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BLUE PRINT T H E M A G A Z I N E of G I R L S P R E PA R AT O R Y S C H O O L

MORE LIKELY TO SUCCEED

How Teachers Set Girls Up for Success

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6 THE CLASS OF 2018 ON

Celebrating beloved past faculty and staff

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Sisterhood

LEGENDS OF THE HALL


BRUISERS

on blast TERPSICHORD was chosen to open the NAIS Annual Conference in Atlanta in front of 4,000 educators! MARCH 8

STAY IN THE KNOW Keep up with GPS on social media: Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Below are some of the most popular posts from this semester. Be sure to follow us for the most up-to-date happenings and share in the Bruiser conversation.

Our Presidents-Elect 2018-19 HONOR COUNCIL, PIC, AND STUDENT COUNCIL: Ruchi Patel, Honor Council Olivia Fannon, PIC Allison Smith, Student Council MARCH 20

Today on NATIONAL GIRLS & WOMEN IN SPORTS DAY, we celebrate the achievements and share our support of girls and women in sports— especially our girls in sports—and remind them to #KeepPlaying. FEBRUARY 7

CELEBRATED, CERTIFICATED, AND CHARGED— our eighth-graders have completed Middle School and are ready for Upper School! MAY 23

HERE’S TO THE RING WE WEAR FOR HER. Seniors take Disney over Winterim. FEBRUARY 16

After 30 years of inspiring the minds of more than 3,000 GPS girls, MR. VEY SAYS GOODBYE TO GPS. JUNE 3

HERE’S TO THE GPS CLASS OF 2018. We were most proud to present and honor them at this year’s celebration of our May Day tradition. APRIL 25

SEARCH @GPSBRUISERS TO FOLLOW US! | #HERESTOTHEGIRLS 2

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GPS alumna TAYLOR PELS ’14 was selected as the valedictorian of her class at College of the Holy Cross (Worcester, Massachusetts). MAY 15

ROTUNDA G I R L S P R E PA R AT O R Y S C H O O L GPS.EDU


Table of Contents ROTUNDA

CORNERSTONES

Bruisers on Blast A Message from Head of School

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ADMINISTRATIVE TEAM Head of School Dr. Autumn A. Graves Head of Upper School Jenise Gordon

The Class of 2018 on Sisterhood

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More Likely to Succeed

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COURTYARD

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Head of Middle School Lynne Macziewski Director of Learning Innovation & Teacher Engagement

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IMPACT: Real Life, Real Help May Day Class Day Commencement Athletics Arts Around GPS

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Legends of the Hall GALLERY

CONNECT

Members of the Class of 2018 celebrate Commencement. From left, Reagan Sanborn, Pierson

The digital version at GPS.edu/GPSMagazine provides additional content through links to our website, videos, and photos. In an effort to adopt mindful printing practices, GPS mails one

Khadija Aslam, Anna

magazine per household. If you would

Oglesby, Kate Thel,

like to receive additional copies, please

and Nikki Goldbach.

Alumnae Weekend Class Notes Weddings Babies In Memoriam ID Those Bruisers

BRING BLUEPRINT TO LIFE!

Brown, Meg Marshall,

COLUMNS

Impacting Lives & Community Through Giving

contact blueprint@gps.edu.

Photo by Emily Lester

Understanding Blueprint

Director of Educational Technology & Information Systems Daniel Millbank Director of Strategic Communications & Marketing Bilda Small Chief Financial Officer Mark Vosskamp Director of Athletics Jay Watts Director of Admission

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On the Cover:

Elaine Milazzo

30 34

Debbie Bohner Young ’79 EDITORIAL STAFF Managing Editor Michal Howick ’03 Senior Editor Pamela Hammonds Designer Caitlin Rozell Contributing Writers Anne Exum Callie Hildebrand Lillie Noles Wolf ’13

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Girlpreneurs Find Inspiration and Success Record Turnout at Bruiser Bee Spells Success

Laura Jane Walker Contributing Photographer Emily Lester Blueprint is published

biannually by Girls Preparatory School P.O. Box 4736 Chattanooga, TN 37405 423.634.7600 | GPS.edu Printed by Starkey Printing Co.

ROTUNDA

CORNERSTONES

COURTYARD

GALLERY

COLUMNS

The framework of each issue

The foundation of leadership, values, and purpose

Life at GPS—news and happenings

The recognition and celebration of alumnae beyond our walls

The impact of our school

GPS.EDU G I R L S P R E PA R AT O R Y S C H O O L ROTUNDA

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"Years from now, looking back, I’ll be proud of how my class was throughout school. I think we’re going to be really amazed at how much we cared about each other and how consistently we supported our friends.” —Nikki Goldbach ’18

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The Value of an Education “What is your education worth?” This question was posed by Kate Thel ’18 in her Chapel Talk and again during Commencement as the senior chosen by her peers to reprise her talk. The worth of something—and so is true for an education—is determined by whether or not the effort or cost one puts toward it yields its value and if it meets one’s expectations and the esteem in which it’s held. For Kate, the opportunities, benefits, and value of a GPS education are worth the time, energy, and hard work she and her classmates put forth. “It’s my responsibility to prove that I’m worthy of my education by being appreciative and learning for the sake of learning,” she said. Her classmate, Margaret Lim, in her valedictory address, also spoke to the value of a GPS education by quoting the words of President Theodore Roosevelt in his “Citizenship in a Republic” speech: “The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; ... and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly ….” Lim added, “Because of GPS, I know that admitting I don’t understand a physics concept or sharing my nascent interpretation of a novel are roads to learning.” While a diploma from this prestigious institution signifies a girl’s successful completion of our academic program, it represents far more than courses and content mastered, grades earned, graduation requirements met, and a GPA attained. After all, a GPS education transcends the classroom, which, as Kate said, is “a fraction of what the word ‘education’ encompasses.” Here, and as you will see in this issue of Blueprint, education happens in every arena—in the classroom or the makerspace; on the field or stage; in every moment of celebration and growth; and in every relationship formed among students, teachers, and friends. A GPS diploma is evidence of both the academic success of each girl and the strength of her character.

Presenting diplomas to Kate, Margaret, and their 100 sisters from the Class of 2018 and graduating them to the next step of the GPS journey and sisterhood is why I do not hesitate to say yes when asked if GPS is worth it. They have joined the thousands of GPS alumnae who, like them, are women of honor and purpose, who value curiosity and dare greatly. They are not only worthy of a GPS education, but they also are the reason GPS girls for generations to come will have the same opportunities.

Here’s to the GIRLS!

Dr. Autumn A. Graves Head of School

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Merriam-Webster offers three definitions of

What does sisterhood mean to you?

sisterhood:

1 2 3

MEG MARSHALL: When I came to GPS as a freshman, I didn’t really know anyone and I was really nervous. I remember coming home the first day and telling my mom, “It is so weird; they are all so nice.” I look back on that so fondly. I’ve experienced a really strong web of support, even when I was at a vulnerable time coming in brand new.

 the state of being a sister a: b: sisterly relationship a community or society of sisters

the solidarity of women based on shared conditions, experiences, or concerns

Meg Marshall

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hen the senior class leaders gathered to determine the theme of the school year, it was no surprise they chose sisterhood. At 102 members, they were the largest class at GPS this year and, selfproclaimed, the closest. Even though sisterhood will always be represented at GPS, the Class of 2018 embraced it, modeled it, and beautifully established it as their legacy. When one encounters sisterhood in its many forms time and time again, one has found sisterhood at its best, strongest, fullest, and most meaningful— the mother lode, or rather the “sister lode.” GPS students naturally hit the “sister lode” of sisterhood in joining our community and experiencing the environment of an all-girls school. True sisterhood requires time and effort. No one can speak to this better than the members of the Class of 2018. Here is their evolution of sisterhood captured through interviews, meetings, a Town Hall, and everyday moments.

Andrea van der Merwe

Meg Sikes

Raegan Lamb

Ameera Bhatti

ANDREA VAN DER MERWE: I used to go to a big public school. You’d walk to class and not have a conversation. Here I walk to class, and if I don’t have a conversation, it’s an anomaly! Also, I’ve never had someone celebrate me as much as I have here. We do YGGs—“You Go Girl”—in Chapel, and if you do something good, you get a YGG. It’s really sweet, and especially if the seniors get it, the whole class will stand and celebrate. MEG SIKES: Even with those girls I wouldn’t call best friends or even really close friends, I still can see a sisterhood among our class because we are encouraging of each other. The sisterhood here at school is very different than the sisterhood I have with my sister. Because I got to pick my sisters here, it’s a totally different relationship. We’ve all gone through the same things but had different experiences of the same things. It just makes for really great relationships. RAEGAN LAMB: I can say that I could walk up to any friend group within my class and have a long and natural conversation with them. We’re just so close. AMEERA BHATTI: The bond I share with friends and classmates transcends the classroom. You can see each other outside of the classroom and immediately have a connection and know that you’re going to be there for one another.

The Class of 2018 on 6

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By Michal Howick ’03


I’m the middle child between two brothers. Whenever my brothers had a rough day, we wouldn’t talk about it, but here I can talk to pretty much any of my sisters if I’m having a bad day.” —MARY CATHERINE MARSDEN, pictured here, right, with KHADIJA ASLAM

What has sisterhood taught you? MARSHALL: Sisterhood is having fun and having really good times together, but it’s also loving people even when it’s hard, even when the people aren’t being very easy to love. Having the bravery to do that is a really important part of being a sister. LIBBY WELBORN: For me, one part has been learning how to celebrate others’ successes, even when that means that it wasn’t your success. I’ve seen people do that for me, and I’ve learned to do that for other people. Another part of the sisterhood is learning how to call people out in a loving way when they’ve done something wrong, which is a big life skill.

What makes the GPS sisterhood possible? SIKES: Participating in all of the traditions and knowing that thousands of other GPS women did the same before you is just so special. Also, I just think the environment encourages deep relationships. NIKKI GOLDBACH: We are much closer than the average high school graduating class. I know every girl in my grade and could say something about every one of them, and I’m very confident that every other senior could, too. MARSHALL: Anything that I do with my life, anything great that I do, I have my class to thank for that. I don’t think I would have pushed myself to do any of the things that I’ve done and gotten out of my comfort zone. That support system has led to so many good things for me.

Libby Welborn

Clare Hamn

Nikki Goldbach

Avery Campbell

Mary Catherine Marsden

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This snapshot captures the reaction of the May

When this year did you most strongly feel sisterhood? The senior Class Leadership Council, pictured here (from left), Raegan Lamb, Ameera Bhatti, Khadija Aslam, and McCall Waldrop, helped choose sisterhood as the school year’s theme.

MARSHALL: The day we voted for May Court. Even among the court, there was no feeling of competitiveness. We could not stop smiling and hugging each other. I just remember thinking, This is what GPS is; it’s our supporting each other. Not just supporting like, Yay, good job! But like really, really loving each other. CLARE HAMN: When we started voting for May Court, there were so many girls wondering, “Who’s it going to be?” Then I stopped to think about it, and honestly, there was no one in our class I would not love celebrating as our May Queen. It was such a beautiful moment that there were so many people who had so many different talents and different characteristics and personalities that were worth celebrating and honoring. I cried; I think a lot of people did. BHATTI: I think it was any time someone got something that you might have wanted or hoped for—an award, May Court, a superlative—and you still celebrated each other’s accomplishments. Sisterhood is always in the back of your head, and their accomplishment is also your accomplishment as a class—that you have such amazing girls among you. GOLDBACH: On May Day, we were all dressed and lined up, waiting for it to start. Mrs. [Tracie Marlin Durham ’80] turned out all the lights—I think to calm us down—and all of a sudden someone started singing a Hannah Montana song and then we all started singing. It was so fun. SIKES: When two of my classmates unexpectedly brought pizza and cake to one of my best friends who was having a really rough day. You could just see how much that meant to her—they didn’t have to do that but they did.

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Court when one of their sisters is chosen as May Queen.

If you had to assign a verb to your class contribution to sisterhood, what would it be and why? SIKES: I feel like we cemented it. It’s one thing to pick sisterhood and talk about it, but it’s a completely different thing to actually do it and represent it. BHATTI: I would say we modeled it—in ways that we didn’t expect ourselves to or were hesitant to, for the rest of the school, for each other, and for ourselves. Just being good friends to others, helping someone out in the classroom, or giving someone a ride home, those are little things that go a long way over time. GOLDBACH: I think we revived it. Last year was a rough year for a lot of people—everywhere in the world. There was a lot of animosity and unkindness. All the groups on campus, all the seniors, all the people were really dedicated to this idea of bringing back that spirit of sisterhood, no matter our experience. MARSHALL: I would say we celebrated it. Sisterhood is something that’s always existed at GPS, but I think we were really aware. Alums have told me, “Now I know there’s such a strong sisterhood, but I didn’t recognize it as a student.” I think our class has always known that.


How does sisterhood at GPS translate beyond these walls and the GPS experience and into real life?

In true sisterhood fashion, the Class of 2018 dressed up for Halloween together as 101 Dalmatians and Cruella de Vil.

What advice would you give to girls in other classes? MARSHALL: Choose to be kind. It’s sometimes the really hard choice, but I cannot think of a time that it’s not the better choice. In a sense, it began organically, but we made the conscious effort to have that sisterhood. I hope that we’ve just shown how much more fun it is to be nice to each other and how much better everything is when you can celebrate each other.

SIKES: By placing so much emphasis on sisterhood this year, I’ve learned to respect the girls in my class and their opinions. I’ve learned to use my voice and speak up, but also to be loving and respectful. That’s something I’m going to take with me outside of GPS. GOLDBACH: I try to make decisions as if they would affect my entire class and try to make decisions that I would be happy to tell my class about. Like not only being held accountable, but also trying to emulate them in ways or embody the spirit of my class.

WELBORN: Don’t let conflicts take root and control how you interact. SIKES: Slow down and look up. My friends and I have tried, succeeded, and failed this year at just being present together. If you get so caught up in posting, Snapchatting, and taking all these pictures, then you really are missing the moments. WELBORN: We’ve really learned the importance of “hanging up and hanging out.” We can’t all be on our phones checking social media. It’s much more meaningful to have that face-to-face contact and just talk to each other.

For me, Cat-Rat was really special. I feel like a big sister to her, for sure.”

MARSHALL: I am actually excited for the next phase of our sisterhood. On Alumnae Weekend, I was so amazed at the number of women who came back and the way I saw them walking together in pairs. I think feeling that sisterhood is both past and present, because I even felt that sisterhood with the alums I met. BHATTI: The idea of sisterhood is essentially being a support to someone else, cheering someone on, and wanting to share people’s accomplishments with them. You can even be a sister to yourself sometimes, in a world where people aren’t always going to be a sister to you or be a friend to you. You have to remember the values that GPS taught you—carrying yourself with honor and respect—and know that when you are at a low point in your life, where you may not be accepted by everyone around you, realize there is a community that does accept you, and you can always turn to them.

—Avery Campbell, who requested her Rat, Sarah-Catherine Jackson ’24.

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PEEK INSIDE GPS CLASSROOMS TO SEE HOW TEACHERS SET GIRLS UP FOR SUCCESS. By Pamela Hammonds 1

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More Likely to

SUCCEED

1 Noor Ali ’24 explains her  global science project. 2 Ruthie Towns ’18 (left) and  Olivia Evans ’19 complete a lab in chemistry with Tracie Marlin Durham ’80. 3 Astha Sinha ’21 presents her  #TheWomanProject to her classmates.

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hether working collaboratively on a class project or alone in the library, her earbuds in to access the audio portions of a course or to keep distractions at bay, a GPS girl loves to learn. She is curious about the world around her and unafraid of a challenge. In class, she becomes fueled by her peers and speaks up because she knows her voice matters and that her opinions are valued. Throughout the school year, we visited classrooms in the Middle and Upper Schools to witness vibrant interactions between teachers and students. Opportunities to develop and refine their communication, collaboration, analytical, and creative skills—skills vital for success in a world of innovation and responsible citizenship—were crafted for students in a collaborative environment where a growth mindset is encouraged and experiential learning provides the optimal environment for girls to engage in the learning process. While meaningful moments happen each day, here are some examples of ways girls are learning and growing into strong young women at GPS.

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4 Sara Kate Elrod ’24 explains her prototype  during the Global Science Showcase. left, Alexandra Blye ’24, Kinsley Armstrong ’24,  5 From  and Zella Stockman ’24 pose in front of the green screen.

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6 Virginia Byrd ’24 (left) and Grace Cannon ’24

Making World Languages Come Alive Erin Bas is known by students as Señora Bas and Madame Bas. As a world language teacher, she finds that the most successful student learning occurs through the implementation of the process known as comprehensive input. A contemporary method for teaching language, comprehensive input involves a focus on communication proficiency rather than just memorizing vocabulary or grammar rules. “Providing the students with a more conversational, interactive style of learning a language allows them to be more creative with how they put the language together,” Bas says, who also teaches creative writing. This spring, in Madame Bas’ introduction to French class, seventh-graders explored the language through the book Brandon Brown: Veut un Chien, a fun story about a young boy who wants a dog. Class time was spent learning and interacting through verbal communication—almost all in French. With a “prediction activity,” students wrote a sentence about what they anticipated would happen in the upcoming chapter of Brandon Brown, utilizing prompted vocab words that were presented on the board. Students then shared their predictions with the class, and the class determined the probability of their predictions. “It’s fun to see the students putting words and phrases together that they wouldn’t have just by worksheets because they are hearing it in new and different orientations,” Bas says.

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Interdisciplinary Showcase Addresses Real-World Issues

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This year’s sixth-grade students’ Global Science Showcase had global cultures and science classes collaborating to design solutions to problems faced by refugees around the world. “The students have studied the movement of refugees in global cultures and the human body in science,” says Trish King, global cultures teacher. King worked with Kipton Lankford Tugman ’92, science teacher, on the interdisciplinary project that was eventually presented to parents. “We brought our classes together to complete a human-centered design-thinking challenge that asks: How might we design something to help a refugee’s body system work better while traveling to or living in a refugee camp or as they resettle in a new country?” Students worked through the design process—discover, empathize, experiment, produce, test—to craft a solution faced by refugees. Then the students learned to incorporate the feedback of their peers and others on campus to refine their work. Among the designs were a vending machine activated through a thumbprint ID scanner to dispense medicine, a portable analysis kit to test and purify water while providing medicine to counteract toxins already ingested, and a bubble dome with air and rainwater filtration systems. “I’m very impressed with what they’ve done and how eager the girls are to tell their stories,” says Hugh Brown, who attended the showcase to support daughter Lizzie. “It’s interesting to see how two different classes worked together to get the girls to stretch the way they looked at a situation. This reminds me of what happens in college, so it’s great to start early.” At the close of the showcase, the girls took their design-thinking challenge model and led a session with parents and teachers, asking them how the sixth-grade onboarding experience could be improved. Dean of Middle School Debbie Glasscock participated in the challenge and came away inspired by the girls’ methodology. “They timed each step, explained every goal clearly, and kept the adults on task,” she says. “The solutions that the parents proposed will directly affect what we do in orientations at the beginning of the school year. We were all so impressed with the girls’ presentations, organization, communication, and collaboration with this project.”

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Making STEM Studies Relevant In keeping with GPS’s ongoing commitment to STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) studies, classes incorporated real-world applications to encourage students to think outside the hexahedron. Diane Walker’s honors geometry students were tasked with designing a state-of-the-art math wing that met the learning needs of students in the year 2050. “They had to produce a site plan, make a scale model, and determine a cost estimate,” Walker says. All work on the project was completed on campus in four randomly selected teams, so girls experienced teamwork as they would in the real world. The teams then presented their findings to a panel of three teachers—Lisa Wilkes, math; Caroline Carlin, history; and Jill Pala Pieritz ’97, engineering. Students incorporated natural lighting, solar panels, and other energy-efficient initiatives. They included finance as a component of their work, adding rooftop bee hives as a financial resource from honey sales. Walls, tables, and seating were mobile to allow for flexible classroom setups. “They really got creative,” Walker says. GPS girls learn through multiple hands-on opportunities such as: animal dissection labs in anatomy with Erin Davis Sizemore ’98, mock job interviews in Chris Zeller’s finite math class, learning the mechanics and physics of changing a tire in physics with Bryant Haynes, and understanding the components and sequence reactions by making ice cream with Keith Sanders in chemistry.

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Engaging Role Models

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In Corrie White’s freshman English classes, #TheWomanProject challenged students to find a woman outside the GPS community to interview for a podcast and essay. The girls would record and edit a podcast and then write a journalistic profile about the woman’s impact on her community, family, or the student. The students were required to connect the woman to some aspect (character, theme, or historical era) of the English 9 curriculum. “Witnessing all of their presentations revealed to me that, through this project, they were able to connect more deeply with a family member, brave the anxiety of interviewing a near stranger (or someone they greatly admire), realize that success stories are never a straight line, and understand that being a woman today comes with a lot of choices, which is both anxiety-ridden and liberating,” says White. The essay’s five-paragraph format helped the girls build critical thinking/analytical skills, and recording podcasts honed technical skills; some interviews were performed off campus while others invited their subjects to GPS to record in the school’s library green room. Will Glass, Director of Library Studies, stepped in to assist. Students presented their multimedia projects in class, summarizing their subjects’ accomplishments and playing audio clips of their podcasts. “My goal was to teach writing in a way that incorporates the girls’ hearts as well as their minds,” White says.

9 Ninth-grade English teacher  Corrie White helps Kaedra

11 Alison Williams ’21 presents  her #TheWomanProject.

Thorstenson ’21 with her

7 Emma Moore ’18  reviews a dissection

#TheWomanProject essay while Ava Whited ’21 reviews

in her anatomy class.

her podcast.

12 Daphne Thomas ’18 (left) and  Mary Catherine Marsden ’18 work in the lab at UTC after school.

8 Physics teacher Bryant Haynes performs a demonstration in class. 12

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10 Mary Stuart Hornsby ’21  reviews her podcast.

13 Sophie Veys ’18 with Dr. Manuel  Santiago, professor at UTC.


Students at girls` schools :

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UTC Offers Exclusive Opportunity to GPS Students

3x more likely

Are to consider engineering careers than their coed peers

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Tracie Marlin Durham ’80, Science Department Chair, accompanied a select group of students to the University of Tennessee Chattanooga’s campus after school twice a week, where the girls performed lab analysis under the direction of chemistry professor Manuel Santiago, Ph.D. The partnership allows GPS students to gain hands-on lab and research experience at the university level. This year seniors Sophie Veys, Daphne Thomas, and Mary Catherine Marsden worked with science lab instruments—such as a fluorescence spectroscopy and gas chromatography mass spectroscopy—not typically available to high school students. The girls identified compounds in ladybird beetle (ladybug) eggs and collected data for a research study to determine if changing ladybird beetles’ diets will affect development rates. “The work of our young women is being used to determine if the insects’ diets could be changed to work as pest control without adding pesticides to the environment, which is a growing problem worldwide,” Durham says. Dr. Santiago is quick to give credit for their work. In fact, he commended our students for identifying something in a sample that caused him to shift his focus with regard to the study. “Since freshman year, I have aspired to participate in college research,” says Sophie Veys, who will attend the University of Chicago this fall. “Through this program, I experienced what college research is actually like. I definitely feel at home in a laboratory because of my involvement in this project." Being a part of a university-level research project has given our students the opportunity to grow more selfconfidence in their science skills and explore options beyond GPS.

6x more likely

Are to consider majoring in math, science, and technology in college compared to girls who attend coed schools

Have higher aspirations

and greater motivation than their female peers at coed independent and public schools Report receiving more

frequent feedback

on their assignments and other course work than girls at coed schools

Report

higher self-confidence over their coed peers

Receive a wealth of avenues for

self-exploration and development Girls need to see it to be it

to make them more aware of the possibilities in their own lives and help set them on their own brilliant paths.

Sources: National Coalition of Girls’ Schools: NCGS.org; “Women Graduates of Single-Sex and Coeducational High Schools: Differences in their Characteristics and the Transition to College” by Linda J. Sax, Ph.D; Laurel School’s Center for Research on Girls.

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ough conversations need a place to start. But difficult topics are better directly addressed rather than avoided. Anxiety. Substance abuse. Social media use. Relationships. Sports injuries. Self-harm and suicide. These gritty topics aren’t pretty, but they’re important, especially to girls and their families. Through Girl Matters | Girls Matter, the GPS IMPACT speaker series—designed to help girls achieve self-confidence, awareness, and independence—expert guest speakers talked with girls, their families, and teachers about tough but relevant topics. Sarah Young Jackson ’06, Upper School Dean of Students, says many of the topics covered in the speaker series are addressed in myriad ways during the school year, but this approach was universal and direct. It created a platform for shared experiences between parents and their daughters, so that if there was a discomfort or awkwardness about broaching a subject, referencing the speaker would provide an entry point. The series addressed the unique social, emotional, and developmental issues girls face and helped start important, ongoing conversations between girls and those who love and support them. “We are all collectively interested in the success and emotional health of our girls,” Jackson said. “We will continue to aggressively and enthusiastically pursue partnerships with parents—and grandparents, friends, alumnae, you name it!—in educating and raising girls. The better equipped we are with current research, best practices, and common language, the more effective we will be.”

Real Life

2017-18 IMPACT Speakers Share Their Expertise

COPING! WITH ANXIETY | Dr. Eli Lebowitz, Associate Director of the Anxiety and Mood Disorders Program at the Yale Child Study Center, recommended that girls regularly face events and situations that might produce anxiety. While it’s natural to avoid situations and events that produce anxiety, experiencing things eventually dulls the emotional impact. Facing what makes one anxious can then induce less anxiety. “Feel the fear and do it anyway,” Lebowitz said. START THE CONVERSATION | FCD Prevention Works Specialists shared knowledge, understanding, and skills with the girls about making intelligent, healthy choices about alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use. Prevention and education are crucial, including providing age-appropriate refusal skills. It’s not about one 60-minute conversation, but about 60 one-minute conversations over time to discuss the ever-evolving challenges of adolescence. FIND YOUR SUPPORT SYSTEM | Kevin Hines shared his story of survival from a jump off the Golden Gate Bridge to educate Upper School students and their parents about suicide prevention and mental wellness. He discussed the significance of having a support system, not being afraid to ask for help, and removing the stigma from mental health issues. “It’s a battle I continue to fight, but now I have the help of medication, doctors, and my family,” he said. SET BOUNDARIES | Dr. Carol Burns Stoney ’85, licensed professional counselor and mental health specialist, talked with students about sisterhood, healthy relationships, and setting boundaries. She encouraged students with ways to have better communication with friends and cautioned the use of social media as a primary means. “If your relationships aren’t going well, it affects every area of your life,” she said. Some relationship killers she identified included criticism, contempt, defensiveness, and stonewalling, and she gave the girls examples of how to be a better friend.

BRAIN GAINS | Recovering from a concussion typically takes twice as long for females as males, according to a study in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. Drs. Jason Robertson and Bradford Mitchell, physicians at Center for Sports Medicine & Orthopaedics, said girls are at a higher risk for concussions, too. Among sharing preventive measures, they recommended ensuring athletes are fully recovered and symptom-free before returning to activity.

Ten Takeaways for Parents of Girls 1 2 3 4 RECOGNIZE THE CHALLENGES SHE FACES and acknowledge her for managing the demands of her day.

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OPENLY TALK ABOUT STRESS and allow her time to decompress after school.

C O U R T YA R D G I R L S P R E P A R A T O R Y S C H O O L G P S . E D U

START LEARNING ABOUT ADOLESCENCE before she turns 10.

Adolescence is not something girls do to you or us; IT IS SOMETHING THEY HAVE TO DO.

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RESIST THE URGE TO SOLVE HER PROBLEMS; handling conflict is part of her maturation process.


Real Help

CONNECT

By Laura Jane Walker

Along with the Girl Matters | Girls Matter IMPACT speaker series, GPS welcomed two authors and presenters to campus. Open to the Chattanooga community, their parent presentations drew large crowds eager to learn how to best guide girls through the often perilous challenges of navigating adolescence. Both speakers also presented their expertise in specially tailored talks to faculty and to our girls.

UNTANGLING TEENAGE GIRLS

Katey McPherson, author, social media expert, and Executive Director of the Gurian Institute, spent two days on the GPS campus. To parents, she advised that maintaining a family contract about screen time and social media use is crucial. If your child is on a social media platform, you should be, too, and follow her on your phone. While girls aren’t necessarily addicted to devices, they do get a hit of dopamine out of positive feedback on social media. Teaching children how to use technology appropriately is key. “You are really trying to achieve one goal with your child: Dignity,” McPherson said. “Encourage her to treat others that way and to post only photos and comments that keep her dignity intact.” The main takeaway is understanding that children, who sometimes look like adults, make decisions with a still-developing brain that’s often fueled by emotions. To students, McPherson spoke openly about their responsibilities with social media and gave them tips on how to leverage the platforms to promote themselves in a positive light—particularly helpful during the college admission process. Overall, good communication between girls and parents along with established expectations can set the groundwork for mutual respect and responsible digital citizenship.

The time to establish ground rules for social media and cell phones IS BEFORE SHE’S GIVEN ONE.

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Lisa Damour, Ph.D., Director of Laurel School’s Center for Research on Girls and author of the NYTbest-selling book Untangled, shared her expertise with parents, faculty, and Lisa Damour students for navigating adolescence. Parents learned from Damour’s research and counseling experience how to support their daughters while girls find their “tribes” and manage conflict. Using the swimming pool metaphor, Damour told parents they are the safe side their girl clings to when she feels like she’s drowning. But as soon as she catches her breath, she’s kicking off into the deep end again. Damour also gave helpful comparisons as to how boys and girls differ in their approach to school. “Boys will figure out exactly how much work it will take to achieve the grade they want and do no more than that,” she said. “Girls will do whatever it takes to not disappoint their teachers. It’s up to us to teach them to be tactical.” In a special session to GPS faculty and staff, Damour encouraged a growth versus fixed mindset approach to teaching and finding teachable moments and missed opportunities. “Once a girl decides she’s weak in a subject—even if she’s smart or talented—she’s likely to stop trying to build her skills and thus limits her chance at success,” she said. Rather, to encourage a growth mindset, teachers should help girls embrace challenges and draw inspiration from their talented peers. Girls with a growth mindset believe that their abilities can be expanded through hard work. To the girls, she emphasized coping skills to deal with moments of stress and anxiety. Damour talked about three ways of handling conflict, whether you’re a bulldozer (run people over), doormat (let people run you over), or doormat with spikes (play the victim). Damour highlighted the end goal of becoming a “pillar,” or someone who sticks up for herself while being respectful of others.

Katey McPherson

SHARE THE SOCIAL MEDIA EXPERIENCE

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FOLLOW GPS ON SOCIAL MEDIA AND WATCH GPS COMMUNICATIONS FOR UPCOMING SPEAKERS AND EVENTS FOR THE 2018-19 SCHOOL YEAR. ALSO SEE GPS.EDU/ UNDERSTANDINGGIRLS FOR MORE.

SET UP A CENTRAL EVENING CHARGING STATION for all devices; no electronics in bedrooms at night.

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Decisions you make should be rooted in what keeps her safe; STEP IN ANYTIME YOU BELIEVE SHE MIGHT BE IN HARM’S WAY.

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Girls’ need TO FIND THEIR “TRIBES” is of utmost importance.

GIVE HER BRAIN TIME TO “SETTLE HER GLITTER,” then talk about it.

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I’ve always loved May Day; it’s always been my favorite day of the year. Being chosen for May Queen is a huge affirmation of the fact that I can still be quiet and have an impact on people around me.” —PHOEBE MILLS, 2018 MAY QUEEN

The legacy seniors and their families are pictured at May Day. Front row, from left: Hollis Gaffney and mother Beth Flint Gaffney ’79, Mary Margaret Arrowsmith and grandmother Sally Bacon Smartt ’61; Emily Peoples and mother Laura Bickel Peoples ’86; Kate Peele and mother Tracey Wright Peele ’81; Melanie Smith Williams ’89 and daughter Julia Piccolo; Maggie Hill with mother Sally Soileau Hill ’88 (above left) and grandmother Becky Evans Soileau ’62 (above right); Cay Jones Gray ’52 with granddaughter Stella Pritchard and Stella’s mother, Jane Gray Prichard ’84; Abby Walden and grandmother Susan Bridgers Byrd ’64; Elizabeth Hebert Day ’87 and daughter Beth Day. Second row, from left: cousin Sallie Wright Tingle ’06, Daphne Thomas, aunt Kathryn Kersey Harlan ’85, Neely Thomas with mother Cornele Kersey Thomas ’83 and Kathryn Thomas; Amanda Michaud and mother Sally Lyons Michaud ’86 behind her on steps; Irene Jewell Welborn ’51 with granddaughter Libby Welborn to her right; Susie McVey Lynn ’76 with daughter Ashley-Rose Lynn; Mary Ellis Bratcher with mother Adelaide Davenport Naumann ’87; Ruthie Towns (grandmother Peggy Morin Franck ’55, deceased.) On steps: Third row, from left: Maddox Bandy with grandmother Janie Willingham McNabb ’63 and cousin Ellie Edwards. Fourth row, from left: Maddox’s and Ellie’s mothers Meg Glass Bandy ’87 and C.C. Glass Edwards ’89. Not pictured: Meg Sikes and Linda Lea Turner ’65. 16

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May Day 2018

The Leadership + Legacy luncheon at Founders House offered an opportunity for invited May

Sophomores wrapped the May Poles. Seventh-graders served up a musical treat in their dance to “Be Our Guest” from Beauty and the Beast.

Day guests to mingle and celebrate the long-held GPS tradition. Pictured, from left,

Eighth-graders took us “Under the Sea” in their dance to the favorite tune from A Little Mermaid.

Erin Davis Sizemore ’98, Laurel Moore Zahrobsky ’90, and Jen Wingfield Stribling ’91.

ON

April 25, school life as usual stopped for one day—as it does every year—for our annual traditional May Day festivities. A carpet of green (ahem, the gorgeous, rain-drenched front lawn) and an overcast sky greeted our families and classmates as we celebrated our seniors on the Smith Courtyard. In keeping with this year’s theme, “Once Upon a Time,” underclassmen danced to beloved studentchoreographed Disney songs while the sophomore class, as tradition dictates, wrapped the May Poles. Jenise Gordon, Head of Upper School, provided commentary and words of encouragement as she presented the Class of 2018. “‘Once upon a time’ is a phrase that takes us back to our childhood, when life was simpler and all stories ended happily,” Gordon said. “Stith Thompson, in The Folktale, describes a fairy tale or wonder tale as one that ‘... is filled with the marvelous. In this never-neverland, humble heroes kill adversaries, succeed to kingdoms, and marry princesses.’ “(But) no child wanders lost in the woods [at GPS], and there is no damsel in distress trapped in the castle turret awaiting her knight in shining armor. These young women don their own chain mail of purpose and integrity each day to slay their own metaphorical dragons that arise in the form of challenging assessments, societal pressures to be perfect, college application deadlines, and that especially tricky villain known as time, who is the enemy of all.” Gordon spoke of the special bond of sisterhood shared by the GPS Class of 2018. “They’ve argued, consoled, comforted, and competed with each other and, as a result, the relationships they’ve formed will last a lifetime. We look forward to seeing what each girl’s version of ‘happily ever after’ looks like.”

2018 May Court From left: Raegan Lamb, Left Train Bearer; Libby Welborn, Scepter Bearer; Hollis Gaffney, Maid of Honor; Phoebe Mills, May Queen; Meg Marshall, Crown Bearer; Meher Memon, Lady of the Court; and Margaret Lim, Right Train Bearer

CONNECT

WATCH THE VIDEO, READ MORE ABOUT, AND VIEW PHOTOS OF MAY DAY AT GPS.EDU/GPSMAGAZINE.

G P S . E D U G I R L S P R E P A R A T O R Y S C H O O L C O U R T YA R D |

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C

lass Day, the last time the entire student body gathers for the school year, marks both the ending of this chapter in our girls’ GPS journey and the beginning of the next. The day’s activities provide the opportunity to reflect upon the year; recognize individuals with awards in academics, character, the arts, and athletics; and look forward to what is to come. With the distribution of Kaleidoscope, the school’s yearbook, students flip through and write notes to each other on the pages, immortalizing their memories, moments of thanks, and best wishes. In the singing of the traditional “Where Oh Wheres,” students in grades six through 11 bid farewell to the year and their respective grades and loudly express their enthusiasm for moving to the next grade, and our seniors proclaim they are “safe in the college world!” and prepared to step into their new role as GPS alumnae. Another year and chapter in their GPS journey— and their personal growth—is complete!

Upper School Awards SENIOR AWARDS | CLASS OF 2018 Ethel B. Poston Valedictorian Award Margaret Lim Rickie Pierce Salutatorian Award Tatiana Poggi Mary Hannah Tucker Faculty Award Hollis Gaffney Founders Award | Libby Welborn Pete Wood Award | Nikki Goldbach Patsy Williams Scott Service Award Sierra Cooley Betsy Chisolm Silberman Award Meg Marshall Laura Handly Award Pierson Brown Roberta Moore Award | Raegan Lamb

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The sixth-grade Rats sang a special song, “When Love Takes Over” by David Guetta, dedicated to the Class of 2018 as a parting gift to their Cats.

CONNECT LEARN MORE ABOUT THE AWARDS GIVEN ON CLASS DAY AT GPS.EDU/ GPSMAGAZINE.

Class Day

Academic & Character Awards

Barbara Johnson Prickett Award Meher Memon Jane Henegar Noble Christian Award Ashley-Rose Lynn DAR Award | Hannah Prescott

Dora Maclellan Brown Christian Leadership Award | Anna Beth Coffman

Middle School Awards

JUNIOR AWARDS | CLASS OF 2019 Battle Award | Myra Brock Palmer Griffin Award | Charlotte Vance

EIGHTH-GRADE AWARDS | CLASS OF 2022 Janet Campbell Jackson Award Mary Kate Johnson DAR Youth Citizenship Award | Julia Combs

SOPHOMORE AWARDS | CLASS OF 2020 Sophomore Bowl | Kshama Patel Dorris Chapin Wells Award | Jadyn Matthews

SEVENTH-GRADE AWARDS | CLASS OF 2023 Ruth Schmidt Award | Atlee Elliot Thedford Award | Anya Parambath

FRESHMAN AWARDS | CLASS OF 2021 Marilyn Sherman Center Award | Aria Cooper Frances Wheeler Freshman Cup Holland Collett

SIXTH-GRADE AWARDS | CLASS OF 2024 Margaret Wheland Cate Award | Olivia Dodd Joan Haley Frierson Award | Claire Scotchie

C O U R T YA R D G I R L S P R E P A R A T O R Y S C H O O L G P S . E D U


SENIOR RAEGAN LAMB, emcee for Class Day awards ceremony and Chairwoman of Class Leadership Council, shared two things she’s gained from her seven-year GPS experience. “First, an incredible education that has pushed me far beyond limits I ever thought I could reach,” she said. “Secondly, GPS has introduced me to 101 girls who have become my forever sisters. The bonds I have made with my classmates are like none other I have experienced. We have laughed, cried, fought, danced, and studied like sisters do.”

Where OhWhere

Go the Grand Old Seniors?

The Class of 2018 posed for the traditional college sweatshirt photo.

Athletic Awards Robinson Sportsmanship Cup Hollis Gaffney ’18 Mary Alice Hood Chambers Award Louisa Bohner ’22 Elizabeth Collier Farmer Award Meg Priest ’20 Laura Holt Outstanding Athlete Award Myra Brock ’19 Sandra Martin Award Anna Oglesby ’18 Peggy Thomas 100% Award Carley Braman ’18

Fine & Performing Arts Awards

Senior Academic Awards

Greene-Hanlin Award Emma Nash ’18 & Charlotte Smith ’18 Terpsichord Award | Amanda Michaud ’18 Award for Excellence in the Visual Arts Abbey Hegwood ’18 & CeCe Turner ’18 National Orchestra Award | Margaret Lim ’18 National Band Award | Heather Ake ’20 Excellence in Dramatic Arts Award Jayden Doan ’18 Excellence in Technical Theater Award Sierra Cooley ’18

Publications Award

Black, Blue & White Award

William C. McKenzie Award | CeCe Turner ’18

Black Team

Mildred Peters Award for English Tatiana Poggi Eula Lea Jarnagin Love of Language Award Tatiana Poggi, Spanish Charlotte Smith, French Margaret Lim, Latin John Locke History Award for Excellence Meg Marshall Lois Moyer Award for Mathematics Ritika Modi Lucy Ann Adams Science Cup Sophie Veys Computer Science & Engineering Award McKenzie Frizzell Fletcher Bright Award Phoebe Mills & Darby Breedlove

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ON

May 18 we graduated the 102 seniors of the Class of 2018 in the 112th Commencement exercises of Girls Preparatory School. Commencement marks the culmination of years of hard work—of friendships made and relationships formed between students and teachers, of shared victories in the classroom and on the courts and fields, of late night study sessions and group messages about assignments. In her address, Head of School Dr. Autumn A. Graves acknowledged not only the many accomplishments of the senior class but also their character and heart for service. “My girls are leaders in this city,” she said. “They walk their own path and not the path that someone else thinks they should travel.”

112

th Commencement Celebrating the

of GPS

Two students, Margaret Lim, Ethel B. Poston Valedictorian, and Kate Thel, whose Chapel Talk was voted by her classmates to be presented again, reflected on their GPS educations and experiences. “Thankfully early on, my classmates and teachers inspired me, and they taught me that there is something wonderful and human about being wrong and taking risks,” Lim said. “Because of GPS, I know that admitting I don’t understand a physics concept or sharing my nascent interpretation of a novel are roads to learning. Without taking risks, I would never have known if I was wrong, grown from my mistakes, and become an independent thinker.”

Kate Thel shared similar sentiments about her time at GPS. “Too often, we go through the perfunctory motions of the school day, mindless of the sacrifices made to get us where we are, and forgetful of how great this place is,” Thel said. “Every high-schooler says their school is the best, but GPS is better. Your neighbors are what make learning memorable, and they will teach you infinitely more than a textbook can. The girls are what make GPS so valuable to me. Learning side by side adds exponentially to what we take from the classroom.”

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Head of School Dr. Autumn A. Graves and Board Chair Holly Lynch Harwell ’84 lead the faculty, staff, and board members through the Class of 2018 prior to Commencement.


Every high-schooler says their school is the best. GPS is better.” —KATE THEL, WHO REVIVED HER CHAPEL TALK FOR COMMENCEMENT

Before receiving their diplomas, Dr. Graves, on behalf of the faculty and staff, presents the Class of 2018 to the Chair of the Board of Trustees and her fellow trustees. She then instructs the graduates to move their tassels from the right to the left and turn their GPS rings so that the crest faces outward.

Margaret Lim

Kate Thel

From left, Meher Memon, Kendall McKoon, and Maddox McIntire move their tassels.

CONNECT

READ MARGARET LIM’S VALEDICTORY ADDRESS AND KATE THEL’S CHAPEL TALK, VIEW PHOTOS FROM COMMENCEMENT, AND LEARN MORE BY VISITING GPS.EDU/GPSMAGAZINE. TO READ MORE ABOUT THE ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF THE CLASS OF 2018, PLEASE SEE “HERE’S TO THE GIRLS” ON THE BACK COVER.

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TRACK & FIELD

GPS track and field ended its season with an overall eighth-place finish at the TSSAA state tournament, and individuals made their mark in the records. Senior Carley Braman led the way for the Bruisers with her runner-up finish in the 1600-meter relay, recording a personal best time of 5:16.86. Murfee Jones ’18 tied the school record for pole vaulting with her 10’ vault, which earned her fifth place. The Bruisers 4x400-meter relay team of Jones, Braman, Myra Brock ’19, and Nicola van der Merwe ’21 also placed fifth. ROWING

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TENNIS

LACROSSE

The varsity tennis team saved its best of the season for Spring Fling. Senior Maddox Bandy capped off her tennis career for the Bruisers with a TSSAA Division II-AA state singles championship title—adding another gold medal to her existing collection of two state doubles championship titles. Bandy was the first GPS tennis player to win the singles title since assistant coach Sarah Evans ’10 won her senior year. Bandy also earned the Chattanooga Times Free Press Best of Preps Player of the Year award. She was joined by fellow teammates Barbie Edwards ’20 and seniors Ellie Edwards, Maggie Eslinger, Corinne Spann, and Kate Thel as Best of Preps selections. The team finished runners-up in the state tournament.

The 2017-18 lacrosse season featured its largest senior class ever. The roster included 12 seniors, all of whom were involved in the GPS lacrosse program since Middle School. “The developed level of their technical skills allowed us to hit the ground running and focus more intently on the tactical aspect of the game,” said Head Varsity Coach Caroline Carlin. As a result, the team had its most productive season on offense. Seniors Taylor Floyd, Hollis Gaffney, Kendall McKoon, and Alexis West earned all-region honors.

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GPS rowing experienced another successful season on the water. The varsity 4+ boat— consisting of juniors Larkin Brown, Rebecca Guhde, Olivia Evans, Allison Smith, and senior coxswain Anna Oglesby—earned fifth place in the Scholastic Rowing Association of America National Regatta. The Bruisers also claimed their ninth-straight Carney Cup victory over Baylor this spring, and the varsity 8+ boat finished first in the Mid-South Atlantic Championships. SOFTBALL

The GPS softball team closed its season with a runner-up title in the TSSAA state tournament and an overall record of 324. Shelby Walters ’18 was named region MVP, and fellow senior Haley Smith earned all-region honors. Other Bruisers among the all-region list included Hannah Sanders ’19, Kaitlyn Songer ’19, Elizabeth Warwick ’20, and Ariana Whatley ’20.

SCHOOL M ID D L E GOLF

SCHOOL M ID D L E SE L AC R O S

SCHOOL M ID D L E F IE L D T R AC K &


SCHOOL M ID D L E ALL BAS K E TB

SCHOOL M ID D L E G/D IV IN G S W IM M IN

SCHOOL M ID D L E ALL VO L L E Y B

BASKETBALL

With a new coach, major upset victories, and a winning record, this winter proved a sensational season for the Bruisers. Coached by firstyear GPS Athletic Director Jay Watts, the team reached the TSSAA state quarterfinals. The Bruisers also upset rival school Baylor with a 43-37 victory during the two schools’ second matchup.

CLIMBING

The climbing team had a jump in participation this year, with 17 members on the roster. Four of the Bruiser climbers were seniors who have been a part of the climbing program their entire high school career. “It was very rewarding to see them improve from one year to the next,” says Coach Sean Caulfield. “Their initial movements were often tentative and blocky but, through persistent efforts, each one has become a safe and capable climber.” Top climbing performances on the team came from Carter Davenport ’19, Emily Peoples ’18, and Neely Thomas ’18.

"This was an important season for our program because I feel like we took a big step toward getting the program back to where it should be,” said Coach Watts. “I am especially proud of the senior class, who played a big part in our turnaround."

SWIMMING/DIVING

“This year’s team was a very diverse mix of older and younger, experienced and inexperienced,” said Head Varsity Swim Coach John Woods. “Despite this, everyone found their place and came together as the season progressed.” Among the mix was one state champion diver and four all-state swimmers. Senior Qynn Celichowski returned home from the TISCA state meet with a gold medal to complete her diving career at GPS while Carley Braman ’18, Jillian Cantrell ’19, Murfee Jones ’18, and Emma Scruggs ’20 earned all-state honors in swimming. CHEERLEADING

The GPS varsity all-girls cheerleading squad led both GPS and McCallie basketball fans in cheers and vocal support and provided half-time entertainment to spur the basketball teams to victory. Senior cheerleaders included Sophie Becknell, Nikki Goldbach, Sophia Han, and Maddox McIntire.

Our girls played their hearts out this year with the support of outstanding coaches and fans— family, friends, and faculty.” —JAY WATTS, ATHLETIC DIRECTOR

BOWLING

A veteran among GPS Athletics coaches, Jenny Bullard, English teacher and golf coach, accepted the head coach position for the bowling team. The first-year coach led the Bruisers to a region runner-up title, and four individuals—Olivia Hoodenpyle ’20, Cora Long ’19, Emma Prostko ’20, and Abby Worlen ’19—advanced to compete at the TSSAA state tournament. “At the end of the regular season, the girls bowled extremely well under pressure to earn the state berth,” Bullard says. “As my first year with the bowling team, I was impressed with the level of talent and the individual improvement of the girls over the course of the season.” G P S . E D U G I R L S P R E P A R A T O R Y S C H O O L C O U R T YA R D |

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s g n i n g i ticS

e l h t A

HANNAH KINCER MURFEE JONES

MADDOX BANDY

Lipscomb University Tennis

TAYLOR FLOYD

CARLEY BRAMAN

Tusculum College Lacrosse

Georgia Southern University Cross Country

Washington and Lee University Track & Field

University of North Carolina at Greensboro Softball

HALEY SMITH

ANNA SALISBURY

Berry College Soccer

EMMA MOORE BROOKE MCCURDY

KATE SCHLEGEL

College of Wooster Swimming

Tennessee Tech University Softball

Huntingdon College Volleyball

Maryville College Basketball

CONNECT @BRUISERATHLETICS BE SURE TO FOLLOW GPS ATHLETICS ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER, AND INSTAGRAM.

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@BRUISERSPORTS @GPS_ATHLETICS

SHELBY WALTERS

Duke University Softball


GPS and McCallie’s joint production of the musical MARY POPPINS soared to new heights with nearly sold-out crowds each performance. According to Musical Director Mike Lees, presenting Mary Poppins was one of his most challenging tasks to date. “It was such a pleasure to serve as the director for this year’s musical, which was the largest endeavor I’ve tackled over my 30-plus-year career,” Lees says. “I count myself fortunate to have had such a talented production team, which made this show a definite audience pleaser.” The production was led by the talented Darby Breedlove ’18 as the title character along with several seniors, all of whom contributed to pull off a fantastic weekend of performances.

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MOTION MAKERS is the Middle School dance ensemble led by Laurel Moore Zahrobsky ’90, dance teacher. At their winter concert, students performed pieces set to choreography by Zahrobsky. Using the knowledge and vocabulary gained throughout the year, the girls choreographed and performed their own dances for their May concert.

The creativity and passion of our youth is the future of our culture.” —CATHIE AULT KASCH ’72, DANCE TEACHER & PERFORMING ARTS COORDINATOR

GPS and McCallie's joint SPRING CHORAL CONCERT was the perfect welcome to warmer weather and the promise of summer. The May 3 evening concert, held in Frierson Theatre, showcased GPS Singers, GPS/McCallie Coordinate Choir, Senior Ensemble, and Middle School Girls Choir. Students from Middle and Upper School sang a variety of music from classical to covers. One number, performed by GPS Singers, was a medley from Sister Act. Charlotte Smith ’18 choreographed the number while Grace Brody ’19 sang the solo. Other program vocal soloists included Smith and Addie Youmans ’21.

Directed by Mary Baxter, Orchestra Director, the SPRING ORCHESTRA CONCERT featured the many performing groups GPS has to offer: Sixth/Seventh Grade String Class, the Middle School Advanced Orchestra, GPS/McCallie MS Wind Ensembles, GPS Senior Orchestra, GPS/McCallie Honors Orchestra, and the McCallie Wind Ensemble. A favorite of the night, performed by the Middle School Advanced Orchestra and the Honors Orchestra, was the specially flavored “Asturias” by Albeniz, a piece originally written for guitar and named for a region in Spain. The minor mode, quick pace, and flourishes of the flamenco piece all created a wonderful musical picture. This was the last orchestra performance for three GPS seniors: Margaret Lim, Jordan Pauldin, and Gabbi Adasme. Lim plans to attend Duke University this fall and play violin in college. “Music has helped me learn to be a problem solver, gain confidence, and connect with others,” she says.

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Lim was the featured senior soloist on the Vivaldi’s Four Seasons “Spring” violin concerto. In preparation, the Upper School strings were given a masterclass rehearsal with Dr. Ann Rylands, Juilliard graduate and violin teacher, to study baroque bowing styles and dynamic contrast.

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Pauldin has played the viola for seven years and will attend Savannah College of Art and Design. Even though she doesn’t plan to play in college, “Music will still be important to me because it has helped me grow,” she says. “It has shaped me into the woman I am today.”

Headed to Spain to study at IE University, Adasme plans to take several of her musical instruments with her. “Music has always been an important way for me to express my feelings,” she says. She will play either in a club or just for fun.


35 Years of the Dress

STUDENTS FROM AP 3D, 2D, DRAWING/PAINTING, and college portfolio classes had the opportunity to display their artwork during a three-week exhibit held in February at Chattanooga WorkSpace. The Open Studio Night kickoff event gave the girls an opportunity to be present with their art, mingle with more than 300 guests, and receive feedback for their work as well as interact with professional artists in the space. “The girls and their work were just fabulous,” said Kathy Lennon, Director of Operations at WorkSpace. “It’s great to partner with GPS and allow the students to step outside their school and display their work in a gallery.”

Those displaying their works included, under the instruction of Julie Deavers, AP 2D students junior Carter Davenport and seniors Mia Bertani, Ellie Edwards, Meher Memon, Anna Salisbury, Anna-Blair Self, and Meg Sikes. The AP Studio Drawing seniors were Abbey Hegwood, Blythe May, Phoebe Mills, Kate Peele, and Reagan Sanborn. The College Portfolio seniors included Eliza Diamondidis, Jordan Pauldin, Ivana Robinson, and CeCe Turner. Under the instruction of Isabel Bryan McCall ’69 were AP 3D seniors Ameera Bhatti, Avery Campbell, Hollis Gaffney, Carolyn Kline, Kate Schlegel, Neely Thomas, and Abby Walden.

UPPER SCHOOL DANCE ENSEMBLE is comprised of students in grades nine through 12 who are interested in learning more advanced techniques and original professional choreography. Fall of 2017 brought a special chance to learn from Daniel Gwirtzman, the artistic director of a New York-based modern dance company. They performed his original work “Shake, Rattle, and Roll” during the February performance for the student body. Second semester focused on learning the technique of modern dance pioneer Erick Hawkins.

CONNECT FOLLOW GPS FINE & PERFORMING ARTS ON FACEBOOK, INSTAGRAM, AND TWITTER.

ISABEL BRYAN MCCALL ’69 capped off her 30-year career at GPS with an art exhibit displaying a variety of her artwork—clay sculptures vases, her Cloud and Party Series, the Three Graces, and “35 Years of The Dress.” As part of Alumnae Weekend in April, McCall’s friends and family gathered at Founders House to celebrate the opening of her art exhibit in GPS’s Frierson Theatre Lobby and to honor her brilliant career as an artist and teacher. McCall is known for taking ordinary pieces of clothing—some worn by her family members—and dipping them in resin to then paint and patina to transform them into warm, rich pieces of sculpture. Her works remained on display through the end of the school year.

TERPSICHORD kicked off a semester full of dance with their Spring Concert titled “Chiaroscuro,” defined as an effect of contrasted light and shadow created by light falling unevenly or from a particular direction on something. The concert displayed works choreographed by Terpsichord members and featured guest artists. Terpsichord showcased many different styles of dance such as jazz and contemporary as well as dances influenced by bachata and flamenco.

“The creativity and passion of our youth is the future of our culture, and this performance showcased those very things,” said Cathie Ault Kasch ’72, Terpsichord Director and Performing Arts Coordinator. “A wide variety of movement, message, and music was represented in this concert.” Kasch is assisted by Laurel Moore Zahrobsky ’90, who was her student as a junior and senior at GPS.

@GPSFINEPERFORMINGARTS @GPSFINEPERFORMINGARTS @GPSFINEARTS

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GPS Excels at Statewide Math Contest

Eleven from the Class of 2018 were honored with the highest academic accolade bestowed upon a Girls Preparatory School student—membership in Cum Laude. In the formal installation, each girl was introduced by a GPS faculty or staff member of her choosing—one of the highest honors for a teacher. Welcome to Cum Laude, young women of diverse talents, brave souls, kind hearts, and curious minds! 2018 CUM LAUDE INDUCTEES College Choice | Faculty Mentor: MARY MARGARET ARROWSMITH Davidson College (NC) | Bryant Haynes KHADIJA ASLAM Fordham University (NY) | Jill Pala Pieritz ’97 PIERSON BROWN American University (DC) | Diane Walker MURFEE JONES Washington and Lee University (VA) | Callie Hamilton MARGARET LIM Duke University (NC) | Dr. Ralph Covino MEG MARSHALL University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | Corrie White MEHER MEMON University of Tennessee, Knoxville | Katy Berotti RITIKA MODI University of Miami (FL) | Jenise Gordon TATIANA POGGI Tulane University (LA) | Cathie Ault Kasch ’72 KATE THEL University of Notre Dame (IN) | Sue Bartlett LIBBY WELBORN Wake Forest University (NC) | Caroline Carlin

Twenty-five GPS students participated in the Tennessee Mathematics Teachers’ Association math contest. Our students accounted for nearly all top 10 finishes by girls. The competition allows Tennessee public, private, and parochial high schools to test students' knowledge, skills, and mastery of mathematics for preeminence in their region and state.

»

Around GPS

Welcome to Cum Laude!

Sisters from Spain GPS hosted its first ASSIST student this year, 11th-grader Maria Soldevilla-Garcia from Zaragoza, Spain. ASSIST is a nonprofit, international, educational, and cultural exchange organization based in the United States and is active in more than 20 countries. Its core work is to identify, place, and support outstanding international students on one-year scholarships at leading American independent secondary schools. Our ASSIST students live with host GPS families (one per semester) who provide not only housing, but also a cultural immersion by including them in their day-to-day lives. Like every new GPS girl, Soldevilla was welcomed into the sisterhood with open arms as classmate Gracyn Davis ’19 made sure she learned her way around campus. “She took me around to my classes,” Soldevilla said, “and I became part of her friend group.” When asked about her experience, she said she’ll miss the friendships she’s made at GPS, and will keep in touch via social media and FaceTime.

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S  oldevilla spends her time between

Pictured, from left, front row: Katy Berotti, Murfee Jones, Kate

classes

Thel, Margaret Lim, Pierson Brown, and Corrie White. Middle

studying with

row: Sue Bartlett, Caroline Carlin, Cathie Ault Kasch ’72,

her friends in

Khadija Aslam, Ritika Modi, Tatiana Poggi, Jill Pala Pieritz ’97,

the Holland

Jenise Gordon, and Dr. Ralph Covino. Back row: Diane Walker,

Library.

Callie Hamilton, Meg Marshall, Mary Margaret Arrowsmith, Libby Welborn, Meher Memon, and Bryant Haynes.

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Our second ASSIST student, Laura from Spain, will join the junior class in August for the 2018-19 academic year. Here she is with her parents in her new Bruiser photo. We can’t wait to meet and welcome her to GPS.

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C O U R T YA R D


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GPS students in Mumbai, India for Winterim.

Here’s to the Ring We Wear for Her! The GPS RING, the ultimate symbol of GPS SISTERHOOD

Moments after the shutter closed on the last official 2017-18 all-school photo, students were asked to shout “The Ring We Wear for Her,” as a banner unfurled from the Middle School balcony announcing the arrival of the GPS class rings for our juniors. The Class of 1927 was the first class to wear the distinctive black onyx stone topped with the GPS crest on a ring of gold or silver with filigree, and GPS alumnae are quick to recognize the iconic symbol across the world.

« Juniors Emily Morrison and Charlotte Vance

Winterim In February, GPS students spent time outside their usual classrooms in Winterim. Sixth-grade students helped serve our community and participated in a Design Thinking Challenge. Seventh-graders traveled to the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Eighthgraders took on the cities of the South with a four-day tour, beginning in the Scenic City, then traveling to Birmingham and Atlanta. Upper School students could choose to “Stay Local” or “Hit the Road.” Seniors either traveled to Walt Disney World or participated in the other offerings: ACT-SAT Test Prep | Appalachian Folk Arts & Heritage | Forfar Field Station on Andros Island | Farm to Table | Day Hiking | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Museum and the University of Georgia Veterinary School | Dude Ranch in Arizona | East Coast College Tour | Film Camp | Driving School | Mumbai, India | Lifeguard Certification | World Language | MindBenders | Money Management | NYC Terpsichord | Wilderness First Aid and Training

National History Day Competition

Schoolwide Participation in MLK Day of Service Makes GPS Among Largest Groups to Serve

As part of their history classes, all GPS freshmen completed a project that adhered to this year’s theme of Conflict and Compromise in history and presented it to a panel of in-house judges. The winners then advanced to the Southeast Tennessee regional competition. Annie Thrash ’21 won the Margaret Lindsley Warden Prize for Best Project in Women’s History and went on to compete at Nationals. GPS freshmen Morgan Brown, Maggie Parsley, Astha Sinha, and AnnaKate Stipanov also took home medals. Following their stellar performance at the school level and a first place finish in the Senior Group Documentary category at the regional competition, their documentary, “Science, Journalism, and Activism: The Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906,” was awarded third place at the state level.

GPS students, faculty, and staff partnered with more than 30 area nonprofit agencies and organizations across Chattanooga on January 15, in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service. Amal Ali ’19 represented GPS at the citywide kickoff event on the campus of UTC, where she read from Dr. King’s last speech. Some of the organizations GPS partnered with include: American Cancer Society | Chambliss Center for Children | Girls on the Run | Hospice of Chattanooga | Humane Educational Society of Chattanooga | Lookout Mountain Conservancy | Lula Lake Land Trust | Maclellan Island Clean Up | Reflection Riding Arboretum & Nature Center | Salvation Army | Sew2Serve at Glenwood YFD Center | Widow’s Harvest Ministries | YMCA | Women’s Fund of Greater Chattanooga

» GPS students volunteer at Lookout Mountain Conservancy.

CONNECT

VISIT GPS.EDU/NEWS FOR THE LATEST CURRICULAR AND COCURRICULAR HAPPENINGS.

G P S . E D U G I R L S P R E P A R A T O R Y S C H O O L C O U R T YA R D |

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of the Hall Contributed by

Pamela Hammonds,

The 2018 Faculty Emeriti Inductees GPS WELCOMES TO THE ESTEEMED COMPANY OF RETIRED FACULTY THOSE WHOSE LEGACIES LIVE ON IN THE LIVES OF THEIR STUDENTS AND THE FACULTY WHO SERVED AMONG THEM.

GlenVey

HISTORY TEACHER, 1988-2018 BA CLASSICAL CULTURE, JD, UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA HOMETOWN: ALBANY, GEORGIA

W

hen faced with a less-than-fulfilling career as an attorney, Glen Vey took the advice of a wise woman—his wife and GPS alumna the Honorable Shelley Rucker Vey ’76—and applied for and accepted a teaching job at her alma mater. Although his foray into education might have not been planned, the decision to teach history turned out to Secret be one that would not only change his life but also the motivational thousands of girls who took his class.

tool

Over the next three decades, Vey would teach, coach, advise, counsel, sponsor, and mentor his students and colleagues. When the textbook he used proved to not keep pace with his teachings, he wrote his own digital version, embedding within it links to websites and videos. Whatever tools helped his girls learn best—video clips from YouTube, pop songs, Disney movies, online maps, props, costumes, applications, treats— he fervently employed and created indelible teaching moments and memories along the way. “When it comes to Glen Vey, there is no song, pun, or truly terrible dad joke too bad to be left out of his educational toolbox,” says his son Alex Vey. “At the same time, there is no effort too great when it comes to helping students learn. Though this be madness, yet there is method in it. His teaching, in the end, reflects himself: a little ridiculous, but a lot passionate, compassionate, and devoted to his craft.”

Oreos

Michal Howick ’03, and Anne Exum


First thing I did after retiring SLEPT UNTIL 9 AM

What I’ll miss most about GPS

THE GIRLS, MY COLLEAGUES

SUMMER JOB ONCE HELD: Laborer in peanut butter factory FAVORITE CLASSROOM PROJECT: The girls had to analyze and research historical events behind the lyrics in the song “We Didn’t Start the Fire” by Billy Joel. I COLLECT: Lord of the Rings miniature figures, part of a game that I played with my son. WHEN I CLEANED OUT MY CLASSROOM, I FOUND: my old Latin teaching notebook from my first year at GPS. SECRET TALENT: gourmet cook FOR FUN, I LIKE TO: work on my model railroad layout.

Glen always had a plan and knew exactly the way he wanted it to play out. However, when he realized the girls were going in a different direction, he would throw away his original idea and go their way.” —LAUREL MOORE ZAHROBSKY ’90, GPS DANCE TEACHER

We Bid a Happy Retirement to

JIM KREIS DIRECTOR OF FACILITIES, 1990-2017 HOMETOWN: JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

O

ne can only imagine the breadth and scope of transformations Jim Kreis oversaw during his 28 years as GPS Director of Facilities. Some of his major projects included the construction of the Mills Complex, Davenport Middle School, Visions Center (boathouse), and The Ben (student center) as well as the addition of the Lupton Drive athletic fields. Throughout his career, he and his crew completed renovations of buildings, classrooms, and offices— including the dining hall and repurposing the business office to house Girls Preparatory School’s Cadek Conservatory of Music. When asked what he did at GPS, Kreis would say, “I’m responsible for everything but academics and the business office.” And there is truth in that. The day-to-day life at GPS for him and his team included constant attention to our grounds; campus prep for the next activity, event, or happening; and more. His enthusiasm and support of GPS and the relationships he formed are where his impact was felt—not seen—the most. If not driving the Bruisers (in one of the many buses in the GPS bus fleet he added during his time here) to an athletic contest, you could bet he wasn’t far behind in his own truck, making the trip to cheer on our studentathletes. He was and still is one of the Bruisers’ biggest fans. His warm and friendly nature, sweet smile, and willingness to step in and help whenever and wherever he was needed made him a campus dad, granddad, cheerleader, greeter, and friend. Upon his arrival, there were only SIX telephones on the entire campus. Now every classroom and office has a telephone, not to mention computers and other technology.

May Day requires the setup and takedown of 1,200 chairs; 1,800 for Class Day and Commencement. Just think about how many Jim set up and took down in his 28 years!

One piece of advice he gave his successor, current Director of Facilities Bill Kropff, was “help as many people as possible … the customer is always right!"

“To me, Mr. Kreis was—and still is—like family, and I think most who know him from GPS would feel the same. He genuinely cared about his colleagues, the girls of GPS, and our school. His presence—his friendly face, playful nature, and warmth—made the campus feel like home.” —MICHAL HOWICK ’03

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One of my earliest memories of my mom as an artist is her experimenting on me. She used to wrap me in wet plaster wraps— covering my arms, legs, and face— and instruct me not move until the strips had hardened.” —CLAUDIA MCCALL POLANCICH ’99

Isabel Bryan McCall ’69

ART TEACHER, 1988-2018 | BFA, STRATFORD COLLEGE | HOMETOWN: LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN, TENNESSEE

The granddaughter of a GPS alumna from the first graduating class, Isabel Bryan McCall ’69 might have been destined to be a legacy, but her 30-year teaching career certainly left the greatest impression on these halls. If I hadn’t Additionally, McCall’s aunts, cousins, sister, been a teacher, and daughters Betsey McCall ’95 and Claudia McCall Polancich ’99 are counted I would have among GPS alumnae; she returned here to been an teach when Betsey started seventh grade.

FAVORITE CLASSROOM ASSIGNMENT: Making paper dresses. It’s perfect for girls and allows for a lot of individual expression. My students have amazed me with their creativity and willingness to go beyond parameters of the project.

During her tenure, McCall sponsored the Investment, Art, and Art Honor Society Clubs, and she worked interdisciplinary initiatives such as the Japanese Tea Ceremony and ceramic classes. An accomplished artist, McCall has exhibited her work in several cities—from Chattanooga to Chicago. She received honors from Public Art Chattanooga and the Lyndhurst Foundation, and is known for her artistic medium of transforming ordinary pieces of clothing—some worn by her family members—by dipping them in resin and covering them in a patina.

BEST MEMORY INVOLVING A CLASS ACCOMPLISHMENT: Winning the “On the Fence” competition and the People’s Choice Award, too. Also the year The Investment Club won the stock market competition. I loved going to the training sessions at the Times Free Press. All the teachers taught advanced math classes except for me. I was the only pottery teacher in the room and everyone laughed at me, but we won that year!

art therapist

“Izzy is brilliantly creative,” says Meg Persinger Brock ’79, Fine Arts Department Chair. “She motivates her classes to search for answers and find inspiration in myriad places. She drives them to dig deeper into the thought process for more clarity with their ideas. She nudges them forward to seek solutions to problems, giving them the freedom to take risks—be it a success or a failure. It’s a safe environment, but it’s risk to achieve more enlightenment.”

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CORNERSTONE G I R L S P R E PA R AT O R Y S C H O O L GPS.EDU

BEST MEMORY ON A SCHOOL TRIP: Two Winterim trips to New York where we had surprise blizzards; one with Mary Carrithers and the other with Cathie Ault Kasch ’72. We had a great time ice skating at Rockefeller Center and playing in the snow in Central Park.

I BELIEVE EDUCATION SHOULD BE: more about helping individuals find out about themselves and their strengths and less about limiting their idea of themselves. I wish education was more about instilling the idea that we are always learning, developing, and changing. Education should not be the definer but the facilitator in helping people find out who they are over the period of their lifetime. IN CLOSING: I appreciate my time at GPS and feel fortunate to have known so many girls as they grew into interesting women. I also treasure my time spent with wonderful colleagues.

What I’ll miss most about GPS

SEEING THE EVERYDAY VICTORIES OF STUDENTS


Jane Henegar

First thing I did after retiring

WENT TO SEE OUR OLDEST GRANDCHILD PLAY HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL IN SOUTH CAROLINA

BIBLE TEACHER, 1982-2012 BA, TEXAS CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY | HOMETOWN: TEMPLE, TEXAS

When you least expect it, life has a way of leading you to exactly where you need to be. Some might consider these moments as serendipitous. For Jane Henegar, it was recognizing that God’s hand was leading her to GPS. The former stay-at-home mom, co-owner of a catering company, and food writer had catered the wedding of GPS Bible teacher, Sally Gilman, who suggested she apply for her job. Henegar started teaching at GPS that fall with daughter Emily in tow, a seventh-grader. “I am convinced she bribed (former headmaster) Dr. Nat Hughes with baked goods to put her on the seventh-grade hall so she could be an eyewitness to my awkward seventh-grade life,” says Emily Henegar Estep ’88. Henegar would influence not only her students but also the faculty who served beside her. “Jane taught me about marriage. About parenting. About holding both belief and doubt,” says David Cook, former GPS English teacher, who enjoyed a reciprocal open-door policy with Henegar, often visiting each other’s classrooms or simply listening from the other side of the wall. “I’d find poems on my desk. Notes written in calligraphy. Messages on my phone. Constant encouragement. Thoughtfulness.” FAVORITE CLASSROOM ASSIGNMENT: Everything about teaching Old and New Testament; independent studies in wisdom literature with a dozen or so unique and soulful In my thinkers; gender issues: with McCallie boys and GPS classroom, you’d girls and their “Who Am I?” papers and studies of a marriage papers; global issues: Skype interviews with always find people on the ground around the world, working to rescue and protect women and children.

Quotes

BEST MEMORY INVOLVING A COLLEAGUE: Being on the Faculty Committee, supporting GPS teachers as they worked tirelessly to encourage and challenge their students. Also our daily conversations and collaborative friendships around our calling to work wisely with those wonderful girls. IN CLOSING: Teaching is a holy and wholly absorbing calling. The GPS classroom is a sacred place. GPS girls grow up and shape the world—yes, often in the workplace but centrally in the life-giving homes they create.

Best memory involving a student accomplishment

DISCOVERING THAT SOMETHING FROM CLASS STAYED IN A STUDENT’S MEMORY AND HELPED HER BE WHO SHE WAS CREATED TO BE

Jane helped me find a door into myself by giving me the language for asking questions about who I am, who God is, and what those two things mean for my future. Jane was an amazing model for a confident woman who spoke the truth in love.” —JAMI HASKINS ’10

GPS.EDU G I R L S P R E PA R AT O R Y S C H O O L CORNERSTONE

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Save the Date!

Alumnae Weekend

4s and 9s classes APRIL 12-13, 2019

50th Reunion

Alumnae WEEKEND

Friday evening the Class of 1968 celebrated its 50th

reunion with a special reception at Founders House.

MORE THAN 200 MEMBERS OF REUNION CLASSES 3s AND 8s returned to campus for Alumnae Weekend.

The celebration began with cocktails and appetizers at Founders House, while mingling with classmates and GPS faculty members. Afterward many walked over to the Frierson Theatre to watch the Upper School students from GPS and McCallie present their spring musical Mary Poppins.

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Real Talk

Saturday’s full day of events included breakfast for the classes of ’63, ’58, ’53, and ’48 with Dr. Autumn A. Graves, Head of School, and a Town Hall, moderated by Jenise Gordon, GPS Head of Upper School, where seven students from the Class of 2018 shared their GPS experiences with and fielded questions from alumnae in attendance. Following the Town Hall, three GPS faculty—Jane Heneger, Isabel Bryan McCall ’69, and Glen Vey—were inducted as Faculty Emeriti. (See story beginning on page 30.)

Kicking off Alumnae Weekend Friday morning was “Real Talk,” where selected alumnae spoke to current GPS students on the shared topic of sisterhood, the theme of this school year. Alumnae speakers included: from left, front row, Emma McCallie ’13, Abigail Tester ’08, Casey Caldwell ’08, Meredith MacLean ’08; back row, Sydney Leech ’13, Ali Mena Loughman ’03, Kristen Warren ’13, and Dr. Bindu Bareddy Menachery ’93.

During Saturday’s Awards Luncheon, we recognized the 2018 Notable Alumnae from each reunion class, nominated by their peers, and Rising Stars from the classes of 2008 and 2013. Two notable alumnae were honored with our alumnae awards, and three former student-athletes were inducted into the GPS Athletic Hall of Fame. Class parties held off campus Saturday evening provided more time for alumnae to reconnect with classmates.

GALLERY G I R L S P R E PA R AT O R Y S C H O O L GPS.EDU


Celebrating & Recognizing

2018 Athletic Hall of Fame inductees Claire Bartlett

Women of Purpose

’08 (left) and Kamri Chester Busby ’08 (right) with

Distinguished Alumna Award FRANCES ZWENIG ’63 Before her retirement, Frances Zwenig served as president of the US-ASEAN Business Council Institute. Her long association with the region began as a Peace Corps volunteer in Thailand, and she has worked many years with the U.S. Congress. Zwenig completed her undergraduate degree from the College of William & Mary and earned her master’s degree from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. She also has a juris doctor degree from Duke University School of Law. She received the GPS Lupton Award of Excellence in 1993.

Lupton Award of Excellence VIRGINIA “GIN” JOHNSON JOHNSTON ’53 | Gin Johnston has had three exciting careers: computer programmer, Youth Director at First Centenary United Methodist Church, and Principal and College Counselor at GPS. Her retirement years have brought many new friends of the heart as she tutored juvenile court probationers, mentored in after-school reading programs, befriended prison inmates, and taught the Hardin Sunday School Class at First Centenary UMC.

2018 Notable + Rising Star Alumnae Front row, from left, Anne Hanahan Ford Kimzey ’78, Frances Zwenig ’63,

Gin Johnston ’53, and Claudia Swafford Haltom ’73. Back row, from left, Rachel Davis ’13, Mary Katherine Roark Harbin ’03, Jennifer Vickery ’88, Margaret Cleary Dean ’93, Anna Mittelstadt ’08, and Tish Shomaker Gailmard ’83. Not pictured: Marcie Ulin ’98.

CONNECT

READ MORE ABOUT THESE WOMEN OF PURPOSE AT GPS.EDU/GPSMAGAZINE.

Athletic Director Jay Watts.

Michal Howick ’03 (center) is presented with her award by Susan Crownover (left) and Jay Watts at Chapel.

Athletic Hall Of Fame Inductees MICHAL HOWICK ’03 | Cheerleading Howick was a member of Coed Varsity Blue Crew all four years of Upper School at GPS, cheering for McCallie Varsity Football and GPS and McCallie Varsity Basketball. She was a four-time All-American cheerleader and the first recipient of the Headmaster’s Award for Elite Athletic Performance. She cheered at University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and received a Bachelor of Arts degree. In 2013, Howick was named Director of Cheerleading and Head Coach of Coed Varsity and All-Girls Varsity. She is the Associate Director of Communications and Marketing at GPS. CLAIRE BARTLETT ’08 | Tennis Bartlett played tennis for GPS and led the Bruisers to three TSSAA state team titles, capturing three TSSAA state individual titles. While playing for the University of Florida from 2009 to 2012, her team won both SEC and NCAA championships in 2010 and 2011. She also played tennis for the University of Virginia from 2008 to 2009. Bartlett received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University of Florida. In 2013, she obtained her master’s degree in sport psychology and motor behavior from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Bartlett currently works for USTA Southern as the Tennis Service Representative for Tennessee. KAMRI CHESTER BUSBY ’08 | Softball Busby was a multi-sports GPS athlete, competing in varsity basketball, softball, and volleyball. In softball, Busby contributed to two GPS softball state championship wins her junior and senior years. She was on the 2006, 2007, and 2008 all-state and all-region teams and was a three-time all-city selection and a 2005 honorable mention all-state selectee. Busby went on to play college softball at the University of Memphis. In 2010, she was named Scholar Athlete by the National Fastpitch Coaches Association. She is a registered nurse at Erlanger East Hospital in the ICU.

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ClassNotes 1960S

The Bowling Green Chamber of Commerce recognized JANET PARKS ’60 with the 2018 Athena Award, which celebrates the potential of all women as valued leaders in the community. Over the course of her career at Bowling Green State University, Parks served as an active mentor, helping other women realize their potential. Parks used her skills as a producer and author to show that women’s athletics are just as important as men’s athletics, and she spent her career working to level the playing field.

1970S

LYNN FRIERSON FAUST ’72, “The Lightning Bug Lady,” (Knoxville, Tennessee) wrote Fireflies, Glowworms, and Lightning Bugs, a comprehensive firefly guide for the central and eastern United States, published in 2017. In January 2018, she shared her expertise with GPS biology classes. She serves as an advisory consultant to state and national parks.

Former GPS teacher and Director of Planned Giving CAROL KILLEBREW ’79 begins as head of school in July at Salem Academy, an all-girls school in WinstonSalem, North Carolina, after four years as principal at Ursuline School in New Rochelle, New York.

HILDA SCHMISSRAUTER MURRAY to remember classmate MARSHA BLOYER THIGPEN who died August 9, 2017. Rick Booth, husband of KAKI THORNTON BOOTH, created an iron sculpture that captured the essence of Thigpen.

Classmates honoring Thigpen included, from left, front row: Shannon Pitner, Kaki Thornton Booth, Hilda Schmissrauter Murray, Merry Lynn Doster Cato, Margy Davenport Oehmig, Chris Benz Smith. Middle row: Ann Newell Yungmeyer, Ginnie Graves Martin, Mimi Rogers, Debbe Moses Moredock, Ann Cochran Mullins, Libby McKinney Bailey. Back row: Becky Prestwood Davis, Lynn Frierson Faust, Shelby White Montague, Susan Ingalls Baird (co-host), Sue Peele Steele, Francie Thompson Chambers, Susan Scott LeSourd, Cathie Ault Kasch, Melody Hannah Hardesty, Anne Leader Reason, Julia Anderson.

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DR. ANITA HILL ’81, Chief Scientist for the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, was elected in 2017 as a Fellow to the Australian Academy of Sciences. Her research is in materials and process engineering, specifically in the transport of atoms, ions, and small molecules in condensed matter. She is best known for her work with membranes.

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1 Class of 1972 members gathered at the home of

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1980S

GALLERY G I R L S P R E PA R AT O R Y S C H O O L GPS.EDU

2 DR. MARIE GRIFFITH ’85, (second from left) 2005 Margaret Rawlings Lupton Award of Excellence recipient, connected with classmates SUSAN LANDRESS BECQUET, MICHELLE LEWIS, and CAROL BURNS STONEY during her book signing at Star Line Books in Chattanooga. Griffith, a prolific author, recently published Moral Combat: How Sex Divided American Christians and Fractured American Politics and was featured on NPR’s “Fresh Air.” She is the the John C. Danforth Distinguished Professor in the Humanities at Washington University in St. Louis and directs the John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics. AMY EDGAR SKLANSKY ’89 has published three new children’s books this year: These Little Piggies Go to the Beach, a picture book illustrated by New York Times-bestselling illustrator Christine Davenier, and Sweet Hearts and My Rainbow Surprise, with art by Anna Dunn featuring die-cut graduated pages. She often visits schools to share her books and teach children about the writing process.


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COURTNEY PARE WEIL ’07 has been making jewelry through her business Crafts & Love since 2011 and full-time since 2013. Her line of geometric handcrafted jewelry will be available in all Papyrus Stores in the United States and Canada and sold online.

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1990S

3 USAF Lt. Col. DION ROL AND FLYNN ’91, a 2011 Distinguished Alumna, will be promoted to colonel in her new assignment as chief, Active Guard-Reserve Transition for Headquarters Air Force Reserve Command. She’ll stay at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia. Her promotion ceremony is in July at the Museum of Aviation in Warner Robins, Georgia.

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MONICA HARVEY ’08 attained her architecture license in September and moved to New York City this spring. She’s an architect with Gluckman Tang Architects, which specializes in modern design for museums, galleries, and residential and hospitality projects.

2000S

5 KATIE LOCKERBY GOSS ’00 and her husband, James, opened

BROOKE GOOD BOWLES ’92 founded Triumph in 2007, a Birmingham nonprofit that serves adolescents and adults with developmental disabilities. She stepped into the role of Director of External Affairs to travel throughout Alabama and determine the statewide need for Triumph’s services, plus secure funding for additional resources.

4 ELIZABETH FAIDLEY ’98, a violin teacher at the Manhattan School of Music, draws students from across the country for lessons and evaluations. Her students win national and international competitions, and she has hosted master classes with Sarah Chang, Ray Chen, and Lisa Batiashvili. In addition to her faculty position, she directs and owns The Elizabeth Faidley Studio Co. with seven associate teachers.

River City Pharmacy in Ooltewah in October 2017. The pharmacy offers retail and compounding services, cards and gifts, and free medication delivery. JENNIFER SIKES ’01 visited the NFL Hall of Fame in Ohio with her boss, former NFL Minnesota Vikings quarterback Fran Tarkenton and his family. She works for Tarkenton Financial. TYLER THURSTON JEFFREY ’02 was recognized as an honoree for the 2018 Unbought & Unbossed Awards for Girls Inc. of Chattanooga. She is a construction project manager at Volkert Inc. and is passionate about educating young women who are interested in careers in STEM-related fields. RUCHI VORA KEJRIWAL ’02 has been in India since 2010, when she married Jai Kejriwal. The two met while he was completing his master’s at Georgia Tech. She started her own small fashion line, Pink by Ruchi, and recently joined her husband in their family tea business, Saffron Cup Teamakers, as marketing and communications specialist. EMILY KILLIAN ’06, an actress in Los Angeles, is currently on a Straight Talk Wireless TV commercial. LINDSEY GRUWELL HEADRICK ’07 repeatedly beat the odds as a three-time cancer survivor and is now cancer-free, 20 years after her original diagnosis. She is an oncology nurse and mother to twin daughters.

MEREDITH MACLEAN ’08 attended Auburn University and graduated from Harbert College of Business in Supply Chain Management. She has worked for international logistics innovator Damco, part of the A.P. Moller-Maersk Group, for six years, primarily focused on optimizing human behaviors within the continuous improvement/LEAN management department. CHRISTINA SINGER ’08 accepted a tenure-track position at the University of Tampa as an assistant professor of graphic design. When she met Provost Dr. Stern, he said his sister-inlaw works at GPS—Elizabeth Resnick! ABIGAIL TESTER ’08 graduated with her bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Meredith College in 2012 and this May with her doctorate in analytical chemistry from the University of Tennessee. She currently lives in Knoxville with her son, Henry.

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NATALIE BERG ’09 is an interior architect with local Kansas City firm HIVE Design Collaborative. She recently became NCIDQ-certified, which indicates to clients that she is “highly trained and highly qualified.” Berg loves Kansas City and has connected with GPS alumna Claire Samuels ’10 in the area.

2010S

ALEXANDRA LEA CAVITT ’10 received her doctorate of audiology from The University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) in May. She obtained her bachelor’s from The University of Tennessee, Knoxville in 2014 and her master’s from UTHSC in 2016. She will continue to practice in Chattanooga. SARAH ELIZABETH DAVIS ’10, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in May 2018 with a master’s degree in architecture.

6 JASMINE BROWN ’09 has been named the varsity volleyball head coach at GPS. Her experience as a GPS student-athlete, NCAA Division I volleyball player, high school coach, K2 Volleyball Club head coach, and Division I college coach gives her a wealth of skill and understanding to thrive in her new position. Brown, the oldest of six, was excited to return to Chattanooga to be near family. RACHEL SMITH ’09 is currently a graduate student at the University of California, Irvine. She is working on her doctorate in biomedical engineering. Smith is a teaching assistant and recently received the Most Promising Future Faculty award for her excellence. When she’s not teaching, Smith researches biomedical signal processing. AMANDA WHEELOCK ’09 is the marketing and communications specialist for the Continental Divide Trail Coalition in Golden, Colorado. She previously worked as a community outreach liaison for the Appalachian Trail Conservancy.

COLLEEN MAHN ’10 taught English at a private kindergarten for 18 months in Korea after graduating with a double major. While in Korea, she attended the qualifying rounds for figure skating during the 2018 Olympic Winter Games in PyeongChang. After her teaching contract ended, she traveled for a few weeks before heading to Hanoi, Vietnam, where she started her next year-long contract.

In her fourth year at University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine, ANNA-CARSON RIMER UHELSKI ’10 received the honor of being one of 21 students in her class inducted into the Gold Humanism Honor Society. Each was peer-nominated and then selected by a committee of physicians and medical students who were inducted the previous year.

7 ELLE WIGGINS ’10 is a doctoral student studying clinical neuropsychology at the University of Florida. Wiggins’ research interests include white matter diseases of the aging brain and post-operative cognitive decline. Wiggins was recently awarded one of three Stephanie Nicole Ross Foundation scholarships, which honors the work of its namesake who was dedicated to working with people with neurological conditions. SARAH EVATT ’11 is a registered nurse at CHI Memorial Hospital in Chattanooga.

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SARAH WHITNEY ANDERSON ’12 graduated from Clemson University with a master’s of education degree in counselor education with an emphasis in student affairs. She’s the Assistant Director for Student-Alumni Engagement at Vanderbilt University.

Alumnae, faculty, and former Girls State attendees regularly return to volunteer. This year's counselors at ALA Volunteer Girls State at Lipscomb University (Nashville) included, from left, front row: CAROLINE WEST '16, Suzanne Smartt, RACHEL RAISIN '16, EMILY YOU '14, MARY CHANDLER GWIN '14, and PIERSON BROWN '18. Back row: KATE COMMANDER '04, EMMA MCCALLIE '13, LAURA LAUGHLIN '10, Jenise Gordon, DELANEY SWANN '17, and MEG MARSHALL '18.

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LAUCHLAN DAVIS ’14 took a leave of absence from the University of Virginia and found great inspiration for her artwork on a fourmonth, 1,200-mile hike on the Appalachian Trail. She finished her degree—with a double major in art history and English—this spring and is pursuing painting full-time.

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MARY CHANDLER GWIN ’14 was awarded the Louis Sudler Prize for Excellence in the Creative and Performing Arts at Yale College for her future artistic promise and ambitious body of dances. In May she 10 graduated cum laude with distinction in her major, molecular biophysics and biochemistry. MICHELLE FLEENOR ’14, tennis player at Washington and Lee University, was named The Old Dominion Athletic Conference Player of the Year. She also was ranked the No. 1 player on the allconference team and earned All-American honors in singles from the Intercollegiate Tennis Association. TAYLOR PELS ’14 was named valedictorian at College of the Holy Cross this spring. She majored in chemistry in the Health Professionals Advising Program and is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Alpha Sigma Nu Jesuit Honor Society, as well as a Sheehan Scholar, which awarded her full tuition for four years at Holy Cross. She plans to spend a year in clinical or biomedical research after graduation before pursuing a degree in pediatric medicine.

10 TAYLOR BATTLE ’15, a junior at Tusculum College, started the 2018 softball season with 38 career stolen bases, which ties her for seventh-most in program history, and has now reached the triple digit mark for hits. Battle is majoring in biology and prephysical therapy. LINDSAY RUFOLO ’15 was chosen as one of four lacrosse team captains for the 2019 season at Davidson College. She also received the 2018 Coach’s Award at the team’s end-ofseason banquet.

11 KATHERINE WARD ’15 completed an 18-month mission in Thailand for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. She returned to Brigham Young University in June to complete her degree, where she plans to incorporate the Thai language into her studies. VICTORIA HICKS ’16 completed the first component of Officer Candidate School through a Platoon Leaders Course, a six-week training session that tests candidates mentally, morally, and physically. Upon graduation from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Hicks will earn a commission in the United States Marine Corps. LEXIE KYRIAKIDIS ’16 rowed in the NCAA Rowing Championships Memorial Day weekend with the Jacksonville University Dolphins in the second varsity 8+ boat, which finished fourth in its finals. The Dolphins previously captured the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference title for the fifth consecutive year.

Princeton student AYUSHI SINHA ’16 and three teammates are driving entrepreneurship and social good with their WellPower device. The team built the unit, designed to provide solar-powered water purifiers to communities without access to clean water, as part of the Hult prize competition. While they did not yet advance beyond regionals for the Hult, considered the Nobel Prize for students, they plan to continue developing their product through other accelerator programs. RACHEL RAISIN ’16 was recognized with the Georgia Tech Character and Community Service Award at the Scheller College of Business Undergrad Awards. The award is given to a student who exemplifies the importance of service and demonstrates exceptional character and integrity.

CONNECT

SHARE YOUR NEWS WITH US AT ALUMNEWS@GPS.EDU. JOIN OUR GPS ALUMNAE FACEBOOK GROUP TO CONNECT WITH CLASSMATES AND GPS ALUMNAE.

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Weddings MARGARET WOOD ’081 to Edward Hill LILAS TASLIMI ’042 to Chris Call

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JENNA CAMPBELL ’093 to Guy Dement CATHERINE FIELDS ’08 4 to Jimmy Doster RACHEL MONSEES ’135 to Russ Harwood

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FAERLIE LASSETER ’04 6 to Tyson Hays VICTORIA SMITH ’127 to Tripp Dearman

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ZOE RUSTAND ’16 8 to Grant Sutherland MARY CLAIRE SPANN ’139 to Raymond McLagan

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FROM MARRYING THE LOVE OF YOUR LIFE TO WELCOMING A NEW LIFE INTO YOUR FAMILY—

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Life is Good!

CONNECT

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EMAIL YOUR WEDDING PHOTOS TO ALUMNEWS@GPS.EDU. WERE YOUR GPS SISTERS PART OF YOUR BIG DAY? IF SO, POST YOUR PHOTOS ON FACEBOOK OR INSTAGRAM AND TAG @GPSBRUISERS.

GALLERY G I R L S P R E PA R AT O R Y S C H O O L GPS.EDU

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LEANNE GROSS BRACKIN ’04 a daughter, Mary Nell Brackin 2

SUSAN KENT BRYANT ’05 a son, Follis Smith Bryant

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CARLY RUSSELL DICK ’05

a daughter, Sofia Grace Dick 4

MARGARET DAVENPORT DOUGLAS ’00 a son, Robert “Bobby” McGee Douglas

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BETSY PINCHAK GENTZLER ’00

a daughter, Emily Elizabeth Gentzler shown with big sister Emily, age 3 6

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RUCHI VORA KEJRIWAL ’02 a son, Arjun Kejriwal

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KAYLIN LIMERICK KITTLE ’04 a son, William Pine Kittle

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LINDSAY WATTS MAUNEY ’05

a daughter, Laurel Grace Mauney

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HOLDEN MILLER ’04

a daughter, Addison Noelle Sheriff Not pictured

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SHELTON SWAFFORD CHAMBERS ’01 a daughter, Adira Grace Chambers SALLIE GRAY STRANG CLAYTON ’98 a son, John Hicks Clayton SARAH YOUNG JACKSON ’06

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a daughter, Isla Katherine Jackson CATHRYN MCGILL JOHNSON ’05 a daughter, Evelyn Page Johnson EMILY YATES NELLIGAN ’01

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a son, Arthur Jacob Nelligan

CONNECT

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WE LOVE SEEING PHOTOS OF GPS BABIES. PLEASE SHARE NEWS OF YOUR BUNDLE OF JOY BY EMAIL: ALUMNEWS@GPS.EDU.

Babies

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MARY HASKINS KING ’41 of Greensboro, North Carolina, passed away March 11. A graduate of Sweet Briar College, King was a devoted mother and grandmother, an active member of First Presbyterian Church, a sustaining Junior League member, and part of many other organizations.

2 ADELAIEDE HURST BRINKLEY ’46 died December 17, 2017, in Greensboro, North Carolina. She was an active member and adjunct chaplain at Holy Trinity Episcopal Church. Brinkley was a native of Lookout Mountain and graduated from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and from UNC Greensboro with a master’s degree in education. She was active in her community, in the American Red Cross, in the Greensboro Junior League, and as a counselor at a mental health center and cardiac rehab facility.

3 PEGGY LIBERMAN OSHER ’47 of Portland, Maine, died May

22. She had a lifelong interest in fashion and design. She met her husband, Dr. Harold L. Osher, when she was a sophomore at Wellesley College. Throughout her life she was a patron of the arts and committed community servant, pioneering art education in public schools and serving on the Portland Museum of Art board for more than 50 years.

4 SHIRLEY DEAKINS ’49 passed away January 21, in West Palm

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Beach, Florida. She earned her nursing degree in 1981. Active in Habitat for Humanity of Northeast Georgia and Chattanooga, she was a past member of Christ Episcopal Church in South Pittsburg.

5 DR. CAROL WILLIAMS ’49 passed away January 22. Throughout

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6 MELCENA BURNS JOHNSON ’50 of Athens, Georgia, died

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her medical career as an OB-GYN, she advocated the importance of preventive clinic care for women and low-income families. She was the first woman president of St. Louis Metropolitan Medical Society and the president of the Missouri State Medical Association. Dr. Williams was deeply spiritual and pursued a master’s degree in theology. She served on the boards of GPS and the Aquinas Institute and was an associate of the Adrian Dominican Sisters.

April 11. She attended the Cadek Conservatory and graduated from the University of Chattanooga. Johnson taught drama and speech therapy and was an active community member throughout her life.

7 MARY BEVERLY FURLOW-CLEARY ’51 of Chattanooga, died December 24, 2017. A lifelong learner and educator, Cleary’s many accomplishments, memberships, and awards demonstrate what she gave to her family, community, and world. She served on the boards of the Chattanooga Symphony, United Fund, and the Girls Scouts, and she was a member of DAR, Mensa, and the International Society for Philosophical Enquiry, in addition to other groups.


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FORMER FACULTY, KEN AKIN STAFF & JANE HAWKINS ROBERT S. LYONS TRUSTEES 8

MARGARET “PEGGY” RAULSTON EVANS ’54 of Elberton, Georgia, passed away January 12. She received her master’s in early childhood education and was a member of Elberton First United Methodist Church, Mary Freeman Sunday School Class, and Chi Omega Sorority at the University of Tennessee.

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BARBARA TURNER LONG ’54 of Chattanooga passed away April 8. She had a long career at the Better Business Bureau in Chattanooga, from which she retired as vice president in 2001. She studied early childhood education and worked with children after retiring. Long loved traveling and was a talented painter and banjo player.

10 JOYCE ROGERS MARTIN ’57 passed away December

30, 2017, in Longwood, Florida. She grew up in Red Bank and attended Baylor University, where she met her husband of 59 years, Malcom M. Martin.

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FRANCES “FRANCIE” MCAFEE RYDER ’63 of Chattanooga passed away February 28. She was an active member of Burks United Methodist Church and served as executive officer of the Greater Association of Realtors for more than 20 years and served a total of 27 years with the organization.

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GINNIE GILMAN HARRIS ’67 of Chattanooga passed away April 17. She taught French in many capacities, including at Notre Dame High School and Baylor. After retiring she taught an adult language class and gave tours of Chattanooga.

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MARSHA BLOYER THIGPEN ’72 died August 9, 2017. A resident of Ripley, Ohio, she was a graduate of The Ohio State University and was self-employed.

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LEANNE POLSTON ’76 died June 4. She attended Rhodes College and graduated from Vanderbilt University with a degree in sociology. She was a member of First Baptist Church, the Media Library Council, and served as a volunteer for several years.

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JOAN “JOANIE” MASINGILL BROWN ’78 of Fulshear, Texas, passed away on April 14, 2017. She and her husband, Mike, embraced the gypsy life of the oil business, moving nine times. An exceptional wife and mother, she extended kindness to all, developing lifelong relationships all over the world.

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AMY HOLLAND ROMEO ’80 of Charlotte, North Carolina, passed away March 9. She was a certified public accountant and active in the Junior League of Charlotte and other volunteer organizations.

11 MARY ALEXANDRA “ALEX” MOTT HIRSCH ’58

of Chattanooga passed away December 22, 2017. A homemaker and nurturer, she loved her family dearly and prioritized their needs. All of her family members knew the sweetness of her caring.

12 NANCY BROWNE MACLELLAN ’58 of Lookout

Mountain died May 21. She attended Vanderbilt University. She was a devoted wife, mother, grandmother, and sister, and served her family and community with a humble spirit.

13 HELEN DEAN SHEWELL ’62 of Chattanooga passed

away March 26. She graduated from the University of Chattanooga and worked at Buster Brown Apparel until 2003. She attended First Presbyterian Church.

14 ANNE MORROW MCGARY ’63

passed away April 29. She graduated from Bristol University and worked for government organizations while living in Florida. She loved dancing and playing music, two of her lifelong passions. An avid tennis and pickleball player, she was also committed to animals, volunteering, and hospitality.

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KRISTI JONES ’89 of Chattanooga passed away May 10. She attended Erskine College, where she played soccer and softball.

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CANDICE COOLEY ’01 died at her home in Cordova, Tennessee, on January 2. She was a licensed physician assistant and built a distinguished career providing compassionate healthcare. She recently joined Delta Sigma Theta Sorority and was a member of Mississippi Boulevard Christian Church in Memphis.

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ID THOSE BRUISERS DO YOU RECOGNIZE THE BRUISERS IN THIS PICTURE? The GPS Athletic Association fostered friendly intramural competitions between students. With tournaments in shuffleboard, volleyball, softball, ping-pong, line soccer, and more, the Athletic Association’s goal was to encourage school spirit, fair play, and sportsmanship with the winning team announced at the end of the school year. Can you name these three students who served as captains of the Blue and Black teams?

THEY ID’d THOSE BRUISERS!

Congratulations to Chris Benz Smith ’72, Lynda Minks Hood ’76, and Karen Burns ’72, who won GPS mugs from The Bow. They were the first to correctly identify the girls in the photo from our Winter 2018 issue of Blueprint as, from left, (back) Karen Newton Burns and Cathie Ault Kasch, (front) Becky Prestwood Davis and Lolly Ballard Durant, Class of 1972, who were rehearsing the dance Aztec Legends.

CONNECT SEND YOUR BEST GUESS TO ALUMNEWS@GPS.EDU AND YOU MAY WIN A GIFT FROM THE BOW!

CAT-RAT RECONNECT In the winter 2018 issue of Blueprint, we featured Cat-Rat pairings and asked our readers to share their Cat-Rat stories. Here is an excerpt from our favorite submission—a Cat-Rat connection that has lasted more than six decades: My Cat-Rat relationship has been a memorable and long-lasting one. In 1951 when I entered the school, my Cat was Ann Martin Woody. She made me feel welcome as I had entered in eighth grade when most classmates had entered a year before. I remember when Ann, in her beautiful dress, walked in May Day and graduated at the end of my first year at GPS. Ann and I reconnected as I returned for my 25th class reunion. I have stayed in Ann’s home on visits to Chattanooga on several occasions and followed her family’s journey as she has followed mine. On my visit for my 60th reunion, there was my dear Cat, Ann, present for the reunion and also to meet my daughter. For years we have exchanged Christmas cards. Our paths continue to cross 60 years later. JANE EAGAR LAMKIN ’55 | Smyrna, Georgia

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Jane Eagar Lamkin ’55

Ann Martin Woody ’51


W

hen the roots of GPS sisterhood take hold, they spread and remain steadfast for generations. Such is true of the Bridgers-Jackson family.

The seed was first planted when Mae Betty Bridgers ’34 became a GPS girl. “Mother went to GPS and wanted the same for me,” says Carolyn Bridgers Jackson ’61, “and I’m very glad she did.” She says her GPS education gave her an overall feeling of knowing the right way to do things. “Once I gave my Chapel Talk, I felt I could talk in front of anyone,” she says. “I felt prepared for life.” Jackson went on to graduate from Emory University.

Amanda Thompson Jackson ’97

And while Carolyn didn’t have a daughter, she did gain a daughter-in-law who is a GPS alumna when her son, Keith, married Amanda Thompson Jackson ’97. “I’m surrounded by Bruisers,” says Keith of his wife, mother, and late grandmother. While the family does not currently have a GPS student enrolled, their commitment to the institution remains strong. “We see giving to GPS as an investment in our community, the future of our daughter, and the legacy of our family,” Keith says. Carolyn set up an endowment in honor of her mother; Keith and Amanda joined a Giving Circle.

Amanda Thompson Jackson ’97 with her husband, Keith, and two children.

Impacting Lives & Community By Pamela Hammonds

When you educate a girl, you educate your community.” —A MANDA THOMPSON JACKSON ’97

CONNECT FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT GIVING CIRCLES, THE IMPACT FUND, OR ESTABLISHING A TRUST, PLEASE CONTACT LISA REYNOLDS SHANAHAN ’83, DIRECTOR OF THE IMPACT FUND, AT LSHANAHAN@GPS.EDU.

Carolyn Bridgers Jackson ’61

THROUGH GIVING

Mae Betty Bridgers ’34

“I knew that Mother encouraged every young girl to have the GPS experience,” Carolyn says. “After her death we set up a fund for scholarships in her and our names because GPS was very dear to her. I want the legacy to go on and want (granddaughter) Jillie to go one day.”

feel a commitment to giving. “Life can be so confusing,” Amanda says. “It’s fast paced with constant information, and true, deep, meaningful connections seem to be missing. When something you believe in is important to you and part of your core values, it’s important to stay connected to it.”

More than 50 years after graduating from GPS, Carolyn remains close to many of her classmates. They meet for lunch, take trips to the beach, and even celebrated a joint 75th birthday with 19 in attendance. “The relationships I made at GPS are still very special to me,” she says. “I don’t have the same connection to my college friends. Even though we’ve gone different ways, we have shared memories and have remained a sisterhood even today.”

GPS depends on Giving Circle members for a threeyear commitment to supporting the Impact Fund. “Giving Circles undergird our financial outlook and allow the school to plan more strategically,” says Lisa Reynolds Shanahan ’83, Director of the Impact Fund. “This expression of confidence and support makes a real difference in what we can do for our girls.”

That sisterhood helped Amanda feel an immediate connection to the family. “I never expected to marry someone with a GPS connection,” she says. “It was so neat to have that bond with his mother and grandmother as GPS alumnae.” Amanda says both she and Keith were blessed with wonderful parents and great childhoods; those gifts are part of their hope for all children in Hamilton and Bradley counties. Through service to their communities and supporting worthwhile causes, they

Joining a GPS Giving Circle gives Amanda and Keith an ongoing association to the school. “Our hope is for every child in our community to have an opportunity for a great education,” Amanda says. “I strongly believe when you educate a girl, you educate your community and the future. The effect goes well beyond that one girl who may benefit from your gift.” “GPS is as strong today as it was 50 years ago,” Keith says. “As a day school, it’s a big part of our community, and its mission to inspire girls and create future leaders is vital to our community.”

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GIRLPRENEURS FIND INSPIRATION AND SUCCESS

By Pamela Hammonds

T

he success of a program is often measured by its impact. Clicks, shares, likes, followers. Page views, event attendance, ticket sales. But sometimes success can be calculated by counting to one.

SAVE THE DATE Girls’ Marketplace December 8 GPS Gym Find unique holiday gifts made by girlpreneurs!

That one girl who decides after selling her book at the Girls’ Marketplace that yes, she can be a successful author. That one girl who wins the 24Hour Generator challenge and now believes in her abilities to try new things. That one girl who connects with a mentor during MBD: Girl Edition and becomes motivated to seek a college degree. Sometimes one is a very big deal. Sometimes one is all that matters. At MBD: Girl Edition, Mighty, Brilliant, and Determined young girls from across the Chattanooga area found entrepreneurial support and inspiration the weekend of March 10-11. The GPS campus was transformed into a venue where girls could put into practice their small business acumen in the Girls’ Marketplace as well as learn from mentors about how to solve real business problems in the 24Hour Generator. “By introducing girls and young women to the concepts and skills related to entrepreneurship, we are opening doors of opportunity they’ll use throughout their lives,” says GPS Head of School and MBD Founder Dr. Autumn A. Graves. “Entrepreneurship skills can drive success in corporate positions, nonprofit leadership roles, and in managing busy careers and home life. As women cycle in and out of careers, entrepreneurship provides income options with added lifestyle flexibility.”

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This fall GPS will help girls take their entrepreneurial efforts to the next level by hosting the Girls’ Markeplace in December to help increase their potential for sales during the holiday shopping season. In order to ensure they are well-prepared, pre-event workshops will help hone their sales techniques, booth presentations, and business skills.

This event really does make a difference in the lives of the girls who attend.” —MELODY BEAVERS, BUSINESS TEACHER AT LAKEVIEW–FORT OGLETHORPE HIGH SCHOOL

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Parents learned how to best support their

girls' business journeys in workshops.

Dozens of booths lined the gym with

products and services made and offered by #girlpreneurs. The Chattanooga Public

ThreatAdvice, far left, and facilitated by Toyin Lanade with the Enterprise Center, second from right, next to Dr. Graves.

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Along with mentors and facilitators, teams of high school girls

Library offered marketplace workshops prior

worked together for 24 hours by employing CoLab’s model to solve a

to the event to help them with sales techniques,

real-world business dilemma. The winning team took home a $1,000

booth set-up, and product development.

cash prize, donated by First Tennessee Bank.

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The team of girls from area schools wins the 24Hour Generator

medical scrubs. The girls were mentored by Jennifer Skjellum with

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with a pitch to help Aegle Gear increase sales of their athletic-inspired

COLUMNS G I R L S P R E PA R AT O R Y S C H O O L GPS.EDU

FOR MORE INFORMATION, GO TO GETYOURMBD.COM OR FOLLOW ON SOCIAL MEDIA AT @GETYOURMBD.


CONNECT WANT TO SEE MORE PHOTOS? VISIT THIS ARTICLE AT GPS.EDU/ GPSMAGAZINE FOR A LINK TO PICTURES!

Record Turnout at Bruiser Bee OUR SCHOOL’S SIGNATURE FUNDRAISING EVENT DRAWS LARGE CROWD

A buzz was heard ’round Chattanooga on March 10 during GPS’s signature fundraiser, the Bruiser Bee. Held this year at The Westin Chattanooga, the sold-out event featured an adult team spelling bee along with live and silent auctions, plus a DJ-fueled Survive the Hive after-party sponsored by Mountain View Auto Group.

In the end, I BEE Shrunk, a team sponsored by Newnan Psychological Services, took home the winning trophy. Team members included Rick Rivera, Tony Johnson, and GPS alumna Becca Stimson ’73. Generous Bruiser Bee sponsors assisted in funding the event. Major sponsors included Mountain View Auto Group and First Tennessee Bank, which sponsored the VIP Experience. Those with VIP tickets received a piece of Prentice Hicks hand-blown artisan glassware and enjoyed an open bar.

More than 20 team of three took the stage to compete for the title of Chattanooga’s best spellers as well as enjoy the fun and philanthropy of the evening. Teams embraced the spirit of the competition with names such as Lookout Lexicographers, Buzz Kill, Girls Gone Grad, Spell on Wheels, JOIN US FOR and Community Spellebrities—some even decked out in costumes. BRUISER BEE

Save the Date

The spelling competitors consisted of GPS alumnae, parents, faculty and staff, sponsors, and more. One group of spellers even flew in from the East Coast to participate.

Spells Success

MARCH 9, 2019

Returning to emcee the evening’s activities was local talk show host Alison Lebovitz, and Tommy Thatcher served as auctioneer. Jenny Johnston added her special touch to the floral arrangements. Bruiser Bee participants also bid on a number of great auction items, including tickets to a Taylor Swift concert in Atlanta, a hunting trip, and a Nashville dining excursion. All proceeds from the event help make a GPS education accessible to more girls. Currently, GPS girls come from 33 zip codes, and 40 percent receive some form of financial assistance.

Music Makes Me Girls Preparatory School’s Cadek Conservatory of Music hosts individual and group music lessons for people of all ages—from babies to senior adults—because you’re never too old or too young to develop or nurture a love of music. Group classes include internationally acclaimed Kindermusik, the world’s leading provider of music-based education for children from birth through age seven, and Piano Klass Kidz as well as instrumental and vocal lessons for individuals. Qualified, experienced, personal teachers are eager to help you find your forte.

HERE WE GROW! Girls Preparatory School's Cadek Conservatory of Music expanded programming to offer after-school music instruction at The Bright School beginning this fall.

Find Your Forte at Cadek Conservatory of Music! REGISTRATION FOR THE FALL TERM AT EITHER LOCATION— GPS OR THE BRIGHT SCHOOL—IS NOW OPEN! CADEK.ORG | CALL: 423.634.7694 | EMAIL: CADEK@GPS.EDU

G I R L S

P R E PA R ATO R Y

S C H O O L’ S


GIRLS P R E PA R AT O RY SCHOOL

Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Chattanooga, TN Permit No. 110

205 Island Avenue Chattanooga, TN 37405

Here’s to the GIRLS CLASS OF 2018

The Class of 2018 will attend 58

COLLEGES

and universities in 23 STATES, the District of Columbia, and Spain.

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64%

will attend

out-of-state

colleges and universities. The private/public split is 50/50.

77%

were offered MERIT, TALENT, OR ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIPS totaling more than $12 million.

As a class, they accepted nearly $6 million of these scholarships. seniors will continue their sports in college;

5 RECEIVED ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIPS. acceptance rate for the 576 applications submitted to 210 colleges & universities in the U.S. and abroad. VISIT GPS.EDU/HERESTOTHEGIRLS FOR THE FULL VERSION FOR 2017-18.

GPS Magazine | Blueprint Summer 2018  

We hope you enjoy the digital version of Blueprint Summer 2018! As you flip through the pages, look for the areas that highlight to interact...

GPS Magazine | Blueprint Summer 2018  

We hope you enjoy the digital version of Blueprint Summer 2018! As you flip through the pages, look for the areas that highlight to interact...