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18 Y R A U R B E F S AT U R D AY, 1P M – 6 P M

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06 las vegas weekly 02.16.17

16 Thu., 7:30 P.M.

Trust Us

THE CRAZY WORLD OF ARTHUR BROWN AT VINYL If Brown—the masked performer behind 1968 psychrock touchstone “Fire”—seemed too mythical to be real, a few, lucky Las Vegans caught a glimpse of Sasquatch in the wild last year. The 74-year-old singer, who has rarely hit the road since the old days, brought his band to the Joint for August’s Psycho Las Vegas festival, which found him donning a variety of headdresses and robes (naturally) and dancing with female dancers who looked to be a third his age, and were, at times, twirling balls of actual fire (of course). Good news for longtime fans, or those simply curious about the spectacle: Brown’s first full U.S. tour since 1969 will find its way back to the Hard Rock Hotel this week, for a headlining gig at intimate club Vinyl. Also in the plus column, New York City psych warriors White Hills (of memorable 2010 Beauty Bar patio-set fame) are on the bill, along with rising Cincinnati stonerrockers Electric Citizen. If you have some face paint in your medicine cabinet, now’s a good time to dig it out. $24-$30. –Spencer Patterson

e v e r y t h i n g y o u a b s o l u t e ly, p o s i t i v e ly must get out and do this week

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THURSDAY, 3 P.M.

The African American Experience in Las Vegas at the Historic Westside School Crisp black-and-white images depict a tight-knit community building lives in a new city. They show baptisms, school marching bands, parades and barber shops. Real people doing regular activities, with a quiet vitality. Photographer Clinton Wright spent 30 years documenting life on Las Vegas’ Westside during the Civil Rights era. Now 80, he returns to take part in a photo exhibit and an advance screening of the documentary African Americans: The Las Vegas Experience (set to air on Vegas PBS Channel 10 February 20 at 9 p.m.). Wright would like viewers to see in his photos the hard work of the residents: “The people in that time period were instrumental in [making] the community grow ... and making it a better place.” Curator and photographer Aaron Mayes says he was moved by Wright’s photos. “I can’t begin to explain how my views of our city, its history of segregation and my general understanding of the black community has been influenced by working with Clinton’s images,” says Mayes, who chose 28 Wright photos from approximately 4,000 archived in UNLV’s Special Collections. “I’m terribly proud of this show. .. probably more proud than if it were my own photographs.” RSVP at cal.library.unlv.edu/event/3111476. –C. Moon Reed Self-portrait of photographer Clinton Wright. (Courtesy)

18

Saturday, 8 P.M.

AFI at the Joint While many of their emo and poppunk peers from the late ’90s and early ’00s are busy with nostalgia tours, California goth-punks AFI are forging ahead with new music, touring behind their recent self-titled release (subtitled The Blood Album) with support from Nothing and Souvenirs. $28-$128. –Josh Bell

18

saturday, 7:30 p.m.

NERDLESQUE NIGHT: DC UNIVERSE AT ARTIFICE The math isn’t complicated: It’s burlesque plus Wonder Woman, Superman, Batman, etc. Scheduled to strip for justice: Dahlia Dark, Innocence, Katarina Honeybunny, Loon A Tik, Mae Du Luc, Pistol Holliday and former Absinthe “bubble girl” Charlie Starling. JP Nomi Malone hosts. $10. –Geoff Carter

19

sunday, 8 p.m.

NOTS AT BEAUTY BAR This all-female Memphis foursome sounds just the way a garage-punk group formed by art-school chums ought to: shambolic; indebted to X-Ray Spex, The Raincoats and Bikini Kill; and perfect for a night of open-air Downtown dancing. With No Tides, Headwinds. Free. –Spencer Patterson


07

Shaolin Warriors (Courtesy/Photo Illustration)

las vegas weekly 02.16.17

20

monday, 7:30 p.m.

Shaolin Warriors at Smith Center Las Vegas offers any number of fighting competitions throughout the year, but rarely does any of it approach the ballet-esque technique and stunt-like showmanship of the Shaolin Warriors, who practice a hybrid of spirituality and zenful combat that dates back 1,500 years, and is far more physically demanding than other form of kung fu. The Shaolin Warriors show will feature several different displays, ranging from artful, choreographed meditation poses to Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragonlike presentations that would make Cirque du Soleil blush. It includes graceful sparring matches, both bare-handed and with staffs; choreographed individual and group numbers that showcase agility and combat prowess; and eyebrowraising demonstrations of strength. When you witness a huddle of warriors hoisting up and then balancing one of their brothers with the ends of their spears, you’ll be simultaneously impressed with their gravity-defying accomplishment and stunned at how they have turned pain tolerance into an art form. Reynolds Hall, $24-$85. –Mike Prevatt


08 LAS VEGAS WEEKLY 02.16.17

SIGNS POINT TO YES

the inter W H E R E

I D E A S

Derek Stevens is taking down a block of Fremont Street— but keeping the lights on BY GEOFF CARTER

L

ast year, Derek and Greg Stevens purchased Fremont Street’s Las Vegas Club casino and several neighboring properties, including Mermaids and Topless Girls of Glitter Gulch. All told, it adds up one entire city block that the Stevens brothers intend to demolish and build up anew. It’s an exciting prospect—the first new resort-hotel to be built from scratch on Fremont Street in decades. And yet, our first thought upon hearing this good news was, what about the signs? That block of Fremont features a number of vintage neon signs that feel pretty essential to the character of the street, including Vegas Vickie, the kicky neon cowgirl that debuted with Bob Stupak’s Glitter Gulch casino in 1980; the sign for Herb Pastor’s Golden Goose casino, circa 1974; and the giant “Las Vegas Club” letters themselves, which have been part of the streetscape for more than 60 years. The idea of losing all this glowing history is unthinkable, and according to Derek Stevens, we can continue not thinking it. He says the signs will be saved, one way or another. “In everything we’ve done, from the Golden Gate to [transforming] Fitzgerald’s into the D, we’ve tried to have a connection from the past to the future,” Stevens says. “The signs are going to be part of the design. Whether they’ll be internal or external, I’m not quite sure yet. … I’m a pretty big fan of Vegas history. I don’t see anything getting the wrecking ball.” That said, he’s yet not sure what leftovers the Neon Museum might inherit, or even when demolition will begin (though late 2017/early 2018 seems likely). “We’re not at a point where we can commit [to] anything. … We’re pretty close to the end of our 50th—our 50th—design meeting. We’ve probably got another hundred or something to go.” In the meantime, the signs will stay in place and Vegas Vickie will keep on kicking.

Vegas Vickie isn’t going anywhere, we’re assured. (Steve Marcus/Staff/Photo Illustration)

NEW GOVERNMENT, WHO DIS? Our nation’s government isn’t some crazy, giant robot. It’s composed of regular folk who can be flattered, reasoned with or threatened with humiliating defeat. If you’d like to call your elected officials but don’t, y’know, actually know who they are, you can: 1. Text your zip code to 520-2002223. You’ll get a return text identifying

your representatives, with their office numbers. 2. Try the Countable app (countable.us), which provides email and phone contacts for your representatives and explains what they’re currently working on, in plain English. 3. The 5 Calls app (5calls.org) provides contact numbers and calling scripts, along with a gentle reminder to make five calls to your government every day. –Geoff Carter


rsection A ND L IF E M E ET

09 LAS VEGAS WEEKLY 02.16.17

FROM STORM TO RAINBOW Dennis McBride chronicles Nevada’s LGBT history in a new book

+

MID-MOD ’HOOD PARADISE PALMS IS OFFICIALLY HISTORICAL Paradise Palms’ sleek lines and daring angles embody the postwar, boomtown optimism of a nascent Las Vegas. The mid-century modern neighborhood, near Desert Inn Road and the Boulevard Mall, just became the first to receive historic designation in Clark County. Community organizer Dan Stafford is thrilled, even though his home wasn’t among the first 200 in the official designation. His grandparents bought into Paradise Palms in the ’60s, and he’s excited to carry on the glamour of Old Vegas. With help from the Nevada Preservation Foundation, his community hopes to get all of its properties designated as historic. “We have potentially 1,000 neighbors and 1,000 friends here,” Stafford says, sipping a Bloody Mary at an open house. “It’s overwhelming, but it’s a wonderful overwhelming.” –C. Moon Reed

BY MIKE PREVATT

It took 16 drafts and more than four decades archiving, but historian and Nevada State Museum Director Dennis McBride has finally published the story of the LGBT experience in Nevada. From that epic effort comes Out of the Neon Closet: Queer Community in the Silver State, a nearly epic account itself that begins with statehood and a virulently homophobic government, then focuses largely on the strides made within a growing local LGBT community over the past 40 years— when McBride himself was fighting for equality. We spoke to him about the completion of his life’s work. On the weight of writing about so much death and dehumanization from the former sodomy law and AIDS crisis: “I’m a really emotional guy. But in writing a book like this, I couldn’t afford to be so and not write about something I found out. These are my people, this is my tribe and this is what happened. Reading about what happen to these poor men in the 1910s and 1930s, it was heartbreaking.” On the infighting that marks much of local LGBT history: “I think it is less so now, but it’s also not particular to the gay community. It’s not uncommon in marginalized communities, because they’ve lived with a sense of siege all their lives. Sometimes it’s another gay person that pushes their buttons and leads to wasted animosity.” On how to write about events in which he took part: “I’m writing this history and referring to all these people I’ve interviewed—what do I do when I’m involved as well? I think I worked my way around it. I referred to myself as if I was someone else and then referenced my own journals as another resource.” On the book taking so long: “Before I could start getting in-depth on the subject, I needed a firsthand archive, so I started doing oral histories. Ultimately, I did 60. Most people are starting with archives when writing a book like this. I had to create the archive to write [the book] from. Strictly speaking, I’ve been writing the book for 20 years, but building [the archive] took 40— and I’m still building it. “ For more of our interview with McBride, visit lasvegasweekly.com. Out of the Neon Closet is available at Get Booked (4640 Paradise Road) and online at Amazon.com.


10

Las Vegas Weekly 02.16.17

By Rosalie Spear he galleries inside Strip properties generally favor works by artists who reside elsewhere, with only a handful of locals in the mix. Local artists prefer the galleries and creative atmosphere of Downtown. These narratives have defined our city for years. Now, a pair of local women are working to change them. SKYE Art Gallery—founded in December 2015 by Peruvian native Vanessa Skye and her wife, Russian-born Elena Skye—is nestled within the Forum Shops at Caesars Palace, among highend retail stores and upscale restaurants, plus a handful of fine art dealers like Exclusive Collections Gallery and Martin Lawrence Galleries. SKYE has distinguished itself from its neighbors not only with its local roots, but through its smartly curated lineup of Las Vegas and international exhibiting artists—and a desire to integrate the Downtown arts scene with the Strip. “I’m a young, Latina female. The possibility

that a person like me could do this is rare,” says Vanessa Skye, 34. “But I loved the art world. It was where I was happiest. I knew that I wanted to spend the rest of my life there.” The Skyes have created one of few fine arts galleries in Las Vegas emphasizing pop art, a bright, inviting space with an impressive repertoire of talent from England, Armenia, Belgium, Mexico and the Vegas Valley. “The galleries that are [in the Forum Shops] already have years of experience. That’s the challenge [for us], but that’s also the beauty,” she says. “They are not bringing anything new here; they’re extensions, continuations. They’re not showing what’s new from Las Vegas.” Vanessa Skye moved here in April 2011 after working in the New York City art scene, and is

adamant about influencing the growth of our creative community. “Vegas is like how New York City would have been when it was an exciting city, new to everything,” Skye says. “I feel like Vegas is a new New York.” SKYE’s exhibiting artists include the Cubanborn “King of Pop Art,” Nelson De La Nuez, who has a permanent home at the gallery; Des Taylor, a British illustrator renowned for his DC Comics work and feministoriented art, who has his first fine artworks showing there; and William Sweetlove, a Belgian sculptor who recycles plastic, resin and polyurethane to create animal sculptures as an environmental statement. Even hip-hop legend DMC has made an appearance at SKYE with DMC (Darryl Makes Comics) Fine Art, and is expected to return this summer for a bigger show and live performance. Although the Skyes already boast a high-caliber repertoire of artists, they emphasize their role as


11

las vegas weekly 02.16.17

A variety of artwork awaits purchase inside SKYE Art Gallery at the Forum Shops. (Mona Shield Payne/Special to Weekly)

a community gallery. SKYE exhibits local talents like portraiture artist AraDona, who moved here from California after being given an opportunity at the gallery. A recent art and fashion collaboration show featured AraDona and haute couture fashion icon David Tupaz, who’s involved in the creation of a Las Vegas fashion district. “The art here is not just from artists that are commercial or hot at the moment, but artists that are so passionate about what they do that they would never stop doing it,” Skye says. “They don’t do it because it’s what sells; it’s because it’s an extension of themselves.” The Skyes want to extend the art presence on the Strip to Downtown, and to the rest of our city, starting with murals and internship programs. Vanessa hopes to have Sweetlove create an installation at Symphony Park, and Taylor design a mural at the Plaza. She also wants to construct better art programs for her current artists, while devising opportunities for new ones, including internships for UNLV art students. Brian “Paco” Alvarez, longtime Downtown arts advocate and Art Curator and Boutique Buyer for Zappos,

has known Vanessa for years. He looks forward aren’t we representing there? Isn’t this SKYE ART to working with the Skyes to curate public art our town?’” Vanessa says. “If you’re an GALLERY Sunday-Thursshows for Zappos’ Downtown headquarters, art lover here, you cannot afford to miss day, 10 a.m.-11 and for SKYE artists like Michael Summers great opportunities that are happening p.m.; Saturday to design custom collectibles for Zappos’ gift on the Strip. And if you’re stuck in traffic, & Sunday, 10 a.m.-midnight, shop, Z’Boutique—further linking Strip-exhibit’s an indicator that something good is free. The iting artists with Downtown. happening.” Forum Shops “She’s more than proven herself in the art So, faced with these transportation at Caesars Palace, 702scene here,” he says. “I think what Vanessa and communication challenges, is it 836-3538. and her wife are doing on the Strip is nothing possible to unite the two communities? short of revolutionary.” “Yes, it is absolutely possible. Is it imNot many have successfully linked the perative? Yes, it has to happen,” Alvarez local and tourist worlds. Alvarez favorably says. “Vanessa and I feel that you can do likens the Skyes to local gallerist Michele Quinn, a a lot with a little.” strong presence on both sides of our city’s art scene. Vanessa plans to remain in the Forum Shops, the “If you’re going to be in the art gallery business, you location of her “wildest dream.” She says last year have to look at the Strip in order to make it successshe had the opportunity to open another SKYE in ful, or really market yourself,” Alvarez says. Paris, but that she’s not ready to expand so far away There’s also the issue of locals’ common disdain when there’s much work still to be done in Las Vegas. for the Strip and its gridlock. But Alvarez says he “There’s a lot to do for sure, but most importantly believes all of Las Vegas will be unified within 10 to the passion, desire and talent are there,” Vanessa says. 15 years, through the rollout of a light rail system. “I [have my gallery] on the Strip, but I believe in what Vanessa Skye, meanwhile, points out the posiDowntown is doing. We need artists in both places. Use tive. “The locals see the Strip as the enemy … ‘Why me. Use my location. Let me make that bridge.”


Service ace

Hometown hero Andre Agassi’s educational efforts have quietly expanded far beyond Las Vegas By Brock Radke

(Jon Estrada/Special to Weekly)


13 cover story WEEKLY | 02.16.17

If we’re lucky, there’s a moment in our lives—or even better, several moments—when the light shines, the path is revealed and we realize what it is we’re supposed to do. That’s if we’re lucky. Many us never discover what’s meant to be our life’s work. ¶ It happened for Las Vegas native Andre Agassi at the age of 27, after he’d been a professional tennis player for 11 years. “I’d been No. 1 in the world, and I’d fallen all the way down to No. 140,” he says. “My coach locked me in the hotel room after a loss and said to me, ‘We’re either going to change everything or quit, but no more like this.’ So I sort of gave myself permission to quit, and then I rebelled against myself. I thought: What if I find myself for the first time, no longer playing for my dad, no longer playing for any economic reason?” ¶ Agassi’s soul searching coincided with him catching a 60 Minutes segment about the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP), back then just developing into what it is today—a network of 200 nonprofit, college-preparatory charter schools. He saw the program’s founders changing children’s lives, and calls it “an epiphany. That was my moment of [realizing] that’s what I’ve got to do. Ultimately, it helped me get out of my own way on the tennis court. But that was the time that I set upon the task of building my own K-12 charter school.”

Agassi retired from tennis at age 36 after the 2006 U.S. Open. He’d won 60 singles titles, eight majors and more than $31 million in prize money, plus far more in endorsements while becoming one of the most recognizable athletes in the world. He won five of those major tournaments between 1999 and 2003—after his epiphany—including the 1999 French Open, which put him in the elite class of players who have won all four majors. To this day, only eight men and 10 women have accomplished the feat. But even before his late-career surge, Agassi had set his course. In 1994, he founded the Andre Agassi Charitable Foundation to improve the lives of children through education, recreation and social services. The following year saw him host the first Grand Slam for Children in Las Vegas, starring Elton John, Robin Williams and others, raising $1.8 million for the foundation. After Agassi shifted his focus to education in 2000, his Andre Agassi College Preparatory Academy opened its elementary school the next year on West Lake Mead Boulevard. It has remained at the center of his life ever since. “I compare retiring as an athlete to death, and I don’t mean that dramatically,” Agassi says. “You can never quite prepare for what it’s going to be like when you’ve done something your whole life and spent a third of your life not preparing for twothirds of your life.” He says he was different from most pro athletes in that he didn’t have a healthy relationship with the

game that gave him fame and fortune—a relationship well documented in 2009 autobiography Open—so he embraced retirement, even if he was unsure. “The one thing I did enjoy about tennis was the ability to impact somebody for a few hours, and retirement was a canvas to impact people on a greater scale.” ***** If Open was the perfect title for Agassi’s memoir, Scale might fit his second life. The more the 46-yearold tennis legend has worked to build and improve his Las Vegas charter school—which enrolls 1,200 students in grades K-12—the more he has learned about the shortcomings of the system. The biggest problem he sees is the scale. “My greatest frustration throughout the process with my school was that there are always more kids on the waiting list than in the school,” he says. “I’ve tried to figure out ways to scale what I was doing, through legislation, which isn’t very efficient at times, and I’ve had people who wanted me to build schools in their neck of the woods. But I’m not an operator. “So I realized, I’m not an educator, I’m not an operator, what am I? I’m a facilitator. And doing this for 15 years, seeing it outside the box, has shown me the greatest impediment to the growth of great school operators is not the software. It’s the hardware—the facility itself.” Over the course of 15 years, Agassi’s foundation

raised $185 million for one school with 1,200 kids. In the past three years, the Turner-Agassi Charter School Facilities Fund has built some 70 schools across the country—including several in Nevada— that serve more than 30,000 kids. The fund launched in 2011, the same year Agassi got inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame. “It came out of realizing philanthropy is not the answer all the time,” says Francisco Aguilar, general counsel for Agassi’s foundation and management company. “The question was, how do you merge private capital with a social issue?” Turner-Agassi, created with K. Robert Turner, former CEO for multibillion-dollar commercial real estate firm Canyon Capital, is the answer. The fund’s partners created a for-profit model that gets money from the private sector to build charter schools for established, high-quality operators. Those operators get to scale rent payments as they ramp up enrollment, allowing for faster growth. Once schools have stabilized—usually around the third year, Agassi says—the fund redirects rent payments through tax and bond markets to give operators purchasing power to buy back their facilities. It’s a sped-up version of charter schools’ traditional development model, which often finds them incubating at churches or Boys & Girls Clubs until they grow and generate enough revenue to find permanent homes. Agassi describes the infrastructure fund as a “benevolent owner” instead of a typical landlord-


14 Cover story WEEKLY | 02.16.17

Agassi says his college-prep school will forever occupy a spot close to his heart. (Mikayla Whitmore/Staff)

“A school is like a child—it’s born, it grows up, it goes to college.” tenant arrangement, guiding experienced investors interested in social change to connect with new, paid-for facilities operated by accomplished educators. “I don’t think anyone thinks about education and serving the community as uniquely and broadly as Andre,” Aguilar says. “I think it comes from being an athlete in a sport that requires a lot of thought and preparation.” ***** All the thought and preparation that have gone into Agassi’s efforts to scale up charter-school development across the country have changed the way he thinks about his own school in Las Vegas, and the press conference he’ll hold with Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval on February 17 will officially put those changes into action. Democracy Prep, based in New York City and considered one of the top charter operators in the country, will expand to the West Coast for the first time when it takes control of Agassi Prep next year. “My hope is that by coming out to the west side of the country, we are planting the flag and making sure more operators like us see this as a proof point that it can work for them,” Democracy Prep

CEO Katie Duffy says. “Then more kids would have access to high-quality education in Las Vegas, even if it’s not Democracy Prep.” Agassi says his school has always been about stealing the best practices from operators like Democracy Prep, and that he’ll be more effective for the community by attracting such an operator to Southern Nevada and directing his foundation’s resources in a more strategic way. “I think it’s a win across the board,” he says. Of working with Agassi, Duffy says she was “shocked at how knowledgeable and deeply passionate about education reform across the country he is, My commitment now is to give him the best school in the country as fast as I can.” Agassi still sees his school like it’s one of his children. “I love the years I’ve spent and will continue to do that. ... I’ll never not spend time and energy and money on the school,” he says. “It is like a child. It’s born, it grows up, it goes to college. The needs and responsibilities change, and sometimes you do less, but what you do becomes more important. The stakes get higher. I will always love and care for it.” Will his morphing duties give him more time to do new things? “I don’t know. The balance of life

is important. The choreography of it is crucial. I don’t compromise the family time—I really do get to see and be a part of mostly everything.” Agassi and his equally legendary wife Stefanie Graf (known as Steffi during her tennis-playing days) have two children, Jaden, 15, and Jaz, 13. The couple intentionally steered their kids away from tennis “very subtly” by getting them involved in other things very early on. Jaden, a talented pitcher, is being looked at by college baseball programs. Agassi stays involved in tennis, though, forever appreciating the platform the game provided him. Maybe it’s easier to love tennis more now that he has found his true calling. And maybe he can give tennis some credit for helping him find it. “I didn’t have a choice in my life with what I did, the way I was raised, and that led to a disconnect,” he says. “Even though I was the best in the world at something, that disconnect was a function of that lack of choice. “The idea that children don’t have choice in their lives because of circumstances, and they don’t have the luxury of falling back on something—that can end up in places that are not good, and they don’t get a chance to break that cycle.”


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LAS VEGAS WEEKLY 02.16.17

CHABUYA JAPANESE CUISINE

DO YA CHABUYA?

3210 S. Decatur Blvd. #104; 725-696-8413. Daily, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; MondayThursday, 5:30-10 p.m.; Friday & Saturday, 5:30 p.m.-midnight.

SUBTLE CHANGE MAKES A GREAT JAPANESE RESTAURANT EVEN BETTER BY JIM BEGLEY changing of the guard has taken place inside the Decatur storefront that formerly housed I-Naba. That under-the-radar noodle house is now Chabuya, and the new spot hasn’t missed a beat. Chabuya showcases a swath of Japanese cuisine, emphasizing seafood. A prime example is the battera ($8.50); more commonly known as pressed sushi, its presentation is rarely found locally. The kombu paper-topped mackerel—compressed atop sushi rice—is intensely fishy, making it a must order for the adventurous. Less aggressive is the itawasa ($4), simple slices of pink and white kamaboko fish cakes. Chabuya’s version is particularly mild, enhanced by the accompanying wasabi paste. Not everything is challenging at Chabuya. The agedashi tofu ($5.50) might be the most accessible starter, with the lightly-fried, almost palatecleansing tofu swimming in a more complex dashi broth. Equally approachable is the nasu dengaku ($5)—sweet, miso-glazed eggplant adorned with nori slivers and bonito flakes. The glistening miso sweetens, while the nori and bonito offer textural contrasts to the eggplant. The bulk of the menu consists of rice and noodle dishes. The donburi (rice bowls) follow a simple equation: your choice of protein—like the savory fried pork cutlet katsu or the meaty yakinaku bulgogi (both $12)—atop a rice bowl, accompanied by a salad, miso soup and mild pickles. My favorite is the unagi-don ($14), smoky barbecued freshwater eel with just a hint of sweet nitsume. Noodle-wise, you get a choice of hot or cold soba or udon. I prefer the nuttiness of the buckwheatbased soba to the more mild-flavored wheat udon. The cold noodle preparations are particularly fun with a mini-bowl of mentsuyu—broth with a base of sake, mirin, soy sauce, kombu and dried bonito—for dipping. Get the ten zaru ($12), which combines delicately fried shrimp and vegetable tempura, to test your chopstick skills. Chabuya’s portion sizes are ample enough for a hearty meal, and the service is welcoming. What are you waiting for?

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Chabuya’s seafood-forward Japanese menu rewards adventurous and risk-averse diners. (Mikayla Whitmore/Staff)


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LAS VEGAS WEEKLY 02.16.17

MANGO SASSY David Sim and Heesoo Hwang are expanding their influence on Las Vegas’ Asian food scene. (L.E. Baskow/Staff)

INGREDIENTS 1 1/2 oz. CÎroc Mango 1 oz. Cointreau 1 oz. pink grapefruit juice

SETTING THE PACE DAVID SIM READIES HIS NEXT INNOVATIVE ASIAN EATERY

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Savvy local eaters know the distant southwest part of the Vegas Valley has become a hotbed of Asian food, but they might not realize David Sim has played a powerful role in these restaurant developments. The California transplant and UNLV graduate was working at Bellagio when his wife, Heesoo Hwang, pulled him into F&B. The first step was Oyshi Sushi, which opened on South Rainbow Boulevard in 2007. (It now has a second location on West Sahara.) Sim then went back to his Korean roots in 2010 with Soyo, a “barstaurant” unlike anything Vegas had experienced to that point. Next up? “My wife wanted to open an Italian restaurant,” Sim explains. Enter the Sparklings, after which the couple’s empire continued to grow, with Omoide noodle house, Goong Korean barbecue and coffee shop Loffti Cafe—all on South Rainbow. Sim isn’t straying from the neighborhood with his next project, set to open in a few weeks at 7729

S. Rainbow Blvd., but he’s taking more risks with its food. YuXiang Korean Chinese Cuisine will be another first for Las Vegas, Sim says. “In Korea, Korean-Chinese restaurants are everywhere, but not in the U.S. They have them in LA, New York and Chicago.” Given the growth of Korean barbecue in Vegas over the past year, Sim expects locals to embrace a new style. YuXiang will be similar to American-Chinese eateries in that noodles or rice will be available with entrées of chicken, beef, seafood or pork, but the Korean ingredients—spicy and sour seasonings and sauces—will make a difference. Common fusion dishes to expect include jajangmyun, noodles with black bean sauce and jjampong, a spicy seafood noodle soup. Soyo was a significant trendsetter, and Goong has added a rare fine-dining touch to the world of Korean barbecue. Expect another unique experience at YuXiang. –Brock Radke

Scoop of blood orange sorbet and edible flower for garnish

METHOD Shake with ice, then strain into a cocktail coupe over blood orange sorbet.

Delicate, refreshing and bursting with fruity flavors—the Mango Sassy will get you ready for the warmer days ahead. Cîroc Mango is a smooth, easy-sipping vodka with creamy mango flavors and subtle notes of tangy citrus. The citrus theme is carried throughout this cocktail with Cointreau (a beloved French triple-sec), tart pink grapefruit juice and zesty blood orange sorbet. Take your time while drinking this one and let the sorbet melt into it slowly—it deepens and enriches the flavors, and gives you an excuse to top it off!

Cocktail created by Francesco Lafranconi, Executive Director of Mixology and Spirits Education at Southern Glazer’s Wine and Spirits.


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about us

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Publisher Mark De Pooter (mark.depooter@gmgvegas.com) Editor Brock Radke (brock.radke@gmgvegas.com) Staff Writer Leslie Ventura (leslie.ventura@gmgvegas.com) Associate Creative Director Liz Brown (liz.brown@gmgvegas.com) Designers Corlene Byrd, Ian Racoma Contributors Jim Begley, Sarah Feldberg, Deanna Rilling, Rosalie Spear Circulation Director Ron Gannon Art Director of Advertising and Marketing Services Sean Rademacher CEO, Publisher & Editor Brian Greenspun Chief Operating Officer Robert Cauthorn Group Publisher Gordon Prouty Managing Editor Ric Anderson Las Vegas Weekly Editor Spencer Patterson 2275 Corporate Circle, Suite 300 Henderson, NV 89074 lasvegasweekly.com/industry lasvegasweekly.com /lasvegasweekly /lasvegasweekly /lasvegasweekly

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Gareth Emery, Andrew Rayel, Carnage, W&W and Sander van Doorn set the pace at Marquee’s annual President’s Day weekend dance party, which continues through Sunday.

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After dropping an original Christmas album last year, Kells is back on the grind with his After Party Tour at the Hard Rock Hotel Friday night.

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MANDALAY BAY EVENTS CENTER

Tyler Joseph and Josh Dun are one of the most unlikely recent pop success, as evidenced by their pantsless Grammy win Sunday.

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Diplo just dropped a remix package of his DVLM collab “Hey Baby,” and all three resident DJs play Wynn/Encore this weekend.

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Atlanta trio Quavo, Takeoff and Offset have exploded behind “Bad and Boujee” and a Donald Glover shoutout at the Golden Globes. Migos plays Drai’s to kick off MAGIC week.


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est Coast hip-hop stalwart DJ Quik stopped in Las Vegas last year to perform at Brooklyn Bowl, and he’ll return Saturday night for a set at LAX. We spoke with Quik about keeping his craft alive and well. You don’t come to Vegas a lot. Ever since 2Pac died there, I’m not trying to be there. Sh*t rubs me the wrong way. Before that, Vegas was vacation-land for all of California. It’s not the city’s fault; it’ll just never leave my mind.

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The film Straight Outta Compton put a focus back on the West Coast. What did you think of the movie? A lot of it was super dead-on, and a lot reminded me of those times, hanging out with Eazy. To relive it was awesome. It was almost like the world got a chance to see why he was championed so much. That movie is right up there now with Menace II Society and Boyz n the Hood. Has it changed anything for you? I’ve been getting calls to work with people, yeah. The trickle down is real. When times get weird, people turn to music. It’s like a natural blanket. People want music to make them feel good, and we were discerning in the way we did that with the early stuff. West Coast hip-hop is alive again, and it’s like, thank you!

What do you think of the younger generation of artists? Hip-hop is so young. It’s hard for me to speak on the youth and what’s going on, because what I say is dissected and taken out of context. That’s why I haven’t been doing interviews or Twitter. I’ve been doing important sh*t, like helping to beautify the city of Compton. It’s starting to look like the suburb I grew up in. That’s been my M.O. lately, going back to where I grew up and making it a better place. Do you feel the same way about music? I’m still building, making new music, developing new artists and trying to rediscover my passion for the music and what made me who I was when I was doing it before I wanted money from it. ... I’ve been feeling a little melancholy about the business since we lost so many important people—Prince, Maurice White, George Michael, David Bowie. It’s painful, but the saving grace is that life goes on in finding the spark in some of these new artists. That keeps me going. DJ Quik at LAX at Luxor, February 18. –Brock Radke


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ennifer Lopez had already conquered all facets of the entertainment world when she began her Las Vegas residency show, All I Have, last January. But she’s not slowing down a bit.

Photograph by Denise Truscello

J.Lo will be all over TV in 2017— starring in the second season of cop drama Shades of Blue (returning March 5); producing and judging on NBC’s new World of Dance $1 million competition series; and starring in the holiday production of Bye Bye Birdie, playing a role made famous by Chita Rivera. Between all that, recording her first Spanish-language album in a decade and returning to the Vegas stage, Lopez will somehow find time for a historic April concert at the Altos de Chavón Amphitheater in the Dominican Republic, a 5,000seat venue built in the 1970s and concert-christened by Frank Sinatra in 1982. It’ll be J.Lo’s first-ever performance in the DR, and judging from the all-out energy she puts into her Vegas shows, likely another memorable moment in a career full of them. Jennifer Lopez: All I Have at the Axis at Planet Hollywood, February 17-25.


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iplo’s sets at XS have become major events. The genre-spanning DJ and producer remains one of the biggest names on the Wynn Nightlife roster, and this week he takes control of the club on Monday night to launch a pretty huge Vegas week. He won’t be alone. MAGIC’s winter week brings all things retail and fashion to the Strip beginning Tuesday, guaranteeing

bigger-than-usual midweek parties up and down Las Vegas Boulevard. It only makes sense that Off White founder and designer Virgil Abloh will make his return to XS to set a stylish pace. Abloh, recently rumored for the head job at luxury fashion house Givenchy, is currently working on design projects that go beyond fashion. “I’m taking the concept of streetwear and translating it to the art world,” he recently told Architectural Digest. His

eclectic musical tastes, ranging from cutting-edge hip-hop to classic house to favorite dance tracks, should sync up nicely with Diplo’s sounds. Diplo and Virgil Abloh at XS at Encore, February 20.


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he only thing we knew for sure was that there would be many grand costume changes, and we weren’t disappointed. Cher went through 11 Bob Mackiedesigned outfits during opening night of her all-new Las Vegas residency production Classic Cher at Park Theater on February 8—including the iconic (and revealing) sheer, black ensemble she wore in the 1989 video for “If I Could Turn Back Time.” Now 70 years old, Cher rocked the look—and all the others—like no one else can, delivering a consistently powerful performance throughout the night. But it was during that memorable late-’80s track—paired with another rock ballad from the era, “I Found Someone”— that the colorful, career-spanning show hit its peak. The crowd of 5,000-plus went wild. “Are you overcome with my talent, or just astonished that I’m here?” she joked after arriving onstage singing “Woman’s World.” She seamlessly transitioned back and forth from early hits like “The Beat Goes On” and “HalfBreed” to more contemporary club favorites like “Strong Enough.” Cher has held a Vegas residency before, but her new show is a creative reinvention, which makes sense considering the way she has reinvented herself throughout 50 years in the spotlight. She clearly isn’t finished yet. Classic Cher at Park Theater, February 18-25. –Brock Radke


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erhaps Malcolm Davis gained his unique creative perspective by traveling, growing up a military brat in Tokyo and around the U.S. When he settled in Atlanta as a teenager, that perspective solidified into sound. MadeinTYO (pronounced “made in Tokyo”) founded Privateclub Records with his brother, rapper 24hrs, and started building a buzz in the hip-hop world almost immediately behind the ultra-catchy “Uber Everywhere.” “I recorded that song in my kitchen,” MadeinTYO told Vice. “My whole crew was there in the kitchen, and it just came up. ‘Uber Everywhere’

was just a random line that I said and then ran with. I didn’t really feel like it was a song until a day later when I listened to it and said, “Yo, this sh*t is hard. I think people are really going to mess with it.” The spontaneous success was real, and it continued with the 2 Chainz collaboration “I Want,” the December release of EP 24Hrs in Tokyo and new single “Skateboard P.” MadeinTYO stays connected to his fans, too, joining the #DeleteUber movement after seeing his supporters take it viral on social media.

In March, he joins Big Sean’s I Decided tour, but this week, he parties with MAGIC in Las Vegas at Hyde. “Last year was amazing year for me, so I can only imagine what God is going to bless me with this year,” he recently told Billboard. MadeinTYO at Hyde Bellagio, February 21.


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rekking across North America on his Ninja Nation 2017 bus tour, dubstep darling Datsik has some massive tricks in store for his Las Vegas stop at Hard Rock Live on the Strip. We caught up with the Canadian DJ and producer.

looking thing, and I look like a hybrid of two Mortal Kombat characters. ... It’s all light-up and LED-based and it’s wireless, so I can run around on stage [with] someone at the front controlling all these lights while I’m DJing. It looks pretty cool, and it’s definitely a childhood dream achieved.

What does the Ninja Nation Tour entail, particularly the shogun stage? The shogun is probably my wildest vision yet. I wanted to take all the inspiration I’ve always had as a kid and transform it into something that I was able to tie into the music that I’ve put out recently, called the Sensei EP. It basically looks like a level from Mortal Kombat. It’s a giant dojo-

You’ve also partnered with PK Sound. It’s going to be super loud and super crisp, and it’s gonna be amazing. Expect some organs to explode. What musical direction were you aiming for with the Sensei EP? It’s funny, I had four tracks done, and I was like, it’s cool, but I don’t feel like

it’s quite there yet. So the last two weeks I ended up writing three new tracks. Musically, I’m kind of known for dubstep, and usually I’ll end up switching it up and throwing a bunch more hip-hop in my EP, but this time I wanted to really see what I was capable of, exploring all things dubstep. This is kind of a throwback to my roots, and I think so far it’s been pretty well-received. Datsik (with Crizzly and Virtual Riot) at Hard Rock Live, February 23. –Deanna Rilling

PHOTOGRAPH BY PIPER FERGUSON

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udson Jeans founder Peter Kim is known for going against the grain. As the purveyor of one of the first premium denim brands of the early 2000s, he helped define the essence of laidback luxury, creating a company recognized for a rebellious and free-spirited culture. A self-described feminist, Kim continues to push the boundaries of both business and community. We caught up with Kim before he headed to Las Vegas for the winter MAGIC trade show to talk empowerment, authenticity and rock ’n’ roll.

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On the importance of company culture: “Back in the early days, people would say, ‘That’s not what the brand is about; that’s not for the public,’ and I didn’t agree with that concept. The brand is the company culture. You have to believe in something more than product or money. There’s got to be a deeper meaning. The product becomes the thing that connects you to the consumer. We have a simple but very strong core purpose and core belief ... to help inspire the power of self.”

On why Hudson doesn’t airbrush ads: “I have twin girls that are 16. I watched this documentary called Miss Representation, all about how the media portrays girls and women and how it really screws up their psyche. And it hits home. You take a model who is somewhere between 16 and 22, and you get these amazing photographers and stylists and take these beautiful pictures and then we Photoshop the sh*t out of these girls. It’s not human. We’re not just telling an innocent lie. The cut is so deep. ... We had to make a change. Once you realize how bad those consequences are, how do you go back to doing something that’s horrible?” On Hudson’s heart: “How do you de-commoditize a commoditized industry? For us, we’re about jeans, we’re about denim, this whole spirit of rock ’n’ roll—and that’s deep within us. This is how we live our lives. I think that’s our next phase of where we think it’s going.” –Leslie Ventura


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E D I B L E PHOTOGRAPH BY SAM HYLTON

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he five-course menu at Mina Test Kitchen kicks off with a bang: a pair of golden zeppole topped with caramelized onions, potato mozzarella fonduta and a dollop of glistening caviar. Two decadent bites of crunchy, sweet, creamy and briny—it’s the kind of dish that makes you groan, but if you swing by the unmarked San Francisco restaurant next month or even next week, it won’t be on the menu. Things change fast inside Test Kitchen: a new amuse every week, a fresh menu every month, an entirely different culinary concept every quarter. As its name suggests, the eatery is a perpetual workin-progress, a restaurant laboratory where Michael Mina and Co. workshop ideas and where guests flock to consume lavish meals at mid-range prices.

The pop-up space launched a year and a half ago with Middle’terranea, a hybrid Middle Eastern/Mediterranean restaurant inspired by Mina’s Egyptian heritage and Mina Group partner Adam Sobel’s Jewish and Mediterranean roots. Since then, the cozy 45-seat space has housed a 1920s-style Italian American bistro, an Indian small-plates concept, a Bloody Mary brunch and an international barbecue joint helmed by cookbook author and Food Network personality Ayesha Curry (whose husband is Golden State Warriors star Stephen Curry). “It blossomed into this dream factory,” Sobel says of MTK, where he serves as executive chef. This quarter, Sobel and crew are testing Postcards From la Costiera, an Italian seafood concept. Though Sobel’s already

planning the room’s next incarnation, when Postcards closes in late March the team will have just one week to train and transition, learning new dishes, repainting the walls and creating a fresh venue on a timeline reminiscent of Top Chef’s infamous Restaurant Wars. If that pace seems somewhat masochistic, consider the results: “When [each pop-up is] complete, we have a restaurant on a silver platter with a neat little bow on it,” Sobel says. All but one of the concepts that have called the Cow Hollow space home are on their way to permanent brick-and-mortar locations elsewhere. “It’s kind of our secret weapon.” Mina Test Kitchen, 415-6255469. –Sarah Feldberg


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he Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas has always offered a come-as-you-are vibe and a rebellious attitude, which translates into automatic fun. The same can be said for Culinary Dropout, the Hard Rock’s energetic gastropub. It started as the perfect place to sip and snack before catching a concert at the Joint, but Dropout has become a destination unto itself. The main reason is the menu. The casual atmosphere, well-crafted cocktails and solid list of brews go a long way, but the food variety is pitchperfect. Start with mini platters of

prosciutto di San Daniele, bresaola and truffled crescenza cheese, or stick to deliciously twisted bar-food faves like pickled sweet peppers, cheddar pork cracklings, pork belly nachos or soft pretzels with provolone fondue. Keep it simple and satisfying with a havarti-bacon-barbecue burger, or dig deeper with a Korean-style ribeye cap steak or pan-seared rainbow trout. Or indulge with comfort-food favorites like fried chicken drizzled with honey or beer-battered fish and chips. From smoked salmon to chicken wings, Culinary Dropout is as refined or as relaxed as you want it to be—no

fuss, just flavor. Culinary Dropout at Hard Rock Hotel, 702-522-8100; Monday-Thursday 11 a.m.-11 p.m., Friday 11 a.m.-midnight, Saturday 10 a.m.-midnight, Sunday 10 a.m.-11 p.m.


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here’s a little bit of quirk and a little bit of magic hiding at the base of the new W Las Vegas, the refreshing hotel experience at SLS at the northern tip of the Strip. The W is a hotel within the hotel, offering both an escape and ready access to the casino and amenities of its host facility. It’s not a new concept for Las Vegas, but you’ll know it’s something different as you saunter past the lobby into the Living Room. Yes, it’s a hotel lobby bar and lounge, but it’s also so much more. Bright and clean with a modernized/retro look, the Living Room feels an impossible hybrid of Mad Men and The Jetsons—with a splash of vintage Vegas charm. Look closer at the detailed finishes that surround your cozy leather banquette. What seem like carefully layered textures might be a collage of casino dice. Straight lines are actually curved, like on the chessboards that invite lazy afternoon activity. Metal and wood converge around comfort, artwork stimulates and turntables await the soft touch of vinyl. Take a trip to the gender-neutral water closets where you’ll meet Booker Glam, a fortune teller who answers the question: What if the Zoltar game from the movie Big was modeled after Little Richard? The Living Room’s cocktails are as unique as the environment, from a Negroni under the influence of Madeira to the Floradora, a concoction mixing Hendrick’s with raspberry syrup and ginger beer. A Moscow Mule gets a cinnamon-apple twist, and Chelsea’s Lady Luck ... well, you might not be ready for that. Let’s just say there’s mezcal involved. And aloe vera liqueur. And serrano-lime sugar. Like this lounge, the drink is begging to be discovered. The Living Room at W Las Vegas, 702-761-8700; Sunday-Thursday 4-11 p.m., Friday & Saturday 4 p.m.-2 a.m. –Brock Radke

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The California transplant that first broke into Vegas with a taco shop at Downtown Container Park has opened a festive, expanded location at the Gramercy, and favorite desayuno dishes are available there every day of the week. The potato- and pico de gallo-stuffed breakfast burrito might be the obvious choice if you’re nursing a hangover, but don’t bypass the chilaquiles—tortilla chips sautéed with eggs, Oaxacan cheese, onions, cilantro and a house-made red chile salsa. Topped with sour cream and guacamole, this dish is great for sharing. Other favorites include a breakfast torta layered with eggs, pinto beans and fresh crema, and a chorizo scramble that satisfies with spice. Pair any of these plates with an icy Dos Equis, a blood orange margarita or a spicy michelada to achieve the ultimate brunch combination. Pinches Tacos at the Gramercy, 702-818-4208; Sunday-Thursday 9 a.m.-11 p.m., Friday & Saturday 9 a.m.-1 a.m.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MIKAYLA WHITMORE

runch is an institution in Las Vegas, proven by the fact that you can find weekend hot spots away from the Strip, all over town. On the west side, you don’t have to wait for the weekend to brunch it up—that’s where Pinches Tacos comes in.

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tress less. It’s only February, but your New Year’s mantra is already in need of recitation and Post-it reminders—and spa amenities featuring Turkish and Moroccan hammams steeped in culture and contentment.

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At the Spa at Mandarin Oriental, you can make like a lizard and lounge on the heated marble slab at the heart of a mosaic-tiled space. As constant warmth from the “mother stone” gets blood moving and pushes perspiration levels into overdrive, pores are ready to be purged. A Turkish kese mitt is used to vigorously shed lackluster skin from the neck down, and is followed

by an application of quenching olive oil soap to your body’s largest organ (skin!). As fragrant steam culminates the 45-minute experience, admire your new glow with a coed spa squad of up to eight. Touted as a modern homage to the centuries-old practice of purification and renewal, the Sahra Hammam at the Cosmopolitan offers traditional, yet indulgent treatments. If sprawling on a toasty stone and sloughing off dead skin before nourishing with tangerine-fig body butter amid eucalyptus steam is your thing, choose the 50-minute Hammam soap ritual. Or maybe the Red Flower Hammam Experience that steeps

lemon blossom, jasmine and more into a scrub, mask and massage. Consider the Moroccan Journey that mimics the transcendent effects of a great trip through such highlights as the volcanic black soap bath, a slathering of pure honey and massage imparting Thai, Swedish and Shiatsu movements. The Spa at Mandarin Oriental, 702-590-8886; Sahra Hammam at the Cosmopolitan, 702-698-7171. –Brittany Brussell


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2/17 DJ Que. 2/18 DJ Dash. 2/19 DJ Karma. 2/24 DJ Que. 2/25 DJ Stretch. 2/26 DJ Karma. Bellagio, Thu-Sun, 702-693-8300. TH E

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2/17 DJ Karma. 2/18 DJ Gusto. 2/22 O.T. Genasis. 2/24 Zay Hilfigerrr & Zayion McCall. 2/25 DJ Gusto. Mirage, Wed, Fri-Sat, 702-693-8300. TH E

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2/17 ShadowRed. 2/18 Brett Bodley. 2/22 ShadowRed. 2/24 DJ Dre Dae. 2/25 DJ P-Jay. Paris, Wed, Fri-Sat, 702-776-7770.

Palms, nightly, 702-942-6832. HAK KASAN 2/16 Steve Aoki. 2/17 Cash Cash. 2/18 Zedd. 2/19 Party Favor. 2/23 BRYKLYN. 2/24 Fergie DJ. 2/25 Lil Jon. 2/26 Borgeous. 3/2 GTA. 3/3 BRYKLYN. 3/4 Tiësto. 3/5 Fergie DJ. MGM Grand, Wed-Sun, 702-891-3838.

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M AR QU EE 2/17 Ruckus. 2/18 Dayclub Dome with Gareth Emery. 2/18 Andrew Rayel. 2/19 Dayclub Dome with DJ Carnage. 2/19 W&W & Sander van Doorn. 2/20 DJ Mustard. 2/24 Vice. 2/25 Dayclub Dome with Sander van Doorn. 2/25 DJ Mustard. 2/26 Audien. 2/27 Vice. 3/3 DJ Mustard. 3/4 Dayclub Dome with Vinai. 3/4 Galantis. 3/5 Ruckus. Mon, Fri-Sat, Cosmopolitan, 702-333-9000. OM N I A

HYDE 2/17 Konflikt. 2/18 DJ C-L.A. 2/21 MadeinTYO. 2/22 DJ D-Miles. 2/24 DJ D-Miles. 2/25 Joe Maz. 2/28 Konflikt. Bellagio, nightly, 702-693-8700.

2/17 Kaskade. 2/18 Jauz. 2/24 Hardwell. 2/25 Burns. 2/28 Cash Cash. 3/3 Afrojack. 3/4 Steve Aoki. Caesars Palace, Tue, ThuSun, 702-785-6200. S U R R E N D ER

DRAI’ S

IN T RIGUE

2/16 Eric DLux. 2/17 DJ Esco. 2/18 August Alsina. 2/19 6LACK. 2/21 Migos. 2/23 Ross One. 2/24 Fat Joe. 2/25 T.I. 2/26 Rev Run & Ruckus. 3/2 DJ Esco. 3/5 DJ Franzen. Cromwell, Tue, Thu-Sun, 702-777-3800. EM BASSY 2/17 Big Boy. 2/24 Chocolate. 3355 Procyon St, Thu-Sun, 702-609-6666. FO U NDATIO N

RO O M

2/17 DJ Kittie. 2/18 Dee Jay Silver. 2/24 DJ Crooked. 2/25 Konflikt. 3/3 Graham Funke. 3/4 Dee Jay Silver. Mandalay Bay, nightly, 702-632-7631.

2/16 A-Trak. 2/17 Laidback Luke. 2/18 Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike. 2/23 Flosstradamus. 2/24 Alan Walker. 2/25 MAKJ. 3/2 Robin Schulz. 3/3 Cedric Gervais. 3/4 Stafford Brothers. Wynn, Thu-Sat, 702-770-7300. JEW EL 2/17 Lil Jon. 2/18 WeAreTreo. 2/20 Lil Jon. 2/24 DJ Irie. 2/25 DJ Irie. 2/27 LA Leakers. 3/3 FAED. 3/4 WeAreTreo. Aria, Mon, ThuSat, 702-590-8000. L AX 2/16 Sisqo. 2/17 Eric Forbes. 2/18 DJ Quik. 2/23 Mystikal. 2/24 Eric Forbes. 2/25 DJ Steve1der. Luxor, Thu-Sat, 702-262-4529.

F OX TAIL LIGHT 2/17-2/18 DJ Hollywood. 2/24 DJ Wellman. 2/25 DJ Hollywood. SLS, Fri-Sat, 702-7617621.

2/17 Southside. 2/18 Justin Credible. 2/22 Metro Boomin. 2/24 DJ Spider. 2/25 DJ E-Rock. 3/1 DJ Five. 3/3 DJ Cobra. 3/4 DJ E-Rock. Mandalay Bay, Wed, Fri-Sat, 702632-4700.

2/17 Stafford Brothers. 2/18 RL Grime. 2/22 Dillon Francis. 2/24 Yellow Claw. 2/25 Slushii. 3/1 Brillz. 3/3 Slander. 3/4 Yellow Claw. Encore, Wed, Fri-Sat, 702-770-7300. TAO 2/16 Justin Credible. 2/17 Jerzy. 2/18 DJ Five. 2/23 DJ Five. 2/24 Justin Credible. 2/25 Eric DLux. Venetian, Thu-Sat, 702-3888588. XS 2/17 Diplo. 2/18 Dillon Francis. 2/20 Diplo & Virgil Abloh. 2/24 Chuckie. 2/25 Dillon Francis. 2/27 RL Grime. 3/3 The Chainsmokers. 3/4 David Guetta. Encore, Fri-Mon, 702-770-0097.

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DOW N TOW N LAS V EGAS EV EN TS C EN T ER

AX IS 2/17-2/25 Jennifer Lopez. 3/1-3/18 Backstreet Boys. 3/22-4/8 Britney Spears. 4/12-4/28 Backstreet Boys. 5/3-5/20 Britney Spears. 5/24-6/11 Jennifer Lopez. 6/14-7/1 Backstreet Boys. Planet Hollywood, 702-777-6737.

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BOWL

2/16 Alter Bridge. 2/17-2/19 Ween. 2/20 The Infamous Stringdusters. 2/25 Circa Survive. 2/27 The Grateful Ball. 2/28 Railroad Earth. 3/2 Adelita’s Way. 3/4 Gov’t Mule. 3/5 William Singe. 3/9 Tchami. 3/11 Portugal. The Man. 3/12 Tribal Seeds. 3/17 Umphrey’s McGee. 3/23 Donavon Frankenreiter. 3/28 Robert Randolph and the Family Band. 3/314/1 STS9. 4/8 Sammy J. 4/9 Rebel Souljahz. 4/11 The Head and the Heart. 4/12 Oh Wonder. 4/20 Kehlani. 4/28 Jamey Johnson 5/20 Testament. Linq Promenade, 702-8622695. TH E

CH ELSEA

3/3-3/4 Dierks Bentley. 3/17 Death Cab for Cutie. 3/24 Maluma. 4/14 Bastille. 4/15 Empire of the Sun. 5/26 Band of Horses. 8/12 Deep Purple & Alice Cooper. Cosmopolitan, 702-698-6797. TH E

3/9 Battle Born Boxing. 3/10 Tuff-N-Uff Downtown Showdown. 4/21-4/22 Las Rageous. 5/26-5/29 Punk Rock Bowling. 7/8 Deftones & Rise Against. 200 S. Third St., 800-745-3000. T HE

FOUN DRY

3/17-3/18 Jon Lovitz & Dana Carvey. 3/31-4/1 Jon Lovitz & Dana Carvey. 4/8 Phil Vassar. 5/5-5/6 Jon Lovitz & Dana Carvey. 6/2 Bush. SLS, 702-761-7617. HOUSE

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2/18-2/19 Dreamhack Masters. 3/4 Blake Shelton. 3/10 Charlie Wilson. 3/25 Game of Thrones Live Experience. 4/1 Jimmy Buffett. 4/7 Green Day. 5/12 Train. 5/27 Dead & Company. 6/17 Def Leppard. MGM Grand, 702-521-3826. PAR K

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2/18-2/25 Cher. 3/11-3/12 Bruno Mars. 3/25 Il Volo. 4/5-4/15 Ricky Martin. 4/21 Hans Zimmer. 4/28 Brett Eldredge. 5/3-5/20 Cher. 6/9 Chicago & The Doobie Brothers. 6/23-7/2 Ricky Martin. Monte Carlo, 844-600-7275.

T H E 2/17 Atmosphere. 2/21 Dark Star Orchestra. 2/25 Appetite 4 Destruction. 3/3-3/4 Social Distortion. 3/8-3/25 Billy Idol. 3/16 Jason Isbell. 3/19 UFO & Saxon. 3/23 Worship Tour. 3/30 Ozomatli & Squirrel Nut Zippers. 3/31 Locash. 4/6 Mockstrocity Tour. 4/7 Badfish. 4/9 The Damned. 4/14 NF. 4/15 Tiger Army. 4/21 Jimmy Eat World. 4/22 Biz Markie. 4/23 New Found Glory. 5/3-5/13 Billy Idol. 5/7 Leela James & Daley. 5/17-5/28 Santana. 5/25 Marsha Ambrosius & Eric Benét. Mandalay Bay, 702-632-7600.

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2/17-2/20 Elton John. 2/22-3/4 Reba, Brooks & Dunn. 3/8 Jeff Dunham. 3/15-4/1 Rod Stewart. 4/4-4/22 Celine Dion. 4/9 Steve Martin & Martin Short. 4/25-5/5 Elton John. 5/6-5/7 Jim Gaffigan. 5/9-6/3 Celine Dion. 6/16 Jeff Dunham. 6/17-6/18 Jerry Seinfeld. Caesars Palace, 866-227-5938.

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2/17 R. Kelly. 2/18 AFI. 2/25 Better Than Ezra. 3/25 Martin Nievera. 4/8 Bring Me the Horizon. 5/3-5/20 Journey. 7/22 Third Eye Blind & Silversun Pickups. Hard Rock Hotel, 702-693-5000. M A N DA L AY B AY EVEN TS C EN T ER 2/18 Twenty One Pilots. 3/24 Panic! At the Disco. 5/5 Ramon Ayala & Paquita la del Barrio. Mandalay Bay, 702-632-7777.

PEAR L

2/17 Bonnie Raitt. 2/18 Frankie Valli. 3/11 George Thorogood & The Destroyers. 3/24 Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo. 3/30 Chris Stapleton. 4/6-4/8 A Perfect Circle. 5/5 Carlos Vives. 7/8 Blondie & Garbage. Palms, 702-944-3200. T- M OBI L E

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2/17-2/18 George Strait. 2/25 Bon Jovi. 3/4 UFC 209. 3/8-3/11 Pac-12 Men’s Basketball Tournament. 4/7-4/8 George Strait. 4/12 ACM Awards. 4/22 John Mayer. 5/28 New Kids on the Block. 6/16 Roger Waters. 7/3 Iron Maiden. 7/13 Tim McGraw & Faith Hill. 7/15 Bruno Mars. 8/11 & 12/16 Lady Gaga. 3780 Las Vegas Blvd. South, 702-692-1600. VI N Y L 2/16 The Crazy World of Arthur Brown. 2/18 Amaranthe. 2/25 Almost Normal. 3/2 Sin City Sinners. 3/3 Isaiah Rashad. 3/5 Ekoh. 3/7 The Tuesday Blend. 3/10 Master of Puppets. 3/11 Raiding the Rock Vault. 3/16 Emo Night Las Vegas. 3/21 We The Kings. 3/23 Otep. 3/24 Biffy Clyro. 3/31 Mayday Parade. 4/1 Fortunate Youth. 4/2 Old 97s. 4/24 Bayside. Hard Rock Hotel, 702-693-5000.


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LAS VEGAS WEEKLY WEEKLY LAS VEGAS 0022. .1166. .1177

Keep your camera at the ready for Albert Szukalski’s The Last Supper sculpture at Goldwell Open Air Museum near Rhyolite. (Mikayla Whitmore/Staff)

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT PLACES TO TAKE GREAT PHOTOS 1. CITYCENTER

THE WEEKLY 5

The complex of hotels, shops, fountains and gigantic art pieces looks like the set of a utopian science fiction movie. www2.citycenter.com/ vision/vision_architects. aspx

2. HISTORIC RAILROAD TRAIL Take Anton Corbijn-like portraits against the backdrop of Lake Mead— and inside massive tunnels blasted through rock. nps.gov/lake/ planyourvisit/hikerr.htm

3. 18B ARTS DISTRICT

4. SPRINGS PRESERVE

5. RHYOLITE

Nearly every building, every alley in this Downtown neighborhood is covered in murals— perfect for selfies and impromptu fashion shoots. facebook.com/ thelasvegasartsdistrict

The botanical gardens are home to a wider assortment of photogenic desert foliage than you’ll see outside of a superbloom. springspreserve.org

Some 120 miles northwest of Vegas, this ghost town is home to decaying buildings and outdoor sculptures. nps.gov/deva/ learn/historyculture/ rhyolite-ghost-town.htm –Geoff Carter


VEGAS’ MOST FUN CASINO

WANTS

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Ricky Gervais re-channels David Brent for Life on the Road. (Entertainment One BBC Films/Courtesy)

las vegas weekly 02.16.17

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Return of the squirm Ricky Gervais pushes his Office character even further ixteen years after The Office debuted in the U.K., Ricky Gervais has resurrected his most (in)famous role for David Brent: Life on the Road, a feature-length film that debuted on Netflix last week. I’ll give you a moment to lower your expectations, and perhaps a few moments more for fervent Office fans, since television revivals almost always never work, particularly the ones that pretend to be movies. And that goes double if they happen to be British. I’m not saying British comedy shows are bad. Quite the opposite. The Brits, after all, created Edina Monsoon and Patsy Stone, the boozy fashionistas of Absolutely Fabulous who might be my favorite characters in the history of everything. They also gave us Little Britain and its litany of characters and Cultural catchphrases: Carol Beer (“Computer attachment says no”), Daffyd Thomas (“I’m the by smith only gay in the village”), Marjorie galtney Dawes (“You can have as much dust as you like”), Bubbles DeVere (“Call me bubbles, everyone does!”). For me, these aren’t just TV shows. I’ve quoted them so frequently and for so long, they’ve basically taught me a second language. But here’s the issue: Both of those shows took a brilliant joke and beat it to death for eternity. Little Britain cracked precisely one gag per character and repeated it for three season overseas, and then repeated them all again for one season on HBO. AbFab got revived

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Applicants must audition in dance-wear, GoGo attire or swimwear.

numerous times and grew less funny with each iteration, making no attempt to shake up its formula or develop its characters. When you’ve watched two hopelessly self-absorbed women drink and drug their way through 20-plus years, it’s weird not having some sort of moral reaction. And that’s heartbreaking, because morals are so totally not AbFab. Like the best British comedies, The Office had a brilliant two-season run before whimpering out with two lessbrilliant Christmas specials. Gervais went on to do similar things with different projects (Extras, Life’s Too Short, Derek), in addition to becoming an ace Twitter troll and the world’s greatest Golden Globes host. When The Guardian recently asked why he wanted to play David Brent again, Gervais’s vague response—“Why not?”—goes a long way toward explaining why Life on the Road feels so ho-hum. Making a faux-documentary about Brent taking a band on tour might have seemed like a funny, Spinal Tap thing to do, but it’s nowhere near as funny as Brent dancing to “Simply the Best” while teaching a motivational class. Only Gervais’ ruthless improvisational approach keeps Life on the Road from feeling like a complete waste of time. As usual, he pushes a joke as far as it can go, then pushes it further, and once we’re past that point, well, we have to see where it ends up. Thankfully, it’s been offered to us Americans on Netflix, not as a theatrical release as it was in the U.K. That means we can take it for what it is—an overlong but amusing TV show. If I’d had to put some pants on to see it, that would not have been cool.


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58 LAS VEGAS WEEKLY 02.16.17

WEEN

February 17-19, 6 p.m., $55-$60. Brooklyn Bowl, 702-862-2695.

THE WEEN SCENE EVEN IF YOU AREN’T A SUPERFAN, THE PENNSYLVANIA PAIR’S VEGAS SHOWS ARE WORTH A LOOK BY IAN CARAMANZANA

Don’t even bother trying to place a finger on Ween’s sound. There’s Ween, the twangy country band; Ween, the bass-bumpin’ funk band; Ween, the sweeping prog-rock band; and practically a dozen others. To paraphrase Greek philosopher Heraclitus, the only constant about Ween is change. Since forming in 1984, the eclectic New Hope, Pennsylvania, alt-rock duo of Gene and Dean Ween (aka Aaron Freeman and Michael “Mickey” Melchiondo Jr., respectively) has showcased its wide-ranging songwriting abilities and crude humor through nine studio albums, eight EPs and dozens of singles. The pair might not be brothers

by blood, but their chemistry onstage and in the studio sure makes it seem like they share some DNA, if not one brain. Ween is set to rock Brooklyn Bowl for President’s Day weekend, three gigs in all. The band has amassed a cult following over the years, so it’s no surprise the shows are selling well. Here’s why you should consider going, too. They love to surprise. During Ween’s last Vegas appearance—a two-night 2005 Halloween-weekend extravaganza, with sets at Vegoose and the Joint—the group played more than 50 songs, and only repeated seven. Here’s what you can expect: loads of deep cuts, since word is the band will vary its setlist for each show.


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SLIDE RULES CHATTING WITH GUITAR GREAT BONNIE RAITT BEFORE HER PEARL CONCERT n her first trip to Vegas: It was early in the ’70s, when my dad [award-winning Broadway actor/singer John Raitt] was performing in a show. I believe it was A Musical Jubilee at the Desert Inn. It was kind of a mini-Broadway revue with Dick Shawn and Tammy Grimes, as I remember. Vegas didn’t look anything like it does now, but it was really exciting. It was just legendary to see the Strip lit up at night.

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Gene (left) and Dean Ween bring the Boognish to Brooklyn Bowl. (Associated Press/Photo Illustration by Ian Racoma/Staff)

Maybe Ween will rummage through the heavy metal riffs of “Wayne’s Pet Youngin’,” or go psychedelic, with The Beatles-inspired sprawl of “Pork Roll Egg and Cheese.” And, of course, listen for Ween’s most popular songs, like “Voodoo Lady” (featured in early-aughts comedies Road Trip and Dude, Where’s My Car?) and experimental-pop jam “Push th’ Little Daisies.” Pretty much anything’s fair game, though. They improvise. Though far from a traditional jam band, Ween often brings its songs to life with extended improv sessions and seamless transitions into other cuts. Vermont quartet Phish began covering Ween’s “Roses Are Free” in 1997 and has

performed it more than 40 times since. And during an August 2015 performance in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, Phish guitarist Trey Anastasio, called on Dean and Gene to “get back together and start playing again”— which they did a few months later. They’re just funny. If Ween’s Kool Aid sonic formula sounds too pungent for your palate, come for the laughs. The brothers Ween are known for their crass-yet-smart sensibilities—in songs and onstage. Songs like “Touch My Tooter” and “The Mollusk” blur the lines between toilet humor and ingenuity. And with stage banter that invites the crowd to participate, expect this engagement to be fully immersive.

On approaching other musician’s songs: I grew up watching my dad’s shows and so many pop and jazz singers just inhabit the song, including Frank Sinatra singing those three o’clock in the morning blues songs. You know, “No one in the place/’cept you and me”— he was just so authentic. A great song is a great song no matter what genre it is, and once you sing it, you take the role and that point of view, whether you’re in a play or whether it’s something from your personal life; you’re communicating an emotion that’s so real. That’s what a great song will do. On her cover of INXS’s “Need You Tonight” on latest album Dig in Deep: I was a huge INXS fan—and still am—and ever since I heard that song I knew I would

want to sing, “You’re one of my kind” and then play some slinky slide all over it. I wanted to slow it down, and I wanted to be able to open up the chorus to fit the way I wanted to sing it. My guitarist, George Marinelli, is great at coming up with fantastic licks to make something our own. He added the opening licks and just nailed it. On the current state of U.S. politics: I’m wary of so many of the threats to free speech and a responsible free press and what we’re calling the truth and what science is. I mean, just on the basic level of what’s real and getting the proper information out to people. It’s very, very upsetting every day. … [And] clearly, I’m not pulling any punches about where my sympathies lie. I’m very involved with trying to organize and get people to empathize with the other side and open up conversations to try to find some solutions—and in the meantime, absolutely express my resistance to being run over by some things that have nothing to do with the law. –Matt Wardlaw For more of our interview with Raitt, visit lasvegasweekly.com.

BONNIE RAITT February 17, 8 p.m., $46-$91. The Pearl, 702-942-7777.


60 las vegas weekly 02.16.17

Lifestyles of the rich and devious Big Little Lies picks apart the lives of the privileged By Josh Bell

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he characters in the HBO miniseries Big Little Lies are the kind of affluent, attractive, privileged people whose problems can easily seem exasperating and pointless, as they brood inside their giant mansions wearing expensive clothes and eating fancy meals. But the adaptation of Liane Moriarty’s bestselling novel expertly sidesteps those concerns, creating fascinating, flawed, fully realized characters who happen to be wealthy and beautiful. The entire creative team works to bring Moriarty’s book to life, giving careful consideration to each character and allowing the plot to unfold naturally and unhurriedly over the course of seven episodes (six of which were available to review). That creative team includes stars Reese Witherspoon and Nicole Kidman, who are both executive producers and were the driving forces behind getting the adaptation made. Witherspoon gives what might be the best performance of her career as Madeline Mackenzie, an alpha housewife in upper-class Monterey, California, who delights

in meddling in other people’s business. (“I love my ominous tone. Director Jean-Marc Vallée (Wild, grudges,” she says cheerfully. “I tend to them like Dallas Buyers Club), who helmed all seven episodes, little pets.”) Madeline is pushy and judgmental and uses fractured snippets of dreams, flashbacks and domineering, but she’s also smart and loving and flash-forwards to enhance that sense of unease, fiercely loyal, and Witherspoon finds astounding lending extra weight to the characters’ problems depths of emotion in Madeline’s efforts to define an both large and small. identity that isn’t dependent on being a The script by TV veteran David E. Kelley wife (or ex-wife) and mother. mostly eschews his trademark quippery aaaac Madeline’s best friends are fellow for more subdued and emotionally probing BIg housewife and former lawyer Celeste dialogue, and the cast makes the most of little lies Wright (Kidman), married to the the complex characters. Occasional plot Sundays, 9 p.m., handsome but volatile Perry (True developments come off as forced, but even the HBO. Premieres Blood’s Alexander Skarsgård) and unlikeliest turns are grounded in the characters’ February 19. raising twin boys; and middle-class shared history and relationships. Based on a single mom Jane Chapman (Shailene book sometimes dismissed as “chick lit,” the Woodley), whose arrival in Monterey show could turn out to be soapy or campy, but sets in motion a series of events that culminate instead it demonstrates the power and impact in murder. The show’s first episode reveals that of family, community and friendship, how those someone has been killed, but neither the victim bonds are just as meaningful and just as dramatic nor the perpetrator is identified before the finale. as any grand political or criminal enterprise. It The crime casts a shadow over the events leading doesn’t need dragons or mobsters or robots to stand up to it, giving seemingly mundane interactions an as HBO’s best drama in years.


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Hotel hell Horrors creep up in A Cure for Wellness

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Woodley, Witherspoon and Kidman trade gossip. (HBO/Courtesy)

Brilliant in any language

consists of a war of wills between this ambitious, high-strung woman and her prankster dad, German comedy Toni Erdmann is Winfried (Peter Simonischek), who impulsively flies an unlikely masterpiece out to visit her after his beloved dog dies. Or, rather, it consists of the war of wills between Ines and “Toni Just last week, it was announced that the OscarErdmann,” Winfried’s ludicrous alter ego, nominated German comedy Toni who wears blatantly false teeth and a fright Erdmann will be remade in English, AAAAB wig while alternately claiming to be a life starring Kristen Wiig and (in his TONI ERDMANN Sandra Hüller, coach and the German ambassador. first screen appearance since 2010) Peter Simonischek, Toni’s well-meaning efforts to cheer Jack Nicholson. Don’t wait. While the Michael Wittenborn. Ines up lead to various uproarious remake might turn out to be terrific, it’s Directed by Maren Ade. situations involving everything from unlikely to achieve the transcendent Rated R. Opens handcuffs to full frontal nudity. The mix of hilarity and poignancy that Friday at Regal beauty of Toni Erdmann, however, is writer-director Maren Village Square. the way that it weaves its big laughs into Ade wrings from her a tapestry that also takes Ines’ career bizarrely goofy frustrations—which are largely a result of premise. ingrained corporate sexism—very seriously. The Set mostly in Romania, result is perhaps 2016’s most richly human movie, where Ines (Sandra Hüller) in ways that seem nearly impossible to replicate. works as a consultant for Good luck, Hollywood. –Mike D’Angelo oil concerns, Toni Erdmann

After spending several years lost in the blockbuster wilderness (with three increasingly bloated Pirates of the Caribbean movies and an ill-advised adaptation of The Lone Ranger), director Gore Verbinski takes on an original vision with the self-indulgent but gorgeously creepy horror movie A Cure for Wellness. Verbinski made one of the 21st century’s most influential horror films with 2002’s The Ring, and while Cure is unlikely to become nearly as influential (and might turn off mainstream audiences with its deliberately elliptical storytelling), it exhibits the same sense of style and control, relying on images and atmosphere more than shocking plot developments. Dane DeHaan plays Lockhart, an ambitious investment banker sent by his bosses to a remote resort in the Swiss Alps to retrieve the company’s CEO, who has gone dark at a crucial time for the firm. Once there, though, Lockhart finds he has trouble getting away. The explanation for what is going on with sinister Dr. Volmer (Jason Isaacs) and his “treatment” is not nearly as shocking as Verbinski and screenwriter Justin Haythe make it out to be, but the movie’s lush, carefully composed visual style and slowly building dread make for an enveloping, continually unsettling experience that draws from Frankenstein movies (both Universal and Hammer), Gothic novels, Hitchockian suspense thrillers and Italian giallo. It might not entirely make sense, but it’ll still leave you with chills. –Josh Bell

aaabc a cure for wellness Dane DeHaan, Jason Isaacs, Mia Goth. Directed by Gore Verbinski. Rated R. Opens Friday citywide.


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(Clockwise from top left) “No Soliciting,” “The Black Bear,” “Shoot in Any Direction and You’ll Hit a Bastard” and “Hollywood and Sunset.” (DSFF/Courtesy)

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WEEKLY | 02.16.17

No Shortcuts

Boulder City’s Dam Short Film Festival smoothly expands its reach By Josh Bell t this year’s Dam Short Film Festival in Boulder City, co-founder and executive director Lee Lanier told me that running the festival involves a constant effort to play catch-up: As the festival gets bigger and more popular, the organizers expand their scope to accommodate the increase in attendees, submissions and coverage, and then the festival expands again, beyond what they’ve planned for. It’s a pretty enviable problem to have, and in the DSFF’s 13th year, Lanier and his fellow organizers handled it beautifully. New this year was an evening of special showcases before the first full day of the festival, including the entertaining omnibus feature film Dealer (a linked collection of short films from Vegas filmmakers) and a music-video showcase featuring local bands. Both were programmed by new DSFF board member Tsvetelina Stefanova, who has brought an infusion of new energy into the

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festival. Along with Lanier and festival director John LaBonney, she’s helping the DSFF stay on top of its growth and outreach to new audiences. I made it to a little more than half the programs in the festival, which were generally well-attended and full of stylistic diversity. My overall favorite film from the festival came in the Underground program, which showcases the most risqué content appropriate for Boulder City. The outrageous absurdist comedy “The Black Bear,” featuring a dangerous bear played by an actor in a cute bear costume, is funny, creative and surprising, with a twisted sense of humor that lasts exactly the right amount of time in the short-film format. Local filmmakers made a strong showing this year, and my favorite Nevada film came from former Absinthe stars Voki Kalfayan and Anais Thomassian. “No Soliciting” stars Thomassian as a surly singing telegram who unexpectedly

bonds with her latest client, in an amusing, offkilter way. I also liked Brahm Taylor’s spaghettiWestern pastiche “Shoot in Any Direction and You’ll Hit a Bastard,” which makes up in style what it lacks in narrative cohesion. And former local filmmaker Clinton Cornwell delivered with the sensitive, understated showbiz drama “Hollywood and Sunset.” Other festival highlights included the simple, inventive horror short “Dead Bed,” which is almost like a magic trick in its clever misdirections; the animated “Mr. Madila,” which takes a cheeky approach to existential questions; and the documentary “Billsville,” a sweet portrait of an outsider artist. Nearly every program I went to had at least one standout selection, emblematic of the wide range of submissions the festival now receives. If the organizers are playing catch-up, they’re doing an impressive job of it.


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SHORT TAKES Special screenings

Zhang Yimou. 103 minutes. Rated PG-13. European mercenaries travel to China in the 11th century and become involved in a fight against mystical monsters. Theaters citywide.

African-Americans in the Civil War 2/16, documentaries plus Q&A with director Stan Armstrong, 7 p.m., free. Clark County Library, 1401 E. Flamingo Road, 702-507-3400.

My Ex and Whys (Not reviewed) Liza Soberano, Enrique Gil, Joey Marquez. Directed by Cathy Garcia-Molina. 120 minutes. Not rated. In Filipino with English subtitles. After flirting online, two social media stars decide to meet in person. Orleans, Village Square.

Best Picture Film Festival 2/17-2/26, all 10 Best Picture Oscar nominees, various days and times, $35. Regal Green Valley Ranch, Red Rock. George Takei’s Allegiance 2/19, encore broadcast of Broadway musical, 12:55 p.m., $18-$20. Select theaters. Info: fathomevents. com. Newsies: The Broadway Musical 2/16, 2/18, 2/22, broadcast of the stage musical performed from Hollywood, Thu 7 p.m., Sat 12:55 p.m., Wed 7 p.m., $18-$20. Select theaters. Info: fathomevents.com. Oscar Movie Week 2/20-2/26, all 10 Best Picture Oscar nominees plus Oscar-nominated short films, various days and times, $35. Century South Point. Oscar-Nominated Short Films 2/17-2/20, live-action and animated shorts, 4 & 7 p.m., $9-$12. Regal Green Valley Ranch. Sci Fi Center Mon, Cinemondays, 8 p.m., free. 2/18, Repo! The Genetic Opera with live shadow cast, 7:30 & 10 p.m., $10-$25. 5077 Arville St., 855-501-4335, thescificenter.com. Tuesday Afternoon at the Bijou Tue, 1 p.m., free. 2/21, The Masque of the Red Death. Clark County Library, 1401 E. Flamingo Road, 702-507-3400.

New this week A Cure for Wellness aaabc Dane DeHaan, Jason Isaacs, Mia Goth. Directed by Gore Verbinski. 146 minutes. Rated R. See review Page 61. Theaters citywide. Everybody Loves Somebody aabcc Karla Souza, Jose Maria Yazpik, Ben O’Toole. Directed by Catalina Aguilar Mastretta. 100 minutes. Rated PG-13. This forgettable and predictable (but occasionally semi-charming) romantic comedy follows a Mexican-American doctor (Souza) torn between her nice-guy co-worker (O’Toole) and her unreliable ex (Yazpik). The story beats are well-worn and the sentiments are clichéd, but the cultural and linguistic shifts between California and Mexico provides some refreshing variation. –JB Cannery, Orleans, Palms, Sam’s Town, Town Square, Texas Station.

las vegas weekly 02.16.17

Toni Erdmann aaaab Sandra Hüller, Peter Simonischek, Michael Wittenborn. Directed by Maren Ade. 162 minutes. Rated R. In German with English subtitles. See review Page 61. Village Square.

Now playing A Dog’s Purpose aaccc K.J. Apa, Dennis Quaid, voice of Josh Gad. Directed by Lasse Hallström. 120 minutes. Rated PG. Gad cloyingly voices the thoughts of a dog who is reincarnated through several lives in this treacly combination of kid-movie animal antics and Nicholas Sparks-style romance. The pacing is uneven, the human characters are one-dimensional and the tone is sappy and manipulative, with multiple tearjerking dog deaths. –JB Theaters citywide. Fences aabcc Denzel Washington, Viola Davis, Stephen Henderson. Directed by Denzel Washington. 138 minutes. Rated PG-13. Washington’s adaptation of August Wilson’s 1983 Pulitzer Prize-winning play about a working-class African-American family in 1950s Pittsburgh feels entirely stage-bound and artificial, with set design and performances that might make sense for live theater, but which come across as stilted and ineffective onscreen. –JB Green Valley Ranch, Village Square. Fifty Shades Darker aaccc Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan, Marcia Gay Harden. Directed by James Foley. 115 minutes. Rated R. The second movie based on E.L. James’ series of erotic novels immediately reunites billionaire sadist Christian Grey and naive college grad Anastasia Steele. The relative lack of conflict between the main characters is just one of the reasons that Darker ends up as possibly the most boring movie ever made about kinky sex. –JB Theaters citywide. Hidden Figures aaccc Taraji P. Henson, Kevin Costner, Octavia Spencer. Directed by Theodore Melfi. 127 minutes. Rated PG. The story of three real-life black women who overcame prejudice while working at NASA in the early days of the space program is told with cheesy, crowd-pleasing moments that often simplify and diminish the struggles that the real people endured. Eventually its account of actual triumph over adversity becomes chintzy and disingenuous. –JB Theaters citywide.

Fist Fight acccc Ice Cube, Charlie Day, Jillian Bell. Directed by Richie Keen. 91 minutes. Rated R. There’s almost nothing to like about this comedy starring Cube as an angry history teacher who challenges Day’s nervous English teacher to a fight after a misunderstanding gets the former fired. It’s dreadful, with unpleasant characters, moronic jokes, a paper-thin plot and a disingenuous message that pretends to excuse the repetitive vulgarity. –JB Theaters citywide.

John Wick: Chapter 2 aaacc Keanu Reeves, Riccardo Scamarcio, Ruby Rose. Directed by Chad Stahelski. 122 minutes. Rated R. Reeves returns as the weary, unstoppable assassin who just wants to retire in peace, this time drawn back into action by an Italian mob boss. The story lacks the laser focus of the original, and the increased emphasis on franchise-building is a distraction, but Stahelski still knows how to stage stunning action sequences. –JB Theaters citywide.

The Great Wall (Not reviewed) Matt Damon, Tian Jing, Pedro Pascal. Directed by

Julieta aaacc Emma Suárez, Adriana Ugarte, Daniel Grao.

Look for our review of The Great Wall at lasvegasweekly.com. (Universal Pictures/Courtesy)

Directed by Pedro Almodóvar. 99 minutes. Rated R. In Spanish with English subtitles. Almodóvar returns to more subdued territory in this drama based on three short stories, featuring Suárez and Ugarte playing the title character at different points in her life. Julieta is a bit meandering and digressive, but Almodóvar’s skill at portraying vibrant female characters serves him well, and the lead actresses are excellent. –JB Suncoast. La La Land aaabc Ryan Gosling, Emma Stone, John Legend. Directed by Damien Chazelle. 128 minutes. Rated PG-13. Stone and Gosling are so terrific together, as an aspiring actress and a jazz pianist struggling to realize their respective dreams in cutthroat Los Angeles, that one can sort of forgive this being a throwback musical in which neither lead is a firstrate singer or dancer. ­–MD Theaters citywide. The Lego Batman Movie aaabc Voices of Will Arnett, Michael Cera, Zach Galifianakis. Directed by Chris McKay. 104 minutes. Rated PG. This animated spinoff of The Lego Movie, starring Arnett’s vain, arrogant version of Batman, retains much of its predecessor’s charm, packing in nonstop visual and verbal jokes while telling a simple, fun story with some solid lessons for the family audience. –JB Theaters citywide. Lion aaacc Sunny Pawar, Dev Patel, Nicole Kidman. Directed by Garth Davis. 118 minutes. Rated PG-13. Based on a true story, Lion stars Patel as a young man who was raised in Australia (Kidman plays his mom) after getting hopelessly lost at age 5, but who uses Google Earth in an effort to locate the tiny village in India where he was born. Sluggish at the start, moving by the end. –MD Theaters citywide. Manchester by the Sea aaaac Casey Affleck, Lucas Hedges, Kyle Chandler. Directed by Kenneth Lonergan. 137 minutes. Rated R. Lonergan’s superb third feature (following the equally terrific You Can Count on Me and Margaret) stars Affleck—now a Best Actor frontrunner—as a janitor with a tragic past who unexpectedly finds himself tasked with caring for his teenage nephew (Hedges). Funny and heartbreaking. –MD Colonnade, Suncoast.

Moonlight aaabc Alex Hibbert, Ashton Sanders, Trevante Rhodes. Directed by Barry Jenkins. 110 minutes. Rated R. Divided into three segments, Moonlight follows the introverted, gay Chiron as a kid, a teenager and a young man, coming to terms with his identity growing up in one of Miami’s poorest AfricanAmerican neighborhoods. It’s rooted in real details, and each segment (even the slow-moving final third) achieves its own grace. –JB Suncoast. Paterson aaaac Adam Driver, Golshifteh Farahani, Barry Shabaka Henley. Directed by Jim Jarmusch. 118 minutes. Rated R. Jarmusch’s latest structural gem observes a week in the life of Paterson (Driver), a professional bus driver and amateur poet from Paterson, New Jersey. Virtually plotless and deliberately repetitive, the film is a lovely portrait of the inspiration that artists take from daily life. –MD Suncoast. The Salesman aaabc Taraneh Alidoosti, Shahab Hosseini, Babak Karimi. Directed by Asghar Farhadi. 125 minutes. Rated PG-13. In Persian with English subtitles. A married couple struggles with moving forward after the wife is attacked in their home. Farhadi carefully examines issues of trust, gender roles and the futility of revenge in this methodical and sometimes hard to watch drama. Its themes don’t always come together, but when they do, they’re quite powerful. –JB Village Square. Split aaabc James McAvoy, Anya Taylor-Joy, Betty Buckley. Directed by M. Night Shyamalan. 117 minutes. Rated PG-13. Shyamalan’s tense thriller keeps up the suspense for its entire running time, telling the story of three teen girls abducted by a man with 23 personalities. It’s another step on Shyamalan’s comeback, telling a sometimes familiar horror story with confidence and a surprising amount of depth. –JB Theaters citywide. JMA Jeffrey M. Anderson; JB Josh Bell; MD Mike D’Angelo For complete movie listings, visit lasvegasweekly.com/movie-listings.


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WEEKLY | 02.16.17

The parent trap Family quarrels have teeth in The Beauty Queen of Leenane By Jacob Coakley

ou think you have a tough parent? Try being Maureen Folan in Martin McDonagh’s The Beauty Queen of Leenane. Intimidated and berated by her overbearing mother, Mag, Maureen fights to gain her own life against an enemy who knows all her weaknesses—and isn’t afraid to exploit them all to keep her edge. “They fight over everything—the porridge they eat, whether to turn on the radio, how high to turn it—but it’s not about those things; it’s about power and dominance and gloating,” says Ann Marie Pereth, who’s directing Beauty Queen for A Public

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Fit, beginning February 17 at the Usual Place. Now bring a man into the situation, a man who could be Maureen’s last chance to get out, and things can get ugly. They do, with a harrowing confrontation involving a hot stove and oil heated until it’s sizzling. “McDonagh has no apprehension for violence onstage,” says Pereth, who admits that she has little stomach for the violence—but intense interest in the motivations behind it. “It’s not the oil burning I was attracted to in the play; it was the tensions. The sizzling of the oil on the stove—when it starts to pop, right in front of you, it’s terrifying. And that interests

me. I was a psych major before I switched to theater. I love examining the motives of people and what makes them tick. We’ve spent hours and hours trying to decide the right tone in terms of the choices she makes. Because if you look at it through one lens, this woman is a psychopath— but she’s not a psychopath.” Playing the mother and daughter are Joan Mullaney and Mindy Woodhead, respectively, with Darren Weller and Mike Rasmussen rounding out the cast—all working to lay the battle grounds. “They’re all so frickin’ talented,” gushes Pereth, who pressed them all to move


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STAGE

las vegas weekly 02.16.17

Stripped-Down entertainment With Love Letters , the Space offered Vegas celebrities a chance at local theater By C. Moon Reed he lights went down on the blackcurtained stage, obscuring everything but magician Penn Jillette and his wife, Emily. They sat in chairs at tables with three-ring binders and read a lifetime of correspondence to one another, starting with childhood party invitations from the 1930s. This was the February 10 debut of A.R. Gurney’s Broadway play Love Letters in actor/producer Mark Shunock’s new offStrip venue, the Space. The production is a classic but also a little bit of a gimmick, one enhanced by the choice to feature one of five Las Vegas entertainment power couples on each night of the five-show run. Love Letters is one of those scaled-back endeavors in which everything gets scraped away except the authenticity of emotion. The actors never leave their chairs or even really look at each other. And when it works, it really works. The 1988 play was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in drama. With no set pieces, music or movement to distract, Love Letters was an ambitious pick for a venue’s maiden theatrical voyage. In an enthusiastic introduction, Shunock told the audience that the performers had only done one read-through or rehearsal of the play. Apparently, this was to be a grand experiment. And the three-quarters-full

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house seemed up for anything. Penn—Strip headliner, TV personality and podcaster extraordinaire—effortlessly engaged the audience. After the first bit, during which he sounded like his usual self, Penn morphed into a stiff and vulnerable U.S. senator. His wife Emily, who had the (mis)fortune of acting next to a world-class performer, took longer to adjust, or perhaps it just appeared that way. By the second act, she found her character, an artsy, damaged heiress. With more prep time, she might have caught up with her husband before the audience arrived. Or maybe there’s a reason Penn’s longtime stage partner doesn’t speak. (Disclaimer: Having only seen the first show, I can’t comment on the others.) Shunock has had great success bringing Strip entertainers into his projects. The former Rock of Ages star created the biweekly charity revue Mondays Dark, which features a rotating cast of Vegas celebrities. My guess is that Shunock made a compromise. He wanted to use Strip entertainers in his theatrical production, which is terrific. I love the idea of bridging the divide between Strip entertainment and local theater. But in order to attract busy performers, he couldn’t ask too much of them. In this case, Shunock might have asked a little more. Two rehearsals, perhaps?

(From left) Woodhead, Weller and Mullaney in The Beauty Queen of Leeane. (Photograph by Mikayla Whitmore/Staff)

beyond their comfort zones to follow the twists and turns of the play. “In the beginning of the play, we have a tendency to be very judgmental of the mother,” Pereth says. “By the end of the play you don’t know who to side with, because the thing is such a hot mess that you don’t know who’s most at fault. It’s not so black and white.”

The Beauty Queen of Leenane February 17-March 5, times vary, $20-$25. The Usual Place, 100 S. Maryland Parkway, 702-735-2114.

Emily and Penn Jillette in Love Letters. (Photograph by L.E. Baskow/Staff)


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into his store’s movies. Darnielle ohn Darnielle—the frontdraws together lyrical diction and man for indie band The carefully timed doubt to build tenMountain Goats, who sion on every page. He leads Jeremy debuted as a novelist with on a hunt for the tapes’ meaning, 2014’s Wolf in White Van—returns and parallels Jeremy’s story with a with Universal Harvester, an eerie much older one about another chartale that evokes 1990s nostalgia, acter who has also lost her mother. cults and small-town life in Iowa. Darnielle’s non-linear timeline Jeremy Helt is 22, living in Nemirrors the broken tapes; ambiguvada Iowa, (“Nev-ay-da,” the locals ity is wielded so artfully, it might say), in the late ’90s. Though his as well be the secondary setting. mother died in a car crash when This is a world of both comfort and he was 16, things have pretty much silence, where characters learn normalized. His work at a young “how to consign hard AAAAC local video store is predictthoughts to hidden corners.” UNIVERSAL ably mundane until one Darnielle thankfully avoids HARVESTER overwriting and spoiling customer returns a video By and says, “There’s someJohn Darnielle, the beautiful confusion un$25. thing on it.” Two days later til he draws it to a satisfying another customer returns end. Universal Harvester a different tape with the calls to mind both ’90s presame complaint. Jeremy reluctantly occupation with the occult and the views one of the tapes and discovers early 2000s influence of Blair Witch something dark and potentially Project. Before streaming and wifi, violent spliced into the middle of when families gathered around the the tape: glow of the latest VHS rental, it was A black-and-white scene, shot by easier to imagine a great unknown. a single camera, mounted or held Darnielle epitomizes both the mysby a very steady hand. At first, he tery and the yearning of a decade. had to turn the volume up to hear Universal Harvester is a story whether there was even any sound about the children that mothers at all: There was, but not much. A leave behind. It’s about generalittle wind across the camera’s mitional dissonance, about the futility crophone, the audible rise and fall of of any method of record keeping a person breathing. or art to preserve history or truth. He discovers more of these hauntDarnielle paints a haunting picture ing scenes on additional tapes, more as notable for its blank spaces as its fragments of potential crimes cut thrilling detail.

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Live Music

Hip-hop outfit Atmosphere lands at House of Blues February 17. (Courtesy)

THe Strip & Nearby Brooklyn Bowl Alter Bridge, Nonpoint, Andrew Boss 2/16, 6:30 pm, $28-$60. Ween 2/17-2/19, 6 pm, $55-$180. The Infamous Stringdusters, Horseshoes & Hand Grenades 2/20, 7 pm, $23$35. Linq, 702-862-2695. Caesars Palace (Colosseum) Elton John 2/17-2/20, 7:30 pm, $55-$500. Reba, Brooks & Dunn 2/22, 7:30 pm, $60-$205. (Cleopatra’s Barge) Blues Traveler 2/22-2/23, 9:30 pm, $79-$199. 702-731-7333. Double Down Danny Dean & The Homewreckers 2/16, 10 pm, free. 640 Paradise Road, 702-791-5775. Hard Rock Hotel (The Joint) R. Kelly, June’s Diary 2/17, 9 pm, $50-$250. AFI, Nothing, Souvenirs 2/18, 8 pm, $28-$128. (Vinyl) The Crazy World of Arthur Brown, White Hills, Electric Citizen 2/16, 7 pm, $25-$30. Amaranthe Maximalism, Failure Anthem, Citizen Zero, Cypher 16, Smash Into Pieces 2/18, 7 pm, $22-$39. 702-693-5000. Hard Rock Live All That Remains, DED, Kadkey, Righteous Vendetta 2/16, 7 pm, $15-$18. Hard Rock Cafe (Strip), 702-733-7625. House of Blues Atmosphere, Brother Ali, Dem Atlas, Plain Ole Bill, Last Word 2/17, 7 pm, $28. Grits & Biscuits 2/18, 10 pm, $20. Dark Star Orchestra 2/21, 8 pm, $25. Mandalay Bay, 702-632-7600. Mandalay Bay (Events Center) Twenty One Pilots, Jon Bellion, Judah & The Lion 2/18, 7 pm, $40-$50. 702-632-7777. Monte Carlo (Park Theater) Cher 2/18, 2/19, 2/22, 8 pm, $55-$436. 844-600-7275. Pearl Bonnie Raitt 2/17, 8 pm, $47-$88. Frankie Valli 2/18, 8 pm, $46-$138. Palms, 702-944-3200. Planet Hollywood (Axis) Jennifer Lopez 2/172/18, 2/21, 9 pm, $79-$416. 702-777-2782. Stoney’s Rockin’ Country Shane Gamble 2/17, 9 pm, $5-$10. Town Square, 702-435-2855. T-Mobile Arena George Strait 2/17-2/18, 8 pm, $75-$200. 702-692-1600. Venetian (Venetian Theatre) Diana Ross 2/17-2/18, 2/22, 2/24-2/25, 8 pm, $61-$226. 702-414-9000.

Downtown Backstage Bar & Billiards Inna Vision, The Steppas, ST1, Jessica Manalo 2/16, 8 pm, $12-$15. Authority Zero, Hey Smith, Hard Pipe Hitters, Anti-Vision 2/17, 7 pm, $12-$15. Tijuan No, Nosis, Drinking Water, Los Ataskados, King Sol & The Vibes 2/18, 8 pm, $10-$20. 601 E. Fremont St., 702-382-2227. Beauty Bar Cardiac, Astoria, Fear of Static 2/16, 8 pm, free. Franks & Deans, Easter, The Swamp Gospel 2/17, 8 pm, free. Danger*Cakes, The People’s Whiskey, The Unwieldies 2/18, 8 pm, free. NOTS, No Tides, Headwinds 2/19, 8 pm, free. Sirus Hood, Sacha Robotti, 530, Flash Gang 2/21, 9 pm, $10-$12. 517 Fremont St., 702-598-3757. Bunkhouse Saloon Surfer Blood, Hidden Levels 2/16, 9 pm, $15. The Desperados, The Van Der Rohe, Shanda and the Howlers, DJ Maybelline, DJ Lucky La Rue 2/17, 9 pm, $10. Dog Year, Shayna Rain, Slept Ins 2/18, 8 pm $5. Dada 2/21, 9 pm, $15-$20. Truckstop Honeymoon, The Prettiest, The Pittman All Star String Band 2/22, 8 pm, $5-$10. Nevada NOW Fundraiser ft. Glass Pools, Hassan, Phil A, Hungry Cloud, Thee Swank Bastards, Le Dominiki 2/23, 8 pm, $5. 124 S. 11th St., 702-854-1414. Golden Nugget (Gordie Brown Showroom) David Cassidy 2/17, 8 pm, $32-$228. 866-946-5336. Hard Hat Lounge Yeisukee, RocksGotBeats, Astrogold, Paxton Pope B2B, Edward Baxter, Jay Zen 2/18, 9 pm. 1675 Industrial Road, 702384-8987. Smith Center (Troesh Studio Theater) Las Vegas Philharmonic Spotlight Series 2/16, 7:30 pm, $70-$195. (Cabaret Jazz) Ramsey Lewis Trio

2/17-2/18, 7 pm, $45-$79. John O’Hurley 2/19, 2 pm, $39-$59. Frankie Moreno 2/21, 8 pm, $30$42. 702-749-2000.

Everywhere Else Adrenaline Sports Bar & Grill Marduk, Incantation, Svart Crown, Vatican Falling, Pillars of Creation 2/16, 7 pm, $20-$23. Metalachi, Bipolar, Within the Cochlea, Dr. Phobic 2/18, 8 pm, $12-$15. 3103 N. Rancho Drive, 702-645-4139. Aliante Casino (Access Showroom) Russ Freeman & The Rippingtons 2/18, 8 pm, $40$60. 702-692-7777. Cannery The Flamingos 2/18, 8 pm, $20. 2121 E. Craig Road, 702-507-5700. The ChXrch Bad Omens, Cane Hill, Nations, A Poison Alibi, Sunlifter 2/20, 6 pm, $13-$15. 5818 Spring Mountain Road, thechxrch@gmail.com. Count’s Vamp’d The Moby Dicks 2/16, 2/23, 10:30 pm, free. Frank Dimino, Baker’s Dozen 2/17, 10 pm, free. Devil City Angels, Mycah 2/18, 9 pm, $10. Hollywood Scars, John Zito Electric Jam 2/22, 9:30 pm, free. 6750 W. Sahara Ave., 702-220-8849. Dive Bar Mustard Plug, The Phenomenauts, Sheiks of Neptune 2/17, 9 pm, $12-$14. Crowbar, DiM, Fat Dukes of F*ck, Demon Lung 2/21, 8 pm $17-$20. 4110 S. Maryland Parkway, 702-586-3483. E-String Las Vegas Richie Cole Alto Madness Orchestra 2/18, 1-4 pm, $10. 2031 W. Sunset Road, 702-530-5299. Eastside Cannery Great White, Slaughter 2/18, 8 pm, $15-$28. 702-507-5700. Primm Valley Resort Pedro Fernandez 2/18, 8 pm, $35-$75. 702-386-7867. South Point (Showroom) Earl Turner 2/17-2/19, 7:30 pm, $30-$40. 702-796-7111.

Comedy

Harrah’s (Main Showroom) Ralphie May 2/162/18, 10 pm, $35-$99. 702-369-5000. Majestic Repertory Theatre Stand Up for Animals Forget Me Not Animal Sanctuary fundraiser 2/19, 8 pm, $10-$15. 1217 S. Main St.,

eventbrite.com. Mirage (Terry Fator Theatre) Sebastian Maniscalco 2/17-2/18, 10 pm, $54-$87. 702-792-7777. Red Rock Resort (Rocks Lounge) Louie Anderson 2/17-2/18, 8 pm, $50. 702-797-7777. Texas Station (Dallas Events Center) Adal Ramones 2/17, 8 pm, $24-$54. 702-631-1000.

Performing Arts

Las Vegas Little Theatre (Black Box) Sex With Strangers 2/16-2/18, 8 pm; 2/19, 2 pm, $15. 3920 Schiff Drive, 702-362-7996. Lloyd D. George United States Courthouse Margaret Bourke-White: A Chautauqua presentation by Doris Dwyer 2/17, noon, free. 333 Las Vegas Blvd. S., 702-388-6355. Majestic Repertory The Two ***** of Verona 2/16-2/17, 2/23, 8 pm; 2/19, 5 pm, $15. 1217 S. Main St., 702-478-9636. A Public Fit Theatre Company The Beauty Queen of Leenane 2/17, 2/23, 8 pm; 2/18, 2 & 8 pm, $20$25. A Public Fit’s Outburst 2/22, 7:30 pm, $20. 100 S. Maryland Parkway, 702-735-2114. Sci-Fi Center Repo! The Genetic Opera 2/18, 7:30 & 10 pm, $10-$25. 5077 Arville St., 855-501-4335. Smith Center (Reynolds Hall) Finding Neverland 2/16-2/17, 7:30 pm; 2/18-2/19, 2 & 7:30 pm, $29$139. Shaolin Warriors 2/20, 7:30 pm, $24-$85. 702-749-2000. UNLV (Artemus W. Ham Hall) UNLV Music: Symphonic Winds Concert I 2/16, 7:30 pm, $8-$10. Charles Vanda Master Series: Simply Three 2/18, 8 pm, $20-$55. Theatreworks USA: Skippyjon Jones Snow What? 2/21, 10 am, $10-$14. (Black Box Theatre) NCT’s Metamorphoses 2/17-2/18, 2/23-2/24, 7:30 pm; 2/19, 2 pm, $28-$33. (Rando-Grillot Recital Hall) Allegro Guitar Series: David Russell 2/17, 8 pm, $41-$45. 702-895-3332.

Special Events

Artist Talk & Workshop w/Kara Joslyn 2/16, 4 pm, free. UNLV Barrick Museum of Art, 702-895-3381.

Beer Zombies Craft Beer Festival 2/18, noon, $40-$75. Atomic Liquors, 917 Fremont St., atomiccitybrews.com. Black History Month Festival 2/18, 10 am-4 pm, $3-$5. Springs Preserve, 333 S. Valley View Blvd., 702-822-7700. Boulder Dam Brewing 10th Annibrewsary Bash 2/18, 7 pm, free. 453 Nevada Way, Boulder City, 702-243-2739. Dreamhack Masters Las Vegas 2/18-2/19, 9 am, $37-$168. MGM Grand Garden Arena, 866-740-7711. Farm to Table Dinner 2/22, 6:30 pm, $54. Honey Salt, 1031 S. Rampart Blvd., 702-445-6100. Let Me Lick Your Plate Brunch & Bowling Tournament 2/18, noon, $99 per team. Brooklyn Bowl, 702-862-2695. Mother Earth Brewing Co. Craft Beer Dinner 2/22, 7 pm, $35. PKWY Tavern, 9820 W. Flamingo Road, 702-243-5329. Slam Poetry Workshop 2/18, 3-4:30 pm, free. Writer’s Block, 1020 Fremont St., 702-550-6399. VIVA Fest 2/16-2/19, times vary, $20-$55. Silverton, 702-566-1414 ext. 227.

Sports

JAMZ All Star Cheer & Dance National Championship 2/17-2/19, noon, $18-$79. Orleans Arena, 800-745-3000. UNLV Women’s Basketball San Diego State 2/18, 4 pm. Air Force 2/22, 6 pm. Games $5. Cox Pavilion, 702-739-3267.

Galleries

The Cube Bianca Scott, Lucky Wenzel: Phaos Perspectiv Thru 2/25. Art Square, 1025 S. 1st St., #150, 702-483-8844. Las Vegas City Hall (Chamber Gallery) Sylvester Collier 2/16-4/6. Artist Reception 2/16, 4-6 pm. 495 S. Main St., 702-229-1012. UNLV Metcalf Art Gallery Inquiry: The Art of Scientific Discovery Thru 3/31. Reception 2/24, 5-7 pm. Richard Tam Alumni Center, 702-895-2079.


MARCH 16 – 19

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2017-02-16 - Las Vegas Weekly  
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