into a synthy dance party Friday at 11 p.m. Instrumental Seattle jazz-funk unit Polyrhythmics spice up Rhythm & Riffs Sunday at 5 p.m. And LA’s Twin Temple will perform doo-wop ditties about—what else?—Satan, Sunday at 10 p.m. inside the House of Blues. Variety, indeed. –Spencer Patterson

Names you should know at Psycho 2019

(Courtesy)

(Sunday, 8:40 p.m., Beach) Who: A strong candidate for most influential metal band of the decade. The San Francisco act’s blend of black metal, shoegaze and post-rock—termed “blackgaze” and expertly honed on 2013 breakout Sunbather—has spawned a crowd of imitators. Love it or hate it, you have core Deafheaven members George Clarke (vocals) and Kerry McCoy (guitarist) to thank. Spin: New single “Black Brick” illustrates how Deafheaven has remained exciting half a decade after its initial buzz. Last year’s Ordinary Corrupt Human Love LP suggested the band had softened a bit, but this song arrived as arguably the group’s most abrasive track yet. Catch because: You’ll probably never catch Deafheaven poolside again.

(Courtesy)

(Nicholas Sayers/Courtesy)

By Case Keefer and Spencer Patterson

(Friday, 5 p.m., House of Blues) Who: Long Island post-hardcore heroes who inadvertently helped launch the commercial emo and punk outbreaks of the early-to-mid 2000s. They’ve been enigmatic since, disappearing for years without notice, while toying with genres like dub and noise rock on sporadic releases. Spin: Worship and Tribute, the group’s introspective 2002 triumph, placed so much pressure on the band it might have knocked its career off course. Glassjaw went on its first hiatus soon after, reportedly fought with record label Warner Bros. and didn’t release another LP for 15 years. Catch because: Nothing else at Psycho sounds remotely like Glassjaw, which is both more exploratory than most of the bill’s metal acts and more traditional than the fest’s experimental contingent.


(Dan Winters/Courtesy)

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(Travis Keller/Courtesy)

(Saturday, 7:15 p.m., Events Center) Who: Bluesy, stoner-rock demigods from the Maryland suburbs of D.C., known for their work ethic and fervent fanbase. Clutch’s lineup—vocalist Neal Fallon, guitarist Tim Sult, bassist Dan Maines and drummer Jean-Paul Gaster—has stayed together for 28 years, putting out 12 LPs and touring up to nine months annually. Spin: Earth Rocker (2013) jump-started a late-career renaissance that found the band simplifying its sound on anthems glorifying the rock ’n’ roll lifestyle. Catch because: You never know what you’re going to get—in a good way. Clutch prides itself on making every show stand out, to the delight of die-hard fans who follow tours for weeks at a time.

(Yannick Grandmont/Courtesy)

(Saturday, 11 p.m., Beach) Who: Austin psych warriors celebrating 15 years since they began creating dark, fuzzed-out rock in their garage. The current lineup features founders Stephanie Bailey (drums), Christian Bland (guitar) and Alex Maas (vocals/bass), along with guitarist Jake Garcia and keyboardist Kyle Hunt. Spin: Debut album Passover (2006) still makes for the best starting point (you’ll likely recognize opener “Young Men Dead” from various films, TV shows and video games), but don’t miss latest LP Death Song (2017), which adroitly toes the line between catchy and trippy. Catch because: The Angels are closing out Saturday at the Beach, an ideal setting for their expansive sound.

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(Peter Beste/Courtesy)

(Sunday, 7:15 p.m., Events Center) Who: The current standard-bearers of dream pop, Baltimore’s Victoria Legrand and Alex Scally have spent the past 15 years putting out acclaimed albums with a live show to match. Spin: Last year’s triumphant 7, which closed with “Last Ride,” a song that exhilarated and alarmed the band’s fanbase with its beautiful slow-build and allusions to death. Catch because: At a festival rooted in psychedelic rock, there might not be a more hypnotic experience than Beach House. Legrand’s rich voice floats amid an entrancing accompaniment of lights silhouetting her, Scally and touring drummer James Barone.

(Alexander Valenti/Courtesy)

(Shawn Brackbill/Courtesy)

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(Friday, 8:30 p.m., House of Blues) Who: A New Orleans band at the nexus of death metal and black metal that released its first album in 2000. Longtime guitarist Sammy Duet and vocalist Ben Falgoust remain in the touring lineup, along with drummer Zack Simmons and bassist Robert Coleman. Spin: Goatwhore’s latest LP, 2017’s Vengeful Ascension, provides the best sense of the current sound—Metalinjection.net compared it to “a moshpit that opens at the beginning of a set and never closes”—and the bleak lyrical content. Catch because: You shouldn’t wear a Goatwhore shirt unless you’ve seen the band live at least once.

(Friday, 5:30 p.m., Events Center) Who: Canada’s esteemed experimental-rock export, a collective that swells close to 10 members—including founders Efrim Menuck (guitar), Mike Moya (guitar) and Mauro Pezzente (bass)—in concert. The group went dark in 2003 before returning in 2010 and adding three new albums to double its LP output. Spin: Lift Your Skinny Fists Like Antennas to Heaven, the group’s 2000 masterwork, which is split into four, side-long pieces combining composed instrumental music and found-sound fragments. Catch because: Godspeed’s breathtaking live show— which pairs spine-tingling epics with looped film projections—has never made its way to Las Vegas … until now.

(Saturday, 7:35 p.m., Beach) Who: The 54-year-old former lead singer of ’90s Washington State grunge mainstay Screaming Trees, who has released a string of albums under his own name beginning while that band was active and continuing since its 2000 demise. Spin: New record Somebody’s Knocking won’t be out until next month, so circle back to 2004’s shadowy Bubblegum, described by The Guardian as “powerful enough to take your breath away … a staggering record.” Catch because: Lanegan’s live sets are typically retrospective affairs featuring gems from throughout his solo career, along with well-chosen covers.


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SPLASH

LAS VEGAS BALLPARK’S OUTFIELD POOL HAS BEEN A HUGE HIT IN YEAR ONE BY BRYAN HORWATH

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bby Joseph sips on a margarita while keeping an eye on her 4-year-old daughter, LillyDrew, as the summer sun begins to set over Summerlin. LillyDrew floats around the pool using arm rings, while nearly 40 people around her eat, drink and socialize. It could be a scene at any number of pool parties across Southern Nevada, but this one has a key difference: It’s taking place amid a minor league baseball game at the new Las Vegas Ballpark. “This is so Vegas,” Joseph says. “It’s very interactive here. There’s a lot more to do than just sitting in a seat. I love watching baseball, but let’s be honest, it can be slow.” On this night, as the Triple-A Las Vegas Aviators open a home series against the Salt Lake Bees, Joseph and a group of friends have rented the pool area at the ballpark. It provides a private setting among the thousands of other spectators watching the Aviators’ 13-3 win. Since opening in April, the 10,000-seat, $150 million Downtown Summerlin ballpark has become one of the places to be—and to be seen—in the Vegas Valley. The pool area, officially known as Desert Ford Oasis Pool, is no different. T.J. Thedinga, an Aviators ticket sales executive, says the pool sold out months ago for the remaining home series, and fans are already requesting reservations for next year. At least one person even inquired about 2021. The pool, located just beyond the center field fence, measures just 3.6-feet at its deepest, but the space can accommodate up to 50 people. It runs $2,000 to rent for one game with tickets included, though food and drinks cost extra.

AVIATORS

REMAINING HOME SERIES August 15-18: Albuquerque Isotopes August 19-21: Reno Aces August 30-September 2: Tacoma Rainiers All games at 7:05 p.m. (except September 2 season finale, 12:05 p.m.) Tickets: $15-$35, ticketmaster.com

Reed Hawkins, left, and Dax Kunz, both 14, take in some food and a swim between dips in the outfield pool at Las Vegas Ballpark. (Steve Marcus/Staff)


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Christine Gorlin, lifeguard and pool operator, has worked everything from kids’ birthday parties to corporate events at the pool during its inaugural season. She stresses awareness to the swimmers, especially since a dozen of the more than 250 home runs hit at the ballpark have landed in the pool. Gorlin said the most memorable one came when a young girl beat out a bunch of boys to retrieve a ball that splashed down. She later got her souvenir signed by former Major League Baseball slugger Jose Canseco, who happened to be walking past the pool area. “I’ve gotten pretty good at judging home runs,” Gorlin says. “I just look at the outfielders and see where they’re looking. You have to pay attention to the game, especially when the wind is blowing out.” Sixteen-year-old Pilar Burgess, however, doesn’t seem very interested in what’s happening between the Aviators and Bees. “I haven’t watched one minute of this game,” Burgess says while lounging in a pool chair. “If a [home run ball] hits me, it hits me, but this is way better than just sitting in a seat at a game.” Besides, Burgess’ companion, fellow teenager Thorsten Balmer, says he’s on alert for home run balls. He insists he’ll dive in front of Burgess to shield her if need be. No balls end up landing in the pool on this night, even though the Aviators have hit four home runs to electrify the home crowd, especially those watching from the pool like Henderson resident Jack Daigle. “Being out here, it gives you a whole different view of the game,” Daigle says. “It’s a great ballpark. How many ballparks have so much for the fans?” Aviators spokesman Jim Gemma says the pool is a rarity for in the minor leagues. The homes of two Texas teams—the Round Rock Express and Corpus Christi Hooks—feature pools, and the Frisco RoughRiders have a lazy river beyond their outfield. The Arizona Diamondbacks launched the trend by putting a pool into their home stadium, Chase Field (formerly Bank One Ballpark), when it opened in 1998. But it would be hard to argue against Las Vegas Ballpark’s pool as the nicest at the minor league level. “The pool has been the most popular group area for fans this season,” says Erik Eisenberg, the Aviators’ vice president of ticket sales. “I figured the pool would sell out, but maybe not as quickly as it has.” For Abby Joseph and her family, any future visits to the pool will be welcomed—assuming they can get a reservation. “This is way better than Cashman [Field],” Joseph says. “We used to go there for Little League Day back when the Aviators were the 51s. Cashman was still fun, but this is really awesome.”


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THRU OCT 27

BIG THIS WEEK Young the Giant (Courtesy)

FRI, AUG 16

Downtown Las Vegas Events Center Young the Giant & Fitz and the Tantrums Get all the feels with two bands from Cali—rock outfit Young the Giant and neo-soul indie-pop group Fitz and the Tantrums—at DLVEC’s fifth anniversary party. The all-ages show is the perfect way to say goodbye to summer break. With Alice Merton. 8 p.m., $33-$63. –Genevie Durano

AUGUST 16 & 17

THE JOINT MARY J. BLIGE It’s surprising these shows weren’t sold out at press time, considering the R&B legend has seen all 13 of her studio albums reach the Billboard 200’s top 10. And her impact isn’t just past tense; brandnew single “You Know” is a female-empowerment anthem as current as anything going right now. 8 p.m., $51-$209. –Spencer Patterson (Amy Harris/AP Photo)

BELLAGIO GALLERY OF FINE ART PERMEATING LANDSCAPE If you saw Primal Water at Bellagio last summer, you’ve already enjoyed an introduction to the dimensional art of Yasuaki Onishi. The artist has returned to BGFA with Permeating Landscape, featuring two large-scale pieces intended to stretch (in one regard, literally) your definition of what sculpture can be. “They are sculptures that do not point to any particular phenomena but leave much to be interpreted by the viewer,” Onishi says in an emailed statement. “Vertical Volume” comprises 12 cylindrical polyethylene bags that are activated by vertical motion; the bags expand and contract, constantly filling and emptying in reaction to their environment. And the exhibit’s namesake piece, “Permeating Landscape,” is a mountainlike form weaved from hanging strands of wire. Other mixed media and photographic works round out the exhibition. In September, Onishi will create an entirely new sculpture at the Artist Studio at Bellagio, using locally sourced materials. Guests can watch as Onishi builds a steel exoskeleton around a local tree, using a special welding process. Daily, 10 a.m.7 p.m., $5-$10. –Geoff Carter


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(Courtesy)

Sun, Aug 18 |

KAOS Above & Beyond

Fresh off a weekender at beautiful Gorge Amphitheater in Washington state, the electronic trio takes a breather from the summer festival circuit to engineer the nighttime SOAK Sundays party. A&B has emerged as one of the strongest acts on the roster during KAOS’ inaugural season, so you might not want to miss this one. 10:30 p.m., $20-$25. –Brock Radke

FRI, AUG 16 THE SPACE PIANOS TO THE DEATH This isn’t just your gardenvariety night of dueling pianos. PTTD turns the crowd-pleasing entertainment mainstay into a high-stakes game show, in which the audience picks the music and judges the musicians. 8 p.m., $20. –C. Moon Reed

SAT, AUG 17 THE HYDRANT CLUB PUPS & POETRY Poetry doesn’t just happen in a library. Enjoy readings by a variety of talented local poets, including Clark County Poet Laureate Heather Lang-Cassera, as you sit among the happy pups of Downtown’s dog hangout. 6 p.m., free, 109 N. 9th St. –C. Moon Reed

SUN, AUG 18 BROOKLYN BOWL GEORGE CLINTON & PARLIAMENT FUNKADELIC Catch a ride on the Mothership Connection while Clinton is still captaining it—he’s planning to retire. Eventually. With Dumpstaphunk, Fishbone, Miss Velvet & The Blue Wolf. 6:30 p.m., $50. –Geoff Carter

WED, AUG 21 Catch James Beard house Dinner Vegans, Baby founder Diana Edelman recently curated a plant-based dinner featuring five local chefs at the esteemed NYC institution. Here’s your chance to experience the menu at Aria. 6:30 p.m., $140, vegansbaby. com. –Genevie Durano


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By Brock Radke

THE KNOCKS August 17, 11 a.m., $20-$30. JEMAA the NoMad Pool Party, 702-7306784.

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ew York producers and DJ duo Ben Ruttner and James Patterson—aka The Knocks—have been bringing some delicious big-city vibes to the inaugural party season at JEMAA at the NoMad Pool this summer. They’re back for another round on August 17, armed with new single “Colors,” a sugarysweet, body-warming house track perfect for the generally chill environment at the Strip’s newest pool party venue. “Colors” is also a great comedown from The Knocks’ other summer release, the one-two punch of “New York Luau” and “No Requests,” both dance-ready gems. “Those two are really good for our summer DJ sets, even though we made them a while ago,” Ruttner says. “‘Luau’ we did last-minute, because it felt like such a good song for the summer. The stuff we have coming out now is all over the spectrum.” Patterson endorses that idea of creating new sounds for the season and stresses that The Knocks are constantly making music and currently pointing

back to their roots. “Our last record was a little more of a deviation from what we normally do. We started out more as straight dance-music producers, and we wanted to get back to that.” Before focusing on their own music, Ruttner and Patterson were known for producing and remixing Katy Perry, Flo Rida, Britney Spears and M83. They’ve collaborated with Fetty Wap, Cam’ron, Carly Rae Jepsen, Walk the Moon and others, and toured with Justin Bieber and Ellie Goulding. Given that mix of experiences, it’s hard to categorize what The Knocks going back to their roots might sound like. “Part of our MO has been being genreless, and also collaboration is always at the heart of whatever we do,” Patterson says. “We love working with other people, and we’ve made some of our best stuff with other people. It’s just a different approach.” The duo is also known for being prolific. “We like to put out a lot of stuff out, whether it’s collaborations or featuring with pop artists,” Ruttner says. “But when we’re making Knocks records, anything goes. It can get weird

when you get to do your own thing, but I think a lot of people like us for that, that we’re taking chances.” The versatility and spontaneity in their music and DJ sets have made for a unique party this summer at JEMAA, where Mark Ronson, Questlove, Matoma and local faves Mighty Mi and Crykit have all made an early impact. “We’ve played a couple times at Marquee Dayclub and a few other places, but this is a different kind of party and feels a lot less Vegas-y,” Ruttner says. “There’s less banger, big-room stuff ,and it feels a little more funky and disco. It’s a little tastier, I think, than the normal Vegas pool party.” Ruttner compares the direction at JEMAA and Park MGM’s nightclub, On the Record, to a similar movement in New York City. “I’ve seen it change a lot [in New York] from the explosion of the bottle-service club world, and that vibe is dwindling a little bit. People want these sexy environments now, lounge-y things and rooftop places. I feel like New York has always been the center of nightlife, and people follow suit. JEMAA and NoMad are a bit ahead of the curve that way.”


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SOPHOMORE

SUCCESS (Courtesy)

DJ Snake strikes again with Carte Blanche By Brock Radke

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aki Taki” has been forcing us all to shake it and heights. He dips back into tropical house for upbeat yell “Rumba!” at clubs and sporting events for gem “Recognize,” a chill track featuring Canadian almost a year now. The Ozuna-anchored all-star R&B duo Majid Jordan, then plunges headlong into track created by DJ Snake—with steamy appearhi-hat heavy trap for “Smile” with instantly recogances by Cardi B and Selena Gomez—peaked at No. nizable multilayered vocals from Bryson Tiller. 11 on Billboard’s Hot 100 in November, nearly giving Snake has never been afraid to dabble in differthe French/Algerian superproducer and ent dance genres, and he’s experimenting DJ SNAKE longtime Wynn Nightlife resident DJ his more than ever on Carte Blanche. He August 17, 10 p.m., fourth top 10 smash. The other three hits recently revealed that the dancehall song $25-$45, XS; August 18, 10:30 are still ubiquitous in Vegas clubs: “Lean “No Option,” showcasing Nigerian singer a.m., $35-$55, On” with Major Lazer and MØ, “Turn Burna Boy, was originally written with Encore Beach Club; Down for What” with Lil Jon and “Let Me Rihanna in mind. 702-770-7300. Love You” featuring Justin Bieber. “We ended up using it … because I But the album containing “Taki Taki” fell in love with this record,” he said on has only been out since July 26, and Carte Blanche Apple Music’s Beats 1 show. “I don’t want to say the is stacked with bangers and other guest stars. The wrong things so all the Rihanna fans … kill me. I newest single is the equally infectious “Loco Conjust had to follow my heart. That’s it.” tigo,” which opens with a megahook by J Balvin It’s easy to imagine RiRi’s distinct vocal tone before an extra-elastic verse from Tyga. floating on top of this beat, but we’ll have to Dig deeper into the album and you’ll discover DJ wait for that superstar team-up—though for DJ Snake isn’t just relying on his uncanny knack for Snake, no collaboration seems out of reach at riding current dance music trends to superlative the moment.

+ HOT SPOTS DILLON FRANCIS FRI 16 | XS It’s been awhile since Francis played Vegas, since he’s been touring all summer, including an epic August show with the All My Friends posse in Seattle. Now he’s back at XS with a new track— the rap-rock-electro hybrid “Til I Die.” 10 p.m., $25-$45. Encore, 702-770-0097.

JESSE MCCARTNEY SAT 17 | GO POOL Last month, the former pop heartthrob played his first-ever concert in the Philippines, thrilling a Manila crowd with a cover of Leona Lewis’ “Bleeding Love.” Catch him poolside center Strip for Daybeats Saturday. 9 a.m., $15. Flamingo, 702-697-2888.

CHRIS LAKE SUN 18 | MARQUEE DAYCLUB Hopefully the British house sensation busts out his new Anti Up single “Right Now”—crafted with regular collaborator Chris Lorenzo—during this Sunday Beatwave series set. 11 a.m., $20-$30. Cosmopolitan, 702-333-9000. –Brock Radke


THIS WEEK JUST ANNOUNCED

O.A.R. WITH AMERICAN AUTHORS

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SIMPLE PLAN & STATE CHAMPS

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ROCK OFF –

SEP

TRIBUTE TO GUNS N ROSES & BON JOVI II

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AUG

UPCOMING

26 LEONI TORRES

AUG

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DANIEL CAESAR WITH KOFFEE

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ON SALE 8/16!

NOV 30 | 7 PM | ALL AGES

IVAN ESTRELLA –

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OCT

11 UFO WITH ARMORED SAINT

SEP 14 DEEP PURPLE WITH JOYOUS WOLF

OCT

SEP

OCT

18-29 SELECT DATES

AN INTIMATE EVENING WITH

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SANTANA – GREATEST HITS LIVE

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18 HOBO JOHNSON AND THE LOVEMAKERS

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OCT

AUG

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BABYMETAL WITH AVATAR

OCT

20 BOULET BROTHER DRAGULA TOUR OCT

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OCT

CALEXICO AND IRON & WINE

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OCT

ANGELS & AIRWAVES

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GASOLINA WITH REGGAETON PARTY

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OCT 05 BIG K.R.I.T.

SEP

OCT

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DANIELA MERCURY

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WITH NATALIE PRASS

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THE STORY SO FAR WITH THE FRIGHTS,

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E n cor e Beac h c lub Flosst radamu s & vale nt ino K h an

aug 9 Photographs courtesy Wynn Nightlife


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ON THE RECOR D Jane t Jacks o n aft e rpart y w it h DJ AKTIVE

aug 10 Photographs courtesy Tony Tran


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E n co r e beac h Clu b Al a n Walker

aug 10

Photographs courtesy Wynn Nightlife


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FLIGHTS Miracle Mile Shops at Planet Hollywood, 702268-7264. Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Friday, 11 a.m.-midnight; Saturday, 10 a.m.-midnight; Sunday, 10 a.m.-11 p.m.

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FOOD & DRINK Flights offers three times the fun

By c. Moon Reed hy have one when you can enjoy the variety of three? That’s the philosophy behind Flights, a restaurant expansion from Northern California that has landed at the Miracle Mile Shops at Planet Hollywood. The restaurant’s focus on shareable, “high-quality comfort food” (according to its website) feels like the perfect fit for its location, next to the V Theater in the hightraffic shopping mall. Chef Kyle Kingrey (formerly of Beauty & Essex and Lavo at Palazzo) piloted the menu. In keeping with the “flights” theme, most food and beverage items are offered as a trio. For example, the flight of fries ($14) features three variations: truffle, herbs and sweet & smokey. There are flights for familiar menu items: shrimp, ceviche, mac ’n’ cheese, dips and pita, and even salad. The cocktail menu offers flights of mojitos, daiquiris, mules, martinis (all are $19) and more. Happy hour, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., lowers that price to $10. The stand-alone but shareable rum

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Orders come in threes at Flights. (Christopher DeVargas/Staff)

cocktail Miracle on the Hudson ($24) is worth a shout-out for its clever concept. A playful homage to the pilot who successfully landed a stalled Airbus on the Hudson River, this large blue drink is garnished with a tiny plastic airplane floating in the center. Kingrey elevates the menu with a variety of international flavors, such as house-made falafel with tofu tahini, truffle croquettes, street corn and Korean chicken. Vegetarian options abound, like a Beyond Beef burger and Soyrizo street tacos. Dessert includes flights of cheesecake and beignets. The Flights theme is also aesthetic, with an airplane hanging from the ceiling and servers dressed as flight attendants. There’s a device on each table inspired by airplane call buttons, which diners can use to summon their server. Flights, which replaced former the tiki-themed Cheeseburger Las Vegas, updates and opens the space. The walls have been removed for optimum flow so that diners can truly soar.

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FOOD & DRINK Raising the bar The Local ups Henderson’s grape game

+

For all the gazillion gallons of vino sipped in this thirsty desert oasis each year, the Las Vegas Valley has never truly seemed like a wine bar kind of place. But now, Henderson is stepping up the cork-popping quotient with the Local, a sociable boîte in the District at Green Valley Ranch. Opened by restaurateurs Chris Connors and Li Sun— who own Me Gusta Tacos in the same center—the Local is a sunshine-filled West Coast take on the traditional wine bar, with an alabaster-toned marble bar, white-and-black geometric tile work, wrought-metal lighting and stylish potted verdure. It’s a pretty space that doesn’t feel Instagrammably cloying or cutesy. The eclectic selection of wines is mercifully free of big corporate labels, and the per-glass price points range from reasonable ($19) to splurge-worthy ($49). Flights are a handy way to get acquainted with your new winey neighbor: The summery New World White selection features Three Brooms’ Sauvignon Blanc, the Fableist’s Grüner Veltliner, Buena Vista’s Chardonnay and Eberle’s Viognier for $16. There are five other such curations with reds and mimosas. Want to be a dark-berry baller? Splash out with a goblet of 2008 Cabernet Sauvignon from Napa Valley’s DeBeikes ($25) or a 2016 Châteauneuf-duPape from Provence’s Louis Bernard ($28). Sparkles are served by the glass and bottle, too. The menu also includes a compact roster of craft beers and cocktails, plus light eats like charcuterie and cheese boards. –Greg Thilmont

THE LOCAL 2240 Village Walk Drive #136, 702-665-6050. Sunday-Thursday, 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Friday-Saturday, 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m.

Spanish on the fly

Build your own paella bowl at Valencian Gold. (Wade Vandervort/Staff)

Valencian Gold takes a fast-casual approach to paella By Leslie Ventura en years ago, the Institute of Culinary Ed- to enjoy. ucation awarded New Yorker Paras Shah First, you choose a paella base (chicken, and San Franciscan Jeffrey Weiss a schol- seafood, mushroom-chickpea or harvest grains), arship to study Spanish cuisine in Spain. and then your greens (arugula, romaine, spinach, Given their shared love of paella, the supergreens). Next, load up on the duo decided to fulfill a bigger dream: protein of your choice (grilled chicken, VALENCIAN bringing the Valencian rice dish to the steak, lamb, shrimp, beans or vegan GOLD U.S. in an affordable and approachratatouille). There are also a number 7960 S. able way. The friends first looked at of items you can add atop your paella Rainbow Blvd. LA, then found a spot where they bowl, including a delicious charred #8000A, could launch the fast casual-concept— broccoli dip with Manchego and Par702-776-7707. Monday-Saturcalled Valencian Gold—right here in mesan cheeses, a romesco sauce and a day, 11 a.m.-10 Las Vegas, on Rainbow just south of vegan tahini aioli with black garlic. An p.m.; Sunday, Windmill. The restaurant takes after assortment of toppings—from an apple noon-7 p.m. the Chipotle model, in which your slaw and a sweet corn salad to Basque meal is prepared to order along an aspickled peppers and crispy chorizo— sembly line of fresh ingredients. follows, and then you finish it off with a dressing, If you’re not familiar with paella, know this: like the zesty fresh parsley and garlic sauce. The preparation process is laborious, to say the If you can’t make up your mind, there are also least. But Shah and Weiss have mastered the old- six bowl specials with various protein bases world techniques and found ways to make the on offer. To make the whole process easier, all dish quicker to produce and easier for customers bowls—custom or not—are priced at $9.75.

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NOISE

(Courtesy)


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By Annie Zaleski

Kacey Musgraves began 2019 by winning four Grammy Awards—including Album of the Year for Golden Hour and Best Country Solo Performance for “Butterflies”—and she has kept her profile high with a collaboration on Brooks & Dunn’s Reboot album, gigs at Lollapalooza and Coachella, and especially her Oh, What a World global tour. In advance of her appearance at the Chelsea inside the Cosmopolitan, here are five reasons why Musgraves is a must-see artist now more than ever.

She has confidence beyond her years. Over the past few years, Musgraves has spent time in arenas opening for major pop stars (Harry Styles and Katy Perry) and country darlings (Little Big Town), and warming up the crowd at some of George Strait’s T-Mobile Arena shows. Performing in front of those crowds has helped the 30-year-old Musgraves gain experience in front of large audiences, while also building expertise at convincing skeptics or those unfamiliar with her music that she’s the real deal. She brings levity to her shows. Musgraves is inarguably country’s meme queen, thanks in part to her genuinely shocked facial reaction to winning Album of the Year (which spawned an officially licensed phone PopSocket) and her wholehearted embrace of the cheeky cowboy aesthetic. That same levity extends to her stage banter, which is refreshingly freewheeling and charming and provides a perfect balance to her dreamy, introspective songs. Exhibit A: At Coachella, after encouraging the crowd to respond to her saying “Yee” with a hearty “Haw,” she jokingly chided them, “I didn’t say f*cking yee!” when they jumped the gun. Golden Hour translates extremely well live. This wasn’t necessarily a given, since while the album’s production is sleek and expansive, the songs themselves are delicate and adorned with sparse piano, guitars and percussion. But Musgraves’ songwriting sincerity gives them heft—it’s even clearer in concert how personal and meaningful Golden Hour is to her—and the emotional connection between the performer and her crowd is undeniable.

Her eclectic take on country is well-honed. Musgraves has always hoped to nudge the country establishment into a progressive direction sonically and thematically. And while radio still isn’t embracing her (“Rainbow” only reached No. 33 on the airplay chart), her full range of influences emerges in brilliant color live. She has recently been covering The Flaming Lips’ psych-pop touchstone “Do You Realize??” and Gloria Gaynor’s empowering disco anthem “I Will Survive”—both of which align well with Golden Hour jams like the zoned-out “Oh, What a World” and the synth-heavy “High Horse.” There’s plenty for longtime and new fans. When an artist breaks out the way Musgraves has, he or she is bound to bring on legions of new fans. Those who have followed Musgraves for years shouldn’t be left behind, however, as her current setlists cover both hits (“Merry Go ’Round,” “Follow Your Arrow”) and choice album cuts (“Die Fun” off 2015’s Pageant Material).

KACEY MUSGRAVES with Poolside. August 20, 8 p.m., $39-$150. The Chelsea, 702698-7000.

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Comedy

(Photos Courtesy/Photo Illustration)

Tom Green

Jim Florentine

Lisa Lampanelli

Downtown laughs

Tim Meadows

The Plaza’s Comedy Works connection adds to a funny Vegas wave By Brock Radke tand-up comedy is surging in Las Vegas. Two hot new rooms have opened in the past 16 months—the Comedy Cellar at the Rio and Jimmy Kimmel’s Comedy Club on the Linq Promenade—and at a larger Strip venue, Encore Theater at Wynn Las Vegas, has added a fresh slate of comedians to its roster of headliners. There, Chris Tucker, Jim Gaffigan, Sebastian Maniscalco, Ali Wong and Nate Bargatze are playing the same room as Diana Ross, Smokey Robinson and John Fogerty. The laughter can be heard beyond the Strip, too. Downtown Grand recently opened the Spare Room with stand-ups onstage five nights a week. And the Plaza will launch comedy in its classic casino showroom on September 12 through a partnership with the Comedy Works, which also operates a club in Saratoga Springs, New York. Take a closer look at the names booked at the Plaza and you’ll realize this is serious comedy. Familiar comics Jim Florentine and Nick Di Paolo kick things off in September before MTV prankster Tom Green—a regular at Bally’s and

S

Harrah’s on the Strip in recent years—takes the stage October 10-12. October 24-26 finds former Venetian and Treasure Island headliner Lisa Lampanelli bringing her no-holds-barred style to the Plaza, and Scream actor and comedian Jamie Kennedy (November 14-16) and Saturday Night Live favorite Tim Meadows (January 9-11) round out the Comedy Works’ initial Vegas lineup, which appears primed to have a major impact on the Downtown entertainment scene. “There are plenty of options if you want to see comedy around the city, but focusing on Downtown, there’s still a stigma that you’ll find great value but maybe the entertainment is not up to par with the Strip,” says Bronson Olimpieri, who’s been working on Plaza marketing initiatives for more than three years and recently stepped into the role of vice president of creative and branding for the property. “We’ll have weekends with a lineup of touring comedians, but for the most part, it will be bigger names that have played the Strip that we’re bringing Downtown

for a great price point. That’s going to be the game-changer for us.” The Comedy Works at the Plaza will primarily offer performances Thursdays at 8 p.m., Fridays at 9 p.m. and Saturdays at 8 and 10 p.m., with ticket prices starting at $20. The secret weapon is the showroom itself, a rare vintage venue in today’s Vegas landscape. Olimpieri notes that the Plaza’s recent renovations have been all about adding modern amenities without compromising the Main Street destination’s old-school feel. “That [feeling] is the main reason I took the gig. I spent over 10 years [working] on the Strip, and hanging out Downtown felt like a real city and reminded me of when I was in West Hollywood,” he says. “It just has great bones and that iconic look.” Comedy isn’t entirely new to the room. Louie Anderson, Doug Stanhope and a few others have performed there in recent years. But the connection with the Comedy Works seems to have come at the right time for the Plaza.


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STAGE

From Russia, with love

(Evan Zimmerman/Courtesy)

In Anastasia , the Smith Center welcomes a fairy tale of lost royalty By C. Moon Reed n orphaned Russian girl with amnesia. Could she be a lost princess? Or a practiced fraud? Since we’re talking about a Broadway musical, we know the answer will be interesting, if not historically accurate. First, a little background: In 1918, Bolsheviks assassinated the Russian Imperial family, ending 300 years of Romanov rule. The murders were shrouded in mystery, leading to rumors that the youngest daughter, 17-year-old Grand Duchess Anastasia, had somehow escaped. That mystery bred claimants, impostors and a cottage industry of books, movies and plays. It took about 80 years to prove that Anastasia did not survive her execution. But Anastasia: The New Broadway Musical, which premiered in Manhattan in 2017, tells a happier story. Inspired by the 1997 animated film of the same name, the musical imagines what might have happened if the young duchess survived, teamed with a pair of con men and set out to win back her identity. And in a way of speaking, the story is told by Broadway royalty: Tony

A

Award winners contributed its score and book, direct Anastasia came along, Tresnjak realized he’d the former by Stephen Flaherty and Lynn Ahrens been preparing for the job his whole life. “It was a (Ragtime, Once on This Island) and the latter by chance to revisit all that history,” Tresnjak says. “It Terrence McNally (Kiss of the Spider Woman). was a very joyous process.” The play sidesteps the complicated politics of Tresnjak says that if he had the opportunity to the Romanovs by telling the story from Anbe a Romanov, he’d “absolutely not” take ANASTASIA it. Forget the jewels, the palaces, the balls. astasia’s point of view. “It’s filtered through August 20the idealized memory of a daughter who lost He’d much rather direct shows. “With 25, days & times vary, her family,” director Darko Tresnjak says every show, you get to create a universe, and $37-$138. during a phone interview from New York there’s nothing more rewarding than that.” Smith City. “It’s a show that begins with a little The Broadway run drew an “incredible Center’s Reynolds girl and her grandmother. The little girl outpouring of immigrant populations— Hall, 702grows up, and we see her in her 20s dealing young families from all over the world,” 749-2000. with identity and romance. There’s also a Tresnjak says. He realized that it was the count and a countess in their 50s trying to “fairy-tale aspects” of Anastasia that were rekindle their romance. There’s something building such a diverse fandom. “If you’re for every age range. It’s a rare piece of entertainan immigrant child, this is what you dream of. ment that families can truly enjoy.” Maybe that’s what drew me to it. Even if you don’t Tresnjak remembers reading a biography of the have a big, extended family, there’s this irrational last Russian tsar while suffering through pneumonia hope that somebody will take you by the hand and as a child in Yugoslavia. He became fascinated by the elevate you to a status of a princess—that dreams history of the Romanovs. So when the opportunity to will come true.”


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ART

(Christopher DeVargas/Staff)

IN BLOOM Erik Beehn’s Are We There Yet? starts with flowers—then, beguilingly adds and subtracts By Dawn-Michelle Baude ou’ve never seen flower paintings like these before. The blossoms in Erik Beehn’s latest exhibition, Are We There Yet?, materialize and disintegrate before your eyes. You can almost inhale the fragrance before they drip, bleed and seep into the mysterious ground from which they bloom. They become ghosts of themselves. And then they come back to life. Technical know-how and artistic vision are key to the uncanny now-you-see-it/now-you-don’t floral presence in the show. The process begins with stock images of painted flowerpots—the kind hanging above the beds in cheap hotel rooms. Next, Beehn separates colors, often running them off one by one on an inkjet printer. Using solvents, he erases the images, then repaints them by hand, erases, reprints, draws, erases, rubs with graphite, erases, traces, paints and so on. Beehn’s overarching technique—subtracting visual information and adding it back in—creates a robust push-pull in the picture plane. Some flowers fade into a cloudy wash of obscurity, while others pop with color into the foreground.

Y

In “#Getbettersoon_1,” for example, blood-red a lobby shelf, complete with glassy faux decorapoppies overtake dissolving daisies, simultanetive pots made from pigmented glue. An array of ously pinging Warhol’s famous floral prints and the Stardust casino signage snapshots covers the shelf, still lives of the Old Masters. Pop Art also along with a concrete picture frame cast aaaac resonates in the perky-but-secretive black from a real one once holding an image of ERIK BEEHN: blossoms of #Getbettersoon_II;” while Beehn’s brother, a victim of suicide. The imARE WE “Getbettersoon_III,” with its “OUT OF ORploded Stardust and deceased brother might THERE YET? DER” announcement, solves the issue of turn the pots into wacky urns, the flowers Through August wayward blooms by blocking the flowerpot into funeral bouquets and the show into a 31; MondayFriday, 9 a.m.with helpful, but ridiculous, signage. #Getmemorial, but they don’t. There’s too much 6 p.m.; Saturday, bettersoon_IV” takes a different tack—the life hanging on those walls, including the 10 a.m.-4 p.m. entire bouquet, with its fresh pink/purple/ checkered pizza serving paper resurrected Artist reception August 28, yellow hues, seems to be melting into the from dinner, blown up and transformed 6 p.m., free. CSN composition like a weeping sympathy card into a playful backdrop. Fine Arts Gallery, or a comic commentary on clichéd images. While floral imagery dominates Are We 702-651-4146. In Are We There Yet?, the back-andThere Yet?, the real subjects of Beehn’s exhiforth of manifesting and dissolving bition are Las Vegas and the artist’s poignant imagery cues a conceptual framework in which the experiences living here. By building and deconcompeting emotions of joy and melancholy, humor structing imagery, he echoes our history of constant and nostalgia produce a complex emotional depth. reinvention. It’s a thoughtful, accomplished show With a nod to his biography, Beehn—a Las Vegas that stays with you long after you’ve left the gallery native who grew up living in a hotel—has installed and stepped back into the sunlight.


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calendar

Maryland rock band O.A.R. hits House of Blues on August 20. (Courtesy)

LIVE music 172 Kiss This (Kiss tribute) 8/20-8/21, 8/278/28. Strutter (Kiss tribute) 8/15. Goapele 8/24. The Winehouse Experience (Amy Winehouse tribute) 8/30-8/31. Rio, 702-513-3356. ACCESS SHOWROOM Vegas McGraw (Tim McGraw tribute) 8/17. The Fixx 8/24. Arch Allies 9/7. Gerald Albright 9/21. Aliante Casino, 702-692-7777. AMERICAN LEGION POST 8 Back to School Drive: World tension, Drain, Hands of God, Suffer the Loss, Beg for Life 8/17. 733 N. Veterans Memorial Drive, 702-382-8533. Backstage Bar & Billiards Hawthorne Heights, Emery, Oh Sleeper 8/21. Hemlock, Mastiv, AntiTrust, Nebula X 8/23. Alesana, Capture, Avoid, Dead Superstar 8/24. Upon a Burning Body, Of Virtue, Speaking With Ghosts 8/29. Brenda Holloway, William Prince, The Inciters 8/30. Mynas, Covina, The Leader the Legend, Vatican Falling 9/7. The Black Dahila Murder 9/10. Redlight King 9/21. Despised Icon, Kublai Khan, Ingested, Shadow of Intent, I Am 9/29. 601 Fremont St., 702-382-2227. THE BARBERSHOP Battle of the Bands 8/15, 8/22, 8/29, 9/5. Heavy Petting Zoo 8/16, 8/23, 8/30. The 442s 8/17, 8/24, 8/31. Rawhide 8/18, 8/25. Cosmopolitan, 702-698-7434. THE BOXX Death Valley High, Them Guns 8/20. The OG Effect 8/22. 1000 N. Nellis Blvd., 702-824-5281.

Brooklyn Bowl Mike Xavier, Charlie Muse, Ulysses X Indka 8/17. George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic, Dumpstapunk, Fishbone, Miss Velvet & The Blue Wolf 8/18. Ballyhoo!, Passafire, Kash’d Out 8/23. Morgan Heritage 8/28. Lisa Lisa, Trinere, Connie, Nocera 8/30. Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers 8/31. Katchafire, EarthKry 9/1. Scott Stapp, Messer, Sunflower Dead 9/6. Sin City Freestyle 9/7. Xavier Rudd 9/11. The Mountain Goats, Lydia Loveless 9/18. Danny Gonzalez, Drew Gooden, Kurtis Conner 9/27. Marianas Trench, The Unlikely Candidates, DJ George Thoms 9/28. Get the Led Out (Zeppelin tribute) 9/29. Jake Shimabukuro 9/30. Linq Promenade, 702-862-2695. Bunkhouse Saloon Mndsgn 8/17 The Silver State, Tony Taylor and the Nova Babies, Par 8/22. SadGirl, The Hurricanes 8/23. Evan Konrad 8/25. Indigo Kidd, Same Sex Mary, Seacats 8/26. Starover Blue, Chameleon Queen, Laabradoor 8/27. Maggot Heart 8/28. Curl Up and Die, Caravels, Entry, World Tension 8/30. Cold Showers, Vowws, Dark Black 8/31. Son Little 9/6. Fight to Live 9/11. Meg & Dia 9/15. Moonchild 9/25. 124 S. 11th St., 702-982-1764. The Chelsea Kacey Musgraves, Poolside 8/20. Duran Duran 9/7-9/8. Daddy Yankee 9/13. Poncho Barraza 9/14. Cosmopolitan, 702-698-6797. Chrome Showroom John Waite 8/17. Santa Fe Station, 702-658-4900. CLEOPATRA’S BARGE Daniel Emmet 8/25-8/26, 9/1, 9/5-9/6, 9/22-9/23. Wayne Newton 9/2-9/4,

9/9-9/11, 9/16-9/18, 9/24-9/25, 9/30-10/2. Caesars Palace, 866-227-5938. THE CLUB Fortunate Son (CCR tribute), CSN Express (Crosby, Stills & Nash tribute), Evil Waze (Santana tribute) 8/16. Kelly Sheehan (Janis Joplin tribute) 8/17. Tyriq & Jamestown 8/23. Bella Donna (Stevie Nicks tribute), Petty & The Heartshakers (Tom Petty tribute) 8/24. Burn Unit 8/30. MJ Deja Vu (Michael Jackson tribute) 8/31. Chase & The Pursuit 9/6. The Whispers, The Emotions 9/7. Three Lock Box (Sammy Hagar tribute) 9/13. Queen Nation (Queen tribute) 9/14. Rhythm 9/20. Nation 10,000 Maniacs 9/21. Blue String Theory 9/27. Patty Smyth & Scandal 9/28. Cannery, 702-507-5700. CLUB MADRID Average White Band 8/24. Ottmar Liebert 9/7. Sunset Station, 702-547-7777. The Colosseum Keith Urban 9/6-9/7. Luis Miguel 9/12-9/13, 9/15-9/16. Enrique Iglesias 9/14. Rod Stewart 9/18, 9/20-9/21, 9/24, 9/30. Caesars Palace, 866-227-5938.

THE Dillinger Sceddy 8/16. Jeff Reylee 8/17. Wayne David Band 8/23. L&C Acoustic 8/24. Jase Wills 8/30. Marty Feick 8/31. 1224 Arizona St., Boulder City, 702-293-4001. THE Dispensary Lounge Chris Clermont 8/16. Karen Jones 8/17. Josh Mirman 8/21. Toscha Comeaux 8/23. Jo Belle Yonely 8/24. Joe Darro & Friends 8/25. Summer Kodama Septet 8/28. Gary Fowler 8/30. Ryan Baker 8/31. 2451 E. Tropicana Ave., 702-458-6343. THE DISTRICT AT GREEN VALLEY RANCH TJ Gage 8/16. Gracen Reign 8/17. Sonia Barcelona 8/23. Cameron Dettman 8/24. Mikey Tucker 8/31. 2225 Village Walk Drive, 702-564-8595. Dive Bar Lawn Mower Death Riders, Kat Kalling 8/15. Rebel Cats 8/16. The Mapes, Sheiks of Neptune, Los Carahos, No Que No, Skeleton Crew 8/17. Skinlab, Arrival of Autumn, Mastiv 8/30. Nowhere Fast (Smiths/Morrissey tribute) 8/31. 4110 S. Maryland Parkway, 702-586-3483. DONNY & MARIE SHOWROOM Paula Abdul 8/15-8/17. Flamingo, 702-733-3111.

Count’s VAMP’D Sweet Home Alabama (Southern rock tribute) 8/15. Ridin’ the Storm Out (REO Speedwagon tribute), Burn Unit 8/16. Gilby Clarke, The Remainz 8/17. Jeff Scott Soto & Jason Bieler, Brandon Shane 8/22. Problem Child (AC/ DC tribute), Every Woman Band 8/24. Tom Keifer, Bad Little Sister 8/29. Haunt, Void Vator, Great Electric Quest 8/30. Tora Tora, Jeff Carlson Band 8/31. 750 W. Sahara Ave., 702-220-8849.

DOUBLE DOWN SALOON The Filthy Lowdown, City Escape Artist 8/15. The Psyatics, Stagnetti’s Cock, Strange Mistress, VJ Atomic 8/16. Y.A.P.O, Rompe Cabezas, Lean 13, Box Cutters, Dead Punks, Octobrists 8/24. 4640 Paradise Road, 702-791-5775.

DALLAS EVENTS CENTER Aeromyth (Aerosmith tribute) 8/24. Uptown Funk (Bruno Mars tribute) 9/28. Texas Station, 702-631-1000.

DOWNTOWN CONTAINER PARK Danny Loxads & The Latin Fusion 8/16. Stanley Avenue 8/17. Sorry in Advance, Jill & Julia 8/23. Haleamano


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8/24. Jazz Session Sundays 8/25. Matt Matelko 8/30. 707 Fremont St., 702-359-9982. DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS EVENTS CENTER Young the Giant, Fitz and the Tantrums, Alice Merton 8/16. Collective Zoo Block Party ft. Big Gigantic, Chet Porter & more 8/31. Papa Roach, Asking Alexandria, Bad Wolves 9/1. Lost ’80s Live ft. A Flock of Seagulls, Missing Persons & more 9/7. Bite of Las Vegas ft. Rob Thomas, Shinedown & more 9/14. Social Distortion, Flogging Molly, The Devil Makes Three, Le Butcherettes 9/28. 200 S. 3rd St., 800-745-3000. Eagle Aerie Hall The Mad Rabbits, Moral Deficit, Damaged Savage, The Tongues, Rudiments, Dead by Breakfast, Loveshark 8/17. Model Citizen, Pariah Was One, Orenda, Navarre, Amongst the Gallows, Symptom, Gods of Hate 8/25. 310 W. Pacific Ave., 702-568-8927. Encore Theater Diana Ross 8/16-8/17, 8/21, 8/23-8/24. Smokey Robinson 9/18, 9/20-9/21. Wynn, 702-770-6696. EVEL PIE Wayne Hancock 8/17. 508 Fremont St., 702-840-6460. FREEDOM BEAT The New Black 8/17. Shawn Eiferman 8/18. Lisa Marie Smith 8/23. Kennedy King, Tony Venniro 8/24. Kaylie Foster 8/25. Dan Fester 8/30. Cameron Calloway, Megan Ruger 8/31. Downtown Grand, 702-719-5315.

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Evil, Devour the Day 8/31. Gasolina Party 9/6. Schism (Tool tribute), Ghost LV (Ghost tribute) 9/7. Daniela Mercury 9/12. Conccierto del Amor (Vicente Fernandez tribute) 9/13. Deep Purple 9/14. Santana 9/18, 9/20-9/22, 9/25, 9/27-9/29, 10/30, 11/1-11/3, 11/6, 11/8-11/10. Asaiah Ziv, Mac Nealy, Chop808, Jayy, Papichuloteej, Real Hits 9/19. Rancid, Pennywise, The English Beat, Iron Reagan 9/26. Babymetal 9/30. Mandalay Bay, 702-632-7600. The Joint Mary J. Blige 8/16-8/17. Brian Wilson, The Zombies 8/31. Big Blues Bender ft. Gov’t Mule, Robert Cray, Little Steven & The Disciples of Soul & more 9/5-9/8. Cake, Ben Folds, Tall Heights 9/10. Greta Van Fleet, Shannon & The Clams 9/27. Hard Rock Hotel, 702-693-5000. Las Vegas Festival Grounds iHeartRadio Music Festival Daytime Stage ft. Billie Eilish, Maren Morris & more 9/21. 311 W. Sahara Ave., 702-632-7589. LIFE IS BEAUTIFUL FESTIVAL Ft. Post Malone, The Black Keys, Chance the Rapper & more 9/20-9/22. Downtown Las Vegas, lifeisbeautiful.com. M PAVILION Martin Nievera, Pops Fernandez, Robin Nievera 9/1. M Resort, 702-797-1000. M Pool Martina McBride 8/3. M Resort, 702-797-1000.

Fremont STREET EXPERIENCE Buckcherry 8/17. Cheap Trick 8/24. The Wallflowers 8/30. I Love the 90’s ft. Vanilla Ice, Montell Jordan & more 9/1. Smash Mouth 9/28. vegasexperience.com.

Mandalay Bay BEACH Psycho Las Vegas ft. The Original Misfits, Opeth, Electric Wizard & more 8/16-8/18. Iration, Pepper, Katastro 8/24. Rebelution, Protoje, Collie Buddz, DJ Mackle 8/30-8/31. Café Tacvba 9/13. Alejandra Guzmán 9/15. Los Angeles Azules 9/20. 702-632-7777.

Gilley’s Saloon Voodoo Cowboys 8/15, 8/28-8/29. Chris Lozano 8/16-8/17. Brett Arthur Rigby 8/21, 9/4. Dynamite Draw 8/228/24. Redneck Rodeo 8/30-8/31. Treasure Island, 702-894-7722.

Mandalay Bay Events Center Psycho Las Vegas ft. The Original Misfits, Opeth, Electric Wizard & more 8/16-8/18. Marco Antonio Solís 9/13. Maluma 9/14. Alejandro Fernández 9/15. 702-632-7777.

GO POOL Russell Dickerson 8/27. Mitchell Tenpenny 9/17. Flamingo, 702-697-2888.

MGM Grand Garden Arena Chris Young, Locash 8/17. Iron Maiden, The Raven Age 9/13. Maná 9/14. Eagles 9/27-9/28. 702-531-3826.

Golden Nugget Showroom The Grass Roots 8/16. B.J. Thomas 8/23. Lita Ford 8/30. The Buckinghams 9/6. Last in Line (Dio tribute) 9/13. Gary Puckett & The Union Gap 9/20. Jefferson Starship 9/27. 866-946-5336. GRAND EVENTS CENTER Boz Scaggs 8/24. Brian Setzer’s Rockabilly Riot 8/30. Barbara & Frank: The Concert That Never Was (Streisand/Sinatra tribute) 9/6. Pat Benatar Experience (tribute) 9/7. The Women in Me (country tribute) 9/14. Hollywood U2 (U2 tribute) 9/21. Green Valley Ranch, 702-617-7777. HARD ROCK HOTEL POOL Blues Bender ft. Gov’t Mule, Robert Cray, Little Steven & The Disciples of Soul & more 9/5-9/8. The Midnight 9/28. 702-693-5000. Hard Rock Live Bass Wars 8/16. The Killer Queens (Queen tribute) 9/5. Lucky Devils Band 9/16. Lacuna Coil, Bad Omens, Toothgrinder, Uncured 9/28. 3771 Las Vegas Blvd. S., 702-733-7625. HARDWAY 8 Michael Louis Austin 8/16. The New Waves 8/23. Frankie Lee & The Infernos 8/30. 46 S. Water St., 702-410-5124. House of Blues Psycho Las Vegas ft. The Original Misfits, Opeth, Electric Wizard & more 8/16-8/18. O.A.R., American Authors 8/20. Rocks Off (Guns N’ Roses/Bon Jovi tribute) 8/23. Tribal Theory, Mahi, The Escapers, Thrive 8/24. Leoni Torres 8/26. Daniel Caesar 8/29. Black Flag, The Dickies, D.I., The Linecutters 8/30. Skillet, Sevendust, Pop

Orleans Showroom Air Supply 8/30-9/1. The Manhattans 9/7. Gentlemen of Soul 9/20. Taylor Dayne 9/28. 702-365-7111. Park Theater Janet Jackson 8/16-8/17. Cher 8/21, 8/23-8/24, 8/28, 8/31, 9/1. Bruno Mars 9/39/4, 9/7, 9/9-9/10, 9/13-9/14. Aerosmith 9/21, 9/23, 9/26, 9/28. Park MGM, 844-600-7275. Pearl CONCERT THEATER Lady Antebellum 8/23-8/24, 8/28, 8/30-8/31. Farruko 9/6. Heart, Joan Jett & The Blackhearts 9/8. OneRepublic 9/13. Reik 9/14. The Doobie Brothers 9/15. UB40 ft. Ali Campbell & Astro, Shaggy 9/28. Palms, 702-944-3200. THE Railhead Hadden Sayers 8/22. Night Ranger 8/24. Southbound & Company (classic rock tribute) 9/7. The Dennis Jones Band 9/19. Boulder Station, 702-432-7777. RED ROCK BALLROOM David Crosby & Sky Trails Band 9/13. Red Rock Resort, 702-797-7777. Rocks Lounge Cover to Cover (Police tribute) 8/24. Richard Cheese 9/6. Red Rock Resort, 702-797-7777. SAM’S TOWN LIVE OPM Hitmakers 8/30. The Iron Maidens (Iron Maiden tribute) 9/12. Selena the Show (Selena tribute) 9/13. Bamboo 9/20. KZ Tandingan 9/22. 702-456-7777. Sand Dollar Lounge Scott Ellison Band 8/15. The Benders 8/16. GoldTop

31


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8 .1 5 .1 9

Bob, Jocelyn & Chris Arndt 8/17. Dan Fester 8/15. Open Jam 8/19. Chase & The Pursuit 8/20. Stoney Curtis 8/21. Jack Conner’s Soul Town 8/22. GoldTop Bob, The Moanin’ Blacksnakes 8/23. Billy Ray Charles, Chris Tofield 8/24. Open Jam 8/26. Ryan Whyte Maloney 8/27. The Bar Squad 8/28. Revival Records Showcase 8/29. Dazed & Confused 8/30. Becky Lynn, Cherry Rat, Shanda & The Howlers 8/31. 3355 Spring Mountain Road, 702-485-5401.

UPCOMING EVENTS AUG

17

MNDSGN

AUG BUGHOUSE: THE ART 19 OF DIALECTIC 7PM-10PM

& BURNT KARAOKE 10PM-2AM

AUG THE SILVER STATE, TONY 22 TAYLOR & THE NOVA BABIES, IN THEATERS FRIDAY, & PAR AUG SAD GIRL WITH 23 THE HURRICANES AUG INDIGO KIDD, SEACATS, 26 & SAME SEX MARY AUG STAROVER BLUE, 27 CHAMELEON QUEEN, AND LAABRADOOR AUG

28

MAGGOT HEART

AUG CURL UP AND DIE 30 HOMETOWN REUNION WITH CARAVELS & ENTRY- SOLD OUT AUG COLD SHOWERS WITH 31 VOWWS AND DARK BLACK SEP

06

SON LITTLE

WWW.BUNKHOUSEDOWNTOWN.COM @BUNKHOUSE_SALOON

Brad Garrett’s Comedy Club Jay Black, Ahmed Ahmed, Jimmy Burns Thru 8/18. Trixx, James P. Connelly, Jerry Rocha 8/19-8/25. MGM Grand, 866-740-7711.

ZIA RECORD EXCHANGE Tool: Icoculum Midnight sale & listening party 8/29. 4225 S. Eastern Ave., 702-735-4942; 1216 S. Rainbow Blvd., 702-233-4942.

COMEDY CELLAR Mike Yard, Daniel Simonsen, Chloe Hilliard, Chris Distefano, Mark Cohen Thru 8/18. Byron Bowers, Lynne Koplitz, Jackie Fabulous, Mark Cohen 8/19-8/25. Rio, 702-777-2782.

SANDBAR Peter Frampton 9/28. Red Rock Resort, 702-797-7777.

clubs

JIMMY KIMMEL’S COMEDY CLUB Luenell Sundays thru 9/29. Chris Porter 8/15-8/18. Linq Promenade, 702-777-2782.

South Point Showroom Frankie Moreno 8/15, 8/29, 9/5, 9/19. James Darren 8/16-8/17. Folk Legacy Trio 8/23-8/24. Bob Anderson 8/30-9/1. The Lettermen 9/6-9/8. Good Vibrations (Beach Boys tribute) 9/13-9/15. Crystal Gayle 9/20-9/22. 702-696-7111.

BREATHE Chuck Fader 8/16, 8/18. Hard Rock Hotel, 702-693-5505.

The Space Lyfe Jennings 8/24. Volterrum, Eloteros, Draugr, Vetivs, Kalani 8/31. Reckless in Vegas 9/15. Common Ground 9/27. 3460 Cavaretta Court, 702-903-1070. STAR OF THE DESERT ARENA Travis Tritt, Charlie Daniels Band 8/24. Banda Tierra Sagrada 8/31. Larry Hernandez 9/14. Commodores 9/28. Primm, 702-386-7867.

Chateau Koko 8/16. DJ Presto One 8/17. DJ ShadowRed 8/21. Paris, 702-776-7770.

JOKESTERS COMEDY CLUB Justin Joe Brown, Don Barnhart Thru 8/18. Oscar Ovies, Don Barnhart 8/19. Steven Briggs, Don Barnhart 8/20. Oscar Ovies, Don Barnhart 8/21. The D, 702-388-2111.

DAYLIGHT Psycho Swim 8/15. DJ Sincere 8/16. Kid Funk 8/17. Rick Ross 8/18. Mandalay Bay, 702-632-4700.

L.A. COMEDY CLUB Kiry Shabazz Thru 8/18. Willie Fratto Farrell 8/19-8/25. The Strat, 702-380-7711.

Drai’s BEACHCLUB Brooke Evers 8/16. Fabolous, A-Trak 8/17. DJ Pauly D 8/18. F3R 8/20. Cromwell, 702-777-3800.

LAUGH FACTORY Darren Carter, Joe Nipote, Frazer Smith Thru 8/18. Tropicana, 702-739-2411.

Drai’s DJ Pauly D 8/15. Fabolous 8/16. Yo Gotti 8/17. De La Ghetto 8/18. Cromwell, 702-777-3800.

Orleans Showroom Dan Lornitis 8/17. 702-365-7111. SAND DOLLAR LOUNGE Comedy 8/19. Spring Mountain Road, 702-485-5401.

STARBOARD TACK In the Whale 8/16. Midnight Peacemaker, Luxury Furniture Store, The Big Friendly Corporation 8/22. 2601 Atlantic St., 702-684-5769.

ENCORE BEACH CLUB Alesso 8/16. Nightswim: SayMyName 8/16. Diplo 8/17. Nightswim: RL Grime 8/17. DJ Snake 8/18. Nightswim: Flosstradamus 8/21. Encore, 702-770-7300.

Stoney’s Rockin’ Country Jake Rose 8/16. Nate Moran 8/23. Styles Haury 8/30. The Swon Brothers 9/6. Lucas Hoge 9/13. Seth Cook 9/20. Riley Green, Travis Denning 9/27. Town Square, 702-435-2855.

Foundation Room DJ Seany Mac 8/15. DJ Obscene 8/16. DJ D-Miles 8/17. DJ Jimmy Lite 8/18. DJ Sam I Am 8/19. Kay the Riot 8/20. DJ Sincere 8/21. Mandalay Bay, 702-632-7631.

TICKLE ME COMEDY CLUB Anton Knight, Penny Prince Thru 8/17. Eclipse Theaters, 702-816-4300.

GO POOL Jenna Palmer 8/15. DJ Supa James 8/16. Jesse McCartney 8/17. Koko & Bayati 8/18. Greg Lopez, JD Live 8/20. Flamingo, 702697-2888.

LOCAL THEATER

SUNCOAST SHOWROOM December ’63 (Frankie Valli tribute) 8/17. Hot August Nights (Neil Diamond tribute) 8/24. Led Zepagain (Zeppelin tribute) 8/31. Serpentine Fire (Earth, Wind & Fire tribute) 9/14. La La Brooks 9/21. Wanted (Bon Jovi tribute) 9/28. 800-745-3000. Terry Fator TheatRE Boyz II Men 9/14-9/15. Mirage, 702-792-7777. THOMAS & MACK CENTER Rezz, Peekaboo, BlackGummy 9/28. 702-739-3267. T-Mobile Arena Lynyrd Skynyrd, Bad Company 8/16. George Strait, Ashley McBryde 8/23-8/24. Elton John 9/6-9/7. Eric Clapton, Jimmie Vaughan 9/13. iHeartRadio Music Festival ft. Alicia Keys, Chance the Rapper, Mumford & Sons & more 9/20-9/21. 702-692-1600. TopGolF The Majority, Band of Braddahs 8/30. Tortured Soul, Unfiltered Soul 8/31. 4627 Koval Lane, 702-933-8458. Venetian Theatre Jackson Browne 8/21, 8/23-8/24. Tony Bennett 9/25, 9/27-9/28. 702-414-9000.

NOW WITH FOOD FROM

ZAPPOS THEATER Def Leppard 8/16-8/17, 8/20, 8/23-8/24, 8/29, 8/31-9/1, 9/4, 9/6-9/7. Banda MS 9/13. Gloria Trevi, Karol G 9/14. Marc Anthony 9/15. Christina Aguilera 9/20-9/21, 9/24, 9/279/28. Planet Hollywood, 702-777-6737.

Vinyl Emo Night Tour 8/17. Stick to Your Guns, Counterparts, Terror, Sanction, Year of the Knife 8/21. Gregory Michael Davis, RoboTuxedo, Chameleon Queen 8/23. Franks & Deans 8/24. Shonen Knife, Me Like Bees 8/25. Veil of Maya, Gideon, Hawk 8/26. Blues Bender ft. Gov’t Mule, Robert Cray, Little Steven & The Disciples of Soul & more 9/5-9/8. DeVotchKa, The Joy Formidable 9/19. Hard Rock Hotel, 702-693-5000.

JEMAA THE NOMAD POOL PARTY DJ G-Squared 8/16. The Knocks 8/17. V-Tech 8/18. Park MGM, 702-730-6784. KAOS Dayclub: David Clutch 8/16. Marshmello 8/16. Dayclub: Marshmello 8/17. Skrillex 8/17. Dayclub: Gorgon City 8/18. Above & Beyond 8/18. Palms, 702-739-5267. Light DJ E-Rock 8/16. Travis Porter 8/17. DJ Que 8/21. Mandalay Bay, 702-632-4700. Marquee DAYCLUB Deorro 8/15. Ummet Ozcan 8/16. Vice 8/17. Chris Lake 8/18. Cosmopolitan, 702-333-9000. Marquee San Holo 8/16. Mustard 8/17. Deorro 8/19. Cosmopolitan, 702-333-9000. ON THE RECORD DJ G-Squared 8/15. Slim McGraw 8/16. DJ Aktive 8/17. DJ C-L.A. 8/21. Park MGM, 702-730-7777. TAO BEACH Deville 8/15. Kay the Riot 8/16. Brody Jenner 8/17. DJ C-L.A. 8/18. Venetian, 702-388-8588. TAO Justin Credible 8/15. Crespo 8/16. DJ Five 8/17. Venetian, 702-388-8588. XS Dillon Francis 8/16. DJ Snake 8/17. Nightswim: Alesso 8/18. Encore, 702-770-7300.

Comedy

WESTGATE INTERNATIONAl THEATER Soul of Motown 9/10-9/14. Barry Manilow 9/19-9/21, 9/26-9/28. 800-222-5361.

BONKERZ COMEDY CLUB Tommy Lama 8/15. Rampart Casino, 702-507-5900.

The Writer’s Block Benny Grove, Evet + Ted, Gazer, Jess Pluto 8/28. 519 S. 6th St., 702-550-6399.

BONKERZ COMEDY CLUB HENDERSON Comedy 8/17. Klondike Sunset Casino, 444 W. Sunset Road, 702-507-5900.

Terry Fator TheatrE Ron White 8/16-8/17. Mirage, 702-792-7777.

Majestic Repertory Theatre Rattlesnakes Thru 8/18. 1217 S. Main St., 702-478-9636. OPERA LAS VEGAS 20th Anniversary Season Reveal 8/15. Judy Bayley Theatre, 702-895-2787. Super Summer Theatre Chicago Thru 8/17. Spring Mountain Ranch State Park, 702-579-7529. Velveteen Rabbit Much Ado About Nothing 8/18. 1218 S. Main St., 702-685-9645.

Performing Arts & Culture Centennial Hills LIBRARY Woodstock Weekend: 50th Anniversary Celebration 8/168/17. 6711 N. Buffalo Drive, 702-507-6100. East Las Vegas Library Farofa 8/18. 2851 E. Bonanza Road, 702-507-3500 The Hydrant Club Pups & Poetry w/Heather Lang-Cassera, Elizabeth Quiñones-Zaldaña & more 8/17. 109 N. 9th Street, 702-721-9663. MARKET IN THE ALLEY Hosted by Fergusons Downtown. 8/18. 1031 Fremont St. THE Mob Museum The Epic Story of Folies Bergere 8/17. 300 Stewart Ave., themobmuseum.org. Sahara West Library Farofa 8/17. 9600 W. Sahara Ave., 702-507-3630. THE Smith Center (Reynolds Hall) Anastasia 8/20-8/25. (Cabaret Jazz) Michael Grimm Thru 8/13. The Music of Janis Joplin Starring Michelle Rohl 8/17. Freddie B 8/18. Frankie Moreno 8/20. 702-749-2000.


8 .1 5 .1 9

c u lt u r e w e e k ly

33

Hip-hop beat man Mndsgn plays the Bunkhouse on August 17. (Courtesy)

THU

8.15

Comedy 6-8:30pm Scott Elison Band 10pm BLUES

FRI

8.16

The Benders BLUES

SAT The Space Pianos to the Death 8/16-8/17. 3460 Cavaretta Court, 702-903-1070. Springs PRESERVE Billy Hayes: Riding the Midnight Express 8/17. 333 S. Valley View Blvd., 702-822-7700. The Writer’s Block Kevin Alexander 8/19. 519 S. 6th St., 702-550-6399.

900 E. Karen Ave. #D222, 702-805-1166. CSN (Fine Arts Gallery) Erik Beehn: Are We There Yet? Thru 8/31. (Artspace Gallery) Yidan Guo: The Art of Introspection Thru 9/3. 3200 E. Cheyenne Ave., 702-651-4146. East Las Vegas Library Jorge A. Betancourt-Polanco: Life Is Colorful Thru 9/8. 2851 E. Bonanza Road 702-507-3500.

Galleries & Museums

Enterprise Library Amit Chauhan & Jaime Cornelio Jimena II: Code Blue 8/15-10/20. Reception 8/15. 25 E. Shelbourne Ave., 702-507-3760.

Barrick Museum of Art Vessel: Ceramics of Ancient West Mexico Thru 8/17. UNLV, 4505 S. Maryland Parkway, 702-895-3381.

Left of Center ART GALLERY Uncommon Curiosities Thru 8/31. 2207 W. Gowan Road, 702-647-7378.

Bellagio Gallery of Fine Art Permeating Landscape Thru 10/27. 702-693-7871.

Nevada Humanities Program Gallery Dry Wit Thru 9/25. 1017 S. 1st St. #190, nevadahumanities.org.

Centennial Hills Library Ronaldo Dizon: Images Left Behind Thru 9/10. 6711 N. Buffalo Drive, 702-507-6100. Charleston HeightS Arts Center Remnant Thru 9/28. 800 Brush St., 702-229-2787. Clark County LIBRARY The Fabulous Las Vegas Scribes: Making Marks Thru 8/27. 1401 E. Flamingo Road, 702-507-3400. Clark County Museum The Beauty of Purpose: Utilitarian Arts of the Paiute People Thru 8/25. 1830 S. Boulder Highway, 702-455-7995. CORE CONTEMPORARY Sapira Cheuk: New Vessels, Unmade Structures Thru 8/31.

Priscilla Fowler Fine Art Ken Farkash: Lopsided Pop & Priscilla Fowler: More Visceral Blooms Thru 8/31. 1025 S. 1st St. #155, 719-371-5640.

West Las Vegas Library Ted Chase R. McCurdy: Exploration Thru 9/3. 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd., 702-507-3980. Winchester Dondero Cultural Center Gallery And Beyond Thru 8/16. 3130 S. McLeod Drive, 702-455-7340.

FOOD & DRINK JAMES BEARD VEGAN DINNER 8/21. Catch at Aria, bit.ly/31snXnJ. Neon Circus Beer Festival 8/17. 601 Fremont St., it.ly/2Kqs0v8. stella artois artist throwdown 8/17. ReBar, 1225 S. Main St., 702-349-2283.

Gold-Top Bob 6:30-9:30pm Jocelyn & Chris Ardnt 10pm BLUES/ROCK

SUN

FANTASY FOOTBALL EXPERIENCE WITH MATTHEW BERRY 8/16. Cleopatra’s Barge, Caesars Palace, 866-227-5938.

RECYCLED PROPAGANDA Antisocial Media Thru 8/22. 1114 S. Main St. #120, recycledpropaganda.com.

LAS VEGAS ACES Phoenix 8/20. Mandalay Bay Events Center, 702-632-7777.

wentworth GALLERY Rick Allen: Legends & Dreams 2019 Thru 9/7. Planet Hollywood, 3667 Las Vegas Blvd. S., 702-895-4449.

LAS VEGAS AVIATORS Albuquerque 8/158/18. Reno 8/19-8/21. Las Vegas Ballpark, 702-386-7200.

West Charleston Library Christine Wilson: Into Africa Thru 9/22. 6301 W. Charleston Blvd., 702-507-3940.

UNLV MEN’S SOCCER Cal Poly (exhibition) 8/20. Peter Johann Memorial Field, 702-739-3267.

8.18

Dan Fester

1 MAN JAM BAND

MON 8.19 Comedy 7-10pm Open Jam 10pm TUE

8.20

Chase & The Pursuit COUNTRY

WED

SPORTS

8.17

8.21

Stoney Curtis

BLUES/ROCK ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.


34

LV W p u z z l e & h o r o s c o p e s

Premier Crossword

8 .1 5 .1 9

horoscopes week of MONTH DATE by rob brezsny

“E-Z DOES IT” by frank Longo

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Sorting and processing used materials to make them available for fresh stuff is at least as expensive as creating new plastic items from scratch. But recycling is healthier for the environment. So the financial argument is insubstantial, whereas the moral argument is strong. Apply a similar perspective to your upcoming decisions. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Frederick Douglass secretly mastered the art of reading and writing, and ultimately became emboldened to escape slavery. He became one of the 19th century’s most influential abolitionists. Make Douglass your role model for the coming months. You’re ready to break the hold of a certain curse—and go on to achieve success. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): For 25 years, businessman Don Thompson worked for McDonald’s, including three years as its CEO. But in 2015, he left McDonald’s and became part of Beyond Meat, which sells vegan alternatives to meat. An equally dramatic shift could be coming for you in the coming months. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “The learning process is something you can incite, literally incite, like a riot,” wrote author Audre Lorde. That is true, but some phases of your life are more favorable than others for seeking deep and rapid education. For example, the coming weeks will bring you especially rich teachings if you incite the learning process now. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Stay in your lane” has come to mean “mind your own business,” and usually has a pejorative sense. But soften it for your use in the coming weeks. Make it mean “stick to what you’re good at and know about.” Author Zadie Smith says that this is good advice for writers. Apply that counsel to your own sphere or field. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Yisrael Kristal survived the Auschwitz concentration camp and went on to live to the age of 113. Because of the chaos of World War I, he hadn’t had a bar mitzvah when he turned 13. So he did it in his old age. You, too, will claim a reward or observe a milestone or collect a blessing you weren’t able to enjoy earlier.

2018 King features syndicate

ACROSS 1 Not dozing 6 Rock band boosters 10 Make of the XK-E, in brief 13 Leading nun 19 Adage 20 Irrational suspicion 22 Dark-haired man 23 Cracker consumed to become a fraternity member? 25 Against: Prefix 26 Dry stretch 27 Sessions with mediums 29 Vidalia, e.g. 30 Cochlea site 33 Comment when pointing out your aunt’s child? 35 Ducky insurance company? 40 Bloody — (cocktails) 44 Wee child 45 Spanish pronoun 46 German poet who founded a ketchup company? 50 — Minor (Little Bear) 53 Keyless, in music 54 Marilyn of old movies 55 Was a snitch 59 Kindly 61 Shoplifts or embezzles 63 Three-horse wagon 64 Lead-in to byte 66 Cap required to be worn to gain entry? 68 Author Nin 72 Be liable to 74 Big antelope 75 Teal relatives 76 Impudent actress who played Cleo?

81 — bad example 83 Furtive observation 84 Having some replacement parts? 86 Hybrid citrus 91 Perilous stuff to skate on 93 Lethargy 95 Nomadic sort 96 Iraqi, say 97 Walk just beyond a northern Austrian city’s border? 99 Pick, with “for” 102 Stir-fry tidbit 104 Dumbbells 105 Many-time golf champ Nick 106 Small squirt of a zero-calorie drink? 111 With 37-Down, fin-footed mammal 113 “Tiny Dancer” singer John 114 Road show groups 118 Uncrowded 124 Sadness 126 Classic figure skating painting? 129 Sculpted torso, maybe 130 White rat’s condition 131 Chavez of labor 132 “Plus” qualities 133 Vote “for” 134 The whole nine yards 135 Additional DOWN 1 In amongst 2 Lose power 3 Allies’ foe 4 Eagle cousin 5 Persian Gulf ruler 6 Fitting 7 — tai 8 Whizzes 9 Of right mind

10 Wrist or hip 11 Letter after G, spelled out 12 Eye steadily 13 It airs “The Conners” 14 Witch’s “vehicle” 15 Bugs is one 16 Lure 17 Watery, as a membrane 18 Unit of lyrics 21 Gp. backing guns 24 Had a bite 28 Heavily built 31 “Better Call Saul” airer 32 Chicago mayor — Emanuel 34 Some low clouds 35 Melville captain 36 Grand party 37 See 111-Across 38 Oscar winner Hathaway 39 Event for artisans selling wares 41 They follow pis 42 Gossip spreader 43 Fathered, as a foal 47 Nastase near a tennis net 48 Chomsky of linguistics 49 1983 Woody Allen role 51 Beef dish in a sour cream sauce 52 Make right 56 Spirit 57 Wrings (out) 58 Astonish 60 Gator cousin 62 IRS form info 65 Spin — (emulate Spider-Man) 67 Raw beef fat 68 Assist in evil 69 Have a bite 70 High peaks, in

Italian 71 Menzel who voiced Elsa in “Frozen” 73 Fixes text 77 He drew Li’l Abner 78 Rioter’s haul 79 How a loss may be marked 80 Nada 82 Root for poi 85 “Far out!” 87 Grand party 88 Old film actor Jannings 89 Give for a bit 90 Tiny pasta 92 Roger of film review 94 Dull routines 98 Mao — -tung 99 City in west Texas 100 Aviators 101 Aquarium favorites 103 Windpipe 107 Rich dessert 108 Animal nose 109 Actor Peter O’— 110 Fitness program with Latin music 112 Hearth waste 115 — gow (casino game) 116 City of central Sicily 117 Actress Loretta 119 Tempo 120 TV’s Trebek 121 Corrode 122 Sky twinkler 123 Biblical prophet 125 Craven of horror films 127 Prefix like “equi-” 128 Celebrity gossip site

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Sailors have used compasses to navigate since the 11th century. But they also needed knowledge of the stars and skill at reading ocean currents. They also released birds from ships because if the birds flew off and returned, that told the sailors there was no land close by. Gather several navigational tools for your upcoming quest. One isn’t enough. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): What do you want from allies who aren’t your lovers? What feelings do you most enjoy while in the company of interesting, non-romantic companions? Get clear about what you want—and then make it your priority to foster it. In the coming weeks, you’ll have the power to generate an abundance of your favorite kind of non-sexual togetherness. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): As the CEO of Zappos, Tony Hsieh is worth almost a billion dollars. If he chose, he could live in a mansion by the sea. Yet his home is a 200-square-foot, $48,000 trailer in Las Vegas. “For me, experiences are more meaningful than stuff,” he says. “I have way more experiences here.” Reaffirm your commitment to priorities like his in the coming weeks. It’ll be a favorable time to do so. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Medical researcher Jonas Salk said, “It is always with excitement that I wake up in the morning wondering what my intuition will toss up to me, like gifts from the sea. I work with it and rely on it. It’s my partner.” Celebrate and cultivate your own intuition. You may generate amazing results as you learn to trust it deepen your relationship with it. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Environmentalist Edward Abbey once formulated a concise list of his requirements for living well. “For myself, all that I ask is: 1. Accurate information; 2. Coherent knowledge; 3. Deep understanding; 4. Infinite loving wisdom; 5. No more kidney stones, please.” Be bold and precise as you inform life about your own needs. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “We may be surprised at whom God sends to answer our prayers,” wrote author Janette Oke—or Life, for atheists or agnostics. That observation will apply to you in the coming weeks. Set aside your expectations about how help and blessings might appear.


SAT•AUG 17 | DOORS: 8:00PM

THE EMO NIGHT TOUR

WED•AUG 21 | DOORS: 6:00PM

STICK TO YOUR GUNS

LAS VEGAS

REVOLVER PRESENTS THE PURE NOISE TOUR W/ SPECIAL GUESTS COUNTERPARTS, TERROR, SANCTION, YEAR OF THE KNIFE, SUFFER THE LOSS

FRI•AUG 23 | DOORS: 7:00PM

SAT•AUG 24 | DOORS: 8:00PM

GREGORY MICHAEL DAVIS

FRANKS & DEANS

SUN•AUG 25 | DOORS: 7:00PM

MON•AUG 26|DOORS: 6:00PM

SHONEN KNIFE W/ ME LIKE BEES

VEIL OF MAYA

FRI•AUG 30|DOORS: 8:00PM

THU•SEP 19|DOORS: 7:00PM

DANNY DUNCAN

DEVOTCHKA & THE JOY FORMIDABLE

W/ ROBOTUXEDO, CHAMELEON QUEEN

NO COVER

W/ GIDEON, HAWK

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DRAGONFORCE W/ DANCE WITH THE DEAD, STARKILL

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lv w n e w s

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8 .1 5 .1 9

Beyond the brink A look at recent animal extinctions By Meredith S. Jensen | Special to Weekly

or better or worse, Homo sapiens have left their mark on the world. So much so that those in charge of our history are considering replacing Holocene—the label for our current geological period spanning the past 10,000 years—with Anthropocene, a term to describe a period where human activity has dominated the climate and environment on Earth. ¶ Why is the distinction significant? Scientists believe we are now in the middle of the sixth mass extinction, this one triggered primarily by human activity. The race is on to discover and catalog all the world’s living organisms before it’s too late. Here’s a look at just a few of the animals we’ve lost in recent history.

F

International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List Formed in 1948, the International Union for Conservation of Nature is a network of organizations and experts devoted to good global stewardship. Part of its mission includes managing the Red List, a catalog of species threatened with extinction. Established in 1964, the list divides species into nine categories: not evaluated, data deficient, least concern, near threatened, vulnerable, endangered, critically endangered, extinct in the wild and extinct. According to the Red List, scientists have assessed more than 96,900 species. Of these, more than 26,500 are considered potential candidates for extinction.

Percentage of assessed species threatened with extinction

40%

Amphibians

25%

Mammals

34%

Conifers


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Nevada species Spotlight

Ways you can help

Dixie Valley toad (Bufo williamsi) In June, the Las Vegas Sun reported that U.S. wildlife officials agreed to consider protection for the Dixie Valley toad, a rare toad in Northern Nevada’s high desert. Featuring flecks of gold on its olive-colored skin, the 2-inch-long toad was discovered in 2007 in the thick underbrush of a spring-fed marsh in the Dixie Valley, where an ancient lake once covered 190,000 square miles.

One of the smallest “true toads,” the Dixie is found in an area covering fewer than 3 square miles in the marshy remnant of the lake bed east of Reno and is regularly threatened by development. The Dixie Valley toad is also under threat from other factors including disease, predation from the non-native American bullfrog, habitat loss due to climate change and livestock grazing, etc.

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Quick List n Yuma clapper rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis) n Devils Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) n Southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) n Tricolored blackbird (Agelaius tricolor) n Cui-ui fish (Chasmistes cujus) n Carson wandering skipper (Pseudocopaeodes eunus obscurus)

According to the National Wildlife Federation, up to one-third of U.S. species are at increased risk of extinction, and more than 1,300 U.S. plants and animals already have been federally listed as threatened or endangered and are protected under the Endangered Species Act. So how can you help? Extinction is a problem we can’t simply fix by “saving the species” and keeping them in zoos. A captive population does not help maintain a fragile wild ecosystem. The hard truth is, once a species has made it high enough on the IUCN Red List, it will likely never recover. So while it may be too late for some species, conservation is still a worthwhile effort to help others survive the delicate webs of a rapidly changing natural world.

1

Educate yourself, family and friends about endangered species in the area.

2

Donate to or volunteer with organizations such as the National Wildlife Federation or local agencies.

3

Make an effort to be zero waste by purchasing sustainable products, recycling, using less water and reducing your carbon footprint. Demand the same of corporations.

4

Put pressure on local politicians and organizations to defend natural spaces and support conservation policies.

5

Grow native plants to attract native species of insects, birds and other animals that bolster the ecosystem.

14%

Birds

31%

Sharks & rays

33%

Reef corals

27%

Selected crustaceans

Photo Illustration


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Beyond the brink A look at recent animal extinctions (CONT.)

Extinct in the 21st-Century World species spotlight

Pinta Island tortoise (Chelonoidis nigra abingdonii) 2012 Able to survive up to six months without food or water, Galápagos Islands tortoises were no match for humans. Settlers hunted the giant reptiles for meat and shell trophies, and grazing goats destroyed their habitat. The last of one subspecies was discovered in 1971, living all alone on Pinta Island. Scientists made efforts to mate the tortoise with other similar species, but to no avail. Lonesome George died June 24, 2012, at Galápagos National Park.

Spix’s macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii) 2000 Although not technically confirmed yet by the IUCN, the Spix’s macaw is considered possibly extinct in the wild because of habitat loss, capture, invasive threats, etc. According to the IUCN, although this species exists in several captive populations, the last known individual in the wild disappeared at the end of 2000. Any remaining population is likely to be too tiny to effectively repopulate. A native of Brazil, the species’ troubles were fictionalized in the film Rio, where Blu, the last captive male Spix’s macaw, must win over the heart of Jewel, the last wild female.

During the past half a billion years, the Earth has seen five mass extinctions, characterized by the loss of at least 75% of a species in a short geological time period. Scientists believe we are in the midst of a sixth.

West African black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis longipes) 2011 This black rhinoceros subspecies numbered fewer than 10 by 2001 and was located in the forests of war-ravaged northern Cameroon. Once all over central Africa, the population fell because of poaching for its horn. After it hadn’t been seen in more than a decade, the IUCN listed the rhino as extinct in 2011. No West African black rhinos are known in captivity.

Quick list n Pyrenean ibex (Capra pyrenaica pyrenaica) 2000 n Baiji, Yangtze River dolphin (Lipotes vexillifer) 2007 n Spotted green pigeon (Caloenas maculata) 2008 n Eastern cougar (Puma concolor couguar) 2011 n Japanese river otter (Lutra lutra whiteleyi) 2012 n Formosan clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa brachyura) 2013


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Extinct in the 20th-Century World species spotlight Passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) 1914 Found throughout North America and once so numerous their flocks blocked out the sun, the passenger pigeon was driven to extinction in a short span of 100 years. Because of the destruction the voracious migratory birds wrought on crops and trees (the sheer weight of their number when perching could break branches) communities hosted mass pigeon shoots to cull them—plus their feathers looked good in hats. Then, when their remaining numbers were at a critical threshold, a deadly virus hit. With too few animals left to reproduce, the bird disappeared.

Carolina parakeet (Conuropsis carolinenis) 1918 Similar is the story of the Carolina parakeet of the southeastern United States. Within the span of 100 years, the population of Carolina parakeets fell from several million to nothing, thanks in part to their eating things humans also like to eat, such as crops and orchard fruits. Highly social birds, they never left a fallen bird behind, which made them easy targets.

Quick List n California grizzly (Ursus arctos californicus) 1922 n Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus) 1936 n Bali tiger (Panthera tigris balica) 1937 n Pig-footed bandicoot (Chaeropus ecaudatus) 1950s n Caspian tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) 1950s n Barbary lion (Panthera leo leo) 1960s n Javan tiger (Panthera tigris sondaica) 1980s

Sources: The Last of the Giants: The Rise and Fall of Earth’s Most Dominant Species by Jeff Campbell; Small and Tall Tales of Extinct Animals by Hélène Rajcak and Damien Laverdunt; International Union for Conservation of Nature; Bird Life International; National Wildlife Federation; US Fish & Wildlife Service—Nevada Fish & Wildlife Office; Department of Conservation and Natural Resources—Nevada Natural Heritage Program; Las Vegas Sun Photo Illustration


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your watering schedule is changing. tech can help you save + Almost all water used indoors in Southern Nevada is recycled, making outdoor water conservation a primary concern year-round. According to the Southern Nevada Water Authority, about 60% of all water consumed in Southern Nevada is used outdoors and comes from our Colorado River allowance. “Whenever water is used outdoors, it evaporates and cannot be reused. Water resources get eaten up by anything with an evaporative water component,” said Doug Bennett, SNWA conservation manager. There are many ways to help curb wasteful water consumption, including seasonal watering restrictions, smart technology, landscaping practices and more. Here are some conservation tips for the fall season:

New Fall watering restrictions on september 1 “Early September is still hot, but this is around when temperatures begin to drop. It might still be 102 degrees out, but it’s 102 at 2 p.m., not 9 a.m.,” Bennett said. From September 1 to October 31, outdoor watering must be curtailed to three days a week, and those days are assigned by address, so be sure to change your irrigation and watering clocks accordingly. You can find your designated watering days on your water bill or at snwa.com.

report water waste As the weather cools down, hand-watering is an option if your landscaping is struggling to adjust. “If you see your plants aren’t doing well after you switch your watering schedule, you can still hand water whenever necessary,” Bennett said.

Reporting water waste is another way to help with conservation efforts, and you can do so from your smartphone. “If you see water running down the street, a missing sprinkler head that’s shooting water into the air or anything like that, you can report it. If you submit the form online and include pictures, we can pull the geotag from the photo to identify where it was taken and fix it,” Bennett said. There are forms to submit depending on where you are in the Valley at snwa.com.

Text CONSERVE to 85357 to receive a text message reminding you to change your watering clocks each season.


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C r e at e d a n d p r e s e n t e d b y

S o u t h e r n n e va da wat e r au t h o r i t y

tech for leaky pipes Technology makes it easier to control and monitor water use. One conservation option is a smart leak monitor, wherein you attach a small sensor to a pipe, and it tracks water flow and sends that information to your cellphone. These sensors can help detect both large and small leaks. “Small leaks can be easy to catch—a dripping faucet or running toilet—but unseen leaks are very dangerous and can be catastrophic to your home.” Bennett said. “It’s estimated that 12% of all water being delivered to homes in the United States is lost to leaks.” Smart leak sensors can sense both small and catastrophic leaks, and you can use the app to isolate where the leak is coming from. Some of them even give you the option to shut off your water remotely if a problem is detected.

REBATES! SNWA has a rebate program for Southern Nevadans who adopt smart irrigation controllers and is piloting a program for smart leak detectors as well. Smart leak detectors include Buoy, Flo by Moen, Flume, Phyn Plus and StreamLabs. For a list of eligible devices and to learn more about the rebate program, visit snwa.com.

tech for irrigation “Through research, we found that the average person was overwatering by about 40%.” Bennett said. “Smart irrigation controllers are a great way for people to manage their irrigation systems from their smartphones.” Multiple options on the market connect to your irrigation control center, collect data and send alerts if something isn’t working properly. Some also make recommendations based on your watering habits, weather and more. “These apps can help guide conservation practices and make water use simple. They also make people engage more with their outdoor water use and see how much is really being consumed each day,” Bennett said.


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A Native American tribe hopes to stop nuclear waste from reaching Yucca Mountain

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By John Sadler | Weekly staff o the Western Shoshone, most of Nevada isn’t Nevada. At least not in the current sense. More than 150 years after the first treaty between the Western Shoshone and the federal government was signed, the two nations disagree on the outcome—the Shoshone say they never turned over their land. The majority of the land in Nevada falls under the Shoshone’s historical claim. It includes the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), which has released hundreds of tons of fallout in its operational history. It also includes Yucca Mountain, which has been the center of a decades-long argument centered on the long-term storage of the nation’s nuclear waste. The plan to turn the mountain into a nuclear waste facility drums up memories of past nuclear use of the land, and some members of the tribe are pushing back. Ian Zabarte, Principal Man for the Western Shoshone Nation, was blunt—he’ll never stop fighting against licensing Yucca Mountain as the nation’s repository for nuclear waste. “They need to just take Yucca Mountain off the table,” he said.

Shoshone and the federal government

The Western Shoshone is one of four main Native American tribes with historical ties to what is now Nevada. Besides the Shoshone, the Washoe and Northern Paiute and Southern Paiute tribes have roots here. The Western Shoshone had one of the largest historical territories within modern-day Nevada, stretching from the southwest corner, wrapping around most of current-day Clark County and up to the northeast corner. “Our land’s bleeding,” Zabarte said. The relationship between the Western Shoshone and the federal government is different than the agreements made between the government and many other tribes. For example, the main, defining document of the relationship between the Western Shoshone and the federal government is the Treaty of Ruby Valley, signed in 1863. The Shoshone did not cede land claims to the federal government in the treaty. Instead the tribe granted Americans the right to enter its lands for passage and developments like railways and mining. In return, the federal government would compensate the tribe. Unlike many other Native American nations whose moves to reservations were considered de facto cession of their land rights, the Shoshone claim they have never lost ownership of their traditional land. The treaty includes a clause allowing the president to move the Shoshone to reservations, but

there is no language transferring land rights. Zabarte discussed what he said was the misuse of the land. “It’s the language of the land. The mystery, the magic, the spirit, a creator, whatever you want to say,” he said. “I don’t understand why so many people are willing to dispose of it in such a way.” Zabarte is an outspoken advocate against nuclear testing, nuclear waste storage and what he calls the unlawful seizure of Shoshone land by the federal government. The nuclear tests were not insubstantial. Thirteen kilotons of nuclear fallout rained on Hiroshima, Japan, the first city to suffer a nuclear strike, in 1945. Compare that with the Nevada Test Site: Over a 40-year period, tests triggered 620 kilotons of fallout on Nevada, Arizona and Utah, according to a 2009 study in the Nevada Law Journal. This fallout hit lands where Western Shoshone live, including in Nye County, home to the Duckwater Shoshone tribe reservation in Railroad Valley. Zabarte grows stoic when he mentions his family’s medical history—cancer, in many members, which he attributes to the nuclear fallout.


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“This is the kind of burden that we’re dealing with by ourselves,” he said. Shoshone are more susceptible to radiation poisoning than other populations because of lifestyle differences. For example, Shoshone eat essentially all of the game they hunt, and eating meat such as deer thyroid can give a larger dose of radiation than other parts of an irradiated deer. Yucca Mountain

Storage of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain is the subject of what has become a yearslong battle pitting Nevada and its congressional delegation against federal lawmakers from states across the country. Yucca Mountain was designated as the nation’s only permanent nuclear waste storage site in the 1980s but was defunded by the Obama administration in 2010. There have been multiple attempts in Congress to revive the project since. It takes almost two hours to drive from Las Vegas to the mountain, which is the site of a five-mile-deep exploratory tunnel and not much else. Canisters holding nuclear waste, if it is ever stored

there, would be placed deep within the mountain, covered by titanium drip shields—a corrosion-resistant alloy covering. Without the shields, the government surmises, dripping water could corrode the canisters, causing the release of radioactive waste into the mountain’s underground water and carrying it to the outside environment. Zabarte worries about the long-term commitment of the federal government to keeping Yucca safe— and if nuclear waste is stored there, it would require a long-term commitment. Plutonium-239, which is used in nuclear reactors and for nuclear weapons, is among the waste targeted for long-term storage. It has a half-life of more than 24,000 years—meaning half of its radioactivity will decay in 24,000 years. “Are we going to trust [that] America is going to be around to put in drip shields in 100 years?” Zabarte said. Many Shoshone leaders see the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste project as a continuation of their traditional land’s exposure to nuclear materials. Joe Kennedy, a past chairman of the Timbisha

Corbin Harney, an elder with the Western Shoshone Tribe, beats a drum during a May 2002 tribal protest near the planned Yucca Mountain national nuclear waste dump. (Joe Cavaretta/AP Photo)

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Shoshone Tribe, was named to the Native Community Action Council in 2017. Immediately after taking his place on the council, he issued a statement criticizing the federal government. “The Department of Energy has failed to protect Native Americans, leaving us unprotected, if not for the Native Community Action Council intervening in 2008, and now, against the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to protect the land and people of the Great Basin,” he said. There are multiple bills under consideration in Congress regarding the future of Yucca Mountain. The Nuclear Waste Administration Act of 2019 seems to have the most momentum going forward. The bill, sponsored by Sens. Lisa Murkowski, RAlaska; Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn.; and Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., would require multiple levels of approval from affected state, local and tribal governments before the creation of any nuclear waste repository. The bill as it is currently written would not apply to Yucca Mountain, however. Members of Nevada’s congressional delegation are working to change that. Sens. Catherine Cortez Masto and Jacky Rosen have been in talks with West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, to amend the legislation to include Yucca Mountain. Robert Halstead, the executive director of Nevada’s Agency for Nuclear Projects, said the state was excited but skeptical until it sees the amendment’s language. Zabarte is skeptical as well. Though Zabarte said he appreciated work the Nevada delegation had done to stop Yucca, he wished it would tackle a larger problem—the seizure of Shoshone land. “Nevada’s position is that Yucca Mountain belongs to the federal government,” he said. “That is not the Shoshone position.” Zabarte said the focus of the story should be about Yucca, about the land being used for nuclear testing and other projects. “The story isn’t me. That’s not what’s going to last over 10,000 years. The story is going to be about our relationship to the land, the water,” he said. “Hopefully it’s not going to be a story about how we destroyed that—this generation …” As Zabarte talks, he returns to the nature of the Western Shoshone, the amount of hardship they’ve had to endure. “We’re not good at dying,” he said.


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Describe your management style. Multifaceted, focused and team results-oriented. I’m focused on creating environments in which our people are educated and empowered to succeed. Success breeds success. We stand, fall, pick each other up and keeping moving forward along the journey as a team every step of the way. Everybody wins.

For legal support executive, teamwork is central to success

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BY REBECCA CLIFFORD-CRUZ VEGAS INC STAFF

on Fritsch is president of First Legal, an attorney services and litigation support company that relocated its corporate offices to Henderson from Southern California about two years ago. “We have maintained a [local] operational office since 2007 but this move allowed us to provide our team members with an improved work environment,” Fritsch said. “It also afforded the opportunity for some of our people to relocate to this magnificent state from abroad.”

foremost, you have to consistently communicate with each other. It takes a team to be successful. You have to listen to your client’s needs. You have to analyze that which a client presents to you. You have to strategize with your client to effectively contemplate every aspect of the issue at hand. You have to formulate the operational plan and agree on pertinent tasks. Then you have to diligently and methodically execute on the plan, communicating with your client throughout the process.

Tell us about your background. When my father retired from the Marine Corps after serving 22 years as a fighter pilot and combat veteran in WWII and Korea, he became a McDonald’s owner/operator franchisee. From 7 years of age until I was 17, I worked at my father’s franchise stores after school and through the summers. Over that time, I developed my fundamental business management skills. At 19, I entered the private investigation profession and made it my career. I also serve on the board of directors for the Las Vegas chapter of the March of Dimes, working to raise revenue to fund educational programs and provide medical care for families and their prematurely born babies. What is your philosophy when it comes to representing clients? Listen and communicate, analyze and communicate, strategize and communicate, formulate and communicate, agree and communicate, execute and communicate. Notice the core theme? Communicate. First and

Don Fritsch is president of First Legal. (Christopher DeVargas)

What is the best professional advice you’ve ever received? Make time for your family. Genuinely care about others’ well-being. Build successful teams. Act with integrity and honor always. Own your mistakes and fix them. Always do what is right for your people and your clients above everything else. Be steadfast in your leadership. Always remain humble and kind. What is something that people might not know about you? I’m a silver- and goldsmith, lapidary and art jewelry designer. Of course, it has been several years since I put hammer or flame to metal, but I made a sterling silver pendant with 14k accents surrounding a Chrysocolla cabochon this past weekend that, surprisingly, turned out nice. Anything else you want to tell us? Hug your family every chance you get. Support your work teams. Do something kind daily for others and engage in your community.


Wade Vandervort/staff

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Wade Vandervort/staff

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Mandy Shavinsky

Lisa Corrado

Administrative Partner, Snell & Wilmer, Nevada Offices

Assistant Director, Community Development & Services, City of Henderson

Where were you when you received your 40 Under 40 award? I was and still am at the law firm of Snell & Wilmer, practicing in real estate law. I’ve been at the firm for 12 years.

Where were you when you received your 40 Under 40 award? I was moving to Seattle to take a position as an economic development and urban planning project manager for a boutique firm in downtown Seattle called Community Attributes. Two years later, I came back to Henderson.

What’s been your biggest accomplishment since you were awarded? This past year, I was involved in negotiating the joint-use agreement for Allegiant Stadium. It was exciting to be part of a major development project like this and one that will forever change the landscape of my hometown. Being a sports fan myself, it was exciting to see a world-class facility come to life here.

What’s your biggest accomplishment since you were awarded? Leading and completing the three-year Southern Nevada Strong Regional Planning effort was an important accomplishment for me. This is a land use and policy plan that focuses on better integrating jobs, transit and housing to improve economic competitiveness. What do you want to accomplish? I can’t take credit for accomplishing much without investment from the private sector, or from other partner agencies, but one opportunity I have advocated for and will continue to pursue is to support UNLV to create a master’s program in metropolitan planning.

ALUMNI

What have you had to learn the hard way? Don’t take your health for granted, and don’t let stress be an excuse for not taking care of yourself. It should be the opposite—eat right, sleep and exercise to help manage or avoid stress. Who is your business hero? Jan Jones. She was the first female mayor of Las Vegas and has been successful in both business and politics. She was proactive in supporting women in gaming, and advocates for corporate socialresponsibility and environmental stewardship. If you ran Las Vegas, what’s the first thing you would do? Light rail down the resort corridor. Access to transit will expand our appeal to travelers, enhance the visitor experience and reduce traffic congestion for locals.

What do you want to accomplish? As Las Vegas and Reno continue to grow, I look forward to seeing our presence expand in Nevada. We plan to build on the firm’s solid foundation and the values that bind us and continue our long-standing tradition of service and leadership.

What’s the best spot for a lunch meeting? With the real estate market seeing a record number of deals, I find myself at my desk more often than I like, but when I do find the time, I really enjoy Craft + Community Bar and Grill in the Hard Rock Hotel. Their ahi tuna salad is delicious and the restaurant is full of natural light. My two other favorites are Ferraro’s and Morel’s. Both have superb service and excellent Italian and seafood, respectively. Who is your business hero? All of the businesspeople in our community who remain honest and true to themselves throughout their careers. Integrity is everything—when you know you can trust those who you do business with, the results are amazing. What’s the best advice you have to offer? Bet on yourself; it’s the only thing you can control.

S P O N S O R E D

B Y

For 17 years, Greenspun Media Group’s 40 Under 40 awards have honored the best and brightest in the Valley. If you’re an alum interested in participating in related features and events (or would like to update your contact information), email Publisher Mark DePooter at mark.depooter@gmgvegas.com.


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Public records BID OPPORTUNITIES August 16 2:15 p.m. Charleston Boulevard from Nellis Boulevard to Whitewind Lane and Casa Buena lift station force main rehabilitation Clark County, 605335 Tom Boldt at tboldt@ clarkcountynv.gov Buffalo Drive roadway improvements — Tropicana Avenue to Sahara Avenue Clark County, 605336 Tom Boldt at tboldt@ clarkcountynv.gov 3 p.m. Current production model police interceptors & prisoner transport vans Clark County, 605380 Sandra Mendoza at sda@clarkcountynv.gov August 22 3 p.m. Contract for small turf maintenance, equipment and parts Clark County, 605369 Deon Ford at deonf@ clarkcountynv.gov August 23 2:15 p.m. Lewis Professional Building (Phoenix): Sewer line replacement Clark County, 605373 Sandy Moody-Upton at scm@clarkcountynv.gov Regional justice center; third floor jury room upgrade Clark County, 605377 Sandy Moody-Upton at scm@clarkcountynv.gov 3 p.m. Contract for windowwashing services countywide Clark County, 605370 Deon Ford at deonf@ clarkcountynv.gov 3 p.m. GPS monitoring on Clark County vehicle fleet Clark County, 605349 Scott Clark at scott. clark@clarkcountynv.gov August 27 2:15 p.m.

Clark County Fire Station No. 30 Clark County, 605364 Sandy Moody-Upton at scm@Clarkcountynv.gov

CONVENTIONS Digital Dealer 27 Conference & Expo Mandalay Bay August 19-21 2,000 attendees SuperZoo 2019 Mandalay Bay August 20-22 20,000 attendees Evexia Fit Fest Las Vegas Convention Center August 21-24 7,100 attendees PainWeek Conference Cosmopolitan September 3-7 1,800 attendees Interdrone Rio September 3-6 3500 attendees Mobile Tech Expo South Point September 6-7 3500 attendees National Association of Parliamentarians 42nd Biennial Convention Westgate Las Vegas September 5-8 450 attendees International Baking Industry Expo 2019 Las Vegas Convention Center September 8-11 22,000 attendees TravCon: The Travelers Conference Bally’s September 8-11 1,200 attendees IMEX America Sands September 10-12 12,500 attendees 2019 ISPA (International Spa Association) Conference and Expo Venetian September 11-13 2,500 attendees Joe Weider’s Olympia

Fitness & Performance Weekend (Mr. Olympia) Orleans, Las Vegas Convention Center September 12-15 45,000 attendees Motortrend International Auto Show Las Vegas Las Vegas Convention Center September 13-15 17,000 attendees National Electrical Contractors Association Convention and Trade Show 2019 Mandalay Bay September 14-17 5,500 attendees The Experience Paris Las Vegas September 18-20 2,800 attendees

BROKERED TRANSACTIONS Sales $111,250,000 for 898,389 sq. ft. of industrial/flex 1045-1175 American Pacific Drive, 160-194 Gallagher Crest Road, 1060-1100 Mary Crest Road, Henderson, 89074 Landlord/seller: The Northwestern Mutual Life insurance Company Landlord/seller agent: Kevin Higgins, SIOR, and Garrett Toft, SIOR, of CBRE Tenant/buyer: Capital Partners Tenant/buyer agent: Did not disclose $3,050,000 for 8,000 sq. ft. of retail 3053 West Craig Road, North Las Vegas, 89032 Landlord/seller: Building 3053 LLC Landlord/seller agent: Did not disclose Tenant/buyer: Meyer S.F. Partners Tenant/buyer agent: David A. Grant of Colliers International $1,891,349 for 2.6 acres of land APN 162-31-701-047, Post Road and Arville Street, Las Vegas, 89118 Landlord/seller: Kenneth A. and Debbie A.

Kefalas Landlord/seller agent: Cathy Jones, CPA, SIOR, CCIM; Paul Miachika, and Taylor Vasquez of Sun Commercial Real Estate Tenant/buyer: Did not disclose Tenant/buyer agent: Did not disclose $1,600,000 for 14,048 sq. ft. of retail 1400 South Boulder Highway, Henderson, 89015 Landlord/seller: Kwang Ha LLC Landlord/seller agent: Brett S. Beck of Virtus Commercial Tenant/buyer: LV Capital Fund Tenant/buyer agent: Scot Marker; Pat Marsh, SIOR; and Sam Newman of Colliers International $322,002 for 4,000 sq. ft. of retail 8480 Desert Inn Road, Las Vegas, 89117 Landlord/seller: 8480 Desert Inn LLC Landlord/seller agent: Scot Marker of Colliers International Tenant/buyer: Premier BBQ and Fire Tenant/buyer agent: Did not disclose Leases $384,085 for 10,150 sq. ft. of industrial 4330 Riviera Ridge Ave., Las Vegas, 89115 Landlord/seller: Silver State Equity Partners Landlord/seller agent: Lisa Hauger and Timothy Erickson of Sun Commercial Real Estate Tenant/buyer: Classic Floors & Interiors Tenant/buyer agent: CBRE $234,770 for 4,095 sq. ft. of office 2651 N. Green Valley Parkway, Suite 106, Henderson, 89014 Landlord/seller: 2625 GV Landlord/seller agent: Pete Janemark, CCIM, of Sun Commercial Real Estate Tenant/buyer: Nevada State High School Tenant/buyer agent: Rothwell Gornt Lease renewal $230,127 for 6,723 sq. ft. of office 8076 W. Sahara Ave., Suite C, Las Vegas, 89117 Landlord/seller: Sahara Plaza Landlord/seller agent:

Paul Chaffee and Wil Chaffee of Sun Commercial Real Estate Tenant/buyer: Textbroker International Tenant/buyer agent: Logic Commercial Real Estate

BUSINESS LICENSES H2O Backflow Service 10373 Celestial Echo St., Las Vegas Interjurisdictional business Owner/executive on file: H2O Backflow Service Hair So New 2570 W. Horizon Ridge Parkway, Suite 2101, Henderson Barbershop and cosmetology establishment Owner/executive on file: Pacific Pines Limited Partnership

Suite 2016, Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file: Linda Jones Harcalf Agency 2588 Velodrome Court, Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file: Harcalf Agency Harkess Law Offices 10120 S. Eastern Ave., Suite 200 (228), Henderson Law firm or law office Owner/executive on file: Harkess Law Offices Harrizon Cleaning Services 3129 N. Walnut Road, Apt. C, Las Vegas Property maintenance Owner/executive on file: Gregorio Harrizon

Eugene Alexander Henderson Aquatics LLC 6 Caprington Road, Henderson Personal services Owner/executive on file: Henderson Aquatics Henderson Black Bear Diner 2751 N. Green Valley Parkway, Henderson Restaurant/food service Owner/executive on file: Bear Tracks Holdings Henderson Electric Motor 2043 Pabco Road, Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file: Henderson Electric Motor

Hash House a Go Go 555 N. Stephanie St., Henderson Restaurant/food service Owner/executive on file: Run Stephanie

Henderson Estate Auctions 2680 Rue Marquette Ave., Henderson Auctioneer Owner/executive on file: Henderson Estate Auctions

Hawthorn Suites by Wyndham 910 S. Boulder Highway, Henderson Hotel/motel Owner/executive on file: T.L. Verma Corp.

Henderson Family Dental 537 S. Boulder Highway, Suite A, Henderson Dental office Owner/executive on file: Nathan D. Schwartz DDS

Hamathulin, Natchralee 4500 E. Sunset Road, Suite 2, Henderson Massage and reflexology Owner/executive on file: Natchralee Hamathulin

Health & Fitness Instructor Educator 1122 Bradley Bay Ave., Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file: Sorensen, Leanne Lawlor

Henderson Nissan 295 Auto Mall Drive, Henderson Automotive Owner/executive on file: Johnny Autoworld

Hamilton, Tara L. 2481 W. Horizon Ridge Parkway, Suite 100, Henderson Massage and reflexology Owner/executive on file: Hamilton, Tara L.

Health Nut Vending 81 Yesterday Drive, Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file: Anter, Chris

Halbasch, Kyle 1187 Garretts Bluff Way, Suite 3, Henderson Door-to-door solicitor and peddler Owner/executive on file: Kyle Halbasch Hallmark Creations No. 811 1445 W. Sunset Road, Suite 5, Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file: Hallmark Retail

Handyman Connection 115 Maple St., Henderson Property maintenance Owner/executive on file: Robert T. Clark Sr. Handyman Services Alternative to Contractors 2366 Black River Falls Drive, Henderson Property maintenance Owner/executive on file: Mondello, Clifford W. Hansen, Maria Elena 4915 E. Russell Road, Suite 120, Las Vegas Massage and reflexology Owner/executive on file: Maria Elena Hansen Happy Cakes 10701 S. Eastern Ave.,

Heating & Cooling Supply 4530 Calimesa St., Las Vegas Interjurisdictional business Owner/executive on file: Heating & Cooling Supply Heide, Kelly 99 Urbana Drive, Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file: Heide, Kelly Henderson Antiques & Home Decor 6250 Mountain Vista St., Suite A, Henderson Secondhand dealer Owner/executive on file:

Henderson Pools 164 Laguna Landing Drive, Henderson Property maintenance Owner/executive on file: George Calugaru Henderson Tint And Security Film 141 Industrial Park Road, Suite 306, Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file: Henderson Tint and Security Film Her Place 10271 S. Eastern Ave., Suite 107, Henderson Personal services Owner/executive on file: Maharlika Quichocho Heritage Surveying 1895 Village Center Circle, Las Vegas Surveying firm Owner/executive on file: Heritage Surveying Hernandez, Jose M 3431 Side Saddle Court,


8 .1 5 .1 9 vegas inc business North Las Vegas Door-to-door solicitor and peddler Owner/executive on file: Hernandez, Jose M Herrera Landscape Service 545 Bastanchury Ave., Henderson Property maintenance Owner/executive on file: Herrara, Carlos High Tech National 3640 NW 41st St., Miami Locksmith/safe mechanic Owner/executive on file: High Tech National High-Speed Restoration 2799 E. Tropicana Ave., Suite H, Las Vegas Property maintenance Owner/executive on file: High-Speed Restoration Hightower Las Vegas 2360 Corporate Circle, Suite 160, Henderson Commodities, securities, or mutual funds Owner/executive on file: HTLV Wealth Management Hobble Creek Services 275 Hampton Ridge Court, Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file:

Property maintenance Owner/executive on file: Niedermeyer, Ernest

Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file: Miller, Debra K.

Hogue Partners 2063 Pabco Road, Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file: Hogue Partners

Home Sweet Home Personal and Senior Care Services 3305 Spring Mountain Road, Suite 53, Las Vegas Residential home care provider Owner/executive on file: Home Sweet Home Personal Care LV

Horizon Neck & Back 2637 W. Horizon Ridge Parkway, Suite 110, Henderson Medical office Owner/executive on file: Dr. Robert P. Menard, A Professional Corporation

Hogue, Inc. 2063 Pabco Road, Henderson Office only Owner/executive on file: Hogue

Homeplus 2580 St. Rose Parkway, Suite 345, Henderson Mortgage lending Owner/executive on file: SWBC Mortgage Corp.

Holiday Travel 845 Holly Lake Way, Henderson Travel or ticket agency Owner/executive on file: Vohs, Jackie

Homer the Handyman 5761 Baffy Center, Las Vegas Property maintenance Owner/executive on file: Poska Jr., William John

Holistic Veterinarian of Nevada 44 Reyburn Drive, Henderson Veterinary office Owner/executive on file: Tillman, Carol J.

Hop Nuts Brewing 430 S. Rampart Blvd., Suite 190, Las Vegas General retail sales Owner/executive on file: Hop Nuts Brewing

Hobble Creek Services Hodges, Valerie 787 Flowing Meadow Drive, Henderson Bookkeeping Owner/executive on file: Valerie Hodges

Home Repairs Plus 1622 Sebring Hills Drive, Henderson

Horizon Falls Water 1450 W. Horizon Ridge Parkway, Suite C203, Henderson

Horizon Ridge Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitation Center 2855 W. Horizon Ridge Parkway, Henderson Group care facility Owner/executive on file: GHC of Henderson Horizon Specialty Hospital Of Henderson 8550 S. Eastern Ave., Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file: THI Of Nevada II at Desert Lane Houdini Locksmith 30 Tuckaway Court, Henderson Locksmith/safe mechanic Owner/executive on file: Houdini Locksmith and Handyman Hui Zhang Not Displayed, Las Vegas

Independent massage therapist Owner/executive on file: Hui Zhang Hummus 10895 S. Eastern Ave., Suite 100, Henderson Restaurant/food service Owner/executive on file: Hummus LLC Hydro-Steam 2169 Horse Prairie Drive, Henderson Property maintenance Owner/executive on file: Hydro-Steam Hyundai of Las Vegas 7200 W. Sahara Ave., Las Vegas Automotive sales with minor repair Owner/executive on file: ABC Automotive Investments I Love Tacos 1935 Fremont St., Las Vegas Mobile food vendor Owner/executive on file: Jose O Resendiz Morales I-Deal Concepts 114 Sterling Court, Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file: I-Deal Concepts

Icewraps 38 Drawback St., Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file: Icewraps Ichiddo Ramen 10100 S. Eastern Ave., Suite 130, Henderson Liquor Owner/executive on file: Ichiddo Vegas Ideco NV 720 Susanna Way, Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file: Ideco-NV IEDAC USA 7380 Eastgate Road, Suite 120, Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file: IEDAC USA Ignite Dance Center 70 E. Horizon Ridge Parkway, Suite 130, Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file: Lisa Prentice IND Pallet 400 Max Court, Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file:

69

IND Pallet Independent Accuracy 399 Award Court, Henderson Miscellaneous Owner/executive on file: Independent Accuracy Independent Nurse Case Management Services Not Displayed, Las Vegas Management or consulting service Owner/executive on file: Stonehaven Enterprises Indigo Landscape Services 1045 Featherwood Ave., Henderson Property maintenance Owner/executive on file: Bonvillain, Garrett B. Infoscientific.Com 2240 Village Walk Drive, Suite 2310, Henderson Management/marketing/ consulting Owner/executive on file: Infoscientific.Com Infusion Pharmacy 70 E. Horizon Ridge Parkway, Suite 140, Henderson Drug/dept/variety store Owner/executive on file: Clare-Lanie Macaraeg

PACIFIC CONSOLIDATED OF NV INC

MECHANIC: AUTO REPAIRS — N LAS VEGAS, NV —

Requires HS Diploma or equivalent. 60 months experience as Auto Mechanic. Mail resume to:

PO Box 940468, Plano, TX 75094

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41 valley locations | capriottis.com Delivery only available with online orders through order.capriottis.com via 3rd party delivery services. Management reserves all rights. ©2019 Capriotti’s Sandwich Shop, Inc.

@CARLSDONUTSLV M-F 6AM-2PM WEEKENDS 7 AM-2PM 3170 E. SUNSET RD, LAS VEGAS 702.283.7079


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V e g a s i n c b u s i n e s s 8 .1 5 .1 9

VegasInc Notes Modern Healthcare magazine named Dr. Anthony Slonim, president and CEO of Renown Health, as one of this year’s 50 Most Influential Clinical Execu- Slonim tives in the nation. Accion, a nonprofit group that assists entrepreneurs, has changed its name to DreamSpring. The group’s nonprofit status and management remain unchanged. Vegas PBS won 2019 Emmy awards for “Remembering Vietnam: Las Vegas Veterans,” by Jeremy Helal, Gary Williams, Vegas PBS (Historical/ Cultural – Program or Special); and “Outdoor Nevada—Our Radioactive History,” by John Burke, Fabiana Ubben, Sergio de Souza, Hayley Etter, John Lloyd, Todd Hailstone, Dustin Hall, John McClain, Vegas PBS (Magazine – Program/Special).

James Maida, CEO and president of Gaming Laboratories International, received an EY Entrepreneur of the Year 2019 New Jersey Award. Ayelet Blit is director of Jewish Student Life for Jewish Nevada. Susan Bliesner is a franchise owner of Cruise Planners, a travel agency. Chris Thompson is operations manager at The+Source. Mike Casey is Clark County School District chief operating officer and Thompson Christopher Bernier is chief of staff. The Nevada District office of the U.S. Small Business Administration honored lenders at its Small Business Gala. For the Nevada SBA National Lender of the Year, in the category of Total Number of SBA Loans

and Average Loan Size, Chase Bank took first place and Wells Fargo Bank took second. In the category of Total Number of SBA Loans and Average Loan Size, Meadows Bank came in first, Bank of Nevada was second and Nevada State Bank was third. For the SBA Nevada 504 Lender of the Year, Bank of the West came in first and Plumas Bank came in second. For the SBA Nevada Specialty Lender of the Year SBA 7(a) Loan Program, Seacoast Commerce Bank came in first. In the category of Nevada 504 Certified Development Company of the Year, Nevada State Development Corporation came in first and Mortgage Capital Development Corporation (TMC) came in second.

Album of the Year, and Song of the Year—awarded to the album’s hit single “Womxnly.”

Phil Ralston, president of American Nevada Company, joined the board of directors for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, the largest private funder of childhood cancer research grants.

Jasmine Myers is a conflict resolution specialist with Pollack Peacebuilding Systems.

Grammy Award-winning engineer and Studio DMI’s co-founder Luca Pretolesi picked up two Golden Melody Awards—considered the Mandarin-speaking world’s premier award show—for his work on Jolin Tsai’s Ugly Beauty, which took home the trophy for

James Rimpo is a City National Bank vice president and business banking relationship manager. His primary focus will be dealing Rimpo with middlemarket companies with revenues between $20 million and $40 million. Cameron Ashley Building Products opened a distribution center at 6945 Speedway Blvd., North Las Vegas. The company offers roofing, insulation and other building materials.

Jodi Gutstein is director of marketing and communications at Discovery Children’s Museum. Okeeba Jubalo is the featured artist for the Artist in Residence program at Juhl. Jubalo is a Southern artist whose work mostly deals with race. He also has a marketing and branding agency, NobleSol Art Group. Nine experts have been selected

to conduct an international search for an architect for the Nevada Museum of Art. Las Vegas has committed a 1.2-acre parcel in Symphony Park for the project and promised $2 million in construction funding and parking in a new structure under development next door to the proposed art museum. The Architectural Search and Selection Committee is chaired by Nevada Museum of Art CEO David B. Walker, with Heather Harmon, deputy director for the Nevada Museum of Art serving as co-chairwoman. In addition to Walker and Harmon, committee members include U.S. District Judge Richard Boulware, Tom Kaplan, Dana S. Lee, Phil Satre, Peter Stremmel, Roger Thomas, and architectural consultant Richard Koshalek. It is anticipated that the successful architectural firm will be identified by December 31. The Nevada Department of Transportation completed a $78-million widening and upgrade project on a six-milelong stretch of U.S. Highway 95 between Ann and Kyle Canyon roads in northwest Las Vegas. Las Vegas Paving was the general contractor. The Downtown Grand opened the Spare Room, a comedy club.

2 AREA LOCATIONS RAINBOW

7305 S. Rainbow Blvd. Las Vegas, NV 89113 (725) 333-8974

HENDERSON

249 N. Stephanie St. Henderson, NV 89074 (702) 728-5721

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2019-08-15 - Las Vegas Weekly  

2019-08-15 - Las Vegas Weekly