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IN THIS ISSUE

WEEK IN REVIEW WEEK AHEAD EVENTS TO FOLLOW AND NEWS YOU MISSED

10 16 CULTURE

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Cover: ICE fears causing decrease in crime reporting Health & Wellness: Healing your body from your kitchen Marshmello, Counting Crows and LVLT’s Ruthless Culture Food: Burnt end burritos at Mandalay Bay Sports: NBA Summer league expands in Vegas News: Breaking down Nevada’s swing districts VEGAS INC: Local app developers have a big idea

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STORIES FROM LAST WEEK Court fight coming President Donald Trump on July 9 nominated Judge Brett Kavanaugh to fill the Supreme Court vacancy that will be left by the impending retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy. Democratic senators are expected to oppose the nomination on the grounds that Kavanaugh would be a fifth vote on the court against women’s reproductive rights. Charity fraud Kermit Washington, a former NBA player living in Las Vegas, was sentenced July 10 to six years in federal prison for misusing hundreds of thousands of dollars in charitable donations. He pleaded guilty in November to making a false statement in a tax return and aggravated identity theft. Washington spent the donations on vacations, shopping sprees and plastic surgery for his girlfriend. Russian Roulette A second teenager was charged July 10 with murder in the shooting death of a 17-year-old in Las Vegas. A 16-yearold accused of pulling the trigger during a deadly game of “Russian Roulette” was previously charged. The latest boy charged, who also is 17, will be tried as an adult.

Rescuers hold an evacuated boy inside the Tham Luang Nang Non cave in northern Thailand. A daring rescue mission in a flooded cave saved 12 boys and their soccer coach, ending an 18-day ordeal that claimed the life of an experienced volunteer diver. (Thai NavySEAL/Associated Press)


L A S V E G A S W E E K LY

PANIC! AT THE DISCO’S BRENDON URIE LAUNCHES A HUMAN RIGHTS FOUNDATION

President Donald Trump talks with Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh and his family in the East Room of the White House on July 9. (Associated Press)

BOULDER CITY RAILROAD MUSEUM GETS A GRANT FOR EXPANSION The Nevada State Railroad Museum Boulder City has big dreams, and a new $469,000 grant is bringing them into the station. “This is the first money that will mean we put a shovel in the ground,” director Randy Hees said. Plans include a visitors center with community rooms, store and train platform; a linear park with a playground and children’s learning center; a bike path built in conjunction with RTC; and additional museum display buildings. As the new Interstate 11 freeway decreases traffic to Boulder City, the museum’s growth becomes all the more critical. “We’re trying to make sure that if you don’t have to go through Boulder City, you still want to go through Boulder City,” Hees said. –C. Moon Reed

THE “ARTSY TAROTIST” GOES TO THE BANKSY Local artist and educator Shilo Lewis—aka “Cooptylew”—calls herself an “artsy tarotist.” The sobriquet has twofold meaning to her: It speaks to her use of “ancient systems such as astrology, chakras, tarot and oracle cards” as creative tools, and it’s also a nod to famed street artist and “art terrorist” Banksy, whom she admires strongly enough to fashion his art into a tarot deck. $55 gets you a Banksy tarot deck of your own. cooptylew.com/ the-tarot-banksy-by-cooptylew –Weekly staff

MIRACLE BABY A 5-month-old baby was found face-down under a pile of sticks and debris, dressed only in a wet and soiled onesie in 46-degree weather July 9 in Missoula, Mont. The Missoula County Sheriff’s Office said the baby was in good condition at a hospital and called it a miracle that the child survived nine hours alone in the woods. Francis Crowley, 32, had wrecked his car and said he left the baby alone because he was heavy.

Imagine Dragons’ Dan Reynolds isn’t the only Vegas-raised rocker fighting for equal rights and allying with the LGBTQ community. On June 28, Brendon Urie, principal and sole founding member of Panic! at the Disco, announced the formation of his Highest Hopes foundation, established to “support the efforts of nonprofit organizations that lead, develop and advocate support for human rights,” particularly with regard to gender and gender identity, sexual orientation, race and religion. Urie then came out as pansexual in a July 8 interview with Paper magazine. “I’m married to a woman, and I’m very much in love with her, but I’m not opposed to a man, because to me, I like a person,” he said. “Yeah, I guess you could qualify me as pansexual, because I really don’t care. If a person is great, then a person is great.” –Mike Prevatt

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THE WEEK IN TRUMP TWEETS

■ Thank you to all of my great supporters, really big progress being made. Other countries wanting to fix crazy trade deals. Economy is ROARING. Supreme Court pick getting GREAT REVIEWS. New Poll says Trump, at over 90%, is the most popular Republican in history of the Party. Wow! (July 10) ■ On behalf of the United States, congratulations to the Thai Navy SEALs and all on the successful rescue of the 12 boys and their coach from the treacherous cave in Thailand. Such a beautiful moment - all freed, great job! (July 10) ■ A recent Emerson College ePoll said that most Americans, especially Hispanics, feel that they are better off under President Trump than they were under President Obama. (July 10) ■ Democrats in Congress must no longer Obstruct - vote to fix our terrible Immigration Laws now. I am watching what is going on from Europe - it would be soooo simple to fix. Judges run the system and illegals and traffickers know how it works. They are just using children! (July 11)

MARCH FOR OUR LIVES, ROAD TO CHANGE TOUR VISITING LAS VEGAS ON JULY 16 The student survivors of the shooting in Parkland, Florida, are traveling the nation on a summer bus tour called the Road to Change to bring awareness to gun violence in the U.S. The event also aims to educate, register and encourage people to vote in the November elections. The Las Vegas town hall event will take place July 16 at Sierra Vista High School. Doors open at 5 p.m. RSVP at https://tinyurl.com/y72duota –Camalot Todd


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U N I T E D S TAT E S OF AMERICA M e x ico

The conflict in Central America

The influence of gangs There are an estimated 70,000 gang members in the Northern Triangle according to the U.N. and U.S. Southern Command. The majority of the members are MS 13 or Barrio 18 and most active in Honduras, especially in the nation’s capital, Tegucigalpa, as well as Guatemala and El Salvador. On June 11, Attorney General Jeff Sessions wrote a 31-page decision excluding domestic and gang violence from asylum claims.

Why thousands flee their homeland in search of a safer existence

By Camalot Todd | Weekly staff

+

Before the Trump administration enacted a zero-tolerance policy, thousands of Latinos had already left their homes in Central America to begin the trek to the U.S. The journey through cartel-controlled states in Mexico is safer than what they face in Central America’s Northern Triangle, comprised of Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador. With Nicaragua to the south, this geographic area accounts for many of the asylum seekers arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border. Between 2014 and 2016 alone, there were more than 8,900 asylum claims filed by individuals from this region, according to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The borders of these four countries foster political instability plagued by violence, weak or corrupt governments and poverty, all exacerbated by natural disasters, guerilla warfare, street gangs and the drug trade, according to the Council on Foreign Relations. Here are just a few of the main factors contributing to each country’s unrest.

Guatemala Immigration status in the U.S.: Guatemalan citizens do not have temporary protected status (TPS), but more than 3,300 Guatemalans have claimed asylum. W h y t h e r e g i o n i s d e s ta b i l i z e d

El Salvador Immigration status in the U.S.: 262,500 El Salvadorans will lose their TPS status on Sept. 9, 2019. 1 Warfare Lasting from 1960 to 1996, almost 200,000 people disappeared or were killed during Guatemala’s 36-year civil war. The U.N.-sponsored Historical Clarification Commission reported that 83 percent of those individuals were indigenous Maya, and the majority of human rights violations were carried out by government forces. As of 2017, more than 242,000 Guatemalans were still refugees or internally displaced because of the civil war and ongoing drug cartel and gang violence. 2 Drug Trade Drug trafficking groups called transportistas take advantage of Guatemala’s poverty-stricken people and corrupt government to operate from the nation. 3 Weak/Corrupt Government Guatemala’s leading anti-drug investigator and his aides were arrested in the U.S. on charges of drug trafficking in 2005. The nation has a long history of

authoritarian governments, with its most modern roots in the 1950s when the CIA supported a coup d’état against the democratically elected president Jacobo Arbenz. The U.S. viewed Arbenz as a communist threat and helped Colonel Carlos Castillo Armas, laying the foundation for the nation’s civil war. In 2007, three Salvadoran Central American Parliament members went to Guatemala for a meeting with other regional delegates. When they entered the country, they were murdered. Their bodies were found burnt on the side of the road. Guatemalan authorities arrested four police officers, according to InSight Crime, a foundation that studies organized crime in Latin and Caribbean nations Poverty While it’s Central America’s most populous country, the nation has about half the average GDP of other Latin American and Caribbean nations, according to the CIA. Additionally, the nation has one of the most unequal wealth distributions globally. 4

W h y t h e r e g i o n i s d e sta b i l i z e d

1 Natural Disasters In 2001, El Salvador received TPS status after the country suffered three earthquakes. The country is located on one of the most seismically active regions and is exposed to a variety of other natural disasters, including floods, volcanic eruptions, tropical storms and landslides. 2 Warfare The El Salvadoran civil war started in 1980 between the Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front, a coalition of leftist guerrilla groups, and the government, killing 75,000 during the 12-year war. El Salvador and Honduras have long battled over the boundaries their countries share.

In 1992, the International Court of Justice ruled to establish new borders, which were inaugurated in 2006. 3 Drug Trade The nation is relatively small, but it’s a key location for drug receiving and storage. Routes formerly used to transport cargo during the civil war are now used to transport drugs across borders. 4 Gangs MS 13 and Barrio 18 are the dominant gangs in El Salvador. Their growth can be attributed to the nation’s poverty, its pre-existing culture of violence, access to weapons left from the civil war and the arrival of gang members from the U.S., according to InSight Crimes.


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Honduras Immigration status in the U.S.: 86,000 will lose their TPS status Jan. 5, 2020. W h y t h e r e g i o n i s d e sta b i l i z e d KEY

1 Natural Disasters In Oct. 1998, Hurricane Mitch, the deadliest hurricane in the Western hemisphere in 200 years, hit Honduras’ shores, leaving more than 11,000 people dead and causing $5 billion worth of damages in Honduras and surrounding countries, including Nicaragua.

Drug Trade Honduras is located in the key geographic position separating the South American countries of Colombia and Venezuela from the north. In 2009, Colombian drug traffickers changed their routes to run through Honduras, turning the nation into a key handoff spot between Mexican and Colombian drug traffickers, according to InSight Crime 2

.

3 Violence As of 2017, there were 190,000 refugees and internally displaced Hondurans because of violence, extortion, threats or forced recruitment by urban gangs, according to CIA. The nation has one of the highest rates of femicide globally, with one woman killed every 13.8 hours. In 2000, more than 1,000 street children were murdered by death squads that had police backing, according to the Honduran Committee for the Defence of Human Rights. 4 Weak/Corrupt Government Between 1932-1949, General Tiburcio Carias Andino led the nation’s rightwing National party of Honduras under a 17-year dictatorship. During the 1980s, the executive office remained politically weak with Chief General Gustavo Álvarez wielding considerable power. Under Álvarez’s direction, many Hondurans disappeared and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights found the Honduran government guilty of those disappearances. The 2009 coup of President Manuel Zelaya exacerbated instability in Honduras, and the nation continues to struggle with a strong military shaping its politics.

Poverty Honduras is the second poorest country in Central America. 5

G uatama l a HONDURAS

A A LV EL S

R DO

5 Violence El Salvador’s government implemented years of tough anti-gang legislation, but the policy has had the opposite effect. The prisons were almost 350 percent over capacity as of 2016, according to the International Centre for Prison Studies.

N ica r agua

6 Weak/Corrupt Government Between 2004 and 2008, MS 13 and Barrio 18’s battle for power spilled into overcrowding prison systems. Riots killed dozens and injured hundreds. The government now divides the gangs into separate prisons, but the large concentration of the same gang in one prison has helped with recruitment and retention.

CO S TA RICA

Drug Trade

Natural Disasters

Warfare

Weak/ Corrupt Government Poverty

Violence Gangs

CUBA

Nicaragua Immigration status in the U.S.: 5,300 Nicaraguans will lose their TPS status on Jan. 5, 2019. W h y t h e r e g i o n i s d e sta b i l i z e d

1 Natural Disasters Hurricane Mitch wreaked havoc on Nicaragua, along with several other natural disasters, including the 1972 Managua earthquake, the floods of 1982, Hurricane Joan-Miriam in 1988, the eruption of Cerro Negro volcano in 1992 and Hurricane Cesar-Douglas in 1996. These natural disasters caused millions to become homeless, thousands of deaths and billions of dollars worth of damages. 2 Warfare The Cold War-era Sandinista-Contra conflict defined Nicaragua—Guerilla groups found it easy to recruit poor and middle-class locals.

PANAMA

Sources: U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Insight Crime; United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean; Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery; Protection International; Central Intelligence Agency

3 Drug Trade Nicaragua’s coastlines and its islands help traffickers move drugs through the nation to the U.S. Mexico’s Sinaloa Cartel is the largest transnational criminal organization to have power in the country. Drug robbers known as tumbadores have taken advantage of the flow of drugs, often stealing shipments, according to InSight Crimes. The nation’s large forrest reservation also makes it target for timber trafficking. 4 Poverty Nicaragua suffers from underemployment and is the poorest country in Central America and the second poorest in the Western Hemisphere after Haiti, according to the CIA.

COLUMBIA


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Deportation fears silence undocumented crime witnesses and victims

Photograph by Wade Vandervort


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B

By Camalot Todd | Weekly staff

Editor’s note: The names of the undocumented individuals in this story have been changed for fear of retaliation against them and their families.

eneath the Mojave’s blue-velvet night, Allen snapped open two black folding chairs and placed them in his parents’ driveway between the vehicles of family and friends. Exhausted after his shift as a porter at a local casino, he slowly lowered himself onto one of the chairs. ¶ Allen, who is in his mid-20s, is the eldest son of Azucena and Tata—Allen’s sister is in her early 20s and has a family of her own, and his youngest brother is studying nursing at Nevada State College. ¶ All three of Tata and Azucena’s children are protected by DACA, brought to the U.S. about 16 years ago on the back of a truck from Oaxaca, Mexico. Allen’s parents arrived two years before the children, hoping to make money to support their family. ¶ In those first two years, a border divided Azucena and Tata from their three children. That same border threatens to divide them again and is where more than 2,300 children were recently separated from their parents as a result of the zero-tolerance policy enforcement enacted by the Trump administration.

While the Clark County Detention Center is the only one in the Vegas Valley with access to the ICE database, the Las Vegas Detention Center does comply with federal regulations when reporting undocumented immigrants to ICE, according to a City of Las Vegas Public Information Officer.

Those families left their countries for many reasons—poverty, natural disasters and violence—but they crossed the border with the same rationale Tata and Azucena used so many years ago. They wanted their children to study, be good citizens and have a better life. “I consider myself American; I was raised here; I grew up as an American; my wife is an American,” Allen said. He has two young boys and a third on the way who are U.S. citizens. He’s married to his high school sweetheart. Family and friends trickle into Tata and Azucena’s house to eat, dance and talk, celebrating the couple’s release from Nevada Southern Detention Center in Pahrump. Allen stays outside and talks of the night his father called Metro seeking help. *** In the same house where friends and family were celebrating, Azucena’s and Tata’s tempers flared a few months prior and spilled into a fight that tore the couple away from their family and initiated their deportation case. Allen says it was about another woman—Azucena was jealous and slapped Tata. Allen’s younger brother stepped between his parents, pushing his father, and Tata pushed back. In an effort to keep things from es-

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calating, Tata called 911, and the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department arrived. As is common in domestic disputes where both parties are found at fault, they arrested Tata and Azucena on charges of domestic violence for a 12-hour hold at the Las Vegas Detention Center. It was there that Tata and Azucena were handed over to ICE. *** The family struggled to pay the more than $17,000 in arrest fees—bond for ICE, a separate bond for Metro and legal costs—but Allen recognizes that things could be worse. At least Tata and Azucena had family and friends who could pitch in and children who speak English and are old enough to find a lawyer. “I’m glad we’re older now, because I can’t imagine what kids—you know, little kids who watch their parents get deported—go through. And there are a lot of people who can’t come up with the money to be released,” Allen said. “I can’t imagine how it is for people that don’t have any resources; they don’t have any help. There are a lot of people who don’t really speak English … that wouldn’t know what to do when an attorney tries to help and asks for affidavits or property ties.” He’s not wrong, and his fears are not isolated. For 8 percent of undocumented immigrants in Southern Nevada, each day is a choice between reporting crimes committed against them and risking deportation or remaining silent about their victimization. “Undocumented immigrants have a lot of fear in calling 911. They have fear about cooperating with police, about being witnesses to crime,” said Michael Kagan, law professor and UNLV immigration clinic director. “I want to encourage people to call the police, but Sheriff [Joseph] Lombardo and Las Vegas Metro have given a very unclear message to the community, and the trend lines of what I see on everyday cases are moving Metro closer and closer to ICE.” In 2016, Sheriff Lombardo renewed Metro’s Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with ICE, allowing participating police officers to conduct immigration enforcement activities with the supervision of ICE officers. Metro’s jurisdiction is one of 78 across the nation that participate in these MOAs granted through Section 287(g) of the Immigration and Nationality Act. The optional agreement allows ICE to access records of undocumented immigrants who may have been booked on charges but not actually convicted of crimes, similar to Tata and Azucena’s situation. The 287(g) agreement gives Metro access to another system to cross-reference individuals in its custody, which is why Metro elected to participate in the agreement, said Jacinto Rivera, a public information officer for Metro. The agreement is in effect


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until summer 2019. Law enforcement officers do have discretion when booking individuals on charges, but that discretion leads to inconsistencies and an environment in which one undocumented immigrant may interact safely with police and avoid deportation, while another faces the deportation process. In 2012, Allen was pulled over. He had a warrant for an expired ticket, and the officer brought him to the Clark County Detention Center. In his late teens at the time, Allen worked construction alongside his father so his hands and fingerprints were scratched, scarred and could not be run through the system. During an interview, an ICE officer told him he may be deported. He asked Allen if he planned to go to school and was impressed with Allen’s English and work ethic. Then the officer told Allen he never wanted to see him again, tore up the report and let him walk out of the door. Allen has since married an American citizen, works steadily, is raising children and plans to enroll in college. That was six years ago, when ICE officers had prosecutorial discretion. One of the Trump administration’s first actions eliminated that in 2017. “I say this with a lot of regret—I want to encourage people to call the police and work with the police. Most of the police officers I’ve worked with are quite professional, but I can’t assure people that you won’t end up in the hands of ICE if you talk to Las Vegas Metro,” Kagan said. Metro stated that they only participate in the jail-based program through 287(g), and an individual must be arrested before Metro can run them through the ICE database

and place a detainer on them. If the individual arrested was born anywhere outside the U.S., they are run through the program. But even Metro recognizes flaws in system. “People who are arrested by a police officer are technically innocent until they go to court and a judge or jury sees all the evidence and hears all the testimony,” Rivera said. “The charge might be dropped because there’s no evidence.” *** The breadth of crimes committed against the undocumented community in the valley include violent crimes, labor and financial crimes, theft and petty street crime—all crimes that can also affect the larger population. “Undocumented immigrants are an intrinsic part of the fabric of Southern Nevada but often feel that they have no recourse and that no one would protect them if they’re abused in a small way or a large way,” Kagan said. Informal day laborers who often fulfill temporary work needs in specialties such as construction, landscaping and moving face exploitation at the hands of employers, according to the 2018 Day Labor in Las Vegas report. The research found that many of the workers were victims of wage theft and exposed to work site hazards. Wage theft, the nonpayment of wages for the work completed, is a common occurrence for day laborers in the Valley, with 33 percent of those surveyed reporting at least one instance in the last two months with a median amount $160 and a maximum amount of $2,000. Employers will use an undocumented immigrant’s status as a reason for paying them less than the agreed

WHY IMMIGRANTS ARE TRYING TO ENTER THE U.S. Read about the history of violence, poverty and natural disasters in Central America on Page 8.

Any policies that make immigrants more scared about calling the police are really good for criminals. They’re good for abusive husbands, they’re good for rapists, because it makes a population of people feel that they can’t go to the police for help.” — Michael Kagan

amount or not paying them at all, said Bliss Requa-Trautz, director of Arriba Las Vegas Worker Center. Requa-Trautz co-wrote the 2018 labor report, which not only explored the exploitation of day laborers in the valley, but also the interaction between day laborers and Metro. “Day laborers are some of the most visible migrant workers, and that’s true across the country,” Requa-Trautz said. “In that respect, they’re often the frontlines for all kinds of different abuses due to the vulnerability.” In 2006, Los Angeles native Eugene Nunnery terrorized the Las Vegas Latino community, targeting day laborers. Nunnery murdered three people, including Saul Nunez Suastegui, 29, and Antonio Perez-Martinez, 40. Additionally, Nunnery attempted to kill at least 11 people and committed several robberies during his crime spree. According to a 2010 Las Vegas Sun article, “Police said Nunnery told them that his group targeted Hispanics for the robberies mainly because they were less likely to report the crimes to police.” In addition to a death sentence, Nunnery is serving other sentences totaling about 270 years, all running consecutively, according to a Sun article. “The day laborer workforce is comprised largely of immigrants (94 percent), and the problems day laborers experience with police are exacerbated by police involvement in federal immigration enforcement,” according to the labor report. When day laborers were asked in this report if they’d reach out to the police after wage theft, 47 percent said they were worried that officers would ask about their immigration status or the status of someone they know. “The rate at which people reported fear of engaging with law enforcement here in Las Vegas does parallel a national study from 2006 on Latino fear of reporting to police regardless of immigration status. It’s a measured national issue, and it’s a measured local issue,” Requa-Trautz said. Requa-Trautz encourages people to report crimes to the police but understands their fears and notes that this affects the safety of the larger Las Vegas community. “When people are unwilling to re-


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lv w c ov e r s t o r y

LVMPD criminal and non-criminal encounters and removals (FY 2017)

1,488 Total Encounters

377 Total Removals

XX

Of the 1,488 total encounters, 1,136 were convicted criminals, and 352 were non-criminals Of the 377 total removals, 331 were convicted criminals, and 46 were non-criminal

Convicted criminal encounters

Non-criminal encounters

Convicted criminal removals

Non-criminal removals

120

90

XXXX

114 105

103 98

95

88

87

108

106

88 78 66

60

36

30 22

0

22

27

2 October

28

28

22

4

2 November

22

December

18

37

36

33

37

0 January

0 February

March

5

4 April

24

21

17

May

6

4 June

38

34

26

24 2

32

July

29

39

31

7 August

10

September

Across the U.S. In fiscal year 2017, there were 25,884 287(g) encounters and 5,996 removals stemming from 287(g) encounters. Department of Homeland Security’s U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement would not release additional statistics about encounters in other cities. Sources: Center for American Progress; Pew Research Center; Department of Homeland Security

port crimes that they’re a victim of, those same perpetrators are free to go on and continue to commit [further] crimes. When they’re afraid to report crimes they’re a witness to, those same perpetrators may not be prosecuted because the people who can provide the most relevant testimony have been deterred from engaging with law enforcement,” Requa-Trautz said. Police chiefs in Los Angeles, Houston, Salt Lake and Frederick County, Maryland, noted a worrisome trend where the wider Latino and immigrant populations are reporting crimes less frequently, according to a 2018 Immigrant Impacts in 287(g) report by the Center for American Progress. “The biggest thing for an undocumented person is to just stay off of ICE’s radar,” Kagan said. “If interaction with local police puts you on ICE’s

radar, it becomes a good reason, a very rational reason, for a person who is just going to work every day and taking care of their family to become fearful of the police, and when that happens it becomes much harder for an urban police department to ensure everyone’s public safety.” This chilling effect happens beyond the undocumented community and affects those who are American citizens as well, according to that same report. Approximately 22 percent of the Las Vegas Valley is foreign born with a vast range of immigration statuses. Many of these individuals live in mixed-status families where one or more of their family members has a green card or citizenship. And nationally, there are more than 10.8 million people who live in a household with an undocumented in-

David Cienega handles outreach to the hispanic community two ways—as director of the Hispanic Citizens Academy and by visiting the local consulates. The Hispanic Citizens Academy started in 2007 to help bridge the gap between the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department and the Hispanic community. “We recognized that part of the [Hispanic] community, especially the undocumented community, was being victimized. … They were afraid to contact the police; they were undocumented; and of course, from wherever Latin American country they would come from, they always equate police with corruption,” Cienega said. The 16-week program aims to educate the undocumented and Latino community on Metro’s practices and policies, including 287(g), without checking for immigration status. In its 11 years the program has graduated 1,500 people, Cienega said. The Hispanic Citizens Academy has two sessions per year. The next orientation will be August 22 from 5:30 to 6 p.m. at the LVMPD Headquarters, Building A. The first of 15 classes will start immediately after the orientation. To learn more, call 702-828-1993 or visit tinyurl.com/ yc2rje54

13


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dividual, including almost 6.2 million children under the age of 18 (8 percent of all youth). For young American children of an undocumented parent involved in a domestic violence situation, these trends can be especially difficult, said Gabrielle Jones, Deputy Directing Attorney of the Family Justice Project at the Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada. The Family Justice Project has a team of lawyers dedicated to helping victims of domestic violence navigate not only the criminal justice system but the immigration justice system as well. “Even if you took immigration out, victims of domestic violence and sexual assault are often reluctant to go to authorities or are afraid about how they’ll be treated. Throw in fears about immigration issues, and it can really tip the balance in favor of the criminal,” Kagan said. “There’s been a real decline in Latinas reporting sexual assault, and nobody thinks that’s because there’s less sexual assault happening.” For some victims of crime who are undocumented, there’s a pathway to citizenship through a U-Visa, given to victims of violent crimes who collaborate with a law enforcement agency. But the backlog by the federal government, the collaboration from local law enforcement and the strict requirements make it difficult to obtain. Jones said that the majority of cases handled by the Family Justice Project deal with U-Visas. Victims of non-violent crimes don’t have the option to apply for a U-Visa. “Any policies that make immigrants more scared about calling the police are really good for criminals,” Kagan said. “They’re good for abusive husbands, they’re good for rapists because it makes a population of people feel that they can’t go to the police for help.” Regardless of immigration status, when Metro receives a domestic violence call they’re required to book someone on charges, Kagan said. “There is no guarantee that the person that called won’t be taken in. The police on the scene make a judgment on who was the aggressor, and

once someone is booked in the jail, they will be screened for immigration, and that is how they will be sent to ICE,” he said. “Even if charges are later dropped, once you’ve been flagged for ICE, it’s too late.” *** For Allen’s parents, one call for help marked the day of their family’s separation, and the interaction with Metro has affected their family’s perception of the police. “They don’t want to be anywhere near a cop right now. They don’t want to give out any info just because they’re so scared. They have never seen the inside of a jail before this,” Allen said. There are not many pathways to citizenship for Azucena and Tata, despite owning a home in Southern Nevada, paying taxes through an ITIN number, having children and American-born grandchildren nearby and the political instability in the states surrounding Oaxaca, Mexico. “I don’t know why they didn’t just deport them,” Allen said, but he’s grateful for the time he gets to spend with his parents as their case works through immigration courts. Maybe his parents can obtain asylum. Maybe the contracting company that employed his father for 10 years will sponsor a work visa. But the best option for them might just be to voluntarily leave and wait until one of their children become naturalized and can sponsor them, Allen said. “That means I won’t get to see my parents for five, six years, maybe longer,” Allen said. “They’ve raised us here; they have six grandkids, who they love more than anything in the world, and they don’t want to leave them. That’s why they don’t want to go back. They won’t see us or their grandkids for who knows how long.” Finished sharing his parents’ story, Allen closed the folding chairs and walked into the light, festive atmosphere of friends and family chatting, dancing and eating. He may be shouldering the weight of his parents’ looming deportation, but for a few hours he can just enjoy their company.

Resources for undocumented immigrants in Southern Nevada Legal Aid of Southern Nevada 725 E. Charleston Blvd. 702.386.1070; lacsn.org Offers classes to help undocumented residents understand the paths to legal immigration. They help explains family petitions, VAWA petitions, U-Visas, T-Visas, asylum and DACA. The UNLV Law Immigration Clinic 702.895.2080 Provides free legal services Citizenship Project 710 W. Lake Mead Blvd. 702.868.6002 The Culinary Union has helped more than 16,000 Nevadans become citizens by providing free services to union members and their families. It is located inside Nevada Partners and is open Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.5 p.m. It offers citizenship exam preparation courses Monday through Thursday from 4:307:30 p.m. n American Civil Liberties Union has published resources in the event an undocumented immigrant is stopped by police or other officials. It is in English and Spanish at aclu.org/issues/ immigrants-rights


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15

MAP OF JURISDICTIONS THAT SIGNED 287(g) AGREEMENTS PRIOR TO JANUARY 1

Source for tables, map and facts: Center for American Progress

This map does not include the additional jurisdictions that have joined the 287(g) program since January 1. There are 78 total. Red indicates the 57 jurisdictions with 287(g) agreements prior to January. Arizona and Massachusetts have signed state agreements.

In April, President Donald Trump and his administration adopted a “zerotolerance” immigration policy with a goal to prosecute as many border-crossing individuals as possible. No court or ruling mandated this policy. According to the Department of Homeland Security, more than 2,300 immigrant children were separated during the six weeks the policy was enforced until Trump signed an executive order in late June rolling it back. However, thousands of children were already relocated to shelters and licensed foster homes across the country. Several of the placements have histories of neglect and abuse accusations, according to a partnership between ProPublica and

the Texas Tribune. At press time, there are no facilities in Nevada caring for children affected by this policy. “We may not feel a direct impact in Southern Nevada, but we’re against family separation. We are betraying the values of our country,” said Viridiana Vidal, a volunteer for America’s Voice, an immigration nonprofit. “Any practice that violates the rights of children and separates families affects everyone living in the country.” The Trump administration missed the July 10 court-ordered deadline to reunify more than 100 children who are five years or under with their parents. Of the 102 children identified by the administration,

two were reunited with their families on July 9, and 54 were to be reunited with their parents by July 11. The court-ordered the reunification of the remaining children by July 26. A federal Los Angeles judge rejected the Trump administration’s request to allow the long-term detention of these children, citing a 1997 agreement that child migrants can only be detained for 20 days. Vidal said that there are several ways people can get involved, including calling your representatives, signing petitions, volunteering with local immigration nonprofits such as Mi Familia Vota, American Voice or Arriba Las Vegas Worker Center or donating funds to these organizations.


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BLACK PEPPER

(PIPER NIGRUM)

KITCHEN HERBALISM

It’s easy to forget that even most basic spices can pack powerful properties. Use a grinder with whole peppercorns for a more robust flavor. Great for: Enhancing the efficacy of other herbs, stimulating circulation, controlling mucus congestion, aiding digestion

HEAL YOURSELF WITH THE POWER OF YOUR SPICE RACK BY MEREDITH S. JENSEN | SPECIAL TO WEEKLY

COFFEE

Natural wellness is a hot topic—and a lucrative one. There are scores of teas, essential oils, tinctures and supplements that contain powerful properties to help heal and keep your body in tune. But for those with a DIY spirit, taking a “farm-aceutical” approach to your health can begin right in your own kitchen. Fresh herbs and spices not only make dishes taste livelier, they can have a profound effect on your life. Explore these spice rack basics to see how you can get the most out of your pantry apothecary.

While not what we would consider an herb, coffee is a medicinal plant, so it’s nice to have around even if you don’t consider yourself a “coffee drinker.” Use in moderation. Ease up if you find yourself jittery, developing poor sleeping patterns or severe heartburn. Great for: Easing constipation, reducing fatigue, stimulating digestion, improving cognition, managing migraine symptoms

(COFFEA ARABICA)

CAYENNE

(CAPSICUM ANNUUM) This chile is a one-two punch of flavor and health benefits. Even if you don’t like spicy food, keep a jar of cayenne powder to use as a topical pain reliever and hemostatic. Capsaicin, a compound in cayenne chiles, blocks a neuropeptide that relays pain sensations in the body. Great for: Stimulating circulation, speeding up metabolisms, boosting libido, maintaining insulin levels, treating colds, supporting a healthy heart, stopping bleeding and reducing pain when used externally

CARDAMOM

(ELETTARIA CARDAMOMUM)

It’s not a typical “staple” spice in most American households, but two of our remedy recipes use cardamom, so you may want to shake up your spice rack with something new. One of the defining flavors of chai, cardamom’s sweet-spicy flavor will remind you of cinnamon and nutmeg. Great for: Calms the stomach, reduces flatulence and indigestion, eases nausea, makes pancakes extra special

CINNAMON

(CINNAMOMUM CASSIA)

TURMERIC

(CURCUMA LONGA) This radical rhizome yields a bright yellow powder when ground and is one of the spices that gives curry its color. Great for: Reducing inflammation, supporting digestive health, improving liver function, relieving pain, promoting heart health

SPICES

Ah, cinnamon—the bark we eat. Cinnamon has been used as far back as 2700 B.C. It was once more valuable than silver and was the subject of a violent, centuries-long battle for control over cinnamon plantations. Great for: Supporting metabolic function, soothing toothaches, calming diarrhea, easing indigestion, promoting gum health and improving glucose/ cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes


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LV W H E A LT H & W E L L N E S S

17

GINGER (ZINGIBER OFFICINALE)

FRESH HERBS

Ginger root has been used for centuries to treat numerous ailments. Make sure your ginger ale is made with real ginger—or better yet, make your own tea. Great for: Decreasing inflammation, addressing scores of stomach problems, fighting cold and flu, easing migraine symptoms, clearing sinuses

REMEDY STAPLES

GARLIC

If you plan to create home health remedies, you need a few staples.

The “stinking rose” is an antimicrobial and antifungal. Enjoy one or two garlic cloves a day for maximum benefits. You may want to chew on parsley or mint after to freshen your breath. Great for: Fighting infections, alleviating cold and flu symptoms, bolstering heart health, supporting the immune system, improving digestion

■ HONEY: Find it locally and preferably raw. Honey from locally pollinated flowers and trees can help reduce the severity of seasonal allergies when consumed regularly. Bonus? Honey is antibacterial and antifungal, among other positive properties. (Note: Do not give honey to children less than 2 years old.)

(ALLIUM SATIVUM)

■ LEMON: Stick to fresh lemons or 100 percent organic lemon juice. Sources of vitamin C, lemons also contain citric acid, both of which help the body absorb iron.

REMEDY RECIPES QUICK HINTS Herbal remedies can be as complicated as making salves and as simple as cooking with herbs and spices. Here are some easy solutions to get you started on your kitchen apothecary, adapted from recipes in Alchemy of Herbs by Rosalee de la Forêt. ■ KICK-A-COLD TEA Mix a spritz of lemon juice and a tablespoon of freshly grated ginger into your favorite mug. Top off with hot water. Cover and let steep for 15 minutes, then strain. Stir in one tablespoon of honey and add 1/4 teaspoon of cayenne pepper. Drink.

PARSLEY

(PETROSELINUM CRISPUM) CONSULT THE PROFESSIONALS Herbs and spices have been used for millennia as medicine, but as with everything, using herbalism as part of your approach to health and wellness isn’t a one-size-fits-all practice. If you are going to use herbalism or pair it with pharmaceutical treatment, it is important to understand that food, just like medicine, won’t work the same way with everyone. Consult a trusted herbalist or your doctor for any contraindications, especially if you have major health concerns, are pregnant, or are nursing.

Those little green flecks on your plate may not look like much, but parsley is high in nutrients like vitamin K1, vitamin C, and beta-carotene. Use large amounts in salads or pesto. Great for: Using as a diuretic, freshening breath, improving digestion, decreasing oxidative stress, treating urinary tract infections

Sources: Alchemy of Herbs by Rosalee de la Forêt, learningherbs.com, healingharvesthomestead.com

■ CINNAMON TOOTH POWDER There’s a reason cinnamon gum and toothpaste exist. It’s been long used to promote healthy gums. Heap a 1/2 teaspoon of ground cinnamon on a wet toothbrush, then brush and rinse as usual. ■ GARLIC HONEY Surprisingly tasty (especially compared to cough syrup), garlic honey can help sore throats. Mince 1/2 cup garlic and place in an 8-ounce jar. Fill halfway with honey, stir, then top off and stir again. Let sit for 24 hours. Take one teaspoon every one to two hours to soothe throat. ■ GARAM MASALA One of the best ways to incorporate turmeric into your diet is through this Indian spice blend. Combine 2 tablespoons ground cumin, 2 tablespoons ground coriander, 1 tablespoon ground turmeric, 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon, 3/4 teaspoon ground cloves and 3/4 teaspoon ground cardamom. Use liberally on vegetables and meats. ■ SPICED COLD BREW COFFEE CONCENTRATE Cold brew coffee is less bitter and easier on the stomach than a hot-brewed cup of joe. In a onequart jar, place 1 cup coarsely ground coffee beans, 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, and 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom, then top off with water and stir. Place in fridge for 12 hours. Strain. To drink, mix 1/4 cup brew with 1/2 cup water, milk or cream.


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g r e e n s p u n m e d i a

g r o u p

Publisher Mark De Pooter (mark.depooter@gmgvegas.com) Editor Spencer Patterson (spencer.patterson@gmgvegas.com) Associate Editor Mike Prevatt (mike.prevatt@gmgvegas.com) Senior Editor Geoff Carter (geoff.carter@gmgvegas.com) Editor at Large Brock Radke (brock.radke@gmgvegas.com) Staff Writer C. Moon Reed (cindi.reed@gmgvegas.com) Staff Writer Leslie Ventura (leslie.ventura@gmgvegas.com) Creative Director Liz Brown (liz.brown@gmgvegas.com) Art Director Corlene Byrd (corlene.byrd@gmgvegas.com) Designer Ian Racoma Circulation Director Ron Gannon Art Director of Advertising and Marketing Services Sean Rademacher CEO, Publisher & Editor Brian Greenspun Chief Operating Officer Robert Cauthorn Group Publisher Gordon Prouty 2275 Corporate Circle, Suite 300 Henderson, NV 89074

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Marshmello Photo by Danny Mahoney Photo Illustration

T o

a d v e r t i s e

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sunday

7 I 15 I 18 doors at 11AM

$100,000

DJ DIESEL AKA SHAQ

SAT, JUL 21

SUN, JUL 22

SAT, JUL 28

REHAB@HRHVEGAS.COM | 702.693.5505 | HARDROCKHOTEL.COM | REHABLV.COM /REHABLV #REHABLV

SUN, AUG 5


06

c u lt u r e w e e k ly

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BIG THIS WEEK (Marina Chavez/Courtesy)

FRI, JULY 13

BEAUTY BAR HONEYHONEY One listen to 2015 album 3 reveals the LA-based duo’s alluring dynamic: assertive, evocative blues-folk blessed with some R&B swing, country sentimentalism, melodic vocal harmonies (led by singer Suzanne Santo) and countless instruments to give it all depth. Underserved Americana music fans will be served dutifully. With L.A. Edwards. 8 p.m., $15-$17. –Mike Prevatt

Glass Pools (Krystal Ramirez/Courtesy)

SAT, JULY 14

HOUSE OF BLUES S LOCAL BREWS LOCAL GROOVES Vegas musicians of all styles— rapper Mike Xavier, indiepop band Glass Pools, soul singer Cameron Calloway, alt-rockers Silversage and others—pair with local (Able Baker, Hop Nuts, Joseph James) and regional (Ballast Point, Green Flash, Stone) breweries for a night of multisensory sampling, sponsored by Las Vegas Weekly. 6 p.m., $40. –Spencer Patterson

SAT, JULY 14 RED ROCK RESORT TLC “I’m a fan of all girls and girl groups, it doesn’t matter who they are. I like En Vogue, I like the Dixie Chicks, the Spice Girls—anybody out there doing it, I love them.” So says Rozonda “Chilli” Thomas, onethird of one of the greatest and most influential girl groups of all time, TLC, which performs with another great one, SWV, at the Red Rock’s Sandbar pool Saturday night. Thomas and Tionne “T-Boz” Watkins have been touring constantly in recent years, headlining big nostalgia tours with everyone from New Kids on the Block to Rob Base. “We just did the [Soundtrack] Music Festival in Canada, and the Goo Goo Dolls and all these rock bands were there. It was awesome,” she says. “Festivals are fun, but they can be exhausting. I prefer when we’re on tour with just a couple acts on before us. But overall I just love being on that stage; we both love it. We’re just happy to do what we love to do.” With SWV, 6 p.m., $29. –Brock Radke


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c u lt u r e w e e k ly

07

calendar p30 (Kasimir Szekeres/Courtesy)

SAT, JULY 14 |

DAYLIGHT BASSJACKERS

Summer heats up at Mandalay Bay’s Daylight Beach Club when Dutch electronic duo Bassjackers arrives for a Saturday set. Marlon Flohr and Ralph van Hilst just teamed with another duo, Blasterjaxx, for “Switch,” a runaway train of a tune certain to catch extended play this weekend. 11 a.m., $20-$30. –Brock Radke

FRI, JULY 13

SAT, JULY 14

REYNOLDS HALL JACKSON BROWNE

VEGAS THEATER HUB COURTESY SHUTTLE

The 69-year-old Rock and Roll Hall of Famer and his seven-piece band hit the Smith Center. Even if you’ve heard “The Pretender” in concert before, you haven’t experienced it quite like this. 8 p.m., $40-$130. –Spencer Patterson

Rob Belushi (son of Jim) and Tim Stoltenberg are alumni of Chicago’s esteemed Second City. Their short-form improvisational comedy duo Courtesy Shuttle has rolled across club stages and through comedy festivals nationwide. Hop aboard. 8 p.m., $15, vegastheatrehub.com. –Geoff Carter

SUN, JULY 15

SUN, JULY 15

MAJESTIC REPERTORY RACISM: 10 MINUTES OF TRUTH

TENAYA CREEK BREWERY VEGAN BUFFET

Social Issues Theatre presents an afternoon of “raw and uncensored skits,” storytelling and conversation on the topic of racism. In addition to actors and singers, performers also include a comedian, a playwright and a Louis Armstrong impersonator. 1 p.m., free. –C. Moon Reed

LA-based caterer Southern Fried Vegan serves up an allyou-can-eat vegan feast with down-home dishes like Fried Chickun, breakfast sausage by the Herbivorous Butcher, Rosemary Bakun Cheezey Grits and gluten-free goodies. 11 a.m.5 p.m., $24-$36. –C. Moon Reed


08

C U LT U R E W E E K LY N I G H T S

BY BROCK RADKE

7.1 2 .1 8

SPOTLIGHTING THE PEAK MOMENTS ON JOYTIME II

arshmello has been dominating the summer so far at Wynn Nightlife clubs XS, Intrigue and Encore Beach Club, and on June 22 he dropped his second studio album Joytime II, a guest-free collection of rainbow-colored dance tracks arming the helmeted DJ with more musical ammunition. In anticipation of his two Wynn weekend sets, we bounced through the album to pick some favorite in-track moments.

M


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C U LT U R E W E E K LY N I G H T S

09

“STARS”

MARSHMELLO XS: July 14, 10:30 p.m., $40-$60. Encore Beach Club: July 15, 11 a.m., $30-$50. Encore, 702-770-7300.

(1:48) There are plenty of thick bass drops in this twinkly opening track, and this mid-song smooth-out begins the build for a dramatic, buzzing finale.

“TOGETHER” (1:20)

Dueling synth lines charge through this track like friendly electronic fireflies skittering around your ears. This early explosion offers waves of bass buzz and handclaps before fluttering into high-pitch notes, sure to be a memorable cryo-blast moment when “Together” gets played at Encore Beach Club.

“ROOFTOPS”

(2:15) The first Joytime II track with vocals prompted Pitchfork to write that Marshmello’s stylistic evolution is heading into emo territory. The stabby synths and alligator-croak bass of this breakdown section stand out.

“CHECK THIS OUT”

(1:21) ’Mello is known for slipping disparate EDM elements into the same song, and after a pretty bright and beat-heavy opening, “Check This Out” takes a quick surprise voyage into the land of trap with a threatening, distorted bassline and rapidfire hi-hats.

“TELL ME” (:51)

This one begins with a tick-tock melody that sounds like the ringtone you refuse to use as your wake-up alarm, and Marshmello somehow turns it into a story that eventually comes off charming and fun. He also brings in a synth that sounds like an ’80s electric guitar right before the minute-mark to heighten the drama.

“POWER”

(1:07) After the relative dark tones of “Paralyzed,” the album picks up the mood with this straightforward track. There’s a classic countdown and an intricate, multi-layered keyboard breakdown a quarter of the way into “Power” that changes up the tempo and carves a path for the rest of the song.

“IMAGINE”

(2:53) The sugary closer on Joytime II—a polyrhythmic, videogame-soundtrack dip into tropical house—might be the album’s best overall track. The full-charge groove approaches its final destination at this point, when some conga drums make a guest appearance.

(Amy Harris/AP)


10

C U LT U R E W E E K LY N I G H T S 7.1 2 .1 8

DOUBLE UP Rita Ora (File) Mase (Charles Sykes/AP)

F L A M I N G O ’ S D AY C L U B S TA C K S M A S E A N D R I TA O R A I N O N E W E E KE N D

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he Flamingo’s Go Pool dayclub typically brings judging on BBC’s The Voice and The X Factor UK as in a current or nostalgic artist for a live perforwell as the updated VH1 version of America’s Next mance to spice up its Daybeats Saturday party, Top Model. In short, she should rule the stage at the while DJ Eric Forbes runs the decks. This weekFlamingo. end will be a little different, a little bigger Saturday brings a set from one of the RITA ORA and a lot hotter. classic voices of Bad Boy’s golden era— July 13, 9 a.m., $15. Flamingo’s Go Pool, Rita Ora takes the Go Pool stage Friday Mase. Whether he’s popping bottles with 702-697-2888. to perform her hits and songs on which Diddy in videos for “Feel So Good,” “Mo she’s been featured, possibly including “I Money Mo Problems” or “Been Around MASE Will Never Let You Down,” “Black Widow” the World” or charting his own singles July 14, 9 a.m., $15. and the new “Girls,” a team-up with “What You Want” and “Lookin’ at Me,” Flamingo’s Go Pool, 702-697-2888. Cardi B, Bebe Rexha and Charli XCX. She Mason Betha’s distinctive voice and could also sing her Liam Payne collabo good-natured rhymes have kept him in “For You,” which might remind you that the hip-hop conversation even though he she not only put a song on the Fifty Shades Freed retired from music in 1999 to become an ordained soundtrack, she also has a role in all three of those minister. He returned five years later with gold movies. record Welcome Back and has been touring steadily Ora’s other acting gigs include Southpaw, Empire since the early 2000s, playing a prominent role on and Fast & Furious 6, and the London-raised enthe 2016 Bad Boy Family Reunion tour. tertainer is also well-known for her coaching and –Brock Radke

HEY MR. DJ: DRAKE’S ‘SUMMER GAMES’

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So yeah, there’s a new Drake album, and with 25 tracks more or less divided into rap and R&B, it’s one of his most substantial efforts yet. Scorpion’s format also makes it easier than usual to pick out the gems, the songs that will be remixed ad infinitum and bumped in cars and clubs all summer long. My pick is the song most unlike the others—and most unlike Drake. Come to think of it, “Summer Games,” produced by longtime collaborators Noah “40” Shebib and No ID, doesn’t sound like someone else. It recalls Drake from another era, when he grabbed the 808s & Heartbreak baton from Kanye West and ran with it faster and harder than Ye ever could. “Summer Games” is a breakup song that makes you feel good, especially in the still-hot wee hours of a summer night. The hypnotically repetitive synths add some warm, New Wave contrast to a perpetually icy, machinelike beat. It sounds like the anthem to a John Hughes version of Blade Runner. With Drake stutter-crooning about his heartbreak, “Summer Games” is probably not a track you’re going to hear in a Vegas club, not even as the cool-off closer at a packed outdoor party. But it could happen. –Brock Radke


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DJ Five sets the sounds for this special edition of Worship Thursday celebrating the NBA Summer League and featuring sportswear giveaways and a photo station. 10:30 p.m., $20-$30. Venetian, 702-388-8588.

XS

The disco-pop duo behind catchy new single “Spaceship” also performs at Encore Beach Club on Saturday. 10:30 p.m., $25-$45. Encore, 702-770-7300.

fu t ure

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Catch him in his Vegas residency before the NickiHndrxx tour takes Future (with Nicki Minaj) to MGM Grand in November. 10:30 p.m., $50-$75. Cromwell, 702-777-3800.

DJ Five by Ron Holden/COurtesy; Galantis/courtesy; Future by Owen Sweeney/AP

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PASTRIES AND PORTOBELLOS PARIS BAGUETTE MAKES SNACKING FUN, ON AND OFF THE STRIP BY BROCK RADKE

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ne of the many signs bolstering Las Vegas’ reputation as a true dining destination: Every restaurant franchise feels the need to plant roots here. Between our tourism and our diverse population, there’s just too great an eating audience to ignore, which is why we have two Paris Baguette locations. The Korean-based international corporation— it’s known as Paris Croissant in Asia—behind this fast-casual bakery-café has covered its bases with a sleek store inside the Venetian’s Grand Canal Shoppes (in the St. Mark’s Square area of the sprawling mall) and a comfy eatery on Spring Mountain Road (in the former Yu Yu kushiage spot). Both offer fast, fresh, coffee-and-pastry bliss, though the menu differs between locations. The top-seller at the Strip site is savory, not sweet: a marinated beef dish available in sandwich ($10.75) or bowl ($11.75) form. Grilled soy-sesame beef sliced thin is combined with grilled onion, carrot, green onion and a spicy aioli on a baguette, or with brown or green tea rice with more veggies and a poached egg if you choose the bowl. There are similar options with portobello mushrooms or Mediterranean chicken as the core ingredient, but the beef is where it’s at. The selection of ready-to-go sandwiches and pastries at the Venetian included the hearty mozzarella onion bread ($4.25), essentially an exploded baguette bursting with cheese, herbs and onions. Also in the rotation was a roast beef calzone ($3.25), more of a soft, sweet bread pocket filled with beef, bacon and cheese than a true calzone, but delicious all the same. The Chinatown location feels and tastes more like the neighborhood spot where you meet for coffee and a snack. The standard croissant ($1.90) will do the trick but it also comes swirled with chocolate ($2.95) or filled with pineapple ($2.20). The PB version of the cronut ($3.50) drops a ring of lemon cream on top of a flaky doughnut. Elsewhere, hot dogs come into play in the pastry frank or the even better Polish sausage cornbread (both $2.95). Paris Baguette also sells whole cakes and other desserts, intensifying the local bakery feels despite its corporate identity. It’s a fine fit for Las Vegas.

PARIS BAGUETTE Grand Canal Shoppes at Venetian, 702-476-0046. Sunday-Thursday, 8 a.m.-11 p.m.; Friday & Saturday, 8 a.m.-midnight. 4115 Spring Mountain Road, 702-820-0909. Daily, 7 a.m.11 p.m.

The sweet and savory delights of Paris Baguette. (Jon Estrada/Staff)


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Food & DRINK BBQ Mexicana’s burnt ends burrito. (Peter Harasty/Courtesy)

A gelato family affair +

Barbecue burritos

Food truck flavors go pro at Border Grill’s BBQ Mexicana

+

Veteran Vegas chef Mike Minor pretty much with chipotle coleslaw, fried potatoes, manchego invented a new kind of food when he left his cheese and barbecue mole sauce. There are pulled post at Border Grill in 2014 to launch his own pork ($13) and avocado chicken ($14) burritos, too, food truck, Truck U Barbeque, blending his passion for along with new breakfast burrito options includslow-smoked awesomeness with the authentic Mexican ing the lighter egg white ($10) with spinach, black flavors he had mastered. It wasn’t Tex-Mex, and it wasn’t beans, mushroom and soyrizo, and a more standard traditional, but it was bold, memorable, satisfying and chorizo, egg and potato burrito ($10) with guac and definitely barbecue. salsa fresca. Now that he has returned to the kitchen BBQ Mexicana is a more refined and at Border Grill, Minor has brought his streamlined version of what Minor started BBQ MEXICANA Mandalay Bay, unique creation to the Strip at the new with Truck U, meaning there are salads and 702-632-7200. BBQ Mexicana, a lunchtime takeout operabowls instead of massive beef ribs and fried Monday-Friday, tion just across from the Mandalay Bay chicken tacos (but check the special of the 11 a.m.-4 p.m. stalwart. Vegas conventioneers are now day to catch some of those truck favorites participating in the righteous experience returning to action). The Coop ($14) chicklocals used to savor after too many drinks en bowl is a crowd-pleaser but we’re stuck at Atomic Liquors, specifically the burnt ends buron the Brisket Lover ($16), more meat with barbacoa rito ($16)—chunks of slow-smoked brisket with that sauce, chili-lime broccolini, cilantro slaw, red rice and salty, crispy bark on the edges, packed into a tortilla pickled veggies. –Brock Radke

It was a circuitous route that landed Las Vegas its best current gelato shop. Before planting his feet in a strip mall on Trop and Rainbow (that also includes the excellent neighborhood Greek joint Meraki), Franco Pati spent years in the beachside paradise of Florianópolis, Brazil, where he collaborated with his pizza-making champion wife. The native of Italy followed his son Jean Luca to Las Vegas, where the latter studies hospitality management at UNLV and helps the former churn out the goods. “It’s an Italian tradition, dad and son working together,” Luca says. “My dad has been in the food business for over 30 years. That’s why I decided to go into hospitality, because I love the food business and I love working with Dad.” The current business, Gelato di Milano, finds la famiglia Pati making handmade gelato and sorbet using natural, high-quality ingredients. Take, for instance, the best-selling pistachio gelato, which has a natural, light-brown appearance instead of the pastel green most Americans are used to seeing. There are about 60 rotating options, some 25 of which are fruit-based. The lemon and basil sorbet has been the fan favorite. Speaking of crowd pleasers, during the Golden Knights’ recent run to the Stanley Cup Final, Gelato di Milano named a flavor after the team, featuring a concoction of vanilla, graham cracker and peanut butter cookie. Not surprisingly, it often sold out. –Jason Harris

GELATO DI MILANO 4950 S. Rainbow Blvd. #140, 702-888-1133. Daily, 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m.

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The measured approach Singer Adam Duritz explains Counting Crows’ blueprint for longevity and self-preservation By Annie Zaleski

his summer, Counting Crows are embarking on a 25th anniversary tour. Don’t expect the jam-folk band to make too much of a fuss about the milestone, however. Frontman Adam Duritz tells the Weekly it’ll be business as usual from a setlist perspective—the band will have 80-plus songs worked up from its catalog, from 1993’s T Bone Burnett-produced blockbuster August and Everything After through its most recent album, 2014’s Somewhere Under Wonderland. When asked what has been most gratifying about his long and winding career, Duritz has an immediate response: “Playing music all this time. After you’ve done it for a little while and you see the other bands and how it works out for everyone, you realize how rare it is to actually get to spend your life doing this.

t

“I mean, I’ve spent my entire adult life doing this, pretty much. Half my life, really. It’s pretty crazy.” Duritz also has a simple answer for Counting Crows’ longevity: Even early on, the band eschewed immediate gratification and took a longterm approach to their career. “We really tried to think about the future, and each other, and what the best ways to stay together [are] and how to do things that were important artistically for us—even when they didn’t really agree with what the record company or the business wanted,” he says. “You know, when you sell 10 million records with a record you make with T Bone Burnett, they don’t want you to go find the guy that made the Pixies records to do your next record,” Duritz adds, in reference to Gil Norton, who produced the band’s second album, 1996’s Recovering the Satellites.

“And when that’s a No. 1 record, they don’t want you to go find the guy who did Sparklehorse [Cracker’s David Lowery] to do the next one [1999’s This Desert Life]. But we were more interested following things that we were passionate about. We thought we’d always do better work if we were passionate about it, as opposed to if it was the right commercial decision.” That same iconoclastic mindset lingers to this day—on the opening night of the tour, Counting Crows even didn’t play their biggest hit, “Mr. Jones”—and it permeates Duritz’s non-band life. In October, he’s curating a two-day music festival, Underwater Sunshine Fest in New York City, featuring new and up-and-coming acts about which he’s enthused. Duritz is also working on a memoir with the co-host of his podcast (also called Underwater


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C U LT U R E W E E K LY

NOISE UNDER THE RADAR THREE SHOWS TO CONSIDER THIS WEEK

Duritz, fourth from left, and Counting Crows are celebrating a quarter-century. (Danny Clinch/Courtesy)

Sunshine) and is starting to think about new Counting Crows music. “I’ve been holding off on it, because I really thought it was important to figure out how we really want to put out music from now on,” he says. “I thought we needed to take a second and try and do a little more research into that. But I think we’ll go in the studio again soon.” In the meantime, he’s looking forward to returning to Vegas with Counting Crows, as it’s a city he loves—in small doses. “After the first couple of trips [to the city], I was enjoying myself so much,” he says. “And it suddenly occurred to

me that it was incredibly dangerous to be enjoying Las Vegas that much. I had this vision of homelessness and bankruptcy. “I made a decision right then and there that I would enjoy myself immensely every time I went to Vegas with the band—and I would never set foot there unless I was there for work. And other than one occasion when Cal [Berkeley], where I went to college, was playing a bowl game in Vegas, I’ve never been back except for gigs since then. I’ve had a great time in Vegas over the years, but I made a vow to myself, and I stuck to it.”

HOLY WAVE “We’re children of My Bloody Valentine and Slowdive,” singer/ guitarist Ryan Fuson told the hometown Austin Chronicle in 2016, but two years later, Holy Wave sounds more like the offspring of Syd Barrett and Stereolab on March LP Adult Fear. The El Paso-born quintet—whose records have all been released by the Austin-based (and Black Angels-affiliated) Reverberation Ap-

u r te

sy )

SARAH SHOOK & THE DISARMERS Rebellion and outsiderdom drip from every note of North Carolina singer-songwriter Sarah Shook—and with good reason: K She grew up in an eil (N orthodox Christian household. Naturally, she would start a band called Sarah Shook and the Devil and become a bisexual, atheist vegan. But those things don’t define her artistry. Through two stellar full-length albums, last year’s Sidelong and April’s Years, she has channeled her experience into broader themes of independence, identity and self-resilience, a punk sensibility colored in strums and twangs. Las Vegas doesn’t typically see the likes of artists like Shook—and, come to think of it, the rest of the country doesn’t, either. With Paige Overton, Timmy the Teeth. July 16, 8 p.m., $12, Beauty Bar. –Mike Prevatt g/ Co

July 14, 7:30 p.m., $51-$201. The Joint, 702-693-5222.

preciation Society—crafts lush, psychedelic pop tunes that often don’t end up where you expect. Here’s hoping it finds time in its Vegas set for “Habibi,” which splits the difference between Os Mutantes and Faust over eight bouncy minutes. With The Acid Sisters, K. Kilfeather. July 16, 8:30 p.m., $10-$12, Bunkhouse Saloon. –Spencer Patterson

ru

COUNTING CROWS

UNKNOWN MORTAL ORCHESTRA It seems like these New Zealanders know a thing or two about the finer things in life—at least that’s what the title of their April LP would suggest. Musically, Sex and Food is funky, psychedelic and slow-burning, taking listeners on a silky-smooth ride, infused with groovy guitar hooks, experimental effects and fuzzed out vocals (hear “Major League Chemicals” and “Hunnybee”). If you haven’t seen the Jagjaguwar outfit since its 2013 Beauty Bar show with Foxygen, don’t miss its return. Also returning: Vegas ex-pat Shamir, following up on last February’s hometown headlining debut. July 18, 9 p.m., $25, Vinyl. –Leslie Ventura

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THE STRIP

Mollison has brought Absinthe to Caesars Palace and Opium to the Cosmopolitan. Where will We Are Here wind up? (Erik Kabik/Courtesy)

‘The next thing’ Talking to Spiegelworld boss Ross Mollison about disco-themed show We Are Here By Brock Radke know what you’re thinking. Spiegelworld just opened a new show, Opium, at the Cosmopolitan. What is all this about workshopping a third Vegas show, the disco-themed We Are Here, in New York City this summer for an opening next year? What does a disco show from the people who brought you Absinthe even look like? And how did they manage to wrangle the legendary Nile Rodgers into the musical plans? I needed answers, so I tracked down Spiegelworld founder Ross Mollison for a quick convo. What sparked the idea for this show? I’ve always loved disco. It defines that whole era, even though it came out of a very politically difficult time. It was about different groups of people claiming the dancefloor for themselves. The documentaries I’ve seen about disco go on about the politics—it was about gay rights, it was about female rights, black rights. Then you talk to the people who were there and ask about a political

I

movement, and they’ll tell you they were just having a great time. That’s not to undermine those movements, but ultimately it was about going out and having a blast, people dancing together and holding each other rather than standing apart. Is We Are Here going to explore those themes? We’re not documenting history, but we’ll certainly make reference to history. There are so many extraordinary stories surrounding disco and it coming out of New York during that period, it would be crazy not to draw on some of them. Steven Hoggett is the director, and Nile Rodgers the music curator. How did that happen? I asked every musician friend I have in the world, ‘Do you know Nile?’ Eventually Chrissi Poland who was in Vegas Nocturne said, ‘Of course.’ She connected me, and I called him up. He loves Vegas and the idea for the show. He’s one of those true artists who operates in multiple genres. There are similarities between Absinthe and Opium. Will there be fewer similarities between

those shows and We Are Here? Yeah, I think it will feel different. I think people are looking for the next thing [in Las Vegas], and this could be that next thing like Absinthe was in 2011. But I don’t think I’m going to go pitch [casino executives] and ask them to build me a $30 million theater. I don’t want that kind of pressure on us, and we like to build differently. I think it will be an incredibly immersive show, and it won’t take itself too seriously. But I don’t think there’s anything like it onstage in Vegas right now. So there’s no venue yet. I don’t want a venue now. I want someone to come to me and say, ‘We want to do the next thing, and we want you and this team to get together with our resort and all the incredible marketing leverage and savvy that comes with it.’ We want someone to come in and say, ‘Yeah, this is right.’ Someone said that about building an arena at the back of Monte Carlo and buying a hockey team, and that’s the most exciting new show in Vegas.


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7.1 2 .1 8 From left, Cory Benway, Teah DeStefano and Evelyn Connors star in Las Vegas Little Theatre’s Ruthless! (Christopher DeVargas/Staff)

She’s killing it A wannabe child star is ‘ruthless’-LY funny in LVLT’s kitschy new musical By C. Moon Reed t’s an over-the-top ode to over-the-top ambition. In the Off-Broadway cult classic Ruthless!, 8-year-old Tina Denmark literally kills for the lead role in her school play. The New York Times describes the musical as “so high camp there ought to be a sleepaway version.” The sheer comic ridiculousness of Ruthless! is what attracted director Rob Kastil to the script. “I’ve loved this play ever since it opened in 1992,” he says. “It’s a take off of The Bad Seed, All About Eve, Gypsy, Mame and every other over-the-top musical. It’s a lot of fun.” Ditto for actor Evelyn Connors, who has also always dreamed of performing in Ruthless!. “The show came out when I was 15,” Connors says. “I wanted to be Judy Denmark, but I knew I wasn’t old enough.” She waited for her chance throughout her pro career, but it never came. After “retiring” to Vegas to work as a lifestyle di-

I

rector for high-rise condo towers, she was finally go for it with open auditions,” Kastil says. “We were cast in her dream role. shocked and thrilled by the talent out there.” Connors is the perfect Denmark, a deceptively He cast local 10-year-old Teah DeStefano, who typical housewife and stage mother. “One of the like her fictional counterpart dreams of enterreasons I love this show is because I feel like I’ve tainment stardom. “I really want to grow up to lived this life,” Connors says. “There’s not be a TV star,” she says at a rehearsal. Her RUTHLESS! a person out there who can’t relate to this brown hair is in twisted buns and a wig July 13-29; show, even if they just did high school thecap. “I love acting.” Thursdayater for a hot minute.” “It’s my first time ever working with a Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Ironically, Kastil shied away from prochild,” Connors says. “It’s been surpris2 p.m.; $20-$25. ducing a show about a wannabe child star ingly delightful. Teah is lovely. She’s Las Vegas because of the challenge of working with a more professional than most of us.” Little Theatre, 702-362-7996. child star. In the best of times, kids are noA few minutes later, DeStefano takes toriously unpredictable, so what would hapthe stage in a curly blonde wig and beltpen if you directed them to unleash their ing the song, “Born to Entertain.” DeStemurderous instincts? (Case in point: Both Britney fano says the role of Tina is fun to play because Spears and Natalie Portman have played the role the character is like a roller coaster ride. “She of Tina.) Some directors have solved the problem can appear very sweet and innocent. Then as by casting older actors, but Kastil nixed that idea. quick as lightning she can turn into a devil when Finally, he decided to try his luck. “We decided to she doesn’t get her way.”


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PRINT

Sarah Ortiz, program manager for Black Mountain Institute and The Believer. (Christopher DeVargas/Staff)

HOME WORDS The Juhl, The Believer and others join forces for an ambitious writer-in-residence program By Leslie Ventura he Juhl condominiums, The Believer magazine and the Beverly Rogers, Carol C. Harter Black Mountain Institute are bringing acclaimed writers to Las Vegas as part of BMI’s 2018-2019 Residential Fellows and Writers-in-Residence programs. Visiting Shearing Fellows include poet, essayist and cultural critic Hanif Abdurraqib and National Magazine Award nominee Lesley Nneka Arimah. Visiting Saltman Fellows include PortugueseCandian freelance reporter and producer Susana Ferreira and Mojave School co-director and novelist Derek Palacio. Under a new partnership, the Juhl and BMI are also launching a live-in writer-in-residence opportunity similar to the Juhl’s previous artistin-residence series. The program will allow writers and fellows to live and work in a designated Juhl loft with an attached studio where writers can network and contribute directly to Las Vegas’ cultural landscape. “We wanted to mix it up with our third artist, to

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not just engage the visual art community but [to take] a more comprehensive approach,” says Uri Vaknin, partner of KRE Capital, which owns the Juhl and Ogden condos. The Juhl’s inaugural artistin-residence was contemporary artist and Nevada native Justin Favela (2016-2017), followed by local artist Krystal Ramirez (2017-2018). Vaknin, an Art Museum at Symphony Park board member, spearheaded the artist-in-residence program at Juhl in 2016. After attending the Believer Festival this year, Vaknin says he was “blown away” by the talent the literary magazine brought to Las Vegas. “Often times we don’t see enough diversity in our cultural offerings,” Vaknin says. “Part of what we want to do with our artist-in-residency program is engage the community.” Sara Ortiz, program manager for BMI and The Believer, helped curate this year’s lineup, which features two Believer magazine contributors and editors. Ortiz currently lives in the Juhl studio space while she develops programming for the fall. The Juhl’s first writer-in-residence will be

Believer magazine interviews editor Niela Orr, followed by Believer features editor and Tran Thi Oanh Fellow Camille Bromley. Another Downtown apartment complex, the Pioneer—owned by BMI board member Christopher Gonya—will also host an artist-in-residence during the season. Having recently moved from Austin, Texas, Ortiz says Downtown is an ideal place to host something of this stature. “It has these perks of it feeling like a small town, a desert isolated place, but it also has the amenities of this world class city. It’s this really interesting juxtaposition. ... We’re trying to build the idea that this is another literary destination.” The studio space at the Juhl will be home to a number of events that “will allow us to interact with the already embedded Juhl residents community,” Ortiz says. Those “world class cultural and literary events” will also be open to the public, which will welcome students, artists and other creatives in Las Vegas. “The Believer is really well respected on both literary coasts,” Ortiz says. Now that it’s based in Vegas, “it’s really going to bring a lot of people in.”


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calendar LIVE music

The Cult plays a free Fremont Street Experience show on July 14. (Tim Cadiente/Courtesy)

ACCESS SHOWROOM Color Me Badd, Tag Team 8/4. Arturo Sandoval 8/25. Aliante Casino, 702692-7777. Artisan Hotel Habaka, David Van Such 7/15. Michael Henegan 7/22. Lady S 7/29. 1501 W. Sahara Ave, 702-214-4000. Backstage Bar & Billiards The China Wife Motors, Los Carajos 7/13. Cirka: Sik, Vile Child, ReVolta 7/18. The Rhythm Shakers 7/20. Eldren, Ossum Possum, Stereo Assault 7/21. 7/21. Take, The End of Everything, Relent 7/27. Elevar Music & Art Festival 7/28. Stolas, VIS 7/30. 601 E. Fremont St., 702-382-2227. Beauty Bar Honeyhoney, L.A. Edwards 7/13. Dorothy, Charming Liars 7/14. Weedeater, Zeke, Sierra 7/15. Sarah Shook & The Disarmers, Timmy the Teeth, Paige Overton 7/16. War Twins, A Mirrow Hollow, Pet Tigers, The Scorched, Water Landing 7/27. 517 Fremont St., 702-598-3757. BOOTLEGGER BISTRO Ryan Baker w/Patrick Hogan, Jeff Davis & Jess Gospen 7/15. 7700 Las Vegas Blvd. S., 702-736-4939. Brooklyn Bowl Tom Keifer 7/12. Saved by the Bowl ft. DJ CO1 7/13. Maoli 7/14. The Breeders 7/20. Quicksand 7/21. Streetlight Manifesto, Mephiskapheles, Kitty Kat Fan Club 7/22. UB40 ft. Ali Campbell, Astro & Mickey 7/27-7/28. The English Beat 8/3. Adelitas Way 8/5. Ivan Neville’s Dumpstaphunk 8/9. The Struts, The Regrettes 8/10. Catfish John 8/12. Dispatch, Nahko and Medicine for the People 8/17. Lloyd, Cameron Calloway, B. Rose 8/18. Rodrigo y Gabriela, Robert Ellis 8/24. Linq Promenade, 702-862-2695. Bunkhouse Saloon City Vibes 7/12. The AllTogether, The Rhyolite Sound, Rob Leines 7/13. Holy Wave, The Acid Sisters, K. Kilfeather 7/16. Moon Darling, The Laissez Fairs, Indigo Kidd, The Psyatics 7/19. El Primer Instinto (Caifanes/ Jaguares tribute), Gordonas, Krumpaw 7/20. Car Seat Headrest, Naked Giants 7/22. Destroyer, Devon Williams, The Midnight Disease 7/23. Divided Heaven, Jesse Pino & The Vital Signs 7/28. Givers 7/30. 124 S. 11th St., 702-982-1764. The Chelsea Rebelution, Stephen Marley, Common Kings, Zion I, DJ Mackle 8/12. Jack White 8/23-8/24. Cosmopolitan, 702-698-6797. Chrome Showroom Keiko Matsui 8/11. Santa Fe Station, 702-658-4900. The ChXrch Rest Repose, Drewsif Stalin Music Endeavors, For the Likes of You, A Real King, Full Fledged, FSTR SPRNT, Crossing Quiet 7/13. Gregory Michael Davis, RoboTuxedo, Fugue 7/14. Earth Groans, Vatican Falling, Mastiv, Levitron, Fatal Crime, Stereo Assault 7/23. 5818 Spring Mountain Road #217. CLEOPATRA’S BARGE Roger Clyne 7/13-7/14. Caesars Palace, 866-227-5938. THE CLUB Music for the Soul 7/17. Vince Neil 7/21. Serpentine Fire (Earth, Wind & Fire) 8/4. Hot August Night (Neil Diamond tribute) 8/18. Lita Ford, Vixen 8/25. The Cannery, 702-507-5700. CLUB MADRID Eric Paslay 7/21. Sunset Station, 702-547-7777. The Colosseum Mariah Carey 7/14-8/15, 8/31-

9/2. Reba, Brooks & Dunn 8/17-8/18, 8/22, 8/248/25. Caesars Palace, 866-227-5938. CORNISH PASTY CO. Matt Ballaro, Chop808, Tre Norman, Steven Joseph 7/20. Lie for Fun, Pet Tigers, Lovesick Radio 7/21. Struckout, Strange Mistress, Silverscape, Spring Breeding 7/22. Jimmy Gnecco, Hannah Gernand 7/27. 10 E. Charleston Blvd., 702-862-4538. Count’s Vamp’d Dellacoma, LA Story, Baker’s Dozen 7/13. Count’s 7, Burn Unit 7/14. John Zito Electric Jam 7/18. Void Vator, The Babes, Queens Riot 7/19. FXP 7/20. Electric Radio Kings, Michael Grant & The Assassins 7/21. John Zito Electric Jam 7/25. Lies Deceit & Treachery, Leona X 7/26. Smashing Alice, NE Last Words 7/27. Damage Inc. (Metallica tribute), Vile Child, .bipolar 7/28. 750 W. Sahara Ave., 702-220-8849. THE Dispensary Lounge Karen Jones 7/13. Gary Fowler 7/14. Jazzmin 7/18. Windy Karigianis 7/20. Toscha Comeaux 7/21. 2451 E. Tropicana Ave., 702-458-6343. THE DISTRICT AT GREEN VALLEY RANCH Richard Mann 7/29. 2225 Village Walk Drive, 702-564-8595. Dive Bar Malevolent 7/12. Black Void, Lifecurse 7/13. Graveshadow, Driven, Not My Master, Nebula X 7/14. Dead Inception, Blood Vomit Ritual, Casket Raider, Omniversa, Draugr, Achromatica 7/15. Leona X, Queens Riot 7/20. Lost Horizons, Evasion, The Mendenhall Experiment, Tremble, Blood of the Heretic, Anathemma, Octobrists, Exerberation 7/21. Shadows of Algol, Suicide Forest, Casket Raider 7/27. Condemned Existence, Contortion, Long Face Dogs, Goreatorium, Excrebration 7/28. Resonate, Set Blasters, Baker’s Dozen, Spokes 7/29. 4110 S. Maryland Parkway, 702-586-3483. DOUBLE DOWN SALOON TV Party Tonight w/Atomic Fish, Sheiks of Neptune, Hayden

Thais 7/12. Sick Sense, Cycotic Youth, A Broken Line, Sacred Owls 7/13. Sex & Sin, SLOKA, Wolfhounds, The New Waves 7/14. Brian Lee Dunning, The Legendary Boilermakers 7/15. Prof. Rex Dart & The Bargain DJ Collective 7/16. Unique Massive 7/17. GoldTop Bob & The Goldtoppers 7/18. Angry Samoans, Sector 7-G, IDFI, Mersa, DJ Atomic 7/20. 4640 Paradise Road, 702-791-5775. DOWNTOWN CONTAINER PARK The Whoopsies, Basswüd Poets 7/13. Matt Morgan, Elmer Abapo 7/14. Richard Mann, Jill & Julia 7/20. Miles Van Blarcon 7/21. Jazz in the Park 7/25. Cameron Calloway 7/27. Hazard & Co. 7/28. Jazz Session Sundays 7/29. 707 Fremont St., 702-359-9982. DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS EVENTS CENTER 311, The Offspring, Gym Class Heroes 7/28. Godsmack, Shinedown 8/3. 200 S. 3rd St., 800745-3000. Eagle Aerie Hall Landon Tewers, Hotel Books, Ky Rodgers, Twin Cities 7/19. Traitors, Signs of the Swarm, Distinguisher, A Perfect Being, Slugger, Man Made God 7/27. 310 W. Pacific Ave., 702-568-8927 Encore Theater The Gipsy Kings 8/17-8/18. Anita Baker 8/29, 9/1-9/2. Wynn, 702-770-6696. EVEL PIE Ska-Mi-Con Vegas 7/21. 508 Fremont St., 702-840-6460. THE Foundry Zion y Lennox 7/13. SLS, 702-761-7617. Fremont STREET EXPERIENCE The Cult 7/14. Eddie Money, Jefferson Starship 7/21. Molly Hatchet 8/11. Halestorm 8/25. Melissa Etheridge 8/31. vegasexperience.com. Gilley’s Saloon Scotty Alexander 7/12. Michael Austin and the Law 7/13-7/14. Voodoo Cowboys 7/18. Scotty Alexander 7/19-7/20. Reckless Kelly 7/21. CJ Simmons 7/25. Rob

Staley Band 7/26-7/28. Treasure Island, 702894-7722. GO POOL Scott McCreery 7/5. Midland 8/29. Flamingo, 702-697-2888. Golden Nugget Showroom Pure Prarie League 7/13. Arrival From Sweden (ABBA tribute) 7/20. Ambrosia 7/27. Firefall 8/3. GapX 8/10. Gary Lewis & The Playboys 8/17. Steven Adler 8/24. Tommy James & The Shondells 8/31. 866-946-5336. THE Golden Tiki Kid & Nic 7/14. 3939 Spring Mountain Road, 702-222-3196. GRAND EVENTS CENTER Mirage (Fleetwood Mac tribute) 8/3. Blue Öyster Cult 8/31. Green Valley Ranch, 702-617-7777. HARD ROCK HOTEL POOL Snakehips 8/3. Psycho Las Vegas ft. Danzig, Witchcraft, Dummu Borgir & more 8/16-8/19. 702-693-5000. Hard Rock Live The Brevet 7/28. 3771 Las Vegas Blvd. S., 702-733-7625. House of Blues Thigh Voltage (AC/DC tribute) 7/13. Local Brews Local Grooves 7/14. Clash of the Titans 7/20. One Drop Redemption (Bob Marley tribute) 7/21. Karla Perez 7/26. Steel Panther, Systemec 7/27. Seether, The Dead Deads 7/28. Playboi Carti 7/29. The Decemberists, Whitney 8/1. Chuponcito 8/10. Yuridia 8/16. Parkway Drive, August Burns Red, The Devil Wears Prada, Polaris 8/31. Mandalay Bay, 702-632-7600. HUNTRIDGE TAVERN The Implosions, Danger Inc., The Pluralses 7/27. 1116 E. Charleston Blvd., 702-384-7377. ITALIAN AMERICAN CLUB Frankie Scinta, Jerry Tiffe 7/20. Chadwick Johnson 7/26. Steve McCoy (Tom Jones tribute) 7/27. 2333 E. Sahara Ave., 702-457-3866.


M Pool Lifehouse, Elvis Monroe 7/20. M Resort, 702-797-1000.

SUNCOAST SHOWROOM Mick Adams & The Stones (Rolling Stones tribute) 7/29. 800745-3000. SUNSET STATION OUTDOOR AMPHITHEATER George Thorogood & The Destroyers 7/20. Toto 8/10. 800-745-3000. Terry Fator Theater Boyz II Men 7/207/22. Mirage, 702-792-7777.

Mandalay Bay BEACH Kane Brown, Kylie Morgan, Morgan Evans 7/22. Brett Young, Michael Tenpenny 8/17. Atmosphere, J Boog 8/24. 702-632-7777.

T-Mobile Arena Chris Brown, Rich the Kid, 6LACK, H.E.R. 8/4. Avenged Sevenfold, Prophets of Rage, Three Days Grace 8/17. Panic! At the Disco, Hayley Kiyoko, Arizona 8/18. 3780 Las Vegas Blvd. S., 702-692-1600.

MGM Grand Garden Arena Shania Twain 8/4. Rob Zombie, Marilyn Manson 8/25. 702-521-3826.

TOMMY ROCKER’S Tommy Rocker 7/13-7/14, 7/20-7/21. 4275 Dean Martin Drive, 702-2616688.

NINJA KARAOKE Chuuwee, Trizz 7/13. 1009 S. Main St., 702-487-6213.

Park Theater Logic, NF, Kyle 7/21. Bruno Mars 7/25, 7/27-7/28. Stevie Wonder 8/3-8/4, 8/8, 8/10-8/11. Park MGM, 844-600-7275.

Vinyl The Buttertones, No Tides, In Theaters Friday 7/12. GoldBoot, Almost Normal, Zack Gray 7/13. Hobo Johnson & The Lovemakers 7/16. Unknown Mortal Orchestra, Shamir 7/18. Anthony Green, Good Old War, Found Wild 7/19. Ekoh, BM&V, Soz 8/15. Grateful Shred 8/10. Psycho Las Vegas ft. Danzig, Witchcraft, Dummu Borgir & more 8/17-8/19. Ella Mai, Mapache 8/23. Anti Vision, Be Like Max, Unfair Fight, Rayner, Stop on Green, Duct Tape Shoes, New Cold War 8/25. Hard Rock Hotel, 702-693-5000.

The Pearl Adam Ant 7/25. Halsey, Jessie Reyez 7/28. Train 8/3. Alice Cooper, Ace Frehley 8/10. Charlie Puth, Hailee Steinfeld 8/12. Niall Horan, Maren Morris 8/18. Gavin DeGraw, Phillip Phillips 8/24. Palms, 702-944-3200.

ZAPPOS THEATER Gwen Stefani 7/13-7/14, 7/18, 7/20-7/21. Backstreet Boys 7/25, 7/277/28, 8/1, 8/3-8/4, 8/8, 8/10-8/11. Lionel Richie 8/15, 8/17-8/18, 8/21, 8/24-9/25. Planet Hollywood, 702-777-6737.

THE Railhead Les Dudek 7/19. Chris Lane 7/26. Anthony Gomez 8/16. Boulder Station, 702-432-7777.

clubs

Rocks Lounge Billy Bob Thornton & The Boxmasters 7/13. Queens of Rock 7/28. Red Rock Resort, 702-797-7777.

APEX SOCIAL CLUB DJ Sincere 7/12. DJ Jayceeoh 7/14. DJ Shift 7/15. Palms, 702944-5980.

SAM’S TOWN LIVE Las Vegas Elvis Festival 7/12-7/15. The Original Lakeside 7/20. Jad Madela, K Brosas 7/21. Henry Kapono 7/28. 702-456-7777.

DAYDREAM DJ Josh Bliss 7/14. DJ Sayne 7/15. M Resort, 702-797-1808.

Orleans Arena Throwback Sizzling Jam ft. Joe, Blackstreet, 112 & more 7/21. American Idol Live 7/29. 702-365-7469. Orleans Showroom Air Supply 8/31-9/2. 702-365-7111.

Sand Dollar Lounge GoldTop Bob 7/12. The Rayford Bros. 7/13. The Moanin’ Blacksnakes 7/14. Dan Fester 7/15. Toney Rocks 7/17. Billy Ray Charles 7/18. 3355 Spring Mountain Road, 702-485-5401. SANDBAR TLC, SWV 7/14. Whitesnake, Scrap Metal 8/4. Red Rock Resort, 702-797-7777. South Point Showroom Frankie Moreno 7/12. Herman’s Hermits 7/207/22. Tower of Power 7/27-7/29. The Four Freshmen 8/10-8/11. Tony Orlando 8/17-8/19. Frankie Moreno 8/23. James Darren 8/248/25. Ambrosia 8/31-9/2. 702-696-7111. STAR OF THE DESERT ARENA Los Tucanes de Tijuana 7/14. Gary Allan 7/28. Keith Sweat 8/4. El Chapo de Sinaloa 8/11. Joan Jett & The Blackhearts 8/18. 2601 Atlantic St., 702-684-5769. STARBOARD TACK Being Awone, Mariposa 7/12. In the Whale 7/19. 2601 Atlantic St., 702-684-5769. Stoney’s Rockin’ Country Chris Bandi 7/13. Steve Monce 7/27. Town Square, 702-

DAYLIGHT DJ Neva 7/12. Eclipse: Jeezy 7/12. Blueprint Sound Takeover 7/13. Bassjackers 7/14. Rick Ross 7/15. Mandalay Bay, 702-6324700.

THIS WEEK

M PAVILION Kalimba (Earth Wind & Fire tribute) 7/21. M Resort, 702-797-1000.

435-2855.

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ON SALE NOW

The Joint Counting Crows 7/14. Brian McKnight 7/27. Kingdom Hearts Orchestra 8/5. Coheed and Cambria, Taking Back Sunday, The Story So Far 8/10. Psycho Las Vegas ft. Danzig, Witchcraft, Dummu Borgir & more 8/17-8/19. Hard Rock Hotel, 702-693-5000.

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ON SALE FRI AT 10 AM

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Drai’S BEACHCLUB 4B 7/13. Destructo 7/14. Savi 7/15. Swim Night: Trey Songz 7/17. Cromwell, 702-777-3800. Drai’s DJ Esco 7/12. T.I. 7/13. Future 7/14. Jeremih 7/15. Cromwell, 702-777-3800. Embassy Zion & Lennox 7/13. 3355 Procyon St., 702-609-6666. ENCORE BEACH CLUB Nightswim: Yellow Claw 7/12. Yellow Claw 7/13. Nightswim: Dillon Francis 7/13. Galantis 7/14. Nightswim: Slander 7/14. Marshmello 7/15. Encore, 702-770-7300. Foundation Room DJ Seany Mac 7/13. DJ Excel 7/14. Mandalay Bay, 702-632-7631. GO POOL Jenna Montijo 7/12. Rita Ora 7/13. Mase 7/14. DJ JD Live 7/15. DJ Leverage 7/16. Greg Lopez 7/17. Koko & Bayati 7/18. Flamingo, 702-697-2888.

UPCOMING 8.4 Shania Twain • 8.4 Chris Brown • 8.17 Avenged Sevenfold 8.25 Rob Zombie & Marilyn Manson • 9.1 Shakira • 9.1 - 9.22 Queen 9.2 Smashing Pumpkins • 9.8 Def Leppard & Journey 9.28 Fall Out Boy • 10.13 Ozzy Osbourne • 10.19 System of a Down

B U Y T I C K E T S A T L I V E N A T I O N .C O M


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calendar Hyde DJ Kiddo 7/12. DJ Konflikt 7/13. DJ Metro 7/14. Thomas Gold 7/15. DJ Konflikt 7/17. DJ Sincere 7/18. Bellagio, 702-693-8700.

Cinderella frontman Tom Keifer plays Brooklyn Bowl on July 12. (Tammy Vega/Courtesy)

INFLUENCE DJ J-Nice 7/12. DJ Exodus 7/13. Cam Colston 7/14. Josh Bliss 7/15. DJ Thrilla 7/16. Eric Forbes 7/17. DJ JBray 7/18. Linq Hotel, 702-503-8320.

Chillin’ & Grillin’ Under The Stars

Intrigue RL Grime 7/13. Flosstradamus 7/14. Vice 7/18. Wynn, 702-770-7300. Light DJ Shabazz 7/13. Metro Boomin 7/14. DJ Ikon 7/18. Mandalay Bay, 702-632-4700. Marquee DAYCLUB Chuckie 7/12. DJ MikeAttack 7/13. DJ Mustard 7/14. Bad Beat 7/15. The Cosmopolitan, 702-333-9000. Marquee Eric DLux 7/13. Ruckus 7/14. Chuckie 7/16. Cosmopolitan, 702-333-9000. TAO BEACH DJ ParaDice 7/12. DJ Konstantina 7/13. Eric DLux 7/14. DJ Deville 7/15. Venetian, 702-388-8588. TAO DJ Five 7/12. Jerzy 7/13. Eric DLux 7/14. Venetian, 702-388-8588.

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XS Galantis 7/13. Marshmello 7/14. Nightswim: Dillon Francis 7/15. Encore, 702-770-0097. Wayne Brady 7/14. Bill Maher 7/20-7/21. Tim Allen 7/28. Mirage, 702-792-7777.

Comedy BONKERZ COMEDY CLUB HENDERSON Greg Vaccariello, Jeremy Wieand 7/21. Klondike Sunset Casino, 444 W. Sunset Road, 702-507-5900. BONKERZ COMEDY CLUB Alex “Koolaid” Ansel, Carmen Morales 7/12. Greg Vaccariello, Jeremy Wieand 7/19. Angie Krum, Tyler Jolly 7/26. Rampart Casino, 702507-5900. Brad Garrett’s Comedy Club Rondell Sheridan, Ken Garr, Omid Singh 7/12-7/15. Brad Garrett, Bob Zany, Mike Gaffney 7/167/22. Brad Garrett, Jason Collings, Frazer Smith 7/23-7/26. Jason Collings, Frazer Smith, Derek Richards 7/27. Brad Garrett, Jason Collings, Frazer Smith 7/28-7/29. Larry Reeb, Kermet Apio, Becky Robinson 7/30-8/5. MGM Grand, 866-740-7711. The Colosseum Jim Gaffigan 7/20. Caesars Palace, 866-227-5938. The COMEDY CELLAR Dean Edwards, Rocky Dale Davis, Lynne Koplitz, Henry Phillips 7/12-7/15. Phil Hanley, Joe Machie, Sam Morril, Ian Edwards 7/18-7/22. Erik Rivera, Kathleen Dunbar, Jeff Leach, Greer Barnes 7/25-7/29. Rio, 702-777-2782. LA COMEDY CLUB Sam Comroe, JC Currais 7/12-7/15. Spencer James, Jason Cheny 7/167/22. Jay Reid, Rocky Dale Davis 7/23-7/29. Greg Wilson, Jay Hollingsworth 7/30-8/5. Stratosphere, 702-380-7711. LAUGH FACTORY Angelo Tsarouchas, Kristeen Von Hagen, Steven Roberts 7/127/13. J Chris Newberg, Sandro Iocolano, Jeremiah Watkins 7/16-7/18. Andrew Santino, Sandro Iocolano 7/19-7/22. Bill Dawes, Malcolm Hatchett, Jay Davis 7/23-7/25. Tropicana, 702-739-2411. Terry Fator TheatrE Jay Leno 7/13.

TopGolF Kyle Marlett 7/20-7/21. 4627 Koval Lane, 702-933-8458. Vinyl Colin Kane 7/27. Hard Rock Hotel, 702693-5000. Winchester Cultural Center Brandon Baggett: Laugh Out Loud Comedy Magic Show 7/18. 3130 S. McLeod Drive, 702-455-7340.

Performing Arts & Culture CENTER FOR SCIENCE & WONDER Jennifer Jayne: My Inner Critic 7/14, 7/28. 1651 E. Sunset Road #A111, 725-696-2729. Charleston Heights Arts Center Sonia de los Santos 7/18. Jazzy Ash & The Leaping Lizards 7/25. 800 Brush St., 702-229-2787. Clark County Library Taji Brothers: Qawwali 7/12. Uketopia 7/15. Na Hula Halia Aloha: Christmas in July 7/21. Zemskov Dance Academy: Golden Dreams Talent Show 7/23. Secret Agent 23 Skidoo 7/26. 1401 E. Flamingo Road, 702-507-3400. Henderson EVENTS PLAZA Last Friday 7/29. 200 S. Water St., 702-267-2171 Historic Fifth Street School Paris Chansons 7/14. Sonia De Los Santos 7/19. Summer Jazz Intensive 7/21. Jazzy Ash & The Leaping Lizards 7/26. 401 S 4th St., 702229-6469. House of Blues Rocky Horror Live 7/29. Mandalay Bay, 702-632-7600. THE Mob Museum Gatsby Gang Jazz Band 7/14, 7/21, 7/28. 300 Stewart Ave., themobmuseum.org. Rainbow Library Tumbledown House 7/15.

3150 N. Buffalo Drive, 702-507-3710. Sahara West Library Gary Nassif: Stop Crying and Listen to the Music 7/22. Seth Carlos Mongrut 7/29. 9600 W. Sahara Ave., 702-507-3630. THE Smith Center (Reynolds Hall) Jackson Browne 7/13. Dave Koz & Friends 7/28. (Cabaret Jazz) David Perrico Pop Strings Orchestra 7/14. Frankie Moreno 7/20. The Donny Nova Band 7/21. The Composers Showcase 7/25. Maiya Sykes 7/27. The Lon Bronson Band 7/28. 702-749-2000. The Space The Stone Cold & The Jackal Comedy Show 7/12. Brother Noland 7/14. Mondays Dark 7/23. Rita Lim: The Sweetest Taboo (Sade tribute) 7/24. Top Rock 7/26-7/27. 3460 Cavaretta Court, 702-903-1070. STARBRIGHT THEATRE Las Vegas Valley Theatre Awards 7/16. 2215 Thomas W. Ryan Blvd., 702-240-1301.. Summerlin Library The Romanov Dynasty: Romance & Reign, 100 Years Later 7/15. Las Vegas Dance in the Desert Festival 7/27-7/28. 1771 Inner Circle Drive, 702-5073860. UNLV (Artemus W. Ham Hall) Miss Asian North America Pageant 7/14. (Judy Bayley Theatre) Broadway in the H.O.O.D.: Bring in the Light 7/21. (Lee and Thomas Beam Music Center) 702-895-2787. VEGAS THEATRE HUB Courtesy Shuttle 7/14. 705 Las Vegas Blvd. N., 702-569-9070. West Charleston Library Tumbledown House 7/14. Karan Feder: The Folies Bergere 7/17. 6301 W. Charleston Blvd., 702-507-3940. West Las Vegas LIBRARY Secret Agent 23 Skidoo 7/28. 947 W. Lake Mead Blvd., 702229-4800. Winchester Cultural Center Folklorico Libertad de Las Vegas: Folkloreada Las Vegas 7/21. Ecologic 7/27. 3130 S. McLeod


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Drive, 702-455-7340. Windmill Library Las Vegas Young Artists Orchestra’s Summer Music Institute String Ensemble 7/14, 7/21. Secret Agent 23 Skidoo 7/27. 7060 W. Windmill Lane, 702507-6019.

LOCAL THEATER Las Vegas Little Theatre (Mainstage) Ruthless! 7/13-7/29. 3920 Schiff Drive, 702362-7996. Majestic Repertory Theatre Bigfoot Thru 7/15. 1217 S. Main St., 702-478-9636. Super Summer Theatre She Loves Me Thru 7/14. 4340 S. Valley View #210, 702579-7529. Theatre in the Valley Accomplice Thru 7/15. 10 W. Pacific Ave., 702-558-7275.

Galleries & Museums Barrick Museum of Art (East Gallery) Andrew Schoultz: In Process—Every Movement Counts Thru 9/15. (Braunstein Gallery) Vessel: Ceramics of Ancient West Mexico Thru 12/16. UNLV, 4505 S. Maryland Parkway, 702-895-3381. Bellagio Gallery of Fine Art Primal Water: Japanese Contemporary Art Thru 10/21. 702-693-7871. Centennial Hills Library Marie Martelly: Flying Geese Thru 7/22. 6711 N. Buffalo Drive, 702-507-6100. Charleston Heights Arts Center Gallery Final Juried Exhibit Thru 7/14. 800 Brush St., 702-229-2787.

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Left of Center ART GALLERY Djibril N’Doye: Taking Root and Blossoming Thru 9/1. 2207 W. Gowan Road, 702-647-7378. Nevada Humanities Program Gallery Neon Air: Radiant Residents Thru 7/26. 1017 S. 1st St. #190, nevadahumanities. org. Nevada State Museum Finding Frémont: Pathfinder of the West Thru 4/2019. 309 S. Valley View Blvd., 702-486-5205. Sahara West Library Eugene Rolfe: Korea ’76 Thru 7/15. Nevada Clay Guild: Mud ’n More 7/19-9/15. Reception 7/19. Polyhedral 7/13-9/15. Reception 7/19. All That Glitters 7/179/23. Reception 7/19. 9600 W. Sahara Ave., 702-507-3630.

Springs PRESERVE (Origen Museum) Nature’s Ninjas Thru 9/3. Microscopic Beauty of Fruits and Vegetables Thru 9/30. Springs Preserve, 333 S. Valley View Blvd., 702-822-7700. Summerlin Library Las Vegas Crafters Guild: Holy Crafts Thru 8/26. 1771 Inner Circle Drive, 702-507-3860. West Charleston Library Las Vegas News Bureau/Nevada State Museum Las Vegas: Les Folies Bergère: Entertaining Las Vegas One Rhinestone at a Time Thru 8/12. 6301 W. Charleston Blvd., 702-507-3940. West Las Vegas Library Las Vegas News Bureau: Las Vegas Lineup Thru 8/5. 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd., 702-507-3980. Whitney Library Brian Martinez: Then and Now Thru 7/31. 5175 E. Tropicana Ave., 702-507-4010. Winchester Cultural Center Gallery Ian Racoma 7/12-8/17. Reception 7/27. 3130 S. McLeod Drive, 702-455-7340. Windmill Library Nevada Arts Academy: Season Thru 8/7. 7060 W. Windmill Lane, 702-507-6030.

Clark County Las Vegas News Bureau: Dean Martin: The King of Cool Thru 9/4. 1401 E. Flamingo Road, 702-507-3400.

SPORTS

CSN (Fine Arts Gallery) Shona Macdonald: Overcast 7/13-9/8. 3200 E. Cheyenne Ave., 702-651-4146. Enterprise Library David Veliz: Fading Shadows Thru 8/28. 25 E. Shelbourne Ave., 702-507-3760. Las Vegas City Hall (Grand Gallery) Outside the Box II Thru 8/31. (Windows on First) Brian Henry: Vibrance Thru 10/21. 495 S. Main St., 702-229-1012. Las Vegas Natural History Museum Permian Monsters: Life Before the Dinosaurs Thru 9/16. 900 Las Vegas Blvd. N., 702-384-3466.

Look 10+ Years Younger in Less Than 2 Hours.

Spring Valley Library Jim Atha: Wet Is Wild Thru 8/19. 4280 S. Jones Blvd., 702507-3820.

Clark County Government Center Rotunda Gallery October 1 Remembrance Quilt Exhibition Thru 7/20. 500 Grand Central Parkway, 702-455-7030.

Clark County Museum 50 Years of Preserving History Thru 8/26. 1830 S. Boulder Highway, 702-455-7995.

“... BECAUSE SELFIES DON’T LIE.” ™

BOXING Jaime Munguia vs. Liam Smith 7/21. The Joint, 702-693-5000. JBA LEAGUE Pop Up Shop 7/26. Orleans Arena, 702-365-7469. LAS VEGAS ACES Los Angeles 7/15. Indiana 7/22. Mandalay Bay Events Center, 702-6327777. LAS VEGAS 51s Albuquerque 7/12-7/15. Nashville 7/24-7/26. Memphis 7/27-7/30. Cashman Field, 702-386-7200. NBA SUMMER LEAGUE Thru 7/17 Thomas & Mack Center, Cox Pavilion, nbatickets.com. NPC USA Bodybuilding Championships 7/27-7/28. UNLV’s Artemus W. Ham Hall, 702-895-2787.

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Saturday, July 28th, 2018 • 1PM–5PM

99

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Official CasaBlanca Tournament

INCLUDES: ROOM ONE BUFFET TOURNAMENT FEE

79 EXTRA GUEST IN SHARED ROOM

$

BRING A FRIEND $99 + $79 = $178 = SHARED ROOM, TWO TOURNAMENT FEES AND TWO BUFFETS

RESERVE YOUR SPOT TODAY Cash & Prizes up to

To Register visit CasaBlancaResort.com (Click Entertainment, Find Bunco) or Call 888-711-4653 ext. 6950 Once teams have been filled management reserves the right to close the registration. Guest is responsible for the 12.5% Hotel Tax and the $6.99 Resort Fee upon check-in.

Mesquite Nevada California

15

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One Hour North on I-15


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LV W S P O R T S 7.1 2 .1 8

NBA SUMMER LEAGUE Through July 17, times vary, $35-$500. Thomas & Mack Center and Cox Pavilion, 702-739-3267, unlvtickets.com.

A LEAGUE SUMMERTIME BRINGS THE NBA TO VEGAS—NOW MORE THAN EVER

BY MIKE GRIMALA

T

he idea of Las Vegas as home to an NBA franchise has swirled on and off, with varying degrees of intensity, for more than a decade. It rose up in February 2007 when the city hosted the league’s all-star game (making it the first city without its own franchise to do so), then resurfaced in 2014 when newly appointed commissioner Adam Silver came out in favor of legalized sports gambling. When an NHL expansion team was awarded to Las Vegas two years ago, followed quickly by news of the Oakland Raiders’ imminent relocation, it spurred more talk of an NBA franchise eventually arriving. What seems lost in that conversation is that the city already has an NBA franchise … of sorts. The Las Vegas Summer League, now in its 14th year, has become a boon for the NBA and the city, drawing TV ratings during a typically slow period on the sports calendar and attracting droves of fans. A record average of 227,000 daily viewers watched on television last year, while attendance reached an all-time high of 127,843 during 11 days at the Thomas & Mack Center. It might not be a typical hometown team, but in true Vegas fashion, it is an event. And this year for the first time, all 30 NBA teams are participating in the summer league, playing a total of 82 games—the exact num-

ber of games each NBA team plays during the regular season—through July 17. Albert Hall was one of the co-founders of the Las Vegas Summer League 15 years ago (along with noted NBA agent Warren LeGarie), and he has seen it grow from a small, exploratory venture with six participating teams playing 13 games to the monster it is now. And Hall believes the event has developed into something uniquely Vegas. “It’s almost as if this is Las Vegas’ version

of an NBA franchise,” Hall said the day before this year’s edition tipped off. “There’s not a franchise here, but when you have the summer league, everyone in the industry is here. It brings the business of basketball to Las Vegas. Granted, it’s not season-long, but when we first started, we knew Las Vegas is an event town. This format just works for Las Vegas.” NBA-affiliated summer leagues have come and gone through the years, with Orlando


7.1 2 .1 8 LV W S P O R T S

OF OUR OWN and Salt Lake City among the cities with now-defunct leagues. Las Vegas has outlasted and outperformed them all because of a combination of its location—which has always been attractive to NBA players and personnel—and the support of the community. Hall estimated that fans from Las Vegas and Southern California—where the summer league focuses its marketing efforts— make up 65 percent of the attendance.

“Locals are huge,” Hall said. “Las Vegas has been a home for us. We love our locals. We’ll have people that will walk in the doors that have been coming since the first year and say, ‘Hey, great to have you; congrats, you guys got 30 teams.’ But it should be us thanking them. If they don’t show up, we’re not here.” Michael Dagovetz, 18, attended the summer league July 7. The Las Vegas native identifies as a Cleveland Cavaliers fan but cited

the opportunity to see young talent from all the teams as the main reason he attended for the second straight year. “I really want to see all the young players that got drafted,” Dagovetz said. “That’s what makes the summer league interesting. I can see players that got drafted this year, and I even want to see some of the young players that got drafted last year.” Alan and Diane Elmore have been attending the Vegas summer league for years, and before that, they were regulars at the Rocky Mountain Revue, a summer league put on by the Utah Jazz. Although they’d love to have an NBA team based in Las Vegas, they can see why the Vegas summer league is such a popular alternative. “It’s affordable, so people can bring their kids,” Diane Elmore said. “Not everybody has tons of money, and the other games are expensive. It’s also a great location. People who come here can do Las Vegas at night and then come [to the summer league] during the day. Las Vegas is a great venue to host it.”

(Las Vegas News Bureau/Courtesy)

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Democrats and Republicans compete for legislative control The results of upcoming elections could have a major effect on redistricting in 2021 BY YVONNE GONZALEZ

T

WEEKLY STAFF

he political lines that will be drawn after the 2020 Census, along with immigration concerns, are just a few of the issues shaping the fight for Nevada’s Democratic-controlled legislature. Republicans have been using a failed sanctuary state bill introduced in 2017 as a major talking point against Democrats this election, and both the GOP and Democrats are warning voters of what reapportionment and redistricting could mean for the 2019 legislature. Senate Minority Leader Michael Roberson, who opened up his swing seat with his bid for lieutenant governor this year, has called the sanctuary bill “the most reckless legislation in Nevada history.” The sanctuary bill sought to bar state and local law enforcement agencies from participating in certain immigration enforcement actions. Another bill that also failed sought to prohibit counties and cities from implementing policies that would interfere with immigration enforcement. Courts have held up an anti-sanctuary ballot measure that Roberson supports, and he has said Democrats in the 2017 session pushed “the most anti-business, pro-felon legislative agenda in state history.” “The stakes are very, very high,” Roberson said. “I know this personally because I saw firsthand up in Carson City last session.”

The Republican National Committee has dedicated staffers on the ground and is working to register voters and train volunteers to organize in their communities. The group also has a data program dating back to 2014 that can help track voters gravitating to or from the party. Assemblyman Nelson Araujo, whose campaign for secretary of state against incumbent Barbara Cegavske could make him the first LGBT candidate elected to a statewide office in Nevada, said that the balance of the Legislature will be a key factor as the state prepares for the 2020 Census and the redistricting that will follow in 2021. Araujo said gerrymandering, the unfair drawing of voting districts to favor one particular party, is a real threat and can be avoided in Nevada if Democrats win statewide offices and maintain control of the Legislature. Carl Bunce, Clark County Republican Party Chairman, has said Democrats will increase their advantage in the Legislature if they’re allowed to control redistricting. The Assembly favors Democrats more than any other state’s lower legislative chamber in the country, according to an Associated Press analysis. Eleven Democrats are running unopposed in the Assembly, while the same is true for just two Republican incumbents. The state’s last bout of reapportionment and redistricting, which gave the state one more congressional district, had to be decided in court.

LAS VEGAS STATE SENATE

STATE SENATE 8 Marylin Dondero Loop (D) Valerie Weber (R)

STATE SENATE 9 Melanie Scheible (D) Tiffany Jones (R)

STATE SENATE 20 Julie Pazina (D) Keith Pickard (R)


7.1 2 .1 8 LV W N E W S

32

RENO ASSEMBLY

LAS VEGAS ASSEMBLY

31 27

24

30

ASSEMBLY DISTRICT 31 Incumbent: Richard “Skip” Daly (D) Jill Ann Dickman (R)

25

ASSEMBLY DISTRICT 4 Connie Munk (D) Incumbent: Richard McArthur (R) Robert Lystrup (Independent)

39

40

26

ASSEMBLY DISTRICT 5 Incumbent: Brittany Miller (D) Jason Burke (R)

Battleground districts in Nevada

ASSEMBLY DISTRICT 29 Incumbent: Lesley Cohen (D) Stephen Silberkraus (R) Bruce James-Newman (Libertarian)

Based on the political affiliations of registered voters, the majority of the state’s less-populated districts are Republican-leaning, while more populated areas lean Democratic. Here’s a look at the swing districts in the upcoming midterm elections. Districts with a larger number of Republican voters Districts with a larger number of Democrat voters Battleground districts with an almost equal number of voters from both Republican and Democrat parties

ASSEMBLY DISTRICT 37 Shea Backus (D) Incumbent: Jim Marchant (R)

19 18

13

1 12

2

8

19 37

4 6

34

3

2

21

17

1

4

7 3

6

11

10

5

14

11

9

10

7

36

16

8

9

12

15

42 19

28

20

18

29

5 20

35

41

22 23

59


60

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Seats in the State Senate and State Assembly Republican seat Democrat seat Independent Vacancy

Republican seat up for election Democrat seat up for election Battleground Seats

State Senate 21 SEATS TOTAL

State ASSEMBLY 42 SEATS TOTAL

In the Senate, where there are 10 Democrats and eight Republicans, 11 seats are due for election. Democrats hold a 27-14 majority with one vacant seat in the Assembly. A handful of seats are in likely swing districts, with three held by Democrats and two held by Republicans, all running to keep their seats. Nevada Democrats have held at least one organizing event in every Assembly district, the group announced in late June. “Our team is committed to meeting folks where they are and empowering them to organize in their communities to register voters and turn them out to the polls this fall,” Nevada State Democratic Party Coordinated Campaign Director Peter Mellinger said in a statement. “Through the hard work of our organizing team and volunteers, we will continue to have these meaningful, face-to-face conversations with voters across Nevada about what’s at stake and how much each vote matters in this election.” One Senate Democrat is running unopposed, and at least two other incumbents in the party are likely safe. Three of the districts, represented by an independent

and two Republicans in the 2017 session, could swing for either party this year depending on voter turnout. Three recall efforts sought to knock down the Democratic majority, including Independent Patricia Farley, who caucused with Democrats. The recall petition against Farley failed, and courts have dealt several blows to the all-but-dead efforts targeting Democratic Sens. Joyce Woodhouse and Nicole Cannizzaro. Democrats have criticized the recall attempts as Republican efforts to flip the balance of the state Senate. They argue Republicans are unlikely to win a majority for the 2019 session without forcing elections in swing districts during a midterm election when Democrats tend to see lower turnout than the GOP. Farley is not running for reelection for family reasons, and her seat will be either red or blue come the 2019 session. Democrat Marilyn Dondero Loop is running against Republican Valerie Weber for the seat. Both major parties had about the same number of active registered voters in the district during this year’s primary. The resignation of former State Sen. Becky Harris

to become the first woman appointed to chair the Nevada Gaming Control Board put her seat up for grabs this year. Democrats had the edge in active voter registrations in that senate district, covering part of Clark County, during the primary, and the number of Republicans almost equaled the number of unaffiliated and third-party voters there. Nevada’s Legislature could become the first in the country with a female majority, said Assemblyman William McCurdy II, chair of the Nevada Democrats, during the group’s state convention in June. The Legislature has one of the most even male-female ratios in the country, with about 40 percent of the seats held by women. The rising number of female lawmakers goes along with several other historic milestones in recent years, such as Nevada electing its first Latina U.S. Senator. The 2017 session was the first in state history for both chambers to be under the leadership of African-American lawmakers at the same time. “Help us make history one more time,” Araujo told the 2018 convention. “This is truly going to be the most consequential election of our time.”


The Ultimate in Warm Fuzzies

Adopt a Shelter Pet

Search for pets online at animalfoundation.com 655 North Mojave Road | Las Vegas, NV 89101 Š2018 The Animal Foundation


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less usually has their ID and their paperwork. What they need is emergency shelter while they get back on their feet.

Leadership and renovations laying the groundwork for future of women’s shelter BY LESLIE VENTURA

T

WEEKLY STAFF

his past year, Stacey Lockhart moved from Washington to Las Vegas to begin her new position as executive director of the Shade Tree women’s shelter. Since, Lockhart’s main goal has been to help the shelter become financially stable, which meant closing the third-floor transitional living center in August. With a year under her belt, Lockhart talked to Las Vegas Weekly about the shelter’s fundraising goal of $2.3 million, planned renovations to the 17-year-old building and the goals she has for better-serving women in crisis.

What were some of the goals you had for Shade Tree when you came on board? My priorities coming in were to get us financially stable. We’re not quite there, but we are much closer than we were at the beginning of the fiscal year. Another goal was to clean up the campus. We’re on two acres, and we might be in the “homeless corridor,” but there’s no reason we can’t have curb appeal. There’s no reason our grounds can’t be well kept. More than 5,000 women and children go through this building each year—that’s a lot of wear and tear. We can’t do what we’re going to do if the walls are falling down around us.

kitchen staff, floor advocates, case managers. We do get a lot of private and government grants, but they don’t cover everything, and they’re very restrictive. Local unions provided some significant renovations; they’ve been incredible. They’re renovating two of the shower rooms on the third floor. Once the bath and showers on the second floor are complete, my goal is to move everybody to the third floor so we can get the second floor fixed. Once the second floor is complete, my goal is to dedicate a floor for domestic abuse/violence victims and their families, and human trafficking victims. The other floor will be for our homeless women and families. How might that help you provide better services to your clients? Their needs are very different. The women that come to us from abusive situations and trafficking are dealing with trauma and injuries, so they need more nurturing and care. It takes more time for them to be ready to move forward. Comparatively, someone who is home-

What is intake like for someone seeking services or emergency shelter? They fill out a form, and our specialist will meet with them one-on-one, do an assessment, find out what’s going on, what brought them here, what their needs might be and determine if we’re the best place for them. If we’re not the right place, we connect them with [someone] who can get them into the right place. Once they go through intake, they are assigned a bed on the sleeping floor, and we find out what their immediate needs are. As far as kids—are they enrolled in school? If they’re not, we get them enrolled. If they need to be immunized, we immunize them. We take care of those immediate needs so they can get to a point where they feel a little bit settled. Within the first couple days, they’re assigned a case manager. They will meet during that first week and start to develop a plan, taking a look at what’s needed. It’s a crisis situation, and for some women, it’s their first time being on their own.

HOW TO HELP SHADE TREE 1 W. Owens Ave., 702-385-0072; theshadetree.org 1. Become a volunteer: Fill out an application at theshadetree.org and then attend an orientation to learn more about the organization. 2. Volunteer as a group: Looking for a way to teambuild at the workplace? Set up an event that benefits the Shade Tree. Group applications are available on the website. 3. Donate furniture: Beds, couches, small kitchen tables, lamps, dressers, dishes, pots and pans are all needed for future transitional housing apartments. 4. Don’t add to the excess: Check the Shade Tree’s Facebook page (facebook.com/shadetreeoflasvegas) for items they’re in immediate need of, which change monthly.

One of the first things you did when you came to Shade Tree was close the transitional living center. Why? I had to close that program, the floor and lay off staff because we weren’t going to have as many residents. At the same time, I said if we’re going to turn this around, we need to raise money. [We] need $2.3 million before I can open that floor again. How much of the $2.3 million has been raised, and where will it go once its raised? We have about $200,000 to go. The money will allow us to be financially stable and give us breathing room so we can concentrate on things that need to be done. It will allow us to reopen and furnish that floor, add staff—

“When I toured the [Shade Tree] building and met with the board of trustees, I was really impressed with how committed everybody is and how passionate they are in changing lives.” –Stacey Lockhart, executive director of the Shade Tree women’s shelter. (Christopher DeVargas/Staff)


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RATED PG FOR ACTION AND RUDE HUMOR. Please note: Passes are limited and will be distributed on a first come, first served basis while supplies last. No phone calls, please. Limit one pass per person. Each pass admits four. Seating is not guaranteed. Arrive early. Theater is not responsible for overbooking. This screening will be monitored for unauthorized recording. By attending, you agree not to bring any audio or video recording device into the theater (audio recording devices for credentialed press excepted) and consent to a physical search of your belongings and person. Any attempted use of recording devices will result in immediate removal from the theater, forfeiture, and may subject you to criminal and civil liability. Please allow additional time for heightened security. You can assist us by leaving all nonessential bags at home or in your vehicle.

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Las Vegans aim to bridge video broadcasting gap with new social app

T

BY CHRIS KUDIALIS WEEKLY STAFF

eachers, speakers and presenters will soon be able to charge consumers directly for their live videos if a group of Las Vegas tech gurus and celebrity investors have their way. Symposium, founded by Las Vegas locals and based in the Valley, aims to compete with live video platforms on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. The only difference is that unlike those platforms, video broadcasters with Symposium can earn money without having to bring sponsors on board. “If an individual wants to offer their time, they can make money from it,” says Glenn Geller, the company’s COO. “And that’s everything from tutoring to giving lessons or broadcasting.” Most users of the two-year-old startup app include individual entrepreneurs, such as teachers, coaches and celebrities. Users aren’t yet counting on Symposium for full-time work, but as a supplementary source of income for their expertise, advice, tutoring or greetings. The app has about 500 users, and Geller says potential for growth is “unlimited.” “We’re not putting a cap on how much we want this to grow,” he says. Ogden and Geller were among several Las Vegas entrepreneurs to team up for the app to fill what they perceived to be a need in everyday social media users’ ability to monetize their own video content. Symposium is free in the App Store for iPhone and on Google Play for Android. Geller, who helped launch the company in 2016, says Symposium was Vegas-born and will continue to operate here as it grows because of the Valley’s

focus on tourism and international business. Las Vegas resident Jonathan Ogden, an NFL Hall of Famer who spent 12 season as an offensive tackle for the Baltimore Ravens, co-founded Symposium. One of several celebrity users of the app,

he charges consumers $50 to make a customized recorded greeting for birthdays, celebrations “or just general hellos.” The former football star touts the company’s three unique video methods—SymCast, a one-onone live video conversation; SymGram, a recorded greeting; and SymTalk, one-to-many chat in which broadcasters can take questions from members of the audience and bring the person asking the question onto the live video stream. Ogden calls the three distinct methods a “really unique” way of ecommerce. Erik Drake, a youth baseball coach for the 11-andunder Spring Valley Little League All Star travel team, used Symposium this spring season to broadcast his team’s four games. Setting up a cellphone camera with a clear angle of the field, Drake said he charged people who couldn’t make the team’s games $5 to tune into the live Symposium stream (Symposium keeps 20 percent of each sale). He used the app as a fundraiser for the team, later contributing that to an end-of-season party with players’ families. “A lot of people will sell chocolate bars and raffle tickets, and that’s one way to do it, but a lot of time, that’s more work,” Drake says. “This was a great way to fundraise without asking people to put any extra hours in.”

According to its description in the app store, “Symposium is a worldwide social-commerce marketplace with unprecedented access to business professionals, celebrities, athletes, social media trendsetters and many more by connecting users via scheduled video chat and live pay-per-view broadcasts.”


AUGUST 27 & 28, 2018 MGM GR AND L AS VEGAS mgmresortsfoundation.org/wlc

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66

V e g a s i n c b u s i n e s s 7.1 2 .1 8 open at the Railroad Pass Travel Center near the Railroad Pass Hotel.

VegasInc Notes Sinful Subs is open at 5135 S. Fort Apache Road, Suite 145, Las Vegas. Jasmine Taylor is the assistant director of the Sunrise Children’s Foundation. Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award, which recognizes the hospital’s commitment to ensuring stroke patients receive treatment according to nationally recognized, research-based guidelines. Dr. Souzan El-Eid, a breast surgeon at Comprehensive Cancer Centers, is chairwoman of the American Society of Breast SurEl-Eid geons’ Breast Imaging Technologies Certification and Accreditation Committee.

approved for a Workforce Innovation for the New Nevada grant, which will fund the development of home health care, nursing assistant and health technology programs.

Las Vegas Metro Officer David Anthony is PETA’s 2018 Sexiest Vegan Next Door.

Anthony

Platt

Lainhart

Haberman

Chung

Splan Chaya Platt and Susan Splan are vice presidents and professional banking relationship managers at Nevada State Bank. Danny Lainhart is vice president, retail banking sales manager and Donna Haberman is vice president, market manager in Southern Nevada. James Chung is branch manager at the Nevada State Bank at 7030 S. Durango Drive. Flip For Me Gymnastics is open at 8425 Duneville St., Las Vegas. Capriotti’s is

Dimitri Mihaloliakos and Thad Lawrence are shareholders and principals at Burke Construction Group. Mihaloliakosis is vice president of estimating; Lawrence is vice president of preconstruction. Nicole Johnson is social media coordinator with Clark County Credit Union. Southern Hills Hospital & Medical Center offers procedures done with a Mako advanced robotic arm for total knee, partial knee and total hip replacements. The first procedure using the device was performed at the hospital by Dr. Roger Fontes.

Gov. Brian Sandoval appointed Dallas Haun, chairman of Nevada State Bank, to the Nevada Athletic Commission.

Wilson

Carmen Amen is general counsel for the Latin Chamber

Haberl of Commerce.

John Burke is vice president

Justin Wilson is an associate attorney at Solomon Dwiggins & Freer. Wilson focuses on tax, estate and business planning, and asset protection.

Carole Fisher, president and CEO of Nathan Adelson Hospice, joined the Visiting Nurse Associations of America’s board of directors. Shanice Stevens is the education engagement specialist at Junior Achievement of Southern Nevada.

Johnson

Alexander Haberl is regulatory development manager with Gaming Laboratories International.

Back Bar USA is developing specialty cocktails for Mina Group’s

restaurants.

Hadco Staffing Solutions is open at 8935 S. Pecos Road, Suite 21C, Henderson.

Gerald Ward is executive chef at the Blind Center of Nevada’s Visions of Greatness Center. The Nevada Governor’s Office of Economic Development board approved applications for 12 businesses, which will bring nearly 700 jobs and $275 million in capital investments. Applicants included Advanced Technologies Management (Pictographics), Caremark, Fortress Innovations, KRS Global Biotechnology, Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers, Sephora, 3PEA International, Alpha Guardian and Cannae Holdings. In addition, the College of Southern Nevada was also

Joining the Discovery Children’s Museum board of trustees were: Kevin Holyfield, vice president of hotel operations for Park MGM; Rebecca Miltenberger, shareholder at Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck; Boyd Nelson, vice president of strategy and corporate development of Southwest Gas Holdings and Southwest Gas Corp.; Lynda Tache, political director in Nevada for Marsy’s Law; and Ashlee Washington, vice president and community relations manager for Bank of America.

of memberships at Las Vegas HEALS.

Stevens

Lisa de Marigny is president and CEO of Omni

Limousine. The San Martin campus of Dignity Health-St. Dominican Hospitals received a Best in Keys Award from the National Association of Healthcare Access Management. The award recognized success following the association’s AccessKeys guidelines. UNLV received $11.4 million from the National Institutes of Health to build a center of excellence in personalized medicine. Personalized medicine is based on the

concept that a person’s DNA holds crucial clues for effective treatment and disease prevention. Desert Radiology is the official imaging partner for the Las Vegas Aces. Desert Radiology will provide diagnostic care to the team administering magnetic resonance imaging, X-rays, CT scans and services. Las Vegas Oddities and Bugs, Bones, and Stones are sharing one storefront at 1228 S. Main St., Las Vegas. Caesars Entertainment Corp. is creating branding and licensing opportunities with four of its brands — Caesars Palace, Flamingo, the Cromwell and the Linq. Smart City Networks is the IT Systems Management provider for internet and data services at the new Entertainment & Sports Arena in Washington, D.C. Patty Aguilar is vice president, relationship manager at the Spanish Ridge branch of Meadows Bank. Veronica Walthall and Stacey Turpin are tellers at the Pahrump branch. Heather Gozdiskowski is assistant project manager at Grand Canyon Development Partners. Caesars Entertainment set science-based targets to drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the company and throughout its supply chain. The Science Based Targets initiative is a collaboration among CDP, the United Nations Global Compact, World Resources Institute and the World Wide Fund for Nature. Targets adopted by companies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions are considered “science-based” if they are in line with the level of decarbonization required to keep global temperature increase below 2 degrees Celsius compared with pre-industrial temperatures.

Gozdiskowski

We are the leading professional commercial and industrial real estate association. Real estate professionals who have earned the SIOR designation are recognized by corporate real estate executives, commercial real estate brokers, agents, lenders, and other real estate professionals as the most capable and experienced brokerage practitioners in any market.


68

V egas inc business 7.1 2 .1 8

Records & Transactions CONVENTIONS International Premium Cigar & Pipe Retailers Association Convention & International Trade Show 2018 Westgate, Las Vegas Convention Center July 14-17 6,500 Annual Corvette Show South Point July 15-20 1,400 Vietnam Veterans of America — National Leadership Conference 2018 Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino July 16-21 450 National Society of Professional Engineers Annual Meeting 2018 Caesars Palace July 18-22 300 Derm 2018 NP and PA CME Conference Encore at Wynn Las Vegas July 19-22 400 Nerium International — Annual Conference 2018 Las Vegas Convention Center July 19-21 10,000 Bridal Spectacular Events — Veils & Vino 2018 Las Vegas Convention Center July 20-21 1,500 Cvent, Inc.— Cvent Connect 2018 The Venetian July 23-26 3,400 RollerCon 2018 Westgate July 25-29 4,000

BID OPPORTUNITIES July 12

2:15 p.m. Goodspring Trail Clark County, 604904 Sandy Moody-Upton at scm@ClarkCountyNV.gov

fixtures and retrofit kits countywide Clark County, 604944 Deon Ford at deonf@ ClarkCountyNV.gov

July 16 3 p.m. Annual requirements contract for uniform rental Clark County, 604900 Susan Tighi at slt@ ClarkCountyNV.gov

July 27 2:15 p.m. Pedestrian grade separation; Las Vegas Boulevard at Park Avenue Clark County, 604928 Tom Boldt at tboldt@ ClarkCountyNV.gov

ARC for keys and locks countywide Clark County, 604939 Deon Ford at deonf@ ClarkCountyNV.gov

July 30 3 p.m. ARC for landscape and grounds maintenance services for Heritage Museum Clark County, 604941 Deon Ford at deonf@ ClarkCountyNV.gov

ARC for landscape and grounds maintenance services at Wetlands Park Clark County, 604948 Deon Ford at deonf@ ClarkCountyNV.gov July 19 2:15 p.m. Fire Stations 72, 73 and 74 emergency generator connection Clark County, 604914 Sandy Moody-Upton at scm@ClarkCountyNV.gov Government Center, first floor, ODC A/V upgrades and Pueblo Conference Room remodel Clark County, 604917 Sandy Moody-Upton at scm@ClarkCountyNV.gov 3 p.m. ARC for roofing services countywide Clark County, 604818 Adriane Garcia at akgarcia@ClarkCountyNV.gov July 20 2:15 p.m. Spring Mountain Youth Camp: Re-carpet dorms and re-paint dorms Clark County, 604947 Sandy Moody-Upton at scm@ClarkCountyNV.gov July 23 3 p.m. Supplemental maintenance contract for installation of LED light

July 30 3 p.m. ARC for landscape and grounds maintenance services for Cambridge Campus Clark County, 604942 Deon Ford at deonf@ ClarkCountyNV.gov Aug. 3 2:15 p.m. Residential streets pavement reconstruction No. 101 Clark County, 604922 Tom Boldt at tboldt@ ClarkCountyNV.gov Aug. 10 2:15 p.m. Tropicana Avenue, Hualapai Way to Fort Apache Road Clark County, 604761 Tom Boldt at tboldt@ ClarkCountyNV.gov

BROKERED TRANSACTIONS SALES $14,500,000 for 35,440 sq. ft. of retail 1700 & 1710 East Sahara Avenue Las Vegas, 89104 Landlord/Seller: Jay Kim Landlord/Seller agent: Grant Traub and Chris Connell Tenant/Buyer: Marks

The List Garage One LLC Tenant/Buyer agent: Mike Mixer, SIOR $9,100,000 for 2.40 acres of retail 835 & 855 Seven Hills Drive Henderson, 89052 Landlord/Seller: DM Sorrento II, LLC Landlord/Seller agent: David Grant, Grant Traub and Chris Connell Tenant/Buyer: Marks Garage One LLC Tenant/Buyer agent: Mike Mixer, SIOR $3,200,000 for 53 multifamily units 2540 Fremont St. Las Vegas, 89104 Landlord/Seller: Sackley Family Management 2540 Landlord/Seller agent: Devin Lee, Robin Willett, Jerad Roberts and Jason Dittenber of Morthcap Multifamily Tenant/Buyer: SDS Realty Corp. Tenant/Buyer agent: Blake Leavitt of Wardley Real Estate $1,125,000 for 20 multifamily units 1416 F St. Las Vegas, 89106 Landlord/Seller: Did not disclose Landlord/Seller agent: Did not disclose Tenant/Buyer: City Redevelopment and Jagdish & Darshana Oza Family Trust Tenant/Buyer agent: Salina Ramirez, SSIM of Commercial Executives Real Estate Services $874,000 for 6,800 sq. ft. of industrial 2041 Pabco Road Henderson, 89011 Landlord/Seller: Mark Griffin Landlord/Seller agent: Zac Zaher of CBRE Tenant/Buyer: McBeath Holdings Tenant/Buyer agent: Did not disclose

Available commercial space Ranked by available square feet as of June 1

AVAILABLE SQ. FT.

AVAILABLE UNITS

SALE OR LEASE

TYPE OF PROPERTY

197,073

11

Lease

Office

1

The HC 3773, 3800, 3883 and 3930 Howard Hughes Parkway Las Vegas, NV 89169

Darren Lemmon, Amy Lance and Justin Witt of CBRE

134,163

1

Lease

Office

2

Green Valley Corporate Circle 2360 Corporate Circle Henderson, NV 89074

Patti Dillon, SIOR, and Taber Thill, SIOR, of Colliers International

130,789

8

Lease and Sale

Office / Medical

3

Tribeca Parc Campus 5330, 5370 and 5420 S. Durango Drive Las Vegas, NV 89113

Patti Dillon, SIOR, Taber Thill, SIOR, and Stacy Scheer, CCIM, of Colliers International

122,124

3

Lease

Office

4

Town Square North 64543 and 6551 S. Las Vegas Blvd. Las Vegas, NV 89119

Patti Dillon, SIOR, and Taber Thill, SIOR, of Colliers International

110,962

2

Lease

Office

5

Marnell Corporate Center V 6720 Via Austi Parkway Las Vegas, NV 89119

Patti Dillon, SIOR, and Taber Thill, SIOR, of Colliers International

110,000

18

Lease

6

Renaissance III 3300 E. Flamingo Road Las Vegas, NV 89121

Retail and Office

Deana Marcello of Logic Commercial Real Estate

106,000

13

Lease

Office

7

City Center West 7201 and 7251 W. Lake Mead Blvd. Las Vegas, NV 89128

Patti Dillon, SIOR, and Taber Thill, SIOR, of Colliers International

104,397

2

Lease

Retail

8

2605 S. Eastern Ave. 2605 S. Eastern Ave. Las Vegas, NV 89169

Kit Graski, George Okinaka and Maureen Waters of ROI Commercial Real Estate

PROPERTY

LEASING AGENTS AND COMPANY

Source: VEGAS INC research. It is not the intent of this list to endorse the participants or to imply that the listing of a company indicates its quality. This list is a representation of the companies who responded to our request for information. Although every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy and thoroughness of VEGAS INC charts, omissions sometimes occur and some businesses do not respond. Please send corrections or additions to research@vegasinc.com.

For an expanded look at the List, visit vegasinc.com. To receive a complete copy of Data Plus, visit vegasinc.com/subscribe.

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7.1 2 .1 8

“INITIALLY ADORED” by frank Longo

horoscopes week of JULY 12 by rob brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19) Your key theme right now is growth. 1. Not all growth is good for you. It may stretch you too far too fast. 2. Some growth that is good for you doesn’t feel good to you. 3. Some growth that’s good for you may meet resistance from people close to you. 4. Some growth that isn’t particularly good for you may feel pretty good. 5. Some growth is good for you in some ways, and not so good in other ways. 6. Some growth is utterly healthy for you, feels pleasurable, and inspires other people. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You can’t sing with someone else’s mouth. You can’t sit down and settle into a commanding new power spot with someone else’s butt. It’s best if you don’t try to dream with someone else’s heart, nor should you imagine you can finetune your relationship with yourself by pushing someone else to change. You can enhance your possibility for success by harnessing, borrowing or basking in other people’s luck. Especially in the coming weeks. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You wouldn’t attempt to cure a case of hiccups by repeatedly smacking your head against a wall, right? So don’t overreact to minor tweaks of fate. Instead, regard the glitches as learning opportunities. Use them to cultivate more patience, expand your tolerance and strengthen your character. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Pay tribute to your dizzying courage. Salute your efforts to transcend your past. Praise yourself for demonstrating that freedom is never permanent but must be reclaimed and reinvented on a regular basis. Cheer as you avoid every temptation to repeat yourself, demean yourself and chain yourself. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) I’m feeling a bit helpless as I watch you messing with that bad but good stuff that is so wrong but right for you. I am rendered equally inert as I observe you playing with the strong but weak stuff that’s interesting but probably irrelevant. What should I do about my predicament? Is there any way I can give you a boost? Maybe the best assistance I can offer is to describe to you what I see. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Psychologist Paul Ekman compiled an extensive atlas of how emotions are revealed in our faces. “Smiles are probably the most underrated facial expressions,” he wrote, “much more complicated than most people realize. There are dozens of smiles, each differing in appearance and in the message expressed.” Your assignment in the coming weeks is to explore and experiment with your entire repertoire of smiles.

2018 King features syndicate

ACROSS 1 Classic arcade name 6 Subdivision of a religion 10 Low-pitched 14 Southern speech trait 19 Bits of viral web content 20 Spencer of TV news 21 Trade show 22 “Tiny Bubbles” crooner 23 Chris Evert beat her at the 1978 U.S. Open 25 “Poetry Man” singer 27 Fruit related to a 37-Down 28 Paper opinion piece 29 Michigan’s Grosse — 30 “The Jerk” diector Reiner 31 Genie holder 33 “It’s enough to survive on” 35 “How I wish!” 37 “Wall of Sound” record producer 41 Saturate 43 High throw 44 Word sung after “que” 45 Not messy 47 See 57-Across 48 High mount 51 Web handle 53 “The Lady Eve” director 57 With 47-Across, allots 58 “That stinks!” 59 Miners’ finds 60 How oboes sound 61 Casino pair

63 Actor Mark — -Baker 66 Enter on a vehicle 68 Pack in 71 David Letterman’s music director 74 “Halt!” 75 Deodorant target 77 Pueblo pot 78 Bros, e.g. 80 Jason’s vengeful wife 81 E-garbage 83 Garbage 85 Irish coins 89 He played Captain Picard 93 Louisiana cooking style 94 — -Blo (fuse type) 95 Frat letter 96 H.S. math 97 “It’s a possibility for me” 99 — Lingus 100 Mambo music’s Tito 102 “Take Time to Know Her” singer 105 Beachward 108 Exist naturally (in) 110 Put in danger 111 Baseball card no. 112 Smoothed, as wood 114 Ltr. heads-up 116 Spill secrets 120 “Turn! Turn! Turn!” songwriter 122 1964 Beatles hit ... or what an ador- ing fan of any of eight celebrities in this puzzle might say? 124 Occasion 125 Margarine 126 Completed 127 Literary twist 128 Bird homes

129 Scottish loch 130 Picnic pests 131 De Mille the dancer DOWN 1 Gig hookups 2 Pond duck 3 Arsenal stuff 4 Vend anew 5 Bull tail? 6 Casual shoe 7 Roof’s edge 8 Attribute 9 Pothole fill 10 Rail station 11 Artwork displayer 12 Name-lending person 13 Versifier 14 Ike’s inits. 15 Gun, slangily 16 2001 Peace Nobel ist Kofi 17 Fingerprint ridge 18 Humble 24 Frolicked 26 Lebanon’s capital 29 1994 Peace Nobel ist Shimon 32 Whence St. Francis 34 Out of sight 36 Coming time 37 It may become a prune 38 Wash (down) 39 “Yeah, sure!” 40 Mafia title 42 Most domineering 46 Not written in any key 48 Liaison 49 Occasioned 50 CIA mind-game initiative 52 It’s similar to a wapiti 54 Wheel action 55 Spongy ball brand 56 New printing 58 Grizzly rug, maybe

62 Tax pro 64 Chemical “twin” 65 Capitals’ gp. 67 Soft & — 68 Globs 69 Ryan of film 70 Supplement 72 Refs’ kin 73 Actor Jamie 76 City in central India 79 Green gems 82 People present 84 Of the ear 86 Pothole site 87 Cassini of couture 88 Parched 90 Havarti, e.g. 91 Really tired 92 Antiquing sub- stance 93 Slots site 98 Aromatic shrubs of Europe 100 Strong 101 Feel a prickly sensation 103 Rationale 104 Anita of “La Dolce Vita” 105 Quaking tree 106 Actor Carell 107 Abhors 109 Hoagies 113 Years on end 115 Color variety 117 Actress Sue 118 Top-tier 119 Pays for 121 Rd. crossers 122 Hi-tech “appt. book” 123 By way of

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Lucky vibes are coalescing in your vicinity. Scouts and recruiters are hovering. Helpers, fairy godmothers and future playmates are growing restless waiting for you to ask them for favors. You have a mandate to be the show, not watch the show. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Emily Dickinson wrote 1,775 poems—an average of one every week for 34 years. Launch an enduring, deep-rooted project that will require similar amounts of stamina, persistence and dedication. Are you ready to expand your vision of what’s possible for you to accomplish? The current astrological omens suggest that the next two months will be an excellent time to commit yourself to a great work that you will give your best to for the rest of your long life. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) What’s the biggest lie in your life? What’s most false or dishonest or evasive about you? Whatever it is, the immediate future will be a favorable time to transform your relationship with it. You now have extraordinary power to tell yourself liberating truths. Three weeks from now, you could be a more authentic version of yourself than you’ve ever been. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Now and then you go through phases when you don’t know what you need until you stumble upon it. At times like those, you’re wise not to harbor fixed ideas about what you need or where to hunt for what you need. A crucial clue may even jump out at you from a spam email or a reality TV show. The next two weeks might be one of those odd grace periods for you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) “Reverse psychology” is when you convince people to do what you wish they would do by suggesting that they do the opposite. “Reverse censorship” is when you write or speak the very words or ideas that you have been forbidden to express. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to carry out all these reversals. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Japanese novelist Natsume Sōseki told his students that the proper Japanese translation for “I love you” is Tsuki ga tottemo aoi naa, which means “The moon is so blue tonight.” Be inspired by Sōseki. More than any other time in 2018, your duty in the coming weeks is to be lyrical, sensual, aesthetic, imaginative and festively non-literal.


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SAT, JUL 21 FRI, JUL 27 SUN, AUG 5 FRI, AUG 10 AUG 17 – 19

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2018-07-12 - Las Vegas Weekly  
2018-07-12 - Las Vegas Weekly