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Non-lethal systems evolve

Reaching Out:

Global Anti-terror Supply Chain

VOL.1 NO.1

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Security GovSec

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Tamper Evident Security Seals Plastic Truck Seal

Snapper Bolt Seal

The Plastic Truck Seal is the most secure and reliable way to secure your trailer doors and transportation equipment. Because of its patented design, the Plastic Truck Seal is also the easiest to use and the strongest plastic trailer seal available.

The Snapper Bolt Seal is a high security seal, designed for securing high value cargo. A steel bolt provides strength while a molded plastic coating provides tamper-evidence. ISO/PAS 17712 tested & certified C-TPAT Compliant

hen it comes to securing the supply chain, RFID is synonymous with Security today. However, having “100% visibility” of the supply chain does not always mean your supply chain is secure. Tamper-Evident Security Seals remain the most effective way of securing shipping containers, trailers, distribution totes, and other devices. Recognizing the need to combine the security of a traditional seal with the information pertaining to a particular shipment, Stoffel Seals has recently introduced the Tevi-TagTM, a tamper indicating device that combines both. The Tevi-TagTM is the

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“first-step” Stoffel clients can take with regard to combining security and logistics. “The Tevi-TagTM incorporates the proven security features of many of Stoffel’s most popular security devices with a flexo-printed tag that can carry more variable information than any other security device available today.” Most security seals provide a company name or logo, consecutive numbering and at the most, barcoding. Because the flexo-printed tag of the Tevi-TagTM is integrally married to the security seal through a proprietary manufacturing process, the Tevi-TagTM provides a wide-array of

Adjustable Seals The Tug Tight is a versatile security seal designed for use on transportation and storage equipment or anywhere a multi-locking, tamper-evident security device is needed.

TeviTag™ The TeviTag™ is the first security seal to combine the tamper-evidence and security. It also provides the flexibility and efficiency of a printed identification tag and tracking receipt.

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From Stoffel Seals Corporation Ball Type Metal Truck Seal The 51A-II Ball Type Metal Truck Seal is a standard in the transportation industry. For those applications requiring a metal seal the 51A-II provides an easy to use solution that offers a high level of security.

• Bulk Cargo & General Freight Transportation • High Security Seals meeting CTPAT guidelines • One time use fixed length & pull tight plastic indicative seals

• Airlines

• Seals available with reusable bodies offering the option of an easy to break seal for quick access or a barrier seal to prevent entry • One time use plastic seals specifically designed to secure catering carts • Reusable security bags ideal for securing cash and expensive onboard service equipment

• HealthCare

• Securing pharmaceutical drugs in transit • Securing sterilization equipment • Instrument tagging

• Cash – In – Transit • ATM Seals

• Reusable Security Cash Bags

printed information, variable data, tear-off or peel-off receipts and other flexible parameters. Since 1941, Stoffel Seals / Canada Mayer has been a leading provider of tamper-evident security devices for shipping, distribution, retail, healthcare and government needs. “A functional Security Seal provides a simple, cost-effective deterrent to tampering or theft and indicates if tampering or theft has occurred.” explains Ralph Mallozzi, Marketing Director for Stoffel Seals / Canada Mayer. Mallozzi adds, “While RFID provides a great deal of promise for shipping and distribution concerns, it does not yet

provide a cost-effective means of securing your supply chain from tampering or theft.” Stoffel Seals / Canada Mayer also provide C-TPAT compliant products which conform to the latest ISO/PAS 17712 specifications. “The ability to secure any supply chain efficiently is largely dependent on the commitment of the organization to identify the areas which are of most concern, put the proper procedures in place and secure those areas as cost-effectively as possible.” Stoffel Seals / Canada Mayer have the right tools for any organization looking to accomplish this level of security.

Tevisec™ The Tevisec™ is a self-adhesive security seal that shows immediate evidence of any attempt at tampering through a "VOID" message hidden within the adhesive of the seal

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CONTENTS

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] EDITORIAL Welcome to Sentinel, and IT takes security’s center stage

FRONTLINES ■ Tougher C-TPAT rules have some cross-border carriers worried ■ U.K. air cops get one-screen surveillance ■ Mobile command center at L.A. International ■ GE tells Olympic tale ■ Retailers urge private-public cooperation on supply chain security ■ BioShield program set for an overhaul ■ Gabriel gets Jefferson’s help in tackling homeland security market ■ Prepared Response adds GIS to crisis management system ■ PacStar mobile C3 unit ■ SAP, TCS partner for secure wireless links

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THE MAGIC BULLET Hopeful non-lethal systems need Sid Heal’s say-so before they make it to market

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COMPANY PROFILE Critical Mass: Syagen relies on mess spectroscopy for an edge in the explosives detection race

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INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION Reaching Out: Global cooperation on anti-terror is developing – slowly

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COMPANY PROFILE Guardedly Upbeat: Guarding services provider Garda is on a roll with recent and forthcoming acquisitions

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FASTER AND SAFER? The World Customs Organization believes better security can be good for global trade

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COMPANY PROFILE Finding the Level: Canberra Inc. leads the field in radiation detection – and education

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SHOW PREVIEW GovSec is actually three events rolled into one. Attendance is way up, and information technology is finally coming into its own as an integral part of homeland security

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EVENTS Industry conferences, seminars, exhibitions and symposiums

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Photo courtesy TigerLight

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EDITORIAL

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Not So New?

SENTINEL: ANTI-TERRORISM IN THE AMERICAS is published four times per year (April/May, June/July, August/September, October) by TransSec Magazine, 5720 Timberlea Blvd., Suite 201, Mississauga, Ontario, L4W 4W1, Canada. It is distributed internationally to homeland security executives, regulatory bodies,

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elcome to the inaugural issue of Sentinel: Anti-terrorism in the Americas. Our new publication will cover the homeland security market with special emphasis on the U.S., which in a sense can be considered the ‘birthplace’ of homeland security as we know it today. There’s a lot of overlap between homeland security and transportation security, as we’ve found in editing TransSec over the last year. I talked about this in a recent e-newsletter, so suffice it to say here that because transportation security includes fixed facilities like ports, airports and rail yards, the topics you wind up covering often don’t have any intrinsic link to transportation at all – things like video surveillance, biometrics, perimeter security, antivehicle barriers, lighting systems, guard services and equipment, etc. So Sentinel doesn’t represent a new focus for us so much as a recognition of how broad our focus already is – and a commitment to do justice to it in a distinct magazine. It also ‘liberates’ TransSec to focus more closely on transportation-only topics, so look for a more concentrated approach from that quarter. You’ll notice that despite the emphasis on the Americas, this debut issue of Sentinel devotes a lot of attention to global issues. There’s an article on the World Customs Organization effort to develop a framework for securing global supply chains, and another piece on the broader context of international cooperation on antiterrorism. This is a reasoned choice on our part. The threat to security is global, so the responses must be global, and while a huge proportion of the work being done to counter terrorism is being conducted in the U.S., international linkages and cooperation are essential. So don’t take that word “Americas” in our tagline to mean “parochial.” We’ve taken a broad focus before, and we’ll do it again.

The IT Connection Some of you know that I tend to wax nostalgic about the mid-1990s glory days of IT, when there was more money flying around than people knew what to do with and an almost unlimited faith in the future. I don’t want to get too

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misty-eyed here, but it seems to me that the Andrew Brooks security market is Editor entering the same kind of boom, minus the ill-fated optimism. Interestingly, it’s a market where linkages with information technology are finally being drawn, and where that convergence looks set to accelerate. As one example, vendors of all kinds of security technology are increasingly touting the fact that their systems can be interconnected with one another, and tied into any organization’s IT backbone, via Internet protocol (IP) connectivity. The best example I can direct you to at the moment is our GovSec show preview on page 30. While IT-security connections are arising naturally all over the place, GovSec is one security event that is making the connection explicit, and adjusting its conference and exposition agenda accordingly. The “Hacker’s Challenge” they’re putting on reminds me of one of my first Comdex IT events in 1996 or 1997, where organizers actually set up a network operations center in the middle of the show floor, walled off with Plexiglass. Here we could watch sneaker-clad techies go about their business, sort of like watching weird, exotic fish swim around in a huge aquarium. There was no sound feed so you couldn’t tell which episode of Star Trek was under discussion, but it all looked very serious. For Sentinel, the IT dimension of homeland security is one topic we intend to cover as fully as possible, both by natural inclination and by necessity. Consider another IT-related event at GovSec – a simulation of an attack on physical infrastructure, which is followed up by a cybernetic attempt to bring down the communications system used by the emergency response teams. It may sound more sophisticated than one might expect from terrorists but, after all, when the biggest buzzword in security is IP connectivity – and when terrorist cells are known to be recruiting on university campuses – a quantum leap in the sophistication of attacks seems a reasonable assumption. In other words, the enemy can’t be far behind... if they’re behind at all. ■

immigration and customs officials, security and policy makers, academic institutions, training specialists, legal firms, manufacturers, security technology suppliers, consulting firms, maintenance facilities and insurance companies. Subscriptions: US$200 for one year, US$300 for two years and US$400 for three years. Art and photographs will not be returned unless accompanied by return postage.The views expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the publisher or editor. April/May 2006 Volume 1, Issue 1. Printed in Canada. All rights reserved. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. © 2006 Global Marketing Company Ltd.

SENTINEL Magazine 5720 Timberlea Blvd., Suite 201, Mississauga, Ontario, L4W 4W1, Canada Tel: 1 905 629 0007 Fax: 1 905 629 1933 www.transsec-magazine.com

PUBLISHER: Aijaz Khan aijaz@globalmarketingcom.ca EDITOR: Andrew Brooks andrew@transsec-magazine.com ART DIRECTOR: Patrick Balanquit patrick@globalmarketingcom.ca ADVERTISING & MARKETING MANAGER: Michael Braun michael@transsec-magazine.com SUBSCRIPTION MANAGER: Pina Lagrotteria pina@globalmarketingcom.ca EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD Dr. Abdulla Al Hashimi, senior vice-president, Emirates Group Security Michael Crye, Esq, president, International Council of Cruise Lines Theo W. Fletcher, vice-president, supply chain compliance, security and diversity, IBM Integrated Supply Chain David Forbes, president, BoydForbes Inc.


Guardian makes invisible traces of explosives extraordinarily clear ™

Precise screening of passengers for concealed explosives in seconds In the war against terrorism, even the tiniest clues are critical and Syagen technology specializes in detecting them. Syagen has designed the Guardian™ Explosives Trace Detection (ETD) Portal for people screening using the most accurate technology available. The patented mass spectrometry (MS) technology detects explosives contamination as small as onemillionth a grain of sand. MS has a resolution that’s 10 to 10,000-times greater than ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). This high resolving power enables MS to screen for more than 30 explosives simultaneously without compromising accuracy and precision. This advanced technology has been recommended by the National Academy

of Sciences as the core technology for explosives trace detection for aviation security.1 Incorporating the most advanced pre-concentration technology,2 Guardian produces performance levels unmatched in sensitivity, specificity and low false negative and false positive rates for the largest number of explosive compounds and is easily upgraded to search for new compounds should the threat scenario change.

Guardian Explosives Trace Detection Portal

Guardian offers a comfortable environment during the brief screening process, high screening throughput and occupies a small footprint. For more information, contact Syagen Technology at 714 258-4400 x28

Syagen Technology, Inc. 1411 Warner Ave. • Tustin, California 92780 U.S.A. Tel 714 258-4400 x28 • Fax 714 258-4404 Email sales@syagen.com • www.syagen.com 1 National Research Council, “Opportunities to Improve Airport Passenger Screening with Mass Spectrometry,” National Academies Press, Washington DC, 2003. 2 Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque) “Hound” technology.


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FRONTLINES

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Tougher C-TPAT rules have created fears about the effect on smaller carriers

C-TPAT Criteria Change Strengthened minimum-security security criteria for highway carriers became effective last month under the Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) program. The new rules come in a two-phase implementation, and are slightly different depending on whether the carrier is an existing C-TPAT member or is applying for membership. The criteria have been strengthened to provide stronger guidance to members of C-TPAT on what the expectations of the program are, and to help U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in developing a more consistent baseline for program requirements, which in turn will provide clearer guidelines on the border clearance benefits that are the major incentives for participation. The new guidelines were based on the processes, procedures and best practices collected from thousands of profiles that CBP has reviewed and approved. After the new criteria were issued, trucking officials from the U.S. and Canada expressed concern that tougher rules might actually drive some carriers out of the massive cross-border market. “I’m very concerned about how these more stringent rules will affect FAST [Free and Secure Trade], because of a loss of carriers who won’t want to stay in C-TPAT or join it,” Sandi Villeneuve, president of Canada’s Association of International Customs and Border Agencies, told the Journal of Commerce.

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PacStar C3 Unit PacStar has announced the PacStar 5500, a self-managed, secure mobile communications system designed for use in war zones, at disaster sites and in remote areas. The unit gives military and first responder users access to reliable and secure command, control and communications (C3). Similar systems often require heavy-duty trucks or large-scale military aircraft for mobility, but PacStar says that the 5500 can be transported by Humvee or helicopter, and even carried by two people and set up in ten minutes.


Now the security industry’s two leaders in visitor management technology – Stopware and Temtec – have joined forces. Together, they deliver the most advanced and comprehensive visitor management solution available. Stopware’s industry renowned PassagePoint is the most preferred visitor management software available. It’s the networked solution that can be applied to virtually any application from single building/single tenant to multiple building/multiple tenant applications. Temtec’s TEMPbadge Time Expiring Badges provide security professionals with instant visual indication of visitors’ status. And unlike conventional paper/label badges, they can’t be reused, altered or transferred. It’s the perfect combination for all your visitor management needs.

www.temtecID.com • 800.628.0022 • www.STOPware.com


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FRONTLINES

] SAP and TCS Team Up Wireless provider TeleCommunication Systems Inc. (TCS) has teamed up with enterprise software giant SAP. The partnership gives mobile SAP customers the ability to connect to their companies’ head offices over secure wireless networks to access SAP applications. TCS is also supporting mobile, wireless access to SAP for Defense and Security applications, a capability of interest to customers in defense and homeland security.

Olympic Bragging Rights for GE

The Skyquest user interface has been developed to enable airborne police observers to access all onboard equipment

Aerial Surveillance Screen The U.K.’s Metropolitan Police Force has selected the Video Management System manufactured by Skyquest Aviation for installation in their new fleet of EC145 helicopters. Skyquest will supply a surveillance suite for each aircraft. The helicopters will be fitted with five multi-function mission displays and multiple digital video recorders. From any position in the aircraft operators will be able to select any sensor image or multiple images to be called to their display and send any selected data to microwave downlink or onboard recording equipment. Touchscreen interfaces enable operators to control other functions and systems such as moving maps or radar and number plate recognition computers on-screen, without the need for multiple control panels. Skyquest is also supplying an external hoist camera system that will let the pilot view firearms hoist operations.

Mobile Command for LA Airport Mattman Specialty Vehicle Inc. has been awarded a contract to design and build a mobile command center for the Los Angeles Airport Police Department. Serving one of the world’s largest airports, this mobile command center will enable airport police to respond to any incident with mobile communications equipment. The self-contained unit will have complete communications and control capabilities, and will allow officers to work at any site with all the resources they would have at headquarters. Other emergency responders will also have access to the unit. Mattman believes that this unit is the first with this level of technology to be delivered to a major international airport. The company has its eyes on the market potential of the 350odd comparable airports worldwide that might be interested in the same kind of system. This kind of follow-on business has been a consistent pattern in other instances where Mattman has sold into other security and law enforcement markets.

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GE Security says that its fire and life safety, explosives trace detection, intrusion, and video equipment and systems were all deployed throughout the Torino, Italy region during the Olympic Winter Games in February. GE Security worked with its business partner Securpoint to supply optical smoke sensors and fire control panels for the Athletes’ Village. SAGAT, which operates Torino International Airport, worked with GE Security and another business partner, Seteco, to deploy GE’s CTX9000 explosives detection systems to monitor checked baggage. The airport also uses the GE VaporTracer portable explosives trace detectors. “GE Security is very committed to helping the athletes of the world compete safely,” said A. Louis Parker, president and CEO of GE Security. “We are especially gratified that so many Italian value-added resellers, representatives, integrators, contractors and installers chose to work with us to help protect the athletes and visitors that came to the Torino area.” Other facilities, such as parking lots, hotels, roads and government buildings were also outfitted with various fire and life safety systems. GE Security’s VaporTracer portable explosives detector was used by Torino International Airport


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FRONTLINES

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Retail Industry Urges Public-Private Security In testimony to the U.S. House Committee on Homeland Security earlier this month, the U.S. Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA) urged the U.S. Congress to solicit private-sector cooperation and input in developing new supply chain security legislation. Jonathan Gold, RILA vice president of global supply chain policy, also cautioned Congress to be wary of going for quick technological fixes that might not be all that they seem, and noted that the globalization of supply chains requires a security doctrine that “pushes out” the concept of the U.S. border to include trading partner nations. Gold urged Congress to utilize the resources and expertise of industry to help tackle the challenges of supply chain security, cautioning against reliance on measures such as arbitrary inspection goals or premature adoption of unproven technologies that will have a limited effect on enhancing security while actually impeding the flow of legitimate commerce and creating a false sense of security. “A primary goal of those who would disrupt the supply chain is to damage the U.S. economy by any means possible,” he said. “If commerce is disrupted in a way that damages the ability of Americans to hold well-paying jobs, provide for their families, and generate economic growth, whether through an attack or ill-conceived regulation of our international trading system, then the terrorists will have achieved one of their key goals.” Gold endorsed public/private programs like the Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT), which reflect the government’s recognition that it can best provide security through close collaboration with the same enterprises whose ability to recognize potential vulnerabilities in the supply chain is matched by their desire to secure the overall supply-chain system. “RILA strongly believes that government, industry and other stakeholders need to maintain a robust and ongoing dialogue on how best to strengthen port and supply chain security, rather than allowing the debate to intensify and recede as dictated by external factors,” he said. Jonathan Gold of RILA, which represents more than 400 U.S. retailers

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BioShield in Trouble Press reports at the beginning of April noted that the U.S. Administration had conceded that many criticisms of Project BioShield, an ambitious US$5.6 billion program launched two years ago to counter potential bioterror threats, were well founded. Recent criticisms have been especially strong from the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors. Project BioShield was established to lay the groundwork for a cross-country infrastructure of drug stockpiles to be used in the event of a The White House says it will reinvigorate Project BioShield biological or radioactive terror attack. But industry executives have complained of difficulty in assessing the government’s own priorities, meaning that they’re in the dark about what kinds of R&D programs to pursue, and they say that the obscurity makes it more difficult for them to raise the financial backing required. So far about US$1.1 billion has been committed to the program, and the government says that more commitments are forthcoming. The administration has promised to release a draft plan to ‘relaunch’ BioShield later this year, and says that comment will be invited and possibly incorporated into the final version.

Gabriel Targets Homeland Security Gabriel Technologies Corp., which manufactures physical locking systems and wireless biometric security products, and provides GPS tracking services, has teamed with Jefferson Consulting Group (JCG) to tackle the U.S. federal and homeland security markets. JCG is a full-service consulting firm that represents companies and government organizations. It will help Gabriel develop and execute business strategies that incorporate a variety of initiatives, including federal marketing and branding, lobbying and agency advocacy, proposal writing and contract administration assistance. “Increasing threats of terrorism and theft have driven the federal government’s need for advanced, highly reliable security products,” said Gabriel CEO Keith Feilmeier. “Gabriel intends to strategically position itself to deliver top-notch security products and services to the federal and homeland security markets.” Gabriel has also recently announced its entry into the Australian identity management market through a partnership between its subsidiary Digital Defense and Gabriel’s reputation rests on a broad Australian biometrics company Bio Digital Security Pty series of physical locking systems for rail and maritime transportation Limited.

GIS Added to Prepared Response Prepared Response Inc. has added geographic information systems (GIS) capability to the Webbased version of its Rapid Responder crisis management system. The added capability allows police, firefighters and other first responders to view a range of features such as streets, pipelines, railroads or political boundaries as layers on an interactive map. It lets them create more accurate tactical preplans and enables them to respond faster and more effectively to a wide variety of emergencies, including terrorist attacks, bombings, civil disturbances, hazardous materials spills, fires, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes and other natural disasters. The Rapid Responder system already protects more than 1,230 sites across the U.S., representing over 5,200 individual buildings and more than 135,000 digital images. The system can be used to digitally map and inventory critical infrastructure, including public and private buildings, transportation systems, hospitals, utilities, schools, bridges and other structures. First responders can use the system for instant access to more than 300 data points, such as tactical response plans, evacuation routes, exterior and interior photos, floor plans, utility shutoff locations and hazardous chemical inventories.


A D V E R T O R I A L

X-ray Technology for Baggage, Passenger and Air Cargo Inspection Amit Verma, Product Manager, Rapiscan Systems averma@rapiscansystems.com X-ray technology has provided the basis of security screening for decades and will continue to play a vital role in the future. Like any technology, X-ray has strengths and weaknesses and when used alone can be inadequate at detecting some types of threats. The most effective way to screen passengers and cargo includes X-ray combined with other approaches. When complementary technologies are combined into a single system, detection is improved and security is better assured. Passenger screening can be improved with Backscatter systems that complement today’s metal detectors. Backscatter X-ray is completely safe, is available today, and is the most effective way to screen for non-metallic threats like explosives or ceramic weapons that may be concealed under clothing. Quadrupole Resonance (QR) in combination with X-ray can be deployed to automatically detect the most dangerous and hard to find categories of explosives in baggage and mail. Combined X-ray and QR systems are now available.

The most effective way to screen airborne cargo is high energy X-ray combined with neutron analysis. The addition of neutron analysis provides automatic detection of explosives (by gamma-ray spectroscopy) whereas X-ray alone provides an image for operator inspection. Automatic detection is a vital part of cargo screening because it reduces false alarms and preserves the rapid flow of commerce. Technology alone is not the answer. Resources are limited, money does not grow on trees and our society must find a lawful and effective way to allocate the vast majority of security spending to the small fraction of passengers and cargo that pose a real threat. Without a resolution to this problem, scarce resources can drive an unacceptable outcome: the lowest-common-denominator. When looking to solve the most difficult challenges in security, Xray combined with other complementary methods is a logical path forward. Learn more about the technologies available before committing to a solution.

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SENTINEL 13


NON-LETHAL

WEAPONS

Photo courtesy TigerLight

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Your worst nightmare: the TigerLight combines a heavy-duty flashlight with a pepper spray dispenser

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MagicBullet

New non-lethal options have to get past LASD’s Sid Heal first

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ommander Charles “Sid” Heal of the Los Angeles County Sheriff ’s Department (LASD) in Monterey Park, California, looks to the realm of science fiction to illustrate what he believes to be the public expectation of the ideal non-lethal weapon. It’s a phaser from Star Trek. In his contribution to The City’s Many Faces, a book published by the Rand Corp. after an April 1999 Arroyo Center conference on urban operations, Heal described the phaser as an ideal because it is fully reliable, highly portable, discriminating, instantly effective, environmentally safe and – on “Stun” anyway – fully reversible. “The key point to remember,” Heal concluded, “is that this has never existed (emphasis in original).” Why the emphasis? There are a lot of inaccurate ideas out there about what non-lethal weapons are and what they can do. But Heal probably knows the topic better than anyone. The LASD is the largest sheriff’s department in the world, responsible for upwards of 2.5 million citizens, with a staff of over 12,000 who patrol some of the most embattled inner-city streets you’ll find anywhere. Over the years, through the efforts of the department’s “technology exploration program,” which Heal directs, the LASD has become the leading testing ground for nonlethal weapons, with vendors virtually queuing up to have their goods tested out. “We have the largest urban laboratory in the world,” says Heal. “We encounter so many situations that justify the use of lethal force that even less lethal options that aren’t fully developed are appealing. One of the reasons we’ve become so well known is that we’re so desperately trying to save peoples’ lives without having to resort to lethal force all the time.”

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The department’s efforts in this area go back many years but approached what Heal calls neardesperation levels in the late 1970s and early 1980s when PCP – better known as “angel dust” – hit the streets of LA. One effect of the drug was to render users immune to what are called “pain compliance options” such as the traditional police baton. Ultimately technology couldn’t match demand and efforts to find more sophisticated non-lethal options subsided, although they did persist. The first real breakthrough in non-lethal systems didn’t come for another decade, when OC (oleoresin capsaicin, also known as pepper spray) came on the scene in the early 90s. Non-lethal sounds like a moral category, but non-lethal weapons actually have very practical advantages. They broaden the range of actions available to deputies in tense situations: since they can be deployed earlier in a confrontation than lethal options can, they establish control faster and send a clear message that the officer would prefer not to do serious harm, giving the adversary a clear opportunity to stand down. Non-lethal weapons are also less likely to arouse a public outcry when employed, and they put the onus on the adversary to declare their intentions. One area where improvement in non-lethal weapons has been quite marked is in the accuracy of impact munitions, according to Dan Brinton, director of law enforcement sales at Combined Tactical Systems. “Accuracy with non-lethal weapons is extremely important,” he says. “With lethal weapons you have a center-mass approach, which means you aim for the center of the target. But with non-lethal weapons, you want to aim for the extremities – for one thing because ‘non-lethal’ is really a

By Andrew Brooks

misnomer. These weapons can seriously injure and even kill if they strike in the head, neck or chest.”

The flip side There are other potential drawbacks. The use of non-lethal weapons compromises the user’s ability to defend him or herself against lethal force. Workload is also a serious concern. One way that workload actually gets augmented by non-lethal weapons is physical: more and more devices, each with a specific use, have been added to the standard duty belt to the point that in some cases officers are maxed out in terms of what they can carry. “The deputies are so heavily equipped now that we have to decide what to take away from them,” says Heal. “They have so many options it becomes confusing. And we’ve gotten to the point where we can’t put anything more on the bodies, especially on the waist. The standard load is a pistol, two magazines, two handcuff cases, a radio, a baton, a flashlight and pepper spray. There’s just not enough room to put anything more on.” So a device that combines more than one option is generally preferred. Vendors are responding. For example, two vendors are now trialing combination flashlights/OC dispensers with the LASD. For the near future, one form of emerging technology that Heal looks forward to is a directed vehicle disabling system. “That will be almost the Holy Grail of non-lethal options in the mobility denial area,” Heal says. “I think it’ll probably be 18 months before we’re actually in the field stopping cars with drivers in them, but we’re getting closer.” ■


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COMPANY

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Critical Mass

Syagen takes the high-tech road to homeland security

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the TSA’s Acceptance Test process. Syage says yagen Technology Inc., based in Tustin, the process will be complete before the end that is a small firm contemplating California, of 2006 and that he doesn’t rule out the possia big future. The analytical instrumentability of having customer announcements for tion company was founded in 1996 the portal by year’s end. around a unique mass spectrometry (MS) technology that can perform high-speed Massively better molecular analysis, and that is now hitting its The Guardian serves as Syagen’s notice to the stride as the most efficient way of detecting homeland security market that it intends to be explosives, chemicals and biological agents in a major player. Mass spectrometry is the key to the homeland security field. Guardian’s uniqueness – and anticipated marSyagen’s core strengths are in R&D and engiket uptake. Syagen boasts that the Guardian feaneering products for manufacture. The comtures the lowest false negative and false positive pany’s character as a high-end research organization owes much to the character and history of its founder, Dr. Jack Syage. Syage has 20 years’ experience in developing research and commercial mass spectrometry. He received his PhD from Brown University, where he won several academic awards including Best Thesis, and he was a postdoctoral fellow at Caltech under Nobel Laureate Ahmed Zewail. He also holds several honorary academic positions with universities, academic journals and organizations around the world. It’s an impressive CV, but Syagen’s success rests on the transformation of research into real-world applications and products. Much of the company’s product line is geared towards use in the life sciences market. At present, Syage says, the bulk of Syagen’s commercial sales are OEM (original equipment manufacturer) products sold to major mass spectrometry companies. “But that’s quickly going to be eclipsed by our homeland security products, which we are really just launching. Syagen’s Guardian mass spectroscopy We have systems that we are demonstratportal is positioned for huge success ing around the world.” In this context, Syage’s words “really just rates, a key consideration for busy airports launching” is very much like the concept of deciding which systems to buy for crowded, “overnight success.” The Guardian explosives high-throughput passenger terminals. Mass trace detection (ETD) portal that the company spectrometry also gives the Guardian the broadlaunched last July was the product of several est range of detectable explosives compounds. years of research and development in collaboIn 2005, just before the launch of the ration with Sandia National Laboratories. At Guardian, the U.S. National Academy of press time the system was still going through Sciences reported that mass spectrometry had a

resolving power up to 10,000 times greater than that offered by ion mobility spectroscopy (IMS), the core of most competing systems. The Academy actually recommended making MS the core of ETD systems in aviation security. With the caution of a research scientist – and more savvy than most marketers – Syage prefers to avoid the 10,000X figure as probably hard for the market to accept. “You don’t have to be 10,000 times better to be a heck of a lot better,” he laughs. But whether Syagen says 10 or 10,000, having a mass spectroscopy portal in the final stages of premarket trials gives it a huge early-entrant advantage over any hopeful competitors. “The major mass spectrometry companies have ignored the homeland security market,” says Syage. “They’re more into the life sciences, general purpose lab and benchtop analytical systems and they haven’t gotten into the autonomous continuous monitoring systems, which is what you really need here. There are a couple of small players but I think it’s fair to say that we are the leading company in this area.” The key to MS is that the technology has extra levels of specificity besides the enhanced resolving power. IMS systems identify ions by measuring their drift times, which vary according to the molecular weight of the ion but which are susceptible to other factors as well. Mass spectrometry determines an ion’s molecular weight, which gives 99 percent accuracy of identification. Syagen has built in the further capability of removing even that one percent of doubt by allowing operators to break an ion apart and identify the fragments. If the fragments correspond to the molecular weight of the parent ion, identification can be made with 100 percent confidence. If they differ, portal operators can be certain the ion is something different. “We’ve built that into our systems,” says Syage. “But we’ve found that we don’t even need it. We can blow away the detection probability and false positive rate requirements with just that first line of mass spec resolution.” ■ A P R I L / M AY 2 0 0 6

SENTINEL 15


A D V E R T O R I A L

Beyond Detection: ince 9/11, billions of dollars have justifiably been invested in improving airport screening worldwide. New people and systems have been put in place for detecting weapons, explosives, biochemical and nuclear threats. Entirely new technologies have been invented for detecting trace amounts of hazardous substances. Indeed, expenditures for detection efforts in the aviation industry are expected to reach over $3.2 billion worldwide in 2008, with over half of this amount going toward explosive detection alone. But yet all this effort begs a simple question: What happens when this massive array of people and technology detects—or suspects that it detects—an explosive, biological, chemical or radiological device?

S

What next? It’s a question that many airport security directors have not yet adequately considered. A suspect device certainly presents a very real and immediate threat to the many passengers gathered at screening areas, as well as to security personnel and detection systems. Yet a suspect device presents a much more difficult type of threat to contain than a weapon. A weapon, after all, requires a human being to possess it and use it. Weapons are not operated by timers, triggered by a person miles away with a cell phone, or rigged to go off when tampered with. But explosive, biochemical or radiological devices certainly can be—and are.

Evacuation is not the answer The typical reaction to the discovery of a

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N N A B C O, I N C . 10 01 C O R P O R AT E D R I V E , S U I T E 2 0 5 C A N O N S B U R G , PA 15 3 17 U SA T E L : 7 2 4 - 74 6 - 9 6 17 F A X : 7 2 4 - 74 6 - 9 7 0 9 E M A I L : J AY @ N A B C O I N C . C O M W E B S I T E : W W W. N A B C O I N C . C O M

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Containment of Suspect Devices in Airport Settings

suspect device at an airport can be found on the nightly news broadcast. The evacuation of an entire airport these days has become an all too common event. Moreover, the trendline will doubtless only grow worse. The massive dollars being poured into detection efforts will certainly result in a growing number of false positives, causing the number of evacuations owing to a suspect device to increase. Fortunately, a much better answer than evacuation already exists for today’s airports: The NABCO Suspect Luggage Containment Vessel.

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The Suspect Luggage Containment Vessel Instead of moving the people away from the suspect device, why not safely contain the device and move it away from people? That’s the idea behind the NABCO Suspect Luggage Containment Vessel. The Suspect Luggage Containment Vessel has been designed to quickly and safely contain luggage that has been identified as suspect during screening operations, and then to distance it from the public and from expensive EDS machines until the bomb squad responds. Since the unit is highly mobile, it can even be pulled outside the terminal, enabling the bomb squad to perform proper render-safe procedures far away from populated areas of the facility. The result—fewer evacuations and fewer disruptions to airport operations. The Suspect Luggage Containment Vessel has been designed especially for the airport environment. Its compact size allows it to be easily rolled into standard

commercial elevators. Optional radio frequency shielding protects against detonation by radio or cell phone. An optional vapor hood mitigates against biochemical threats. It adjusts to the height of typical EDS conveying systems. And it has been designed to work with all available robotic platforms to allow for remote operation.

NABCO: The leader in explosive containment The NABCO Suspect Luggage Containment Vessel is the latest in a long list of innovations from NABCO. For over 20 years, bomb squads, police departments, government agencies, defense departments, and mass transit systems around the world have relied on the full range of NABCO explosive containment solutions, making NABCO the leader in the field.

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A D V E R T O R I A L

The Initiatives are now in place for border protection and here comes full implementation and greater enforcement for high security seals.

O

ver the last few years, security measures implemented by the Customs Border Protection (CBP) have been restricting the flow on international trade. With this in mind major initiatives such as C-TPAT, CSI and FAST were created as solutions for those that want to speed up cargo inspections in and out of the United States. They appear to be working. Up to now the C-TPAT program was only restricted to importers by offering incentives in orders to encourage voluntary compliance. The CBP has now expanded the minimum security criteria for service providers within the logistics chain to include all US/Canadian “Highway Carriers” and “Ocean Carriers” transporting cargo on behalf of C-TPAT members. This will be in full effect by June 1, 2006. In the expanded C-TPAT program to include “line haul” carriers, it also covers LTL carriers and trailers as well. “In LTL or Pickup and Delivery (P&D) operations that do not use consolidator hubs to sort or consolidate freight prior to crossing U.S. borders, the importer and exporter and/or highway carrier MUST use ISO 17712 high security seals for the trailer at each stop and to cross the border.” With Montreal, Vancouver and Halifax being Container Security

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Initiative (CSI) ports both ocean and highway carriers are now officially part of the Canadian cargo security matrix. As North America continues to protect its borders against terrorism today’s global economy dictates that in order for C-TPAT principles to be embraced by the widest range of trade constituency, it must extend beyond these geographics. The implementation of the recently unanimously signed “WCO Framework” (June, 2005) appears to have set in motion the initiatives for such a governing program in its 162 member countries In all of the announced cargo security initiatives supported around the world, there is one common requirement. There is a mandate for the shipper of record to use a high security barrier seal that meets or exceeds the current ISO/PAS 17712 standard. This ISO standard for high security barrier seals has raised the bar on product quality. The product quality necessary to pass these performance tests is not easy and it has forced many manufacturers to redesign their products. It also raises the questions, are all manufactures complying and how can you tell if it is truly approved for use under CTPAT, CSI, FAST or the WCO? However, now there is finally one global standard to focus on.

Enter the International Seal Manufactures Association (ISMA). The nine members of this organization supply over 80% of world demand and it is essential that the members comply with ISO/PAS 17712 to maintain their credibility. ISMA recently implemented a mandatory product compliance program internally that will assist logistics users to identify ISO compliant seals from the “phonies”. If you require your supplier to provide in writing just three pieces of paper, it will insure that you or any of your third party logistics providers around the world are complying. If the vendor doesn’t supply the information, watch outyou have been warned! You should ask for: (1) the ISO/PAS 17712 product test results; (2) an ISO Accrediation letter from an independent ISO certified testing lab; (3) their “Best Practices” Assessment audited by an ISO 9001:2000 certifier (This basically incorporates the Annex portion of the standard into their ISO 9001 business processes). The next question is, how can I visually identify an ISO/PAS 17712 compliant product? Many times it is difficult. It is made of metal. A plastic strap seal is not compliant. It must have the name of the manufacture on the product and it must have the letter

“H” to designate “high security” on the product. But the best way is to have the paperwork mentioned above to insure that no Customs problems occur, particularly during the selling season. One company that has based their total marketing program on being ISO 17712 compliant with high security seals is E.J.Brooks headquartered in Livingston, New Jersey. Brooks has contracted with an ISO certified testing lab called ACT Laboratories near Detroit to conduct their high security seal product testing. ACT has enormous experience in testing metal performance because of their work with the automobile industry. ACT also can produce an accreditation certificate verifying that they meet the requirements of ISO/IEC 17025 according to A2LA as a product testing facility. Brooks also contracted with the prestigious American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) to conduct an audit assessment that the company is complying with the “Best Practices” portion of ISO/PAS 17712:2005(E). Since ABS is also the ISO 9001 certifier for the Brooks high security seal manufacturing facility, the “Best Practices” are now part of the company’s business processes. Availability to all this information can be found on the company website at http://www.brookseals.com


CUSTOMS REQUIREs SEALS U.S. Customs* has formally launched the requirement that all maritime cargo containers entering the U.S. from foreign points of origin must be secured with a high-security barrier seal which conforms to strength values as specified in the ISO/PAS 17712 Standard. One hundred sixty-six member countries of the World Customs Organization (WCO) have signed THE FRAMEWORK OF STANDARDS TO SECURE AND FACILITATE GLOBAL TRADE. “Such seal integrity programmes will be based on the use of a high-security mechanical seal as presented in ISO/PAS 17712 at the point of stuffing…” These are what ISO/PAS 17712 compliant seals look like.

BROOKS Means compliance® For more information on how these new rulings will affect your company, as well as complete information on our product lines, please visit our web site at

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Schedule *United States Customs and Border Protection

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[

GLOBAL

SECURITY

] Over 450 global delegates attended the EastWest Institute’s Third Annual Worldwide Security Conference in February

Reaching Out Step by step toward global cooperation against terror

By Andrew Brooks

“N

ational measures are no longer enough to fight against terrorism,” says Daniel Bautista, director of the Global Security Program at the Brussels-based EastWest Institute (EWI). The Institute organizes an annual worldwide security conference that is hosted by the World Customs Organization (WCO). When Sentinel spoke with Bautista, the third annual conference had just been wrapped up, with strong representation from Russia in particular: Russia is currently the president of the G8 and plans to present new global anti-terrorism proposals at the next meeting of the organization in St. Petersburg. The WCO also used the occasion to present the latest news on version 2.0 of its

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“Framework of Standards to Secure and Facilitate Global Trade” (see article on page 26 in this issue). “9/11 I think was the first step for the international community in realizing that we were facing a new threat,” Bautista says. “Then with the bombings in Madrid in 2004 the European Union realized that we have terrorists on our own soil, and with the London subway bombings last July the U.K realized that its own citizens could be suicide bombers.” Today, terrorism is even more of a global threat than it was on 9/11. Terrorist networks span the globe and their operatives travel from one nation to another, setting up cells, recruiting new members, gathering and relaying funds and organizing attacks. The need for an equally

global response in responding to and forestalling terrorist acts seems obvious. Step by step the international community has come together to begin to deal with the exploitable ambiguities and weaknesses created where national jurisdictions overlap or leave gaps. Notable successes such as the U.S.-led Container Security Initiative (CSI) have made headway in recent years and are now beginning to be followed up by transnational bodies with their own programs and initiatives. Interpol has urged Southeast Asian nations to cooperate to forestall a bioterror attack in the region. More broadly, the organization has established the “Fusions Task Force” explicitly to combat increasingly sophisticated terrorist activities on a global level.


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[

GLOBAL

SECURITY

]

The UN operates a “global designation program” in which member states report supporters of terrorist groups to the UN Security Council and can then follow up by banning them from member nations and preventing them from setting up bank accounts. Eighteen names were reported in 2005, according to U.S. Treasury Under Secretary Stuart Levey, who believes the program may be the most powerful tool to use against al-Qaeda. Bautista says more opportunities for international dialogue on antiterrorism – such as the EWI conference series – are required before an agenda featuring concrete steps can be drawn up, and that time is of the essence. “The terrorists are faster than we are.”

lum to certain people, to expand fingerprinting programs and to intensify the screening of people at border checkpoints. Falkenrath does believe that significant progress has already been made in disabling the international finance networks of terrorist groups, probably because financial networks are a relatively known quantity, and because international organizations were quick off the mark with anti-finance efforts after 9/11. In addition to the Interpol activity noted earlier, the Wolfsberg Group, an alliance of several leading international banks, issued its famous Wolfsberg Statement on suppressing terrorist financing in January 2002. And the UN operates the Financial Action Task Force, which targets primarily criminal financial networks and moneylaundering operations, but whose mandate has been expanded to cover terrorist financing as well. Falkenrath is downright bullish on the results of this concerted activity in closing down terrorist finance networks. “There’s been a pretty strong record in that area. It’s important, but in my view we’re at a point of diminishing marginal returns. We haven’t had any big breakthroughs in that area in quite a while. Of course we should keep doing it, but you don’t get the highest return for the effort.”

“In order to accomplish high standards you have to revise legacy security practices” Prof. John Steinbruner, University of Maryland

Dollars first For Richard Falkenrath, visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution, who contributed to a 2005 U.S.-Canada Task Force on North America, nations find it easier to cooperate in the economic sphere than in the field of security. “Economics is a more obvious win-win,” he says. Falkenrath believes that policy intellectuals at least are more alive to the aspects of international security cooperation that may be difficult for nations to accept. “For example, the kinds of things that the U.S. would like Canada and Mexico to do on the security front are politically problematic for them and their policy elites.” Falkenrath notes that Mexico has a continuing challenge in trying to stem the flow of economic migrants north to the U.S., while at the same time it has to deal with corruption in its own security services. Both issues are at the top of the agenda when it comes to security cooperation with the U.S. For Canada, cooperation with the U.S. becomes a thorny issue when the U.S. demands information about passengers on flights coming into the U.S., as it did in 2004. The two countries had to hold special talks to ensure that the information sharing would not go against Canadian privacy laws. (The EU initially described the same U.S. passenger data policy as “disproportionate and intrusive.”) Falkenrath says other issues that have created problems between the two countries have included U.S. pressure to deny political asy-

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Bioterrorism Naturally the area of greatest concern is always direct physical attack. One topic that seems to have united antiterrorism experts around the world as no other is the threat of an attack using biological agents. The fear has been fueled by the rise of naturally occurring and seemingly unstoppable epidemics such as avian flu, but the issue may be more complex than at first appears. “Bioterrorism is a serious problem, but I think it has been enormously exaggerated in the public discussion,” says Prof. John Steinbruner of the University of Maryland. Steinbruner says that any biological agent that could be used by a terrorist group in the near future would almost certainly be a known one, and therefore the incident would not be that much different from an outbreak of a disease and could be handled the same way. The problem becomes more complicated, and international collaboration that much more pressing, when talking about the deliberate manipulation of pathogens to make them more virulent. This kind of work, Steinbruner says, is probably beyond the direct capacity of terrorist groups. “This is where we have to worry about what the organized states are doing,” he says.

Falkenrath: security cooperation is tougher than economic cooperation

Steinbruner is frank about the negative impact of U.S. activities on the likelihood of forging international cooperation in curbing bioagent research. “The U.S. is looking at something we call Threat Assessment,” he says. “This is basically figuring out how you can use biotechnology destructively. We’re doing it under secrecy arrangements, which generate suspicion: people begin to emulate that activity, and we then cite their emulation as justification for what we’re doing. That’s a very dangerous situation.”

The best defense The beginnings of international collaboration on fighting terrorism are largely defensive in nature, confined to establishing security scanning systems and procedures to guarantee the security of international supply chains. If terrorist acts can be prevented, well and good, but unless the people themselves – and the rich mixture of political, social and economic factors that fuel lasting, lethal grievances – are dealt with, the problem will remain. Terrorists will continue to make the attempt, evolving new tactics and seeking new targets as old ones are closed off or rendered obsolete. “In order to accomplish high standards you have to revise legacy security practices,” says Steinbruner. “You cannot separate terrorism from the rest of security.” He says that aside from controlling the really dangerous technologies and substances that could be used to devastating effect in the hands of terrorists, the international community needs to be able to look for and hunt down terrorist groups and individual figures. This requires a high degree of international collaboration, “and the problem is that if the conditions for collaboration aren’t established you still have basically a confrontational security arrangement. “I think we’re making it unreasonably difficult for people to collaborate with us just by the


Jose Barroso, president of the European Commission, gave the keynote speech at the EastWest Institute's Third Annual Worldwide Security Conference

Beyond search and destroy

nature of our policies,” Steinbruner says. “If we were more reasonable, if you will – more accommodating – that wouldn’t remove the anger of dissidents but it would certainly help those governments that would like to ally themselves with us on reasonable terms to do so.” Whether or not U.S. policies help or hinder the building of global collaboration on fighting terror, the EWI’s Bautista believes that these things inevitably take time. “The idea of a common strategy is there,” he says. “How to develop it – that’s still at an early stage.” ■

rof John Steinbruner believes that while efforts to track down and neutralize terrorists will continue, it’s “basically a hopeless enterprise” that will never succeed entirely. In his view a successful global antiterror strategy has to have three components: ■ Control access to mass destruction technologies. ■ Seal off physical vulnerabilities as much as possible. ■ Control the reaction to terrorist attacks. “People don’t realize the real point of terrorism is to provoke overreaction, and we have demonstrated ourselves to be pretty susceptible to that.” Steinbruner also believes that the process of globalization itself has played a role in creating the conditions that breed violent reactions. “The economic growth pattern associated with globalization is highly inequitable,” he says. “To achieve reasonable standards of equity you at least need an increasing standard of living at the bottom end. Never mind the gaps – just make sure everybody is getting better.” But he admits that this too is a nearimpossible task, given that there’s no clear consensus on achieving greater equity.

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[

COMPANY

PROFILE

]

Guardedly Canadian security provider Garda takes on the U.S. security market with two major acquisitions and more in the works

J

ust five years ago, employees at Garda World Security Corporation numbered 3,000. Today, that figure has reached an impressive 19,000, thanks to a recent shopping spree of acquisitions that includes the purchase of key security players like United Armored Services, Vance International and Rentokil Initial Canada Limited. For Garda, a Montreal-based complete solu-

shares Garda acquired in March of this year, is one of Canada’s largest security companies, with annual revenues of Cdn$131 million (US$113 million). “By combining Garda and Initial Security operations, we are strengthening our leadership position across Canada and opening new markets for cross selling opportunities,” says Stephan Cretier, Garda president and CEO. Vance International, purchased in January, is a global investigation and security firm with more than 3,700 employees and annual revenues reaching US$155 million. And well-known United Armored Services is the largest armored services company operating in the Midwestern United States, and the sixth largest nationally, with 600 employees and annual revenues of US$40 million. It was purchased at the end of last year for a reported US$23 million, adding US$40 million to Garda’s annual revenue and giving the company a major boost in its expansion plans in the U.S. “With the combination of Vance International and United Armored Services, we are implementing the same business model in the United States as we have successfully done in Canada,” says Cretier.

“With the combination of Vance International and United Armored Services, we are implementing the same business model in the United States as we have successfully done in Canada” Stephan Cretier, president and CEO tions security provider, it’s all part of a master plan to strengthen the company’s four core services, which are physical security, pre-employment screening, investigations and cash handling. It is also part of the company’s quest to conquer the United States market, starting with the Midwest. “We want to be number one in each of those [core] lines of service in each region of North America,” says vice-president of communications Nathalie de Champlain. “This is the focus for the development of the company in North America.” Garda is following through on this strategy. Many of the companies it has purchased are considered leaders in their field. Rentokil Initial Canada, whose issued and outstanding common

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Broad footprint Since it was first founded in 1995, Garda has become increasingly involved in a wide range of security services in its home country, and this includes the important task of providing skilled screeners to many of Canada’s airports (see sidebar, page 25). It has also supplied a small, limited number of security services to Canadian companies operating in the U.S.,

By Roma Ihnatowycz Europe and Africa, including business intelligence, due diligence, audits and investigations. With the acquisition of Vance and Armored Car Services, however, Garda is taking a big first step into the booming U.S. security market. Judging by the company’s dramatic growth so far, this push will likely be rapid. Cretier has already told one Canadian newspaper he would develop the company’s business in the Midwest “aggressively.” Two additional acquisitions are already planned for this year, and negotiations for these new purchases should be finalized in the next three to five months. Given the fragmentation in the security industry in North America, the company is well positioned to meet its targets. The market is still dominated by many small players, while national players like Garda remain small in number. “The market in Canada, and even more in the U.S. is very fragmented,” says de Champlain. “You see a lot of mom and pop companies, especially in investigations. There were no national players offering those services so that unlocks the potential for a company like ours to acquire those experts.” De Champlain stresses that the skills these people bring to the table are vital to the company’s success, as is building a strong relationship with clients. “We are a service company, so we need to be very close to our customers. So this trend [of acquisitions] is to make sure that national clients can rely on us to provide quality of service anywhere they need it.”

Step by step While Garda has teamed up with management staff at the newly purchased companies to handle marketing and IT tasks, other aspects of


Garda’s founder and CEO Stephan Cretier is rapidly expanding his security services company into the United States

Screening for safety Garda builds up its Canadian airport screening business

G

arda’s airport screening business in Canada stretches far and wide: from the country’s largest airport inToronto all the way down to little Sandspit Airport on the Queen Charlotte Islands. Only eleven Garda screeners are based at the tiny British Columbia facility, where there are apparently more aquatic species traveling than the two-legged kind. “There are more fish being shipped out of there than people,” states Allan Bentley, Garda’s senior vice president for Ontario and Western Canada, “but it’s an important job anywhere that we do it.” These aren’t idle words. In just a few short years and with amazing speed, Garda, a Montreal-based security provider, has developed a “multi-million dollar” airport screening business in Canada, currently providing screening services to 27 of the country’s 89 airports that require it. There are 2300 Garda screeners at work in the different airports, and in April that number will jump to 2600 when Garda screeners begin work at Calgary Bentley: “We believe that International Airport, the newest airport client. we gained the [Toronto Pearson] contract based The Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA), the government body responsible for issuing screening on our expertise in security, tenders, is in fact one of Garda’s largest customers. “CATSA is mandated by the government to provide [screening and also on our ability to services] across the system,” Bentley explains. “From inception, CATSA decided it would do that through a publicprovide leadership” private partnership, by contracting professional security companies to provide the service. That’s what we do.” It was only in 2004 that Garda started operating in this sector, after winning a CATSA tender for three Toronto airports, including the country’s largest facility, Toronto Pearson International. “We believe that we gained the contract based on our expertise in security, and also on our ability to provide leadership in that area which was lacking,” says Bentley. “And we’ve been successful since.” Long gone are the pre-9/11 days when tenders in Canada were focused on economics rather than service, backed by an airline industry whose business and margins were already perilously thin. “It basically went to the lowest bidding security company to provide that service,” says Bentley, “so the services were substandard. It was very focused on economics versus service.” Today, not only have the dynamics of the tendering process changed, but CATSA vigilantly mandates and controls the extensive training required for screeners. Contracted security providers, such as Garda, handle the necessary pre-screening, including criminal checks, fingerprints and extensive background checks.

integration will take place gradually, over a twoyear period, including logo changes. “We acquired really healthy companies,” says de Champlain. “They have a strong management so they have the freedom, along with the involvement of our CEO, to manage their teams and attain their objectives. The way they want to attain the objectives is not a concern for us unless they change the objective. So it’s business as usual.”

Garda has long taken an independent approach to managing its different regional operations. While about 45 percent of its growth has been due to acquisitions, it says the remainder has been generated by strong internal business growth, developed in part by building team leadership in the regions and providing their local specialists with a degree of independence to do their job. “We give our local teams the free-

dom to take risks,” says de Champlain. The security provider is certainly no stranger to risk-taking ventures, starting with the $25,000 mortgage that founder and CEO Stephan Cretier took on his house 11 years ago to launch his first security company. The rest, as they say, is history, and if Cretier’s lucky streak and ambitious drive continues, the U.S. market needs to keep an eye on one of its newest players. ■ A P R I L / M AY 2 0 0 6

SENTINEL 25


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Faster and Safer?

By Andrew Brooks

WCO believes making world trade secure doesn’t mean slowing it down

A

common fear among businesses involved in international commerce is that increased security inevitably means a slowing of global trade. For example, complaints that a very low percentage of containers bound for the U.S. are scanned for illicit or dangerous materials – such as the radioactive sources required for a “dirty bomb” – often meet with the reply that 100 percent screening would cripple the nation’s ports and bring the movement of goods virtually to a standstill. (An analogous objection is often made against those who advocate person-byperson screening at the entrances to mass transit systems.) Whether or not the picture is actually as bleak as all that, efforts to improve the security of global supply chains must address the question of what impact any kind of strengthened security will have on the viability of commerce. Better still, such efforts will take account of the impact of enhanced security from the beginning. Last summer, the World Customs Organization (WCO) formally adopted version

The objectives of the WCO Framework: ■ Establish standards that provide supply chain security and facilitation at a global level to promote certainty and predictability. ■ Enable integrated supply chain management for all modes of transport. ■ Enhance the role, functions and capabilities of Customs to meet the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century. ■ Strengthen cooperation between Customs administrations to improve their capability to detect high-risk consignments. ■ Strengthen cooperation between Customs and business. ■ Promote the seamless movement of goods through secure international trade supply chains.

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2.0 of its “Framework of Standards to Secure and Facilitate Global Trade” at its headquarters in Brussels. At a June 23 meeting, Directors General of Customs representing the 166 member states of the WCO unanimously passed the Framework by acclamation. The framework was formulated by the WCO’s “High Level Strategic Group” and has a number of objectives (see sidebar). The “twin pillars” on which the plan will be developed are Customsto-Customs network arrangements (Pillar 1) and Customs-to-Business partnerships (Pillar 2). There are four core elements that are central to the Framework. 1. Harmonization of the advance electronic cargo information requirements on shipments. 2. An agreement by each signatory nation that it will employ a consistent risk management approach in addressing security. 3. At the “reasonable request” of a nation due to receive a shipment, the sending nation will perform an inspection of high-risk shipments, preferably non-intrusive. 4. Prescribed benefits provided by Customs to businesses that meet minimal supply chain security standards and best practices. “It’s the beginning of how governments will recognize each others’ programs,” says Todd Owens, director of the Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) run by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS). “C-TPAT, Canada’s PIP [Partners in Protection]… the Framework deals with these kinds of partnership programs.”

Up to speed It’s a huge step forward in the development of a unified security regime that consistently applies strict security policies and procedures

around the world, but major challenges remain. In particular the framework recognizes that WCO member states are at widely differing levels of economic advancement, technological infrastructure and regulatory viability. Many will require the assistance of the organization’s more advanced states to bring themselves to the high standards of security required. The key response to this need is the notion of “capacity building,” which refers to the development or acquisition of the automated systems required to implement the Framework. Behind this challenge lies a political issue: the existence (or not) of the political will required to make a serious commitment to implementing the Framework in the first place. “The problem with security investments is that if they’re successful nothing happens,” says James Rice, director, integrated supply chain management program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Rice co-authored an MIT special report titled “Investing in Supply Chain Security: Collateral Benefits.” The study was sponsored by the IBM Center for the Business of Government and was published one month before the WCO ratified its Framework. “The ROI is tough to do. But companies that invest in security do see collateral benefits.” The goal of the IBM study was to demonstrate these benefits and to encourage business people, academics and regulators to look into the collateral benefits of supply chain security. “I liken it to the issue of quality, which was big in the 1980s,” Rice says. “People initially saw it as just a cost, but what happened was that by making the investment in higher quality, quality would ultimately become ‘free.’ The same is possible with security, by following the guidelines in the WCO Framework.” ■

Pravin Gordhan, WCO chairperson, Michel Danet, WCO secretary general and Robert Bonner, former commissioner of U.S. Customs & Border Protection


rEvolve

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[

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PROFILE

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“W

e basically grew up with the nuclear power and nuclear fuel cycle markets,” says Bud Sielaff, product line director, health physics/environmental monitoring at Canberra Inc. Founded in 1965 with a focus on nuclear measurement, Canberra has become the leading supplier of radiation monitoring and detection equipment to the global homeland security and nuclear safeguards community. Over its 41 years of existence the company has evolved dramatically, growing organically and by acquisition. “At the beginning it was largely a research-focused industry with a budding nuclear power market,” Sielaff says. “That research focus shifted more into nuclear power and nuclear fuel, and over the years it has also evolved in the direction of environmental and security applications.” Canberra’s involvement in nuclear security is not a post 9/11 phenomenon, Sielaff says.

the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and with this comes a high level of security. “There’s a fair amount of building security and access control required by the NRC,” Sielaff says. “At the end of the day it’s largely what you’d do in protecting any manufacturing facility: smoke detectors, fire monitoring, and so on.” At the company’s two military-cleared facilities in the U.S. the military has its own security regimes in place. Today, Canberra is composed of several subsidiary companies, each of which specializes in a different application segment. These companies are now in the process of being consolidated under the Canberra brand. Some of the application segments include: ■ nuclear laboratory instrumentation; ■ surveillance systems; ■ electronic tags and seals for the nuclear safeguards market; ■ waste assay, safeguards, and decontamination and decommissioning;

FindingLevel the

Canberra leads in radiation detection – and education “We have been a leading supplier to nuclear safeguards customers for many, many years.” The nuclear safeguards community that accounts for the majority of Canberra’s customer base includes major international agencies such as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), responsible for enforcing the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), and the corresponding national-based nuclear regulatory organizations, notably the U.S Department of Energy (DoE). When the attacks of 9/11 occurred, Canberra was already well positioned in safety and security applications. The difference was that rather than working with nuclear specialists, the company found itself working with first responders, HAZMAT personnel, customs inspectors and security personnel from private/commercial organizations. The company has 12 production facilities, including sites that have nuclear sources. In the U.S. this puts Canberra under the jurisdiction of

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■ environmental and health physics monitoring applications; ■ homeland security instrumentation for counterterrorism and emergency response; ■ the manufacture of detection instruments to specialty military demands; ■ and the transportation and disposal of transuranic and low-level radioactive waste.

Homeland security In the homeland security market Canberra has a number of product lines, with many products doing double duty in more than one specific application segment. For border security Canberra manufactures radiation screening portals for people and vehicles, video surveillance systems, a handheld radiation scanner, a portable neutron detector and the UltraRadiac personal radiation monitor. “There’s a change in direction underway in border security,” says Sielaff. “To some people it looks like a lull, but it’s really a change in focus.”

The post-9/11 security ‘blitz’ included the rapid installation of a large volume of portal monitoring systems in the U.S. and elsewhere. These portals were based on technology that had originally been developed not for security applications but for civil use, for example to keep radioactive materials out of landfill sites or steel smelters. If radiation was detected the shipment was simply turned away. “But we’re slowly but surely discovering we live in a radioactive world,” says Sielaff. There are large quantities of legitimate materials in circulation that are radioactive enough to set off highly sensitive screening portals and other detection equipment. So border security is shifting from what the industry calls a “gross counting” technology, that is a non-discriminatory technology, to a spectroscopy-based system. The portal monitors of the future will not only flag radioactive materials but will be capable of identifying the specific isotopes. In addition to border security, the emergency response market, with the associated training, is where Canberra is seeing high demand right now, Sielaff says. “There are lots of training requirements at the first responder level. Many of these people are completely new to the area of radiation measurement, and there are assumptions that have to be dealt with. For example many people assume that if they’re exposed to any amount of radiation they’ll just keel over. People need to be educated to realize that radiation is everywhere. “Essentially everything on the planet is radioactive. It’s just a matter of the level.” ■


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CONFERENCES

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Three in One

GovSec takes a holistic approach to homeland security By Andrew Brooks

T

his is the fifth year for “America’s Premier Homeland Security Event,” GovSec, which takes place April 26-27 at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. Although the event is known as GovSec, that name strictly applies to only one of three events that make up the whole picture: ■ GovSec: The Government Security Expo & Conference: security for federal, state and local governments, including physical security, asset protection, cyber and data security; ■ U.S. Law Enforcement Conference & Exposition: an event dedicated to fostering interaction and knowledge sharing between law enforcement communities across the U.S.; ■ Ready! The Emergency Preparedness and Response Conference & Exposition: an event featuring equipment and information for state and local officials as well as first responders, to help them coordinate incident planning and management. It’s a pretty broad mandate, and it makes GovSec a signal event on the homeland security landscape. “The misson of GovSec is to bring together every discipline in homeland security to exchange ideas,” says Kristina Tanasichuk, director of industry and government relations. “It appeals to everyone because we’re all trying to learn from each other.” The breadth of topics continues to evolve, with GovSec jumping into the IT market with both feet. This year, an area of the show floor has been set aside for “Tech Zone,” which will feature a wireless communications and mobility pavilion, technology showcases and even an Internet café. The subject of IT security is overdue for serious treatment by the homeland security community, and this marks a good start, one that is sure to be built upon in years to come. This year, GovSec has over 500 vendor booths, with a marked rise in the presence of IT companies. The show has formed new partnerships with players in that sector. “We approach it very holistically,” says Tanasichuk. “For example, we have a new course this year that we’re very proud of – a cyberterrorism exercise run by Dartmouth and the U.S. military academy at West Point.” The exercise simulates an initial physical

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attack on a shopping mall that is followed up by an attempt to hack into and bring down the emergency communications system being used by responders on the scene. “This is a good ‘microsession’ about how GovSec approaches homeland security,” Tanasichuk says. “You get the overview of everything involved and how it affects everyone.” In another session attendees can learn how the Venetian Hotel in Las Vegas hooked up all their IT security systems to the hotel’s physical security infrastructure. It’s an especially informative discussion, Tanasichuk says, because the Venetian is a completely open venue, like everything else on The Strip. They can’t even have metal detectors because that would undermine the inviting, come-on-in vibe that is the core of the Vegas experience. There’s also a “Hacker’s Challenge” where attendees can watch a ‘black hat’ team of hackers try to break into a network on the show floor. Tanasichuk says that viewers will come away with a vivid sense of how easy it is for their systems to be compromised. An additional session on merging physical and IT security geared for nuclear facilities is open to special invitees only. This year, pre-conference training programs have been added to the agenda. With an eighthour pre-conference workshop as well as a couple more while the conference itself is underway, the program features a wide range of training, including intermodal transportation security, port security, structural collapse awareness, and fire association courses. “We also have a course called ‘Six Sigma’ for homeland security,” says Tanasichuk. “And there’s a National Incident Management [NIM] certification and a course on surviving technical rescue operations.”

A tipping point? GovSec is enjoying the same kind of year-overyear boom that other security industry events, such as the ISC series, are also experiencing. Security is a hot business these days, and the figures for attendee and vendor registration show this most clearly. “In terms of registrations, we’re trending about 36 percent ahead of last year,” says Tanasichuk. “That’s well ahead of our own pro-

Many of the vendors and attendees at GovSec are from law enforcement

jections which were for about a ten percent increase.” International attendance is up as well, with strong representation from the U.K, and the Australian government is sponsoring a pavilion for Australian vendors on the show floor. Australia is also contributing in terms of speakers as well as attendees. “We get everything across the board when it comes to vendors too,” Tanasichuk says. “Because it’s three co-located events we get everything from physical security to law enforcement: bullets, guns, knives, radiological detection devices, protective gear, emergency response. This year we have a lot of vehicles – even a mobile hospital used by the Federal Emergency Management Agency.” When it comes to keynote speakers, Tanasichuk has a stellar roster of names to choose from. In addition to Michael Scheuer, the former CIA bin Laden expert and controversial political author, there’s Richard Marcinko, an equally controversial former Navy Seal, who in addition to delivering a keynote will also be conducting a workshop on transportation security. Congressman Curt Weldon will deliver the valedictory keynote, while Ken Senser, security head at Wal-Mart, will discuss recovering from large-scale catastrophes. Ken Alibek, the former head of the Soviet biological warfare program, will round out the lineup with some deep insider data on “Preparing Effectively for a Biohazard Attack.” ■


RoadBOSS

• • • • •

reliably secures cargo through the entire supply chain real-time remote alarm indicates location and tampering quick and easy snap on activation, no wiring needed GSM/GPRS functionality for worldwide deployment GPS technology provides accurate, real-time location

B U L L D O G T E C H N O LO G I E S I N C . protecting the global supply chain Suite 301–11120 Horseshoe Way, Richmond, B.C., Canada, V7A 5H7 Tel: 604.271.8656 Fax: 604.271.8654 Toll Free: 1-866-800-0237 sales@bulldog-tech.com www.bulldog-tech.com


[

CONFERENCES

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On Display…

Some of the vendors who will be showing their wares at this landmark security event.

Digital Video Evidence

Burn Kits

Vision Hawk from International Police Technologies is an in-car, server-based digital video evidence system that gathers, transfers, stores and retrieves evidentiary video footage. The system features true DVD-quality video, and has front and rear cameras that can record separately or simultaneously. Frame rate, compression ratio and resolution are adjustable on each video input, and there are five microphones inside and outside the car. Vision Hawk features background recording, which enables the system to capture data-documented snapshots, and users can simultaneously record and play back. There’s an integrated global positioning system (GPS) receiver and the GPS data can be interfaced with dispatch for other applications. An interface to most radar systems allows radar information to be recorded with video.

Water-Jel originated the water-based gel technology that revolutionized burn treatment 20 years ago. Now, the company provides Burn Kits that offer different combinations of burn dressings, burn wraps/fire blankets and “Burn Jel.” The newest additions to the lineup are burn kits geared specifically to the first responder market. These are small and large versions of products geared to address the kinds of burns first responders regularly encounter. Both kits contain several sizes of sterile gel-soaked dressings, including a face mask with pre-cut holes for eyes, nose and mouth, scissors, gauze and a user’s instruction card.

High-Tech Demos Northrop Grumman is demonstrating a range of high-tech systems and products. Its Cyber Warfare Integration Network is a synthetic modeling, simulation and systems analysis environment that will include a border security scenario and an advanced information architecture demonstration. The mass casualty operations trainer (MCOT) is a computer-based simulation tool that allows first responders to analyze the effectiveness of their response plans for managing a mass casualty event. MCOT enables the simulation of hundreds of casualties, each with unique signs and symptoms. VIS2TA is a modeling and simulation system that can offer a complete suite of homeland security and defense planning, training, exercise and crisis-management/operations tools integrated around a geospatial visualization environment. Northrop Grumman’s Remotec robot assists military, law enforcement and first responder users in hazardous duty operations

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Water-Jel kits come in soft-sided heavy-duty nylon carry bag with sewn-in inner pockets

Mobile Communications Verizon Wireless offers enhanced mobile communications networks for first responders. The company operates a cross-country wireless network that serves 49 million customers, and offers pre-negotiated government based wireless solutions for federal, state and local government agencies. The company is highlighting its mobile broadband system for laptops, its secure phone and vehicle monitoring and tracking systems and its locationVerizon’s mobile combased services. munications system, Verizon Wireless set up for firefighters in Southern California plans to announce its first markets for Wireless Priority Service (WPS) – operated by the National Communications Service – at GovSec. The company will offer WPS services in four markets in the U.S.: Washington, DC (including Northern Virginia and Maryland), Chicago, and select counties in South Florida and around Los Angeles.

Incident Management Coastal Training Technologies has “Incident Command System: When Duty Calls,” a new DVD/VHS program that trains employees to assist professional first responders in accordance with the National Incident Management (NIM) System employed by all federal and state response units. The program trains employees to assist first responders by following the command structure and performing specific job responsibilities in accordance with the Incident Action Plan that specifies the strategy to be used in managing the incident. Incident Command System has specific information on responding to fires, natural disasters, hazmat incidents and terrorist attacks


The RAID system has a wide range of options including sniper’s bench, ballistic windshield and radiation detection

Emergency Access The Rescue Access Intervention Deployment (RAID) mobile access system from Patriot3 is fitted with the company’s new Liberator manual ramp system, which can be configured to fit a range of access and rescue missions. The system is fully hydraulic and features dual ramps which can be elevated separately or in unison. The three primary configurations include flat for standard access to 8-12-foot elevations, gooseneck for a level working platform up to 15 feet and full-angle for maximum ramp elevation at 18 feet. A heavy-duty front bumper enables the vehicle to perform pushing and pit maneuvers, and the vehicle also has a 9500lb. front winch and fog lamps. A new rear tactical step mounted to the rear of the vehicle serves as a heavy-duty bumper or can be configured as a step to provide entry and egress – or it can be staged as a platform deployment area for ground or elevated assault.

Security Laminates

Incident Analysis

ACE/Security Laminates manufactures a range of laminates that can be secured to glass. The laminates come in a range of strengths, and increase resistance to small arms fire, reduce the risk of injury from airborne shards released in an explosion, prevent explosive devices from being thrown through a window and even reduce the damage caused by severe weather. Customers include Boston’s Logan Airport, the Canadian Parliament Buildings and Banco Provincial S.A. in Venezuela, among others.

i2 makes the “Analyst’s Notebook,” a software package that is used in more than 2000 organizations for link and timeline analysis. The software supports analyst efforts to identify the factors contributing to a complex issue or situation, evaluating their probable causes and effects and understanding the relationships between them. The The Analyst’s Notebook software helps software is used in law enforcement establish links and relationships as well as in commercial applications. between multiple factors quickly

IP Video Systems iOmniscient has a range of new CCTV and IP Video products on display. The IQ-Implant is a new DSP chip that holds the full range of iOmniscient’s intelligent video software. The chip has enough storage space that even with the full range of software, it can also run new capabilities as they become available. A “Lite” version will also be available for clients with limited requirements, as in the residential market. iOmniscient has recently amalgamated their non-motion detection (NMD) technology with their video motion detection (VMD). The result is called IQ-Infinity and offers advanced features such as abandoned object detection in a crowd, theft detection in a crowd, graffiti and vandalism detection in a crowd, crowd and traffic management and complex behavior analysis and tracking. The company is also introducing IQ-Hawk, a system that allows users to do detection and identification at the same time with the same camera.

Cell Coverage Booster CellAntenna is announcing its CAE750 Dual-Band Rapid Deployment Cellular Repeater System. A fully portable version of the company’s CAE700 system, the CAE750 enables government agencies and others to immediately deploy a system that boosts cellular signals in indoor and outdoor areas that may not have adequate cell coverage due to natural or terrorist-caused disasters. The system is designed specifically for use in emergency operations centers and response vehicles. The unit can facilitate cellular communication in areas as large as 15,000 square feet.

The CAE750 is housed in a rugged roller-type case for easy transport A P R I L / M AY 2 0 0 6

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Event round-up Industry conferences, seminars, exhibitions and symposiums

2006 APRIL ■ ASIS European Security Conference. Organized by ASIS, April 23-26, Nice, France. ■ GovSec, U.S. Law and Ready! Conference and Exposition. April 25-27, Washington DC. www.govsecinfo.com

■ Asian Securitex 2006. Organized by Hong Kong Exhibition Services and Allworld Exhibitions, June 15-18, Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centre. ■ Asia/East Coast Maritime Conference. Organized by Journal of Commerce, June 19-20, Norfolk, VA. www.joc.com/conferences/aecm

MAY

JULY

■ CardTech SecureTech. Organized by SourceMedia, May 2-4, San Francisco, CA. www.sourcemediaconferences.com ■ Preventa. Organized by Dornbirner Messe GmbH, May 3-6, Dornbirn, Austria. www.preventa.info ■ HHGFAA Forum on Cargo Security for Single Event Shipments. Organized by HHGFAA, May 5-6, Hong Kong. www.hhgfaa.org ■ IFSEC 2006. Organized by CMP, May 8-11, Birmingham, U.K. www.ifsec.co.uk ■ Homeland Defense/Defense Industrial Base/Critical Infrastructure Protection. Organized by National Defense Industrial Association, May 8-12, Miami, FL. www.ndia.org ■ International Air Cargo Conference (IACC) 2006. Organized by Air Transportation Marketing Association, May 23-25, Houston, TX. www.iacc-expo.com

■ Latin American Cargo and Border Security Summit. Organized by World Summits Organisation, July 13-14, Miami, FL. www.worldsummits.com/ Events/Security/LACBS06 ■ Americas’ Security & Fire Expo. Organized by ROC Exhibitions, July 18-20, Miami, FL. www.americasfireandsecurity.com ■ Farnborough International Airshow 2006. Organized by The Society of British Aerospace Companies, July 18-23, Farnborough, U.K. www.farnborough.com

Organized by Simply Events, September 13-14, Brussels. www.aps-expo.com ■ U.S. Maritime Security Conference and Expo. Organized by E.J. Krause, Sept. 1920, New York. www.maritimesecurityexpo.com ■ ASIS San Diego. Organized by ASIS International, Sept. 25-28, San Diego, CA. www.asis-sandiego.org

OCTOBER

AUGUST ■ Midwest Security & Police Conference/Expo. Organized by ASIS, Aug. 1-2, Chicago, Ill. www.mspce.com ■ Airport Development 2006. Organized by Centre for Asia Pacific Aviation, Aug. 29 – Sept. 2, Singapore. www.centreforaviation.com

JUNE ■ Northeast Security & Systems Contractors Expo. Organized by NEACC, June 8, Marlborough, MA. www.neacc.com ■ Air & Port Security Expo Asia 2006. Organized by Simply Events, June 13-14, Hong Kong.

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SEPTEMBER ■ Biometric Solutions 2006. Organized by Access Events, Sept. 12-13, Brussels, Belgium. www.biometricsummit.com ■ Air & Port Security Expo Europe 2006.

■ Homeland and Maritime Security Asia 2006. Organized by Defence Directory Conferences, Oct. 12, Singapore. www.defencedirectory.com/conference ■ Biometrics Exhibition & Conference. Organized by Elsevier / Biometric Technology Today, Oct. 18-20, London. www.biometrics2006.com ■ Euronaval 2006. Organized by Gican, Oct. 23-27, Paris. ■ ISC East 2006. Organized by Reed Exhibitions and Security Industry Association, Oct. 24-25, New York, NY. www.isceast.com ■ Security China 2006. Organized by E.J. Krause, Oct. 30 – Nov. 2, Beijing.

NOVEMBER ■ Global Border Security Conference and Exposition. Organized by E.J. Krause, Nov.27-28, San Antonio, TX. www.globalbordersecurity.com ■ ID World International Congress 2006. Organized by Wise Media, Nov. 28-30, Milan. www.idworldonline.com


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