Issuu on Google+

THE GLOBAL MILLER A monthly review

January 2011


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

2


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011 THE GFMT MARKET PLACE

Analysis & Control Intake and Inline measurement of moisture, protein, temperature, structure, ash, fat, fibre, starch and colour. Recipe management and traceability records.

®

For maximum control and efficiency call:

01473 829188 www.suffolk-automation.co.uk

THE GLOBAL MILLER THE GLOBAL MILLER: A blog dedicated for professionals - including nutritionists - in the transportation, storage and milling of grains, feedstuffs, rice and cereals globally

SILO INSTALATIONS ...

... TO COVER YOUR MARKET NEEDS Ctra. Arenas de San Juan, Km 2.300 13210 Villarta de San Juan - Spain Tel: +34 926 64 05 40 Fax: +34 926 64 02 94 Email: elena.ektova@symaga.com

AquafeedClassified40_2x40mFI

www.symaga.com

In association with Symaga_class.indd 1

03/11/2010 10:3 ®

STYLE CC-XD (XTREME DUTY)

Polyethylene Elevator Bucket

04/01/2011

Secretary Vilsack to urge GE and non-GE coexistence

Complexity surrounds American agriculture today. With the recent announcement of USDA's final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for genetically engineered (GE) Roundup Ready alfalfa and the subsequent meeting to bring together diverse stakeholders for a dialogue, USDA has taken decisive steps toward looking at possible approaches to alfalfa production coexistence that are reasonable and practical. These actions have generated tremendous interest in USDA's and my intentions regarding our ability to objectively regulate GE agricultural products and whether we are focused enough on science. I have tremendous confidence in our existing regulatory system and no doubts about the safety of the products this system has approved and will continue to approve. As a regulatory agency, sound science and decisions based on this science are our priority, and science strongly supports the safety of GE alfalfa. But, agricultural issues are always complex and rarely lend themselves to simple solutions. Therefore, we have an obligation to carefully consider USDA's 2,300 page EIS, which acknowledges the potential of cross-fertilization to nonGE alfalfa from GE alfalfa - a significant concern for farmers who produce for non-GE markets at home and abroad. Read more...

Financial failure of grain elevators hurting Texas farmers

In rural parts of Texas over the past two years, when 16 grain elevators - some full of corn, sorghum, wheat and other grains - abruptly went bankrupt or failed. The nine grain companies that owned the elevators fell victim to the national economic recession, according to the Texas Farm Bureau. Hundreds of farmers statewide have been left clinging to their livelihoods as several million dollars in unsold grain became locked inside the storage facilities, the Farm Bureau said. Several farmers lost tens of thousands of dollars, and many more lost hundreds of thousands.

ELEVATOR BUCKETS & BOLTS

St. Louis, Missouri USA

T:+1 314 739 9191• F:+1 314 739 5880 www.tapcoinc.com

WWW.EXTRUDER.NL / WWW.EXPANDER.NL

Almex b.v., Verlengde Ooyerhoekseweg 29 7207 BJ Zutphen, Netherlands, tel.: +31 (0)575 572666 e-mail: info@almex.nl, internet: www.almex.nl

Buhler AG CH – 9240 Uzwil, Switzerland T: +41 71 955 11 11 F: +41 71 955 66 11 E: milling@buhlergroup.com

www.buhlergroup.com

Buhler Class ad_GFMT10.indd 1

11/12/2009 09:0

A Clondalkin Company

FLEXIBLE PACKAGING

CB Packaging is a market leader of multi-walled paper sacks. With over 50 years of experience, we offer solutions for a wide range of industries, including animal feeds, pet food, seeds, milk powder, flour and root crops.

For more information, please call Tim Stallard: +44 (0) 7805 092067 www.cbpackaging.com

3


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

The Farm Bureau has identified the solvency of grain elevators as a major issue facing the state's farmers, and it wants lawmakers to address it in the upcoming legislative session. One of the largest elevators to fail was in Sherman in 2009. Ben Wible said he lost about US$80,000 worth of milo and corn when Dorchester Grain Co., owned by John Chumbley, was closed. Bryan Black, a spokesman for the Texas Agriculture Department, said the department shut down the operation after inspectors found that the company's ledgers didn't add up. They uncovered a shortage of 648,000 bushels of grain, worth US$4.9 million at current prices. The department also wouldn't let any grain into or out of any of the company's seven facilities in Texas, which could hold more than 4 million bushels. Read more...

EPA weighs shorter pesticide review schedule

EPA officials say the consequences of climate change, such as rising temperatures and shifting precipitation patterns, may require the agency to conduct periodic reviews of pesticides more frequently than the 15year timeframes currently required under FIFRA. The question of whether to modify its review schedule was one of several questions that EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) put to its pesticides Science Advisory Panel (SAP), which met on Dec. 7 to consider the effects of climate change on an array of research and regulatory activities. The panel also considered how climate change would affect the parameters that OPP uses to construct risk-assessment models, the extent to which a changing climate will shift regional crop patterns, the use of historical data in risk assessments and how far back EPA should go in compiling historical data sets to predict future weather patterns. Read more...

January 05, 2011

Adapting agriculture to Climate Change

ROME—The Global Crop Diversity Trust announced a major global search to systematically find, gather, catalogue, use, and save the wild relatives of wheat, rice, beans, potato, barley, lentils, chickpea, and other essential food crops, in order to help protect global food supplies against the imminent threat of climate change, and strengthen future food security. The initiative, led by the Global Crop Diversity Trust, working in partnership with national agricultural research institutes, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR), is the largest one ever undertaken with the tough wild relatives of today's main food crops. These wild plants contain essential traits that could be bred into crops to make them more hardy and versatile in the face of dramatically different climates expected in the coming years. Norway is providing US$50 million towards this important contribution to food security. "All our crops were originally developed from wild species—that's how farming began," explained Cary Fowler, Executive Director of the Global Crop Diversity Trust. "But they were adapted from the plants best suited to the climates of the past. Climate change means we need to go back to the wild to find those relatives of our crops that can thrive in the climates of the future. We need to glean from them the traits that will enable modern crops to adapt to new, harsher and more demanding situations. And we need to do it while those plants can still be found.” Read more...

4


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

Rising food grain requirements is boosting The Agrochemical Market in India

Netscribes (India) Pvt. Ltd, a knowledge consulting Solutions Company, announces the launch of its Agrochemicals Market in India 2011 report. Increasing food grain requirements and pest pressure in farmlands is boosting the overall production capacities in this market thereby providing lucrative opportunities for players. The sector is dominated by multinationals in India with their large production capacities and large number of product registrations. Indian manufacturers are generally formulation producers and generic product producers. Government regulates the market with focus on the ban of use of unhealthy pesticides in India. Growing awareness among farmers will lead to healthy and efficient use of agrochemicals to boost the overall production and consumption capabilities in the country leading to growth in the food grain production. The report begins with an introduction to the agrochemicals market indicating the types of agrochemicals used in India as well as a brief description. It provides an indication of the kinds of pesticide producers in the market. The market overview section provides details about the production levels of pesticides in India. The market size of the agrochemical industry has been highlighted stating the usage of the various types in India. It also includes state-wise consumption of pesticides in India. The import and export market of pesticides has been described stating the requisite figures for the same. Read more...

Grain prices, futures retreat

U.S. cash grain and soybean contracts drifted lower Tuesday, sinking in step with declines in the futures market amid the absence of cash supply movement. Cash basis levels held steady, as most of the market activity for spot supplies was for delivery of inventory that was contracted weeks or months ago. The steady basis is not a surprise in this type of market environment, with no fresh demand push, as end users don't have a great need for additional supplies with contracted sales moving to elevators, said Dave Marshall, independent marketing adviser and commodity broker. Spot bids are moving with futures, as farmers who anticipated cash flow needs in January forward booked sales in the fall, allowing them to take advantage of a carry in the market and shift income from the 2010 tax year to 2011, Marshall said. A lot of action at elevators was from producers picking up checks rather than delivering grain, he added. Cash sources said there is not a lot of movement of supplies, with end users unwilling to bid up prices with forward-booked contracted sales filling the local supply pipelines. Farmers were not presented with any incentives for additional sales, with broad-based losses reported across grain and oilseed futures markets Tuesday. Corn and wheat futures slid two percent and soybeans were down nearly one percent in value Tuesday. Read more...

Finding Food Safety Bill Funding is Next Step

Tuesday, President Obama signed into law the historic food-safety bill.  But now it's time to pay for it so the coalition of food-industry, public-interest and consumer groups that used a public-health message to win its passage must now make an argument for its funding. Funding for the law is in question as Republicans assume control of the House and pledge to shrink not expand the federal bureaucracy.

5


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

Even with tight money, Erik Olson, director of food and consumer safety programs at the Pew Health Group, says this is money extremely well spent to save money over the long run. The Congressional Budget Office estimated the food-safety law would cost about US$1.4 billion in its first five years, including the cost of hiring an estimated 2,000 additional food inspectors. A study released last year by the Produce Safety Project at Georgetown University estimated that food-borne illnesses cost the country US$152 billion a year in medical costs, lost productivity and other expenses, not including costs to the food industry incurred when a product is recalled. Still, Representative Jack Kingston of Georgia, the ranking Republican on the Appropriations subcommittee that oversees the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), says the number of cases of food-borne illnesses in the country does not justify the cost of the new law. The overhaul is designed to shift the mission of the FDA from reacting to tainted food after an illness occurs to preventing outbreaks in the first place. It requires manufacturers and farmers to develop strategies to prevent contamination, then continually test to make sure they work. The legislation also gives the FDA the authority to recall food; currently, it must rely on food companies to pull products voluntarily from the shelves. Read more...

University research makes understanding plant breeding easier

University of Illinois research has resulted in the development of a novel and widely applicable molecular tool that can serve as a road map for making plant breeding easier to understand. Researchers developed a unified nomenclature for male fertility restorer (RF) proteins in higher plants that can make rapid advancements in plant breeding. “Understanding the mechanism by which RF genes suppress the male sterile phenotype and restore fertility to plants is critical for continued improvements in hybrid technology,” said Manfredo J. Seufferheld, U of I assistant professor of crop sciences. To reach this goal, Seufferheld teamed up with post-doctoral researchers Simeon O. Kotchoni and Emma W. Gachomo of Purdue University, and Jose C. Jimenez-Lopez of the Estacion Experimental del Zaidin, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) in Granada, Spain, to develop a simplified genetic-based nomenclature that automatically catalogues the entire RF gene products into families and subfamilies. “Up to now, there has been no unified nomenclature for naming the RF proteins,” Seufferheld said. “As the systematic sequencing of new plant species has increased in recent years, naming has been simply arbitrary. We have had ‘chaos’ in the databases. The RF information in the databases could not be adequately handled in the context of comparative functional genomics.” This new tool will help plant breeders and scientists make decisions more quickly. Breeders can now easily match sterility in plants to male restorer mechanisms. Ultimately, growers may benefit sooner from new developments in plant breeding since breeders will be able to generate new hybrids at a faster pace, Jimenez-Lopez said. Read more...

Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine prolonge the quota regime of grain exports till March 31, 2011 The Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine prolonged the quota regime of grain exports till March 31, 2011, informed the Decree of the Cabinet of Ministers No1182, dd. December 6, 2010, and published on December 28, 2010.

7

THE GFMT MARKET PLACE

A Clondalkin Company

FLEXIBLE PACKAGING

CB Packaging is a market leader of multi-walled paper sacks. With over 50 years of experience, we offer solutions for a wide range of industries, including animal feeds, pet food, seeds, milk powder, flour and root crops.

For more information, please call Tim Stallard: +44 (0) 7805 092067 www.cbpackaging.com

CENZONE TECH INC. 2110 Low Chaparral Drive San Marcos CA92069 USA Tel: 760 736 9901 Fax: 760 736 9958 Web: www.cenzone.com E-mail: cenzone.tech@worldnet.att.net

Croston Engineering Ltd Tarvin Mill Barrow Lane, Tarvin Chester CH3 8JF Tel: 01829 741119 Fax: 01829 741169 E-mail: admin@croston-engineering.co.uk Website: http://www.croston-engineering.co.uk BULK STORAGE, HANDLING, AND PROCESS ENGINEERS FOR THE ANIMAL FEED, GRAIN, FLOUR, BAKERY, HUMAN AND PET FOODS INDUSTRIES


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

The Decree makes alternations to the Decree No938, dd. October 6, 2010, “On confirmation of quota volumes for the certain varieties of agricultural products, which exports to be subject to licensing till December 31, 2010, and adoption of the Order of issuance of the licenses for exports of the certain range of agricultural products and quotas distribution”. The Cabinet of Ministers also increased the quota volumes for wheat exports from 500,000 tonnes to the level of one million tonnes, and maize – from 2 million tonnes to 3 million tonnes. At the same time, the Government excluded seed maize from the quota regime. According to the renewed order of issuance of licenses for grain exports, the distribution of grain export quotas is realized on the basis of the application, provided to the Ministry of Economic Development and Trade by the agent of economic activity during the period of 7 calendar days, instead of 15 calendar days after the official promulgation of the beginning of such application acceptance. Besides, the Decree of the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine No1046 dd. November 10, 2010, “On introduction of alterations to the decree of the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine #938 dd. October 4, 2010” became annulled, according to the reporting Decree. Read more...

January 6, 2011

What we’ve learned from strip-till

Growers are learning there’s no one best way to strip-till. “Strip-tillage means different things to different people,” points out Mark Hanna, Extension ag engineer at Iowa State University (ISU). “It’s attractive to a lot of farmers for various reasons.” In its early days, strip-till equipment was patterned after anhydrous-ammonia applicators, but has evolved to more iron, heavier toolbars and often, down-pressure springs he says. “While strip-till is not a new practice,” says Liz Stahl, Extension educator, University of Minnesota, “It brings together the best of both worlds: the benefits of tillage in the crop row and the benefits of reduced tillage between crop rows.” Its benefits include warmer soil for earlier planting, fuel and labour savings; nutrients placed where they’re needed; residue management; and often, higher yields. In the days of the moldboard plow, a straight furrow was a badge of honour among neighbours. Today’s strip-tillers are no exception. With attachments to place nutrients near the seed row, many growers are now switching to GPS auto-steer so planters match previously laid A-B lines and achieve maximize yields from reduced fertilizer input. “Previously we did not have RTK (real-time kinematic) on our planter tractor,” says Tom Muller, Windom, MN, who’s been strip tilling corn since 1994. “Since we bought it, it’s exceeded our expectations. It even worked on side hills, compensating enough to keep the planter dead on.” Read more...

Dioxin scandal: More feed manufacturers involved in German crisis The dioxin crisis in Germany appears to be escalating and spreading across country borders. The latest information from the German Ministry of Agriculture indicates that over 2,700 tonnes of contaminated materials has ended up with 25 manufacturers of compound feeds.

Hitherto it had been estimated that only 12 manufacturers had been involved – and only 527 tonne was distributed. So far it's unclear whether the latest information will affect the number of livestock farms having to be quarantined as a precautionary measure. Estimations range to at least 1,500 poultry, pig and cattle farms in several states.

8


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

German public prosecution is now investigating whether the North German company Harles & Jentzsch can be prosecuted. This company manufactured fat components for the compound feed industry. It was with this company that the dioxin contamination was discovered. A company's salesman has admitted mistakes have been made during production. Read more...

Lallemand opens new Titan yeast production plant

Lallemand Animal Nutrition has announced the opening of a second yeast coating facility in Passau, Germany, dedicated to the processing of protected yeasts Levucell SB and SC Titan. The new state-of the-art-facility is fully compliant with animal feed quality and safety standards. It has already been successfully audited according to FAMI-QS standard. Until now, protected yeast was produced in Lallemand Vienna’s yeast plant only. The new German facility enables to double the company’s production capacity for quality protected yeasts, in order to address a soaring demand from the market.

Protecting yeasts

Pelleted feed represents a significant part of the animal feed market, attaining from 30 percent to as much as 80 percent, depending on the local country practices and target species,” says Laurent Dussert, ruminant product manager for Lallemand. “Our innovative Titan technology maximises the delivery of live yeast to the host animal when submitted to drastic feed processing conditions, such as pelleting.” Titan is a patented technology developed by Lallemand, which combines an optimisation of the yeast fermentation and drying processes with a unique coating technology. Read more…

A Review: Fruit and Vegetable Phytochemicals: Chemistry, Nutritional Value, and Stability.

ISBN 978-0-8138-0320-3 “It is estimated that one third of the cancer cases and up to half of cardiovascular disease cases are thought to be diet related” (Goldberg 1994). In this 2010 publication, Fruit and Vegetable Phytochemicals - Chemistry, Nutritional Value and Stability written by Laura A. de la Rosa, Emiio Alvarez-Parrilla and Gustavo A. Gonzalez-Aguilar it states, that Some studies have shown that little or no fruit and vegetables in the diet of humans have lead to an increase in some types of cancer and cardiovascular disease. This awareness has lead to increased studies and research into the different components, that are contained within the fruit and vegetables that benefits the health and reduces the risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease.

9


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

10


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

Phytochemicals found in fruit and vegetables, which are naturally occurring, contain anticar-cinogenic components and are referred to as chemopreventers. Known chemopreventers that have been studied are plant polyphenols, pigments such as carotenoids, flavonoids and betalains and some vitamins.

THE GFMT MARKET PLACE

Chapter 2 deals with the Phenolic compounds looking at the chemistry and classification of Polyphenols. The Polyphenols are the most abundant antioxidants in human diet, and they are the secondary metabolites of plants. They are designed with an aromatic ring carrying one or more hydroxyl moieties. Chapter 5 and 6 covers the subject of Flavonoids chemistry and their relationship to human health and some evidence that they contribute significantly to lower risks of cardiovascular diseases and cancer in humans. Based on this reason the US food and drug Administration and Health Canada has allowed health claims for fruit and vegetables that they contribute to lower levels of cardiovascular diseases and some cancers. The importance of Antioxidants and dietary fiber in fruits and vegetables are discussed in chapter 8. It has long been understood that fruit and vegetables are a good healthy option in the diet of humans, due to the fact that they contain high water and are low in fat, also containing vitamins and minerals and a significant amounts of dietary fiber. Chapter 9 discusses the emerging technologies that are being used to extract Phytochemicals, from fruit and vegetables since the old methods of extraction are not efficient. Also it reviews the recent findings on the health benefits of the Phytochemicals found in fruit and vegetables, nuts, seeds and herbs. This publication has a lot to offer in my opinion it covers the subject and the science as well as the new technologies needed to improve the extraction of Phytochemicals, such as microwave extraction (MWE), ultrasonic extraction (UE). For students and scientist alike this is a well-written book that should be on the bookshelf of all good libraries.

Milling Industry Recruitment Specialist www.jcb-consulting.com +44(0)161 427 2402

Block 10 Todd Campus West of Scotland Science Park Acre Road, Glasgow Scotland G20 0XA Tel: +44 141 945 2924 IMD_40x40m_classAD

info@r-biopharmrhone.com www.r-biopharm.com R-Biopharm Rhône Ltd, Unit 3.06 Kelvin Campus, West of Scotland Science Park, Maryhill Road, Glasgow, G20 0SP Scotland Tel: +44 (0) 141 9452924 Fax: +44 (0) 141 9452925 info@r-biopharmrhone.com, www.r-biopharmrhone.com

Competence in Food and Feed Analysis

BiopharmRhoneClass.indd 1

31/03/2010 15:3

Whatever you are looking for in the milling industry? ...

... find it with IMD

January 7, 2011

www.internationalmilling.com

Corn, Soybean Farmers Could Be Rewarded for Participating in Federal Crop Insurance Program The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Risk Management Agency (RMA) announced today that it has published a proposed rule in the Federal Register that would reward farmers participating in the federal crop insurance program for good performance. "This proposed Good Performance Refund will benefit qualifying farmers and ranchers across rural America and strengthen the federal crop insurance program," says RMA administrator, William J. Murphy. "It encourages producers to use the best available management practices in order to qualify for the refund in future years and rewards good performance by returning a portion of the out-of-pocket costs paid for crop insurance premiums back to those who have paid into the program and have had limited or no losses." Under the proposed program, payment amounts would vary by producer and will be based on each qualified producer's history in the program. RMA estimates that the average refund amount per producer this year will be about $1,000. The program has a proposed maximum limit at $25,000, with a minimum payment of $25. The first year of the proposed program will use data from 2009 and prior crop years because not all 2010 data is finalized. Read more…

11

IMD_40x40m_classAD.indd 1

15/03/2010 12:4

PALM VIEW TRADE “Your Reliable Supply Chain Manager” Products we produce and Export: • • • • • • •

Banana Meal Banana Powder Crude Tuna Fish Oil Crude Sardine Fish Oil Tuna Fish Meal Sardine Fish Meal Tapioca Chips & Tapioca Powder

Email: palmview@pldtdsl.net Website: www.palmviewtrade.com


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

USDOT issues proposal to resolve truck dispute with Mexico * A proposal was issued today by the U.S. Department of Transportation to provide the framework for negotiations to resolve the cross-border trucking dispute with Mexico. The concept proposal identifies issues related to truck safety issues.

* Included: requirements that drivers have good driving records and understand U.S. and state driving laws; drivers can speak sufficient English; vehicles are safe to drive and comply with emissions standards; vehicles be inspected and carriers have safety management programs in place. The Obama administration has released a concept paper intended to pave the way to ending the nearly two-year-long dispute of the Cross Border Trucking Pilot Program. Western Growers has worked with several federal agencies including USDA, the Department of Transportation, and the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative since March of 2009, to resolve this dispute as the specialty crop industry, particularly producers of grapes, pears, and strawberries have seen sales to Mexico drop considerably due to the retaliatory tariffs levied by Mexico on these, and other, U.S. agricultural products. U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack phoned Western Growers President and CEO Tom Nassif this morning telling him of the announcement. “We welcome this news as a positive first step in resolving a serious problem that has been detrimental to many of our growers and shippers in California and Arizona,” said Nassif. “It is our hope that the United States government will reach a favourable agreement with Mexico and that the U.S. Congress will be ready and willing to consider and support a plan that is reasonable and fair.” Read more…

Phosphate market to hit 68.7 million metric tons by 2015

Fertilizers make up the majority chunk of global phosphate production, with demand for phosphorous fertilizers primarily driven by high consumption levels in developing and large populous countries such as India, China, Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico and Argentina due to greater food requirements. Consumption of phosphorous fertilizers is decreasing in developed nations including the U.S., Europe, and Japan, due to increasing shift towards more eco-friendly agricultural production. Consumption of phosphates, to a large extent, depends on seasonal weather patterns and regulations governing the usage. Growth in the global market is expected to stem largely from the developing countries of Asia-Pacific, Latin America and Middle East. With relatively high usage of phosphates in fertilizers and detergents in Asia-Pacific and Latin America, the regions are poised to remain the pioneers for the phosphates market in the foreseeable future. China is the world's largest phosphate rock producer, with production volume nearing 55 million tons in 2009, followed by the US as the next largest producing country. Morocco and Western Sahara, Russia, Tunisia, Jordan and Brazil comprise some of the other leading phosphate rock producers on a global scale. Lack of stringent regulatory restrictions offers ample growth opportunities in these markets. Read more...

Quinoa gaining in popularity across U.S.

Quinoa isn't a cereal. It's a seed that is eaten like a grain, but is glutenfree and more easily digestible than corn, wheat, rye, millet and sorghum. And it can be substituted for rice in just about anything from soup to salad to pudding to bread. Quinoa grows in the San Luis Valley of Colorado. Quinoa's rising popularity among First World foodies the wholesale price has jumped sevenfold since 2000 as global demand climbed has been a boon to the poor farmers here in the semiarid highlands where most of it grows.

12


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

And that boom has transformed the lives of the largely subsistence farmers who grow it, though it remains unclear whether the large-scale commercial cultivation sought by Bolivia's government is environmentally sustainable in the altiplain or even welcome by growers. President Evo Morales' government has deemed quinoa a "strategic" foodstuff, essential to this poverty-afflicted nation's food security. It is promoting the grain and has included quinoa in a subsidized food parcel for pregnant women. Yet the higher prices quinoa is fetching have had an unanticipated impact where the grain is grown. Some local children are showing signs of malnutrition because their parents have substituted rice and noodles for quinoa in the family diet, said Walter Severo, president of a quinoa producer's group in southwest Bolivia. "Only 10 percent of it stays in Bolivia. The other 90 percent gets exported," says Rural Development Minister Nemecia Achacollo. Read more…

January 10, 2011

Dioxin scandal: Nearly 3,000 farms released

The state of Lower Saxony in Germany today has released just under 3,000 farms that were locked because of suspected to have been supplied with dioxin contaminated feed. The Ministry of Agriculture of Lower Saxony in Hanover said in a statement it had managed to identify the companies, "which food products to the current knowledge, certainly not pose a risk to the consumer." Of the first of about 4,400 farms that have been locked "1,470 establishments remain closed." The Ministry will continue working on it and "clarify the situation for the not yet released companies as quickly as possible." At the height of the scandal nationwide in Germany more than 4,700 companies had been locked, the vast majority of them located in Lower Saxony. For the contamination of animal feed with dioxin residues Schleswig-Holstein fat supplier Harles and Jentzsch is thought to be responsible. The company is suspected of mixing cheap technical fats into more expensive dietary fats for use in animal feeds. New dioxin findings always fuel the debate over consumer protection in Germany. Increasingly, the responsibility of the federal government comes into focus. In the current dioxin scandal Agriculture Minister Ilse Aigner, demanded a crackdown against criminal food manufacturers. “It cannot be denied that here a strong suspicion of criminal activity is paired with startling lack of scruples," she said. A few" black sheep” had caused enormous damage. Read more...

150 Senior agribusiness executives set to meet in Sao Paulo

The Brazilian Agricultural market has already undergone massive growth and development. Driven by a huge surge of investment interest within the financial community, this agri-explosion responds to the rising global corn demand, the shrinking surplus and the need to ensure the world's future food security. Between 1996 and 2006 the total value of the country's crops rose from $23 billion to 108 billion, or 365% and this huge sum has grown even more in the last few years. The monumental potential of the land in Brazil needs to be harnessed in order to ensure greater efficiency, lower cost and higher profits. To accomplish this and to avoid gambling on fluctuating grain prices (dependent on crop failures such as August 2010's Russian grain crisis and subsequent embargo) farms need to be transformed by taking advantage of the enormous leaps made by technology and input developers to minimise crop risk and waste to increase yield.

13


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

Responding to these challenges AgriUpdate has created AgriYield Brazil: The Yield Optimisation Conference, Brazil's premier Agricultural event that shows how to create a profitable, productive and sustainable business. AgriYield Brazil is set to be Brazil's leading Agricultural event. Quite simply, it is the industry's newest and most exclusive meeting place for learning, networking and setting up deals. AgriYield Brazil: The Yield Optimisation Conference is the only event in Brazil focused on risk reduction and R&D developments to make your fields yield more profits. Read more…

New hopes for combating hopping pests in the US

The Mormon cricket is a voracious feeder that wipes out acres of grasses and field crops in no time. When it’s young, though, it grows so fast that its immune system cannot keep up. Agricultural Research Service ARS scientists are finding that this may be the best time to use biocontrol fungi to target the insect pest. United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists and Utah State university colleagues are testing beneficial fungi that could help manage grasshopper populations.

Silo Construction & Engineering

SCE Maximum bulk storage

www.sce.be +32(0)51 723128

Entomologist Stefan Jaronski with USDA's (ARS) at the agency's Northern Plains Agricultural Research Lab in Sidney, Mont., is working with university and U.S.D.A. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service scientists to evaluate several fungi that could be used as biocontrol agents against these hopping pests. ARS is USDA's principal intramural scientific research agency. Each adult female grasshopper can lay multiple egg pods—each containing many eggs—in one summer, which could greatly increase the population the next summer, after the eggs hatch. This compounding effect could lead to drastic yield losses for farmers and ranchers as grasshoppers, who can eat their body weight daily in vegetation, leave less grass on the rangeland for livestock and sometimes move into crops and feed on wheat and alfalfa. State and federal pest control agencies spend millions of dollars each year to control grasshopper and cricket populations. During a particularly bad infestation, the cost can skyrocket. Coupled with the loss of revenue for farmers and ranchers, a grasshopper infestation could cost our country billions of dollars per year. Read more...

January 11, 2011

DuPont to purchase Danisco for US$5.8 billion

US giant DuPont is buying Danish enzyme specialist Danisco for US$5.8 billion as it looks to broaden its food and biofuels operations. The acquisition also includes the assumption of US$500 million in debt. Danisco, which is already a joint venture partner with DuPont in the development of cellulosic ethanol technology, said Monday that it would recommend shareholders accept the deal. Its stock jumped 25 percent in Copenhagen trading to DKr 662 kroner (US$114.71). E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co., founded in 1802, has long been known for its chemicals business. But the Wilmington, Delaware, company has been trying to expand its operations.

14


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

15


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

DuPont has been helped by growth in demand for its products used in agriculture, and by the improving global economy, particularly in Asia. DuPont makes chemicals used in farming, electronics, autos and other industries. Danisco, based in Copenhagen, Denmark, makes enzyme and specialty food ingredients. Its ingredients are used in a wide range of industries from bakery, dairy and beverages to animal feed, laundry detergents and bioethanol. The company has nearly 7,000 employees. Read more…

Silo Construction & Engineering builds silos for De Heus in Poland

The new feed mills of Netherlands-based De Heus Feeds in Poland have been expanded with the help of Silo Construction & Engineering from Belgium. Dutch feed miller De Heus is expanding its foreign assets and offices rapidly and already has a presence in almost 45 countries, supplying more than 3 million tonnes of feed to the livestock sector. Not so long age De Heus took over the activities of Evialis Polska, which further increased their presence in Poland. The company is now the second largest player in the Polish market. To keep up with demand in Poland SCE from Belgium was commissioned to build a new animal feed mill in Miescisko. Read more…

Tainted animal feed found in France and Denmark

France and Denmark on Monday became the latest countries affected by Germany’s tainted food scare, in which pig and chicken feed were contaminated with dioxin and traces were found in exported food products. Although the levels of the chemical detected in France and Denmark were considered low, they indicated that the contamination was not contained, as previously indicated, to Germany, the Netherlands and Britain, where food with egg products reached store shelves. “In Denmark, these products were used for breeder hens, which are not in fact marketed,” Frédéric Vincent, health and consumer spokesman at the European Commission, said in Brussels in a news briefing broadcast Monday. “In the case of France, in the lot exported, apparently the concentration of dioxin was lower than the maximum authorized concentration allowed in E.U. law for animal feed.”Mr. Vincent did not say whether animals had been exposed. In Berlin, the government tried to show that it was in control so as to avoid any hysteria or speculation that the dioxin was becoming a major health hazard. “There’s no reason to panic but also no reason to relax yet either,” Ilse Aigner, minister for consumer protection and agriculture, said Monday at a news conference. “The people who did this were irresponsible and unscrupulous.” Ms. Aigner held a crisis meeting with regional farming organizations and animal food producers and agreed to examine new measures to improve food safety standards and prevent another health scare. She called the meeting as the regional health and agricultural authorities adopted different positions after carrying out inspections. Read more…

Germany to kill hundreds of pigs tainted with dioxin

The focus of Germany's dioxin animal feed scandal has switched from poultry to pigs with news that hundreds are to be slaughtered. High levels of dioxin were found in pigs early on Tuesday at a farm in the county of Verden, Lower Saxony, officials said. The farm had bought feed containing fats at the centre of the scandal.

16


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

Officials say levels of dioxin found so far do not present an immediate danger to human health. On Tuesday, 558 German poultry and pig farms remained shut - but their number was a fraction of the 4,700-closed last week when the scandal made headlines. Tests on feed additives produced at the Harles und Jentzsch plant in the northern region of Schleswig-Holstein revealed levels of dioxin at 77 times the permitted level. The plant produces fats to be used in industrial processes like papermaking as well as to enrich feeds for animals. Gert Hahne, spokesman for Lower Saxony's agriculture ministry, said the pigs in Verden would be slaughtered and incinerated. It is the first time high levels of dioxin have been found in pork at a farm closed under the current ban. Read more‌

January 12, 2011

Technique allows researchers to identify key maize genes for increased yield

Scientists have identified the genes related to leaf angle in corn (maize) -a key trait for planting crops closer together, which has led to an eight-fold increase in yield since the early 1900s. The study, led by researchers from Cornell and the U.S. Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) at Cornell and North Carolina State University, is the first to relate genetic variation across the entire maize genome to traits in a genome wide association study. The researchers have so far located 1.6 million sites on the maize genome where one individual may vary from another, and they used those sites to identify the genes related to changes in leaf angle that have allowed greater crop density. Yield increases have mostly resulted from adaptations made by breeders to maize so crops can be planted closer together. Along with changes in roots and nutrient uptake that also play roles in increased crop densities, the leaves of maize crop plants have become more upright to maintain access to sunlight in crowded plots. The team of researchers found that natural mutations in genes that affect ligules -- the first thick part of the leaf where it wraps around the stalk -- contributed to more upright leaves. Also, the changes in leaf angle result from many small genetic effects added together; while leaf angles may vary from one maize variety to another by up to 80 degrees, the biggest effect from a single gene was only 1.5 degrees. Read more‌

Gene helps crops use less water without biomass loss

Purdue University researchers have found a genetic mutation that allows a plant to better endure drought without losing biomass, a discovery that could reduce the amount of water required for growing plants and help plants survive and thrive in adverse conditions. Plants can naturally control the opening and closing of stomata, pores that take in carbon dioxide and release water. During drought conditions, a plant might close its stomata to conserve water. By doing so, however, the plant also reduces the amount of carbon dioxide it can take in, which limits photosynthesis and growth. Mike Mickelbart, an assistant professor of horticulture; Mike Hasegawa, a professor of horticulture; and Chal Yul Yoo, a horticulture graduate student, found that a genetic mutation in the research plant Arabidopsis thaliana reduces the number of stomata. But instead of limiting carbon dioxide intake, the gene creates a beneficial equilibrium. "The plant can only fix so much carbon dioxide. The fewer stomata still allow for the same amount of carbon dioxide intake as a wild type while conserving water," said Mickelbart, whose results were published in the early online version of the journal The Plant Cell. "This shows there is potential to reduce transpiration without a yield penalty." Read more... 17


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

18


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011 THE GFMT MARKET PLACE

Vilsack warns farmers of pending budget cuts

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack strongly hinted Monday to the nation's largest farm lobbying group that large budget deficits will require spending cuts. However, Vilsack did not explain in detail how cuts might affect the budget of the U.S. Agriculture Department and its programs. His remarks come as U.S. farmers are searching for signals about what programs Congress might trim or curtail in the next Farm Bill expected next year. That legislation sets the federal government's financial support for the agriculture sector. "It's fairly clear. I'm not going to tell you something that you haven't already heard from your leadership," Vilsack told the annual convention of the American Farm Bureau Federation. "When you're dealing with having to reduce deficits, you're going to have to make difficult choices." During his remarks, Vilsack highlighted a federal effort to expand a crop insurance program without increasing the financial exposure for the government. He said the effort saved money that will be used to reduce the spending shortfall. "We cannot continue to sustain high deficits," said Vilsack, who did not take questions. "So everyone's going to have to do their part." Read more...

Analysis & Control Intake and Inline measurement of moisture, protein, temperature, structure, ash, fat, fibre, starch and colour. Recipe management and traceability records.

®

For maximum control and efficiency call:

01473 829188 www.suffolk-automation.co.uk

SILO INSTALATIONS ...

... TO COVER YOUR MARKET NEEDS Ctra. Arenas de San Juan, Km 2.300 13210 Villarta de San Juan - Spain Tel: +34 926 64 05 40 Fax: +34 926 64 02 94 Email: elena.ektova@symaga.com

AquafeedClassified40_2x40mFI

www.symaga.com

Fefac announces action plan dioxin control

The European feed manufacturers association Fefac has announced the development of a dioxin testing protocol for the EU feed fat supply chain and calls for specific approval conditions for fat blending plants. Fefac President Patrick Vanden Avenne confirmed the European compound feed industry “two pillar” action plan to tackle dioxin contamination risks linked to the feed fat supply chain which was submitted at the 2nd European Commission briefing for the EU feed fat chain partners: 1. Pillar 1: Development of a testing protocol for a structured dioxin monitoring plan of the feed fat supply chain at EU level before the end of the month. 2. Pillar 2: Review of the registration, i.e. approval requirements for fat blending businesses under the EU Feed Hygiene Regulation (EC) No 183/2005. Vanden Avenne said that “although the German authorities consider fraud at the fat blending plant which mixed technical fats in feed fats as the most plausible road of the contamination, we, as customers, must take all necessary and effective action which can help preventing such incidents in the future”. “In our view, this would require a combination of an industry-own structured monitoring plan and specific legal requirements for the approval of fat blending plants, which currently only have to be registered under the EU Feed Hygiene Regulation”. Read more…

Variability main problem in using alternative feed ingredients for swine

A swine nutritionist with the University of Manitoba says variability in nutrient composition is the biggest challenge when incorporating alternative feed ingredients into swine rations. With the cost of the more traditional feed ingredients for swine on the rise pork producers will be considering a range of alternatives such as dried distillers grains with solubles, faba bean or other pulse crops or various extruded or processed products to reduce costs.

Symaga_class.indd 1

03/11/2010 10:3 ®

STYLE CC-XD (XTREME DUTY)

Polyethylene Elevator Bucket

ELEVATOR BUCKETS & BOLTS

St. Louis, Missouri USA

T:+1 314 739 9191• F:+1 314 739 5880 www.tapcoinc.com

WWW.EXTRUDER.NL / WWW.EXPANDER.NL

Almex b.v., Verlengde Ooyerhoekseweg 29 7207 BJ Zutphen, Netherlands, tel.: +31 (0)575 572666 e-mail: info@almex.nl, internet: www.almex.nl

Buhler AG CH – 9240 Uzwil, Switzerland T: +41 71 955 11 11 F: +41 71 955 66 11 E: milling@buhlergroup.com

www.buhlergroup.com

Buhler Class ad_GFMT10.indd 1

11/12/2009 09:0

A Clondalkin Company

FLEXIBLE PACKAGING

CB Packaging is a market leader of multi-walled paper sacks. With over 50 years of experience, we offer solutions for a wide range of industries, including animal feeds, pet food, seeds, milk powder, flour and root crops.

For more information, please call Tim Stallard: +44 (0) 7805 092067 www.cbpackaging.com

19


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

University of Manitoba animal science professor Dr. Martin Nyachoti suggests these opportunity ingredients can make the difference between surviving these high feed prices and not surviving at all. “I think variability in terms of nutrient composition for most of the ingredients creates a lot of problems because, unless you have a consistent product, then it means you have to keep changing your formulation all the time which is a pain to deal with and sometime some of the co-products are variable. “They vary from plant to plant or source to source and that creates those problems in terms of being consistent and being sure that you're formulating your diets properly. Read more...

Dishman Netherlands to distribute vit D3 in North America

Dishman Netherlands reaches agreement with Charles Bowman and Company to distribute all their Vitamin D3 products in North America.

Dishman Netherlands (Vitamins & Chemicals) announced recently their intentions to produce, market, and sell Vitamin D3 for the animal feed, pharmaceutical, and food markets during 2011, from their new facility in India which is currently being completed. All products from this facility will be GMP+ certified. Existing Vitamin D products from Dishman Netherlands include Cholecalciferol, Vitamin D3 resin, Dohyfral D3 2000AG (vitamin D3 in oil), and Ergocalciferol. Charles Bowman and Company has been appointed the exclusive North American distributor for all Vitamin D products from Dishman Netherlands. The new products from Dishman Netherlands will include Dishman D3 500,000IU for use in the animal feed market worldwide, Dishman D3 100,000IU for the food market, and also other Vitamin D3 products in oil. The new Dishman D3-500 grade will provide a high quality D3-500 to meet the growing demand in the marketplace. The history of Vitamin D production at Dishman Netherlands can be traced back to the 1920s and the invention of the process to produce vitamin D2 and thereafter in 1946 when the production of Vitamin D3 began.

USGC and China DDGS dumping probe

Three years ago there were virtually no dried distillers grains (DDGS) going to China. Last year there were more than 1.5 million metric tons of DDGS exported to the country and some estimate that the number could be as high as 3 million metric tons at the close of this year. The U.S. Grains Council (USGC) felt that this was the normal progression in trade in a market that is growing exponentially. However, according to Rebecca Bratter, the USGC director of trade development, it didn’t completely come as a surprise when the China’s Ministry of Commerce has launched an anti-dumping probe into the ethanol co-product DDGS. The case was initiated on December 28, 2010 and will take at least a year before a decision is made. In the meantime, the interested parties were only given 20 days to register their interest in the case. “We understand the consequences. We know what’s at stake for registering or not registering,” said Bratter. “We know this is just the first step in what will be a long process which will include both an injury investigation and on a separate track, a dumping investigation.” Read more…

20


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

January 13, 2011

U.S Corn stocks even tighter, more rationing ahead

U.S. ending stocks for corn and soybeans declined further from last month, based on projected lower yields and continued strong demand, according to USDA’s monthly update of last year’s crops. In its Jan. 12 Crop Production Report and World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates, USDA also raised projected U.S. production for cotton and rice. In a Minneapolis Grain Exchange press briefing on the report, Peter Georgantones, Abbott Futures, said the competition for acres between corn, cotton, wheat and soybeans this spring is bound to push prices higher. With the lowering of corn yield and very low stocks numbers, “there is going to have to be a rationing process taking place in corn. That’s why we’re at $6.25 now, but I think we’re going to have to ration more. We’ll have to fight for acres with other commodities.” Estimated U.S. corn production is 93 million bushels lower based on a 1.5-bushel-per-acre reduction in the national average yield, according to USDA. Corn used for ethanol was raised 100 million bushels due to record ethanol production in December. Projected corn ending corn stocks for 2010-11 were lowered 87 million bushels to 745 million, down 963 million bushels from last year. The stocks-to-use ratio is projected at 5.5 percent, the lowest since 1995-96 when it dropped to 5 percent. Read more...

U.N. Data Notes Sharp Rise in World Food Prices

World food prices continued to rise sharply in December, bringing them close to the crisis levels that provoked shortages and riots in poor countries three years ago, according to newly released United Nations data. Prices are expected to remain high this year, prompting concern that the world may be approaching another crisis, although economists cautioned that many factors, like adequate stockpiles of key grains, could prevent a serious problem. The United Nations data measures commodity prices on the world export market. Those are generally far removed from supermarket prices in wealthy countries like the United States. In this country, food price inflation has been relatively tame, and prices are forecast to rise only 2 to 3 percent this year. But the situation is often different in poor countries that rely more heavily on imports. The food price index of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization rose 32 percent from June to December, according to the report published Wednesday. In December, the index was slightly higher than it was in June 2008, its previous peak. The index is not adjusted for inflation, however, making an exact comparison over time difficult. The global index was pushed up last year by rising prices for cooking oils, grains, sugar and meat, all of which could continue to remain high or rise. Read more...

U.S Cash grain bids rally

U.S. cash grain bids rallied following U.S. Department of Agriculture supply forecasts pointing toward very low year-end corn and soybean inventories. USDA cut its estimate for the U.S. corn harvest for the fourth time due to stressful summer weather, and the government's forecast for U.S. corn supplies at the end of marketing year on Aug. 31, was dragged down to a 15-year low. Federal forecasters also trimmed soybean supply forecasts to a precariously low level of 140 million bushels. The supply data propelled cash prices in unison with soaring futures prices.

21


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

However, despite the spike in prices, there wasn't a great deal of additional activity in the cash market beyond already contracted movement of supplies, said Dave Marshall, independent commodity broker and adviser. Cash basis levels showed some weakness, with corn lower and soybeans basis declining 7 cents for soybeans in St. Louis, Marshall said. End-user buying remained subdued, as the market digests fresh supplies already filtering into the cash pipeline in the past week. Producers sold sizable amounts of grain last fall for delivery in January, and the delivery of the inventories has pressured basis levels at interior elevators and river terminals. The initial push to limit up levels in the futures market sent many end users to the sidelines, awaiting lower prices, particularly if they weren't looking for immediate needs, Marshall said. Read more...

Research Report on China's Corn Industry, 2011-2012

Corn is an important grain variety in China whose output in 2009 was about 165 million tons. China's corn consumption is mainly divided into feed consumption and industrial consumption. Macroeconomic circumstances exert more influence on the consumption of corn compared with those of ration varieties such as wheat and rice grain. In recent years, with the increase in China's feed and industrial demand, China's corn consumption demand has been on the rise. In 2010, China's total corn consumption was over 180 million tons, increasing by over five percent over 2009. With the recovery of Chinese economy, the demand of China's feed and deep-processing industry for corn will see an obvious increase in 2011-2012. Among China's processed corn products, primary products occupy a large proportion with low added value. Processed products with high technological content and added value still fail to meet market demand. Another outstanding problem in China's corn processing industry is that the production capacity of primary products especially for starch and alcohol is excessive, and the industry's capacity utilization rate is deficient; small enterprises are numerous and competition among enterprises is fierce. The industry needs to be further integrated. In recent years, as the Chinese government's implementation of the minimum purchase price policy for grain and the increase in cultivation cost, China's corn price has been ascending year by year. Since corn market price was continually going up in 2009, the corn cultivation area in 2010 increases. Read more...

Dioxin scandal: Fat supplier files for bankrupcy

The feed company Harles and Jentzsch, which is accused of causing the German dioxin scandal, has filed for bankruptcy. Harles & Jentzsch from Uetersen in Schleswig-Holstein on Wednesday afternoon at the District Court of Pinneberg submitted an application for insolvency. As a provisional liquidator, the court had appointed a lawyer from Hamburg. The company is suspected of having marketed dioxin-contaminated industrial fats as feed fats and thus caused the recent dioxin scandal where thousands of farms are involved that have received contaminated feeds. Last week already the GMP+ accreditation of the company was withdrawn. Sources said Harles & Jentzsch had GMP+ certification for its major processing unit, but the contaminated fats were processed at a different location which was not audited. The People's Republic of China has halted the imports of eggs and pork from China from fear of containing too much dioxin, press agency AFP reports. The border has been closed even for products in which traces of German pork or eggs have been processed. This was made public by the Chinese watchdog for food safety.The ban has been put in place by January 11. Ships that have left Germany for China, loaded with potentially contaminated products, will not be sent back but will have to be tested for dioxin. Read more...

22


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011 THE GFMT MARKET PLACE

Company update: Cargill

Cargill's fiscal second-quarter earnings more than tripled on strong returns from its Mosaic Co. Stake and as most of the agribusiness giant's units posted strong results. US’ largest private company, active in global meatpacking, grain processing and food business is viewed as an industry leader and like rivals such as Archer Daniels Midland and Bunge has reported revenue growth lately amid tight global grain supplies. For the quarter ended Nov. 30, Cargill reported a profit of US$1.49 billion, up from US$489 million a year earlier. Excluding Mosaic Co, a fertilizer producer in which Cargill owns about a two-thirds stake, the company earned US$832 million, nearly doubled the US$420 million a year earlier. Mosaic reported last week its fiscal second-quarter profit soared as sales rebounded sharply from year-earlier weakness and amid a US$570 million asset-sale gain. Read more…

Grain prices soar as US cuts supply view

Grain prices soared after the US Department of Agriculture made another deep cut in its outlook for global supplies. The USDA again revised downward its estimate for the size of last year's corn and soybean harvest in the US. End-of-season inventories of corn, already expected to be at a 15-year low, were cut by more than 10%. Harvest estimates were trimmed for key export countries abroad. The closely watched monthly crop reports provided yet more confirmation that world supplies are approaching precariously low levels. The devastating drought and wildfires in Russia last summer was a shock to grain markets followed by a disappointing US harvest. More recently, crops are hurting from a drought in Argentina, dryness in the US Plains and torrential rains in Australia. A tug-of-war is expected among crops as farmers in the US decide what to plant this spring. High prices for wheat, soybeans and cotton will entice farmers to plant more of those crops, and that could mean corn supplies won't grow back to comfortable levels until 2013 or 2014, a JP Morgan analyst said. In its first estimate of how much winter wheat was sown this fall, the USDA said 41 million acres were planted. Read more…

Analysis & Control Intake and Inline measurement of moisture, protein, temperature, structure, ash, fat, fibre, starch and colour. Recipe management and traceability records.

®

For maximum control and efficiency call:

01473 829188 www.suffolk-automation.co.uk

SILO INSTALATIONS ...

... TO COVER YOUR MARKET NEEDS Ctra. Arenas de San Juan, Km 2.300 13210 Villarta de San Juan - Spain Tel: +34 926 64 05 40 Fax: +34 926 64 02 94 Email: elena.ektova@symaga.com

AquafeedClassified40_2x40mFI

www.symaga.com

Symaga_class.indd 1

03/11/2010 10:3 ®

STYLE CC-XD (XTREME DUTY)

Polyethylene Elevator Bucket

ELEVATOR BUCKETS & BOLTS

St. Louis, Missouri USA

T:+1 314 739 9191• F:+1 314 739 5880 www.tapcoinc.com

WWW.EXTRUDER.NL / WWW.EXPANDER.NL

Almex b.v., Verlengde Ooyerhoekseweg 29 7207 BJ Zutphen, Netherlands, tel.: +31 (0)575 572666 e-mail: info@almex.nl, internet: www.almex.nl

January 14, 2011

Climate Change Impacts on Agricultural Crops

Changes in temperature, CO2, and precipitation under the scenarios of climate change for the next 30 years present a challenge to crop production. This comprehensive review, published in Agronomy Journal, focuses on the impact of temperature, CO2, and ozone on agronomic crops and the implications for crop production. Understanding these implications for agricultural crops is critical for developing cropping systems resilient to stresses induced by climate change. There is variation among crops in their response to CO2, temperature, and precipitation changes and, with the regional differences in predicted climate, a situation is created in which the responses will be further complicated. The frequency of years when temperatures exceed thresholds for damage during critical growth stages is likely to increase for some crops and regions. The increase in CO2 contributes significantly to enhanced plant growth and improved water use efficiency (WUE); however, there may be a downscaling of these positive impacts due to higher temperatures plants will experience during their growth cycle. Read more...

Buhler AG CH – 9240 Uzwil, Switzerland T: +41 71 955 11 11 F: +41 71 955 66 11 E: milling@buhlergroup.com

www.buhlergroup.com

Buhler Class ad_GFMT10.indd 1

11/12/2009 09:0

A Clondalkin Company

FLEXIBLE PACKAGING

CB Packaging is a market leader of multi-walled paper sacks. With over 50 years of experience, we offer solutions for a wide range of industries, including animal feeds, pet food, seeds, milk powder, flour and root crops.

For more information, please call Tim Stallard: +44 (0) 7805 092067 www.cbpackaging.com

23


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

Drought-Tolerant Maize Gets U.S. Debut

When the planting season arrives later this year, farmers in the United States will have a new way to safeguard their crops from drought. Last week, DuPont subsidiary Pioneer Hi-Bred International, headquartered in Johnston, Iowa, announced plans to release a series of hybrid maize (corn) strains that can flourish with less water. The seeds will compete with another maize strain unveiled last July by Swiss agribusiness Syngenta. Both companies used conventional breeding rather than genetic engineering to produce their seeds. Pioneer says that field studies show its new hybrids will increase maize yields by 5% in water-limited environments, such as the western states of the intensively agricultural Corn Belt region. That compares with the 15% yield gain promised by Syngenta for its maize. Both companies, as well as seed firm Monsanto, based in St Louis, Missouri, are also working on transgenic maize varieties, hoping to tap into a multibillion-dollar market (see Nature 466,548-551; 2010). In theory, drought-tolerant varieties could fill the gap left in maize supplies in recent years, as stocks have been diverted for ethanol production. But not everybody is convinced that these crops will make a big difference. "It's good news, but it's not great news," says David Zilberman, an agricultural economist at the University of California, Berkeley. No crop will survive a severe drought, he says, and other factors such as nutrient availability and soil quality are at play during water shortages, which tend to be more frequent but less severe than droughts. "It will be useful for a small number of really important areas," Zilberman says, "but my feeling is that people expect altogether too much from drought tolerance." Read more…

De Heus focusing on further growth in Vietnam

Dutch feed miller De Heus has started with ambitious plans for the Vietnamese market and builds a new feed mill. De Heus started its operations in Vietnam in 2009 with two production plants (Haiphong Area and Ho Chi Minh City area). After modernising these plants and focusing on the market opportunities in Vietnam, De Heus will be moving forward. The company’s first choice is the Dong Nai province, which offers good opportunities for further growth in the Vietnamese market. The location where the new production plant will be built from scratch as a Green Field Project is in the Dau Giay Industrial Zone. It is located next to the new Ho Chi Minh City - Long Thanh-Dau Giay express highway that connects the South and the Centre of Vietnam, 25 km from the new Long Thanh International airport. Building has started this week. The project will be finalized by February 2012. It will be a complete new “state of the art” feedmill with a capacity of 300.000 MT/year producing pig, poultry and cattle feed. Read more…

Co-op Atlantic to build new feed mill

Canadian Co-op Atlantic from Moncton, New Brunswick announced the construction of a new feed mill, replacing an existing facility, which has been in operation since 1946. The new mill will be located on a parcel of land adjacent to the existing structure. The construction project, estimated at CAN$7.5 million, is expected to be completed by October of this year. The new facility will result in an increase in feed production efficiency. "This new feed mill, with its modern technology, represents a significant step forward in our feed production capability," said John Harvie, CEO for Co-op Atlantic. "The new mill will help us serve livestock producers in New Brunswick in a much more efficient manner. It will also allow us to better serve our growing retail Country Store business in all of the Atlantic Provinces.

24


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

The new mill will have a capacity to produce more than 40,000 tons of animal feed per year, complementing the existing Coop feed milling capacity in Atlantic Canada. The agricultural component of Co-op Atlantic’s business model has always played an important role in its overall operations. The procurement and sale of grains and feeds at fair prices was in fact the principal factor behind the establishment of Co-op Atlantic, in 1927, then called the Maritime Livestock Board. Read more...

Conference for laboratory sector at VIV Asia

LabQA2011 is a half day conference for food and feed testing laboratories aimed at laboratory managers, QA and QC managers and anyone interested in the production of safe food It will be held at the Imperial Queen's Park Hotel in Bangkok on the afternoon of 7th March 2011. LabQA2011 brings together expert from Thailand, Germany and the UK who will focus on topical issues such as proficiency testing, QA aspects of mycotoxin testing, GMO detection, trace residue analysis, campylobacter and assuring quality standards. In addition, Sompiss Julabutradee, who has a wealth of experience in auditing food production in SE Asia, will share with attendees what auditors of farms and food production facilities are looking for in the laboratory reports produced for farm and factory testing. Other speakers include Phil Smith from UK based LGC Proficiency Testing, Ronald Niemeijer from R-Biopharm, Julie Russell from the British Health Protection Agency and British poultry veterinarian Nigel Horrox. They will be joined by the Thais Somvong Trakulroong from Biotec and Natchanun Leepipatiboon from Chulalongkorn University. LabQA2011 is part of VIV Asia week. VIV Asia is Asia's leading livestock, feed and food show that covers the whole spectre of the production of animal derived foods. In addition, there will be a specialist mycotoxins conference, Mycotoxins2011, on 8th March at the same venue. The VIV Asia Exhibition, which includes food safety, food processing and laboratory exhibitors will be held on 9-10th March in Bangkok.

January 17, 2011

Dioxin scandal: Another 1,000 pig farms quarantined

A feed manufacturer, suspected of having received dioxin-contaminated materials, has concealed this information when delivering feeds to pig farm customers. According to information from Lower Saxony a further 934 farms have been closed because of suspected dioxin contamination. According to the Federal Ministry of Consumer Protection on Saturday the farms affected already included 110 laying hen farms, 403 pig farms and 248 pig-fattening farms. And now an extra 934 pig fattening farms. Agriculture Minister Ilse Aigner in Berlin announced said the House was only informed early Saturday morning by the authorities of Lower Saxony about a compound feed manufacturer in Damme, who had not revealed his suspected dioxin-supply relationship with the affected farms. The feed miller appeared to also have carried out feed deliveries to North RhineWestphalia, Brandenburg and Bavaria. Lower Saxony has informed the state prosecutor, because it suspects the feed firm of criminal intent or gross negligence. Aigner called for consequences of this breakdown. "This is a scandal in the scandal," she said. Lower Saxony Prime Minister David McAllister should act now and consistently continue in controlling the scandal. "I expect by this afternoon a detailed report of the Prime Minister and I expect that he pulls through personal consequences by tonight," she said. The ultimatum has gone by without response. Read more‌ 25


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

US to ease barriers on Canadian canola meal

US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) looks to ease restrictions on imports of animal feed with salmonella bacteria. As a result Canadian exports of canola meal to the United States have picked up. The FDA posted a draft policy on its website last August that would limit its enforcement actions against animal feed shipments with salmonella to just a few types of the bacteria known to cause disease in animals and poultry, instead of flagging all shipments with salmonella. It is unclear when the FDA's new policy takes effect, but Canadian canola meal shipments to the United States rose 17% from August through October, Statistics Canada says. FDA imposed shipping restrictions in the past two years against seven Canadian crushing plants whose canola meal exports contained salmonella, although only two plants are still on import-alert status. The companies involved (Richardson International, Cargill, Archer Daniels Midland, Bunge, Louis Dreyfus and Viterra), of course support the new policy, although Viterra and ADM plants are still under import restrictions. Read more...

GEA Niro initiative converts CO2 into fuel and animal feed

GEA Niro is leading a new initiative that will, when successful, significantly assist industries with a large CO2 footprint to become more environmental friendly and reduce operational costs spent on taxation of effluents. The new process converts CO2 into fuel alcohol, proteins for animal feed and fertilizer for agricultural purposes. The basic idea is to feed the CO2 to algae and transforming the algae to alcohol by fermentation and the residual bio matter to fertiliser. The exhausted yeast cells are then spray dried into protein powder for animal feed. The principle is simple, however the process implementation is difficult due to the very large installations and large mass flows involved. GEA does, however, have the necessary core competence and correct organisation to handle projects of this magnitude. CO2 is scrubbed from processes with high CO2 concentrations such as rotary ovens of cement plants. The CO2 is then introduced to basins that contain large volumes of algae, which consume the CO2 gas. Algae are polysaccharides containing fermentable sugars; these are easily converted to alcohol through fermentation. The alcohol can then be recovered for use as fuel, leaving the remaining algae biomass and yeast cream for drying into useful fertiliser and animal feed respectively. The savings when converting CO2 this way can be significant especially as the worldwide tightening of penalties for discharging greenhouse gasses to the environment becomes increasingly severe. Read more...

Kemin reveals dioxin testing program

Kemin Industries reveals an advanced program for detecting both dioxins and PCBs (toxic dioxin congeners) in raw ingredients. Dr. John Springate, president of Kemin AgriFoods, noted that the program was initiated in 2010 to test raw ingredients used by the company that came from natural sources. He stated, "Kemin purchases and farms a number of botanical materials, oils and animal products that could potentially be contaminated with these compounds. As part of our rigorous quality control programs, we have installed state-of-the-art analytical equipment and laboratory procedures to test these materials for dioxins and PCBs.�

26


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

The company’s dioxin testing program includes the use of a high-resolution gas chromatography-magnetic sector mass spectrometer that is capable of detecting dioxin and PCB isomers at levels exceeding EU standards. This testing program is in place at all of Kemin’s manufacturing sites in Asia, China, Europe, India, South America and the United States.

THE GFMT MARKET PLACE

U.S. rice crop estimated at 243.1 million CWT

The U.S. 2010/11 rice crop is estimated at 243.1 million cwt, up 1.5 million or 0.6 percent from the previous estimate due to increased yields, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) report. Average yield is estimated at 6,725 pounds per acre, up 56 pounds per acre from last month, but a decline of 360 pounds per acre from the previous year. Harvested area is estimated at 3.615 million acres, down 8,000 acres from the previous estimate. Long-grain rice production is estimated at a record 183.3 million cwt, up 1.8 million from last month, and combined medium- and short-grain production fractionally decreased to 59.8 million. All rice imports for 2010/11 decreased 1.5 million cwt to 18 million with the decline in long-grain. The pace of imports based on U.S. Census Bureau data through October is lagging, principally due to reductions from Thailand and India. The National Agricultural Statistics Service's (NASS) Rice Stocks reported total rough rice stocks at 172.9 million cwt as of Dec. 1 and total milled stocks at 6.3 million (9.3 million cwt on a rough-equivalent basis). Total rice stocks on a rough-equivalent basis are 182.2 million, up 11 percent from a year earlier. Long-grain stocks as of Dec. 1 are estimated at 126.9 million (rough-equivalent basis) and combined medium- and short-grain stocks at 52.7 million. Domestic and residual use for 2010/11 is unchanged at a record 129 million cwt. However, long-grain domestic and residual use increased 2 million cwt to a record 101 million, while domestic and residual use of combined medium- and short-grain decreased the same amount to 28 million. Some substitution of lower-priced long-grain rice for higher-priced medium-grain rice in domestic use is projected to continue. Read more…

January 18, 2011

Dutch firm under investigation for exploiting Argentine workers

Rotterdam based privately held trading and Agribusiness Company Nidera is under investigation in Argentina for using 'slavery-like' conditions on a maize plantation in Argentina. Labour ministry inspectors from the Argentine national government and the Buenos Aires provincial government said they found 199 farm workers in conditions close to slavery during raids carried out at the end of December and the beginning of January on estates in the area of San Pedro, about 100 kilometres west of the national capital. The inspectors said 130 of the labourers, including some 30 children and adolescents, were producing for the Dutch-based multinational Nidera, and 69 were producing for the Argentine company Southern Seeds Production SA; the workers appear to have been subcontracted through temporary agencies. The workers 'didn't know where they were, were unable to leave, had no electricity or water and their cash-in-hand wages were heavily discounted for the supplies sold by the company at extortionate prices,' according to local media reports.

27

A Clondalkin Company

FLEXIBLE PACKAGING

CB Packaging is a market leader of multi-walled paper sacks. With over 50 years of experience, we offer solutions for a wide range of industries, including animal feeds, pet food, seeds, milk powder, flour and root crops.

For more information, please call Tim Stallard: +44 (0) 7805 092067 www.cbpackaging.com

CENZONE TECH INC. 2110 Low Chaparral Drive San Marcos CA92069 USA Tel: 760 736 9901 Fax: 760 736 9958 Web: www.cenzone.com E-mail: cenzone.tech@worldnet.att.net

Croston Engineering Ltd Tarvin Mill Barrow Lane, Tarvin Chester CH3 8JF Tel: 01829 741119 Fax: 01829 741169 E-mail: admin@croston-engineering.co.uk Website: http://www.croston-engineering.co.uk BULK STORAGE, HANDLING, AND PROCESS ENGINEERS FOR THE ANIMAL FEED, GRAIN, FLOUR, BAKERY, HUMAN AND PET FOODS INDUSTRIES


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

Nidera on its website "categorically denies" all the accusations that its "seed division in Argentina had employed temporary workers who were unregistered and exploited by the company." The 19 minors found working on the plantation were all aged 16 to 18 and had permission from their parents, Nidera's head of legal affairs Job Rietkerk told the paper. According to Argentine newspaper reports, the company is also under investigation for tax evasion totalling 260 million Argentine pesos (€49m). Read more…

No-Till, Summer fallow stores water in Central Great Plains

Storing just one inch of water in an acre of soil is worth US$25 to US$30 per acre. That gets the attention of Central Great Plains farmers served by U.S.D.A. (USDA) researchers. Soil scientist Merle Vigil and his colleagues at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Central Great Plains Research Station at Akron, Colo, calculated this by using 10-year average crop prices in equations they developed to relate crop yields to stored water levels. ARS is USDA's principal intramural scientific research agency, and this research supports USDA's commitment to agricultural sustainability. Four to six passes with various tillage equipment to kill weeds over 14 months of leaving land idle or fallow result in a loss of three acre-inches of water to evaporation. Those six passes also cost US$24 to US$48 an acre in fuel and labour costs. Add that to the cost of water lost, and you have US$99 to US$138 an acre that never makes it into the farmers' pockets. Plains farmers traditionally grow wheat only every other year, leaving fields fallow in between, because most years there isn't enough precipitation to grow wheat annually. Read more…

TechMix appoints LinkAsia Partners for Asia Pacific

TechMix Inc, manufacturer of animal nutritional products to minimize dehydration stress and enhance performance, has appointed LinkAsia Partners as its strategic partner to represent and develop its complete line of nutritional specialty products in the Southeast Asia and Oceania regions. LinkAsia Partners will provide marketing and commercial support to launch TechMix products to these markets. “Partnering with LinkAsia Partners offers us access to an extensive network of channels and market intelligence,” said David Muysson, Director of International Business at TechMix Inc. “We are confident that this is a start of a rewarding journey for TechMix in the important markets in Southeast Asia and Oceania.” TechMix. Inc. is a US-based manufacturer specialized in developing nutritional specialty products that are scientifically formulated to enhance animal performance and minimize dehydration stress. The company offers a complete line of nutritional specialty products for different animal species, all in support of improving and maintaining good animal health and nutrition. Read more…

Pava penetrates compound feed business

Being the largest grain processor in Siberia and the Far East, Pava has now outlined shipments of combined feed to livestock farms as a separate area of work. According to company’s representatives, it’s a promising area of cooperation that requires a customized approach. Pava stresses that cooperation with the livestock farms in a separate line of work does not mean that the grain processor prioritizes one particular area of operation. The crucial point here is different requirements that are put forward by the company’s partners.

28


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

While wholesale companies place orders for traditional recipes, livestock farms have individual requirements. Such separate approach to production and distribution of combined feed has emerged due to increase in the number of contracts with farms and their elevated interest in Pava’s products. OJSC Pava produces combined feed for all types of animals, poultry and fish at its production facility in Achinsk, Krasnoyarsk territory. Read more...

Korea Creates National Grain Procurement System

In response to growing concerns about food security, Korea recently announced the creation of a national grain procurement system. The newly created consortium is comprised of five major parties, including Korea Agro-Fisheries Trade Corporation, a government-invested entity and a key player of the consortium; CJ CheilJedang Corporation, a feed miller and food manufacturer; Samsung C&T Corporation, a general trading company; STX, an export elevator investor; and Hanjin Shipping. According to the agreement, the consortium will work with the Korean government, which will provide financial support for the consortium to start the international grain trading business. The consortium aims to secure grains needed for both animal and human consumption and also plans to invest in 10 country elevators and an export elevator in the United States. “Through this new system, the parties hope to import 50,000 metric tons (2 million bushels) of corn and 50,000 tons (1.8 million bushels) of soybeans in 2011,” said Byong Ryol Min, USGC director in Korea. “By 2020, they plan for this system to secure 30 percent of the nation’s total imports which would include diversifying origin by investing in grain production and marketing chains in Brazil, the Ukraine, the Maritime Province of Siberia and other countries.” Read more...

January 19, 2011

New method to measure Soybean Rhizobia

Soil-borne rhizobia bacteria form a mutually beneficial relationship with legumes, during which the rhizobia convert atmospheric nitrogen into plant-available nitrogen in exchange for carbohydrate energy from the plant. This process is called biological nitrogen fixation and is a major player in the global nitrogen cycle, facilitating greater agricultural productivity with less fertilizer input. Soybean, a legume planted on nearly 30 million ha annually in the United States, can fulfill most of its nitrogen requirements via biological nitrogen fixation. Many commercial, seed-applied rhizobia inoculants are available to soybean producers to encourage biological nitrogen fixation and increase yield, but scientists have found mixed results regarding the effectiveness of these products. To begin researching the predictability of a positive yield response to seed inoculation, a team of scientists at the University of Wisconsin–Madison determined a new method for the quantification of soybean-associated rhizobia in the soil. The method is described in the November–December 2010 issue of Crop Science. Read more...

Increased demand and pricing implications of corn industry

Corn farmers who came to St. Louis for the National Corn Growers Association's Priority and Policy Conference enjoyed a presentation by Bruce Scherr, CEO of Informa Economics and one of the nation's leading agricultural economics research firms. In his presentations, Scherr reviewed the historical trends in corn prices and looked at how changing global demographics are shifting the agricultural commodity market paradigm. 29


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

"What we see in increased corn prices today is the ripple effect of economic expansion," Scherr said. "The expansion of commodity values is not over. It's just beginning." Noting that commodity prices remained, on average, stagnant for three decades despite significant inflation in the market as a whole, Scherr explained that it is essential to keep current price increases in perspective because prior values were unsustainably low. He also pointed out that, while demand initially surged, increases have leveled off and are now trending to more gradual growth. In light of increased demand, Scherr pointed out the importance of remembering that the United States has never actually run out of corn despite major demand increases. When needed, farmers boosted production by as much as 2 billion bushels. Read more...

State of feed additives in new legal environment

Regulation (EC) no. 1831/2003 concerning additives for feed stipulated that all feed additives had to be reassessed by 8 November 2010. A short time after that, the Commission made a distinction in the Online European Feed Additive Database. The first part of the Feed Additives Database (Appendix 4, Annex 1) includes all feed additives, which were admitted between 2003 and 8 November 2010, and the feed additives for which a file had been received for reassessment on 8 November 2010. The second part (Annex 2) lists all feed additives for which no file for reassessment had been received by 8 November. This latter group of feed additives will be prohibited within a foreseeable period of time. It is not clear yet whether a so-called withdrawal will be issued. At any rate, there will be regulations about selling out periods and the Commission will explore measures to prevent these prohibited additives from reaching the market as feed material. Within this context also the work of the Commission on the "grey list products" has been of relevance. "Grey list” products are products which on the one hand consist of feed additives which are also used as feed (double listing) and on the other hand of products about which there has been a great deal of discussion in recent years whether they are feed additives, feed materials or even veterinary medical products. This discussion was completed in October with the publication of Regulation (EU) no. 892/201. Read more...

Cargill to split off Mosaic unit

Cargill said on Tuesday that it planned to spin off its 64 percent stake in the Mosaic Company, a big producer of important ingredients in fertilizer and animal feed, leaving Mosaic open for a possible sale at a time when mining and agriculture giants are on the prowl for acquisitions. The complicated tax-free transaction — worth more than US$24 billion as estimated by The New York Times — will also help keep Cargill, one of the biggest American companies, private. Cargill will distribute its 286 million Mosaic shares to its own shareholders and debt holders. The corporate parent’s sale of its 64 percent stake in Mosaic Company comes as big mining companies have been seeking to expand in fertilizer. As standards of living improve in countries like China and India, global demand for food is rising and companies that produce fertilizer are being seen as attractive takeover targets. “The world is not getting less hungry,” James T. Prokopanko, Mosaic’s chief executive, said on Tuesday afternoon during a conference call with analysts. Mosaic was formed in 2004 from the merger of Cargill’s crop nutrition unit with IMC Global, creating a giant in fertilizer production and leaving Cargill with a 64 percent stake. It is the world’s second-largest potash producer, behind Potash, and owns more than a third of Canpotex, the Canadian entity that controls that country’s exports of the material. Based in Plymouth, Minn., it has 7,500 employees. Mosaic had a market value of about $40 billion. Read more... 30


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

Argentine farmers freeze grain sales in protest

Argentine farmers halted sales of wheat, corn and soy on Monday as they went on strike over export curbs, rekindling a dispute that helped drive global grains prices to record highs three years ago. The seven-day protest by growers in the South American nation, one of the world's biggest food suppliers, could fuel supply concerns just as dry weather linked to La Nina worsens the outlook for soy and corn production. Argentine farmers have been at odds with the government for years over export curbs aimed at taming double-digit inflation and guaranteeing affordable supplies of everyday staples. They say the system of wheat and corn export quotas lets millers and exporters pay farmers low prices, and want centre-left President Cristina Fernandez to scrap the caps. "These distortive, interventionist measures have been repeated for several harvests in recent years," Hugo Biolcati, leader of the Argentine Rural Society, said when the country's four farming groups announced the strike last week. This week's protest, which will last until midnight next Sunday, is bad news for Fernandez nine months from an October election in which she is widely expected to seek re-election. Read more…

THE GFMT MARKET PLACE

Milling Industry Recruitment Specialist www.jcb-consulting.com +44(0)161 427 2402

Feed Outlook - January 2011

Feed grain production for 2010/11 is estimated at 330.0 million tons, according to the latest report from the USDA Economic Research Service.

Block 10 Todd Campus West of Scotland Science Park Acre Road, Glasgow Scotland G20 0XA Tel: +44 141 945 2924 IMD_40x40m_classAD

info@r-biopharmrhone.com www.r-biopharm.com R-Biopharm Rhône Ltd, Unit 3.06 Kelvin Campus, West of Scotland Science Park, Maryhill Road, Glasgow, G20 0SP Scotland Tel: +44 (0) 141 9452924 Fax: +44 (0) 141 9452925 info@r-biopharmrhone.com, www.r-biopharmrhone.com

Competence in Food and Feed Analysis

Domestic changes this month are based in part on USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service's Crop Production 2010 Summary and January Grain Stocks reports. Feed grain production for 2010/11 is estimated at 330.0 million tons, down 2.2 million from last month as lower corn production more than offsets an increase in sorghum output. Projected 2010/11 corn ending stocks are lowered 86 million bushels as a small increase in imports only partly offsets the lower production estimate. At 5.5 percent of projected usage, ending stocks would be their lowest since 1994/95. Projected season average prices are raised for corn, sorghum, and oats. December 1 hay stocks per roughage-consuming animal unit (RCAU) are down from last year, but silage production per RCAU is up as the decline in RCAUs outpaces that for silage. U.S. and foreign 2010/11 coarse grain production and ending stocks are reduced this month. Forecast world coarse grain ending stocks for 2010/11 are down 20 percent from the previous year and are lower than in 18 of the previous 20 years. Read more...

BiopharmRhoneClass.indd 1

31/03/2010 15:3

Whatever you are looking for in the milling industry? ...

... find it with IMD www.internationalmilling.com

IMD_40x40m_classAD.indd 1

15/03/2010 12:4

PALM VIEW TRADE “Your Reliable Supply Chain Manager” Products we produce and Export: • • • • • • •

Banana Meal Banana Powder Crude Tuna Fish Oil Crude Sardine Fish Oil Tuna Fish Meal Sardine Fish Meal Tapioca Chips & Tapioca Powder

Email: palmview@pldtdsl.net Website: www.palmviewtrade.com

31


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

January 20, 2011

Cargill Amsterdam Multiseed plant certified for ingredient safety

The Cargill Amsterdam Multiseed plant is certified according to the European Feed Ingredients Safety Code (EFISC) as of the January 17, 2011. The plant is a modern oilseed crushing facility processing about 600.000 tonnes of rape- and sunflower seeds per year. The audit was performed by the certification body SGS. “As a global acting company we are very happy with this pan- European initiative. Feed safety is a non-competitive issue as any problem occurring has strong repercussions on the industry as a whole,” said Hans Broekhuizen, Cargill Quality Assurance Benelux plants. “The present dioxin crisis is a clear example of such an incident.” “EFISC was developed by our industries best experts and has therefore contributed to the awareness on feed safety in our sector. This has essentially contributed to better understanding and implementation of the EU feed hygiene legislation and beyond. I would recommend this to other feed material sectors as well as an example of the way forward,” he said. The European Feed Ingredients Safety Code promotes good practices in the industrial manufacturing of safe feed materials. Read more…

Alltech’s Sel-Plex 1000 approved for organic farming

The Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI), a United States body tasked with approving the organic status of materials, has approved Alltech’s application for Sel-Plex 1000, making it the third product Alltech has listed with the institute. Since 1993, Sel-Plex 1000 has been a standard organic selenium source in animal diets around the world. Due to the recent OMRI listing, it can now be included in all organic feeding programmes across the United States and is approved for use in organic farming. “Selenium is an essential nutrient for both animals and people, and plays a critical role in metabolism, normal growth, reproductive health, and immunity,” stated Alltech’s president Dr. Pearse Lyons. “Because of its specific organic form, Sel-Plex selenium is better absorbed and retained by the animal. Sel-Plex provides selenium in nature’s form – the safest form.” Sel-Plex is the only FDA reviewed form of organic selenium, and is the first strain specific form of organic selenium to be EU approved for all species (Strain:Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-3060). Read more…

Sodrugestvo loves to play with trains

Sodrugestvo Group has increased its railcar and grain hopper park with the acquisition of Balt-Trans, Russia’s second largest player in this field. Founded in 2009 by a group of private investors, Balt-Trans contributes 1,875 grain hoppers and 102 boxcars to the Group logistics operations, already consisting of Trans-Agro, a railcar owner, operator and freight forwarder. Combined, the company now owns a total of 2,225 grain hoppers and 102 boxcars and leases 80 vegetal oil cars on a long-term basis. Sodrugestvo was the company's largest customer prior to its purchase. The Group has received all required regulatory approvals for the transaction.

Controlling own logistics

"By combining Balt-Trans' holdings with our existing Trans-Agro operations, Sodrugestvo is now able to fully control its logistics chain inside Russia," said Stephane Frappat, CEO of Sodrugestvo Group. Sodrugestvo Group, founded in 1994, is a rapidly growing agro-industrial company serving global markets.

32


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

The company is vertically integrated with three business units - specialized infrastructure (including deep-water sea ports), logistics (including railcars and storage facilities) and processing facilities (for the production of proteins and oils from vegetal and animal commodities). Read more…

Farming co-op opens £18m animal feed mill in Co Tyrone

Farming co-operative Fane Valley has opened an £18m animal feed mill in Co Tyrone. Fane Valley chairman William McConnell, who said it was the result of a six-year development and construction project by the farmer-owned group, opened the mill at Bankmore Industrial Estate outside Omagh. "This development will allow Fane Valley to significantly increase its feed compounding capacity, thereby meeting the needs of our growing customer base throughout Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland," Mr McConnell said. "The investment has also safeguarded the 40-plus jobs at the former Fane Valley (Scotts) mill in Omagh," he said. The company said the facility was the most modern of its kind in Europe and had the best technology for feed milling. Chief executive Trevor Lockhart said the facility was a "win-win scenario for Omagh". Read more...

United States Federal Government spends millions on hoop houses

The federal government has spent millions of dollars to help farmers nationwide buy greenhouse-like structures called high tunnels that can add valuable weeks and even months to their growing seasons by protecting produce from chilly temperatures. About $13 million has gone to more than 2,400 farmers in 43 states to help pay for the low-tech tunnels that look like a cross between Quonset huts and conventional greenhouses. The structures, also known as hoop houses, have been particularly beneficial in the north, where they allow farmers to plant as much as four weeks early and keep growing later in the fall. The U.S. Department of Agriculture touts the tunnels as environmentally friendly and a way to help meet the demand for local and sustainable produce. Experts say high tunnels employ efficient drip irrigation systems and reduce pest problems, diseases and fertilizer costs. Read more...

January 21, 2011

Chinese delegation purchases soybeans

On Thursday, a delegation of Chinese officials representing the ten largest soybean crushers in China signed contracts to purchase 110 million bushels of U.S. soybeans. According to the United Soybean Board, which hosted the ceremony in Chicago, these contracts are worth $1.8 billion. This signing represents the second largest single-day export sale of soybeans, eclipsed only by a sale in 2008. "This is a huge event for U.S. soybean farmers," said Jim Call, United Soybean Board International Marketing chair. "This isn't something that happens everyday and it just goes to show that the commitment between the U.S. soybean industry and China is continuing." A number of U.S. exporting companies also participated in the signing ceremony, including ADM, Cargill and CHS. Illinois Governor Patrick Quinn also attended, as did U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk. Read more...

33


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

Soft cash grain basis; stocked pipeline

U.S. cash basis levels are expected to remain soft, continuing to feel pressure from adequately stocked cash supply pipeline. The market isn't seeing a great deal of activity beyond already contracted movement of supplies, as end-user buying remains subdued while the market digests fresh supplies already filtering into the pipeline in recent weeks, a cash connected broker at the Chicago Board of Trade said. Producers sold sizable amounts of grain last fall for delivery in January, and the delivery of the inventories has pressured basis levels at interior elevators and river terminals. Cash basis is static at best, as shipments are slow right now, but weather could kick start things in the near future, analysts at FCStone, a brokerage firm, said in a market note. Commercial inventories of U.S. cash grain held steady last week while soybeans supplies increased, leaving elevators, terminals, ports and warehouses surveyed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture filled to 70 percent of total holding-capacity. The agency said, although overall stated stockpiles held steady, soybean inventories increased by three percent in the past week, while visible supplies dropped by two percent for corn, and one percent for grain sorghum. Read more‌

More efficient beef cattle with restricted feeding

Reducing the amount of feed given to young female cows called heifers can result in more efficient use of nutrients for growth and reproduction, according to studies conducted by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) animal scientist Andrew Roberts and his colleagues at the Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory in Miles City, Montana, found that the heifers they fed to lower target weights than those traditionally recommended consumed 27 percent less feed over the winter months, and gained weight more efficiently throughout the post weaning period and subsequent grazing season. According to Roberts, this strategy of providing less feed may reduce costs of developing each replacement heifer by more than US$31 and extend their lifespan, with important ramifications for lifetime efficiency and profitability. Feed represents 50 to 55 percent of total costs of developing replacement heifers. In their study, begun in 2001, heifers were divided into two lifetime treatment groups: The control group was fed according to industry guidelines, and the restricted group was fed (on a body-weight basis) 80 percent of feed consumed by their control counterparts for 140 days, ending when they were 1 year old. Read more‌

Australia remains world's 5th-largest wheat exporter

Australia maintained its position as the fifth-largest global exporter of wheat in 2009-10. Exports to China increased in 2009/10 and imports of Australian wheat by Middle Eastern countries decreased, Wheat Exports Australia said. According to industry regulator Wheat Exports Australia (WEA) the country exported 12.1 million tonnes (mt) of bulk wheat to 36 countries, and 2.5 mt in containers and bags to 46 countries in the Australian marketing year ended Sep. 30, 2010. The total global wheat trade reached 127 mt in the international trade year that ended June 30, 2010, WEA said. Australia's top six bulk wheat exporters shipped 9.6 mt and accounted for 79 percent of total bulk exports in 2009-10. The top four exporters each shipped in excess of 1.0 mt of bulk wheat, accounting for 64 percent of Australian bulk wheat exports.

34


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011 THE GFMT MARKET PLACE

Historically, Australia has held a position in the top five major wheatexporting countries, but in recent years growing exports from the former Soviet Union states of Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan has challenged this position. About 20 percent of global wheat production is sold internationally, with the trade averaging 115 mt a year in the 10 years ended 2009-10, peaking with growth of 41percent to 143 mt in 2008-09, WEA reported. Read more…

Analysis & Control Intake and Inline measurement of moisture, protein, temperature, structure, ash, fat, fibre, starch and colour. Recipe management and traceability records.

EFSA opens nanomaterials guide for comments

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has launched a public consultation on its draft guidance document for engineered nanomaterial (ENM) applications in food and feed. The guidance document sets out for applicants, the data needed to understand the specific properties of the ENM, allowing a risk assessment to be carried out. The draft guidance also recognises several uncertainties related to test methodologies and the availability of data and makes recommendations about how risk assessments should reflect such uncertainties. Professor Vittorio Silano, Chair of EFSA's Scientific Committee said, "This is the first time that risk assessment guidance on nanotechnologies related to the food chain has been developed, making this public consultation very important to EFSA. We look forward to reviewing the contributions. " Read more…

Postgraduate seminar - Advances in feed evaluation science

The objective of the International postgraduate seminar ‘Advances in feed evaluation’ (11-15 April in Wageningen, the Netherlands) is to provide a concise update on the principles of feed evaluation as applied to the livestock industries. Our knowledge of the effects of specific nutrients and anti-nutrients on metabolism and ultimately animal performance has expanded rapidly over the last decade. This has increased the need to accurately define the available nutrient content of animal feeds. In addition, some major advances have been made in chemical analyses and other laboratory assays that allow us to better characterise nutrient content and availability in feedstuffs. The Seminar Advances in feed evaluation science is intended for nutritionists, feed formulation, advisors, managers, teachers, researchers and professionals involved in animal feed manufacture.

®

For maximum control and efficiency call:

01473 829188 www.suffolk-automation.co.uk

SILO INSTALATIONS ...

... TO COVER YOUR MARKET NEEDS Ctra. Arenas de San Juan, Km 2.300 13210 Villarta de San Juan - Spain Tel: +34 926 64 05 40 Fax: +34 926 64 02 94 Email: elena.ektova@symaga.com

AquafeedClassified40_2x40mFI

www.symaga.com

Symaga_class.indd 1

03/11/2010 10:3 ®

STYLE CC-XD (XTREME DUTY)

Polyethylene Elevator Bucket

ELEVATOR BUCKETS & BOLTS

St. Louis, Missouri USA

T:+1 314 739 9191• F:+1 314 739 5880 www.tapcoinc.com

WWW.EXTRUDER.NL / WWW.EXPANDER.NL

Almex b.v., Verlengde Ooyerhoekseweg 29 7207 BJ Zutphen, Netherlands, tel.: +31 (0)575 572666 e-mail: info@almex.nl, internet: www.almex.nl

Topics at the seminar will be presented by: Prof. J.L. Black, John L. Black Consulting, Warrimoo University of Sydney, Australia. Prof. W.H. Hendriks, Animal Nutrition Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands. Prof. P.J. Moughan, Massey University, Riddet Institute, Palmerston North New Zealand. Prof C.F.M. De Lange, University of Guelph, Department of Animal and Poultry Science, Guelph, Canada. Read more...

Buhler AG CH – 9240 Uzwil, Switzerland T: +41 71 955 11 11 F: +41 71 955 66 11 E: milling@buhlergroup.com

www.buhlergroup.com

Buhler Class ad_GFMT10.indd 1

11/12/2009 09:0

A Clondalkin Company

FLEXIBLE PACKAGING

CB Packaging is a market leader of multi-walled paper sacks. With over 50 years of experience, we offer solutions for a wide range of industries, including animal feeds, pet food, seeds, milk powder, flour and root crops.

For more information, please call Tim Stallard: +44 (0) 7805 092067 www.cbpackaging.com

35


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

January 24, 2011

It’s show time at World Ag Expo in California

On a clear afternoon, the Sierra Nevada becomes a magnificent backdrop to the largest agricultural gathering in California each February. World Ag Expo exhibitor banners and signs contrast colorfully with what will be a snow encased mountain range this year for the 44th annual running of the world’s largest agricultural exposition Feb. 8-10 at the International Agri-Center in Tulare, Calif. One of the heaviest snow packs in several years will be evident to the 100,000 people who are expected to visit World Ag Expo’s nearly 1,500 exhibitors within the 2.6 million-square-foot show grounds located alongside Highway 99 midway between Fresno and Bakersfield. Snowmelt from the 640-mile long mountain range is major source of water for farmers and ranchers in California. Early-season measurements reflected a snow accumulation of at least 200 percent of normal this year. This is sure to give an economic boost to attendees and exhibitors at World Ag Expo. Read more...

South American crop extremes

Of all the fundamentals weighing in on the corn and soybean markets lately, the one that's gotten most of the attention is how Mother Nature's behaved in the southern hemisphere, namely the areas of Brazil and Argentina that grow most of South America's soybeans and corn. As farmers in those countries start to look ahead to harvest, which will begin in parts of South America in the next couple weeks, they're taking stock of where the weather's left their crop potential: Argentina's faced some tough drought conditions throughout the growing season, but recent rains have helped ease that drought pressure. A lot of farmers in Brazil, though, have had good weather lately, and are looking forward to a bumper crop. Agriculture.com Marketing Talk member Santiago is a farmer in Argentina who's been dealt a tough hand with his crops this year. His farm in the Cordoba province in the center of the nation has missed out on many of the rains that have fallen there -- especially in the last 2 weeks -- and that's got him worried about his crop prospects as harvest looms. "If we do not get any [rain this or] next week either, I can say that our soybeans will be in trouble," Santiago said in Marketing Talk this week. Read more...

Lallemand Animal Nutrition appoints new Business development Director

Lallemand Animal Nutrition has announced that it has appointed Allan MacGillivray as Business Development Director – Australia, effective 1st February 2011. Allan MacGillivray is a nutritionist and experienced manager by background with a Masters in animal science from Colorado State University. He joins LAN from a feed industry consultancy role having previously been General Manager of Provimi Australia for 4 years, handling its sale to Lienert Australia in 2008. Prior to this Allan was managing director/ regional manager of Provimi’s JV business, NuTec Southern Africa for 10 years. Allan will report to Ken Rich, the managing director of Agrig8, LAN’s existing Australian business acquired in June 2010. Read more...

36


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

Jamaica in search of alternative feedstock

Government is exploring alternative feedstock as part of a programme aimed at combating volatile food prices, says Agriculture Minister Dr Christopher Tufton. Tufton made the revelation as Jamaicans brace for higher food prices due to soaring cost of grains on the international market, which is expected to impact the cost of feeds used in the production of diary, poultry, meats and eggs. "Where we have to go is, to take a look at alternative feedstock - cassava, for example, that can be pelletised to make poultry feed and pig feed; different types of grass that can be used for beef or production cattle rearing and small remnants rearing," Tufton told the Business Observer. "That's where we have to focus our attention in order to say, instead of requiring 'x' amount of grain, we can cut back and substitute it with other things," he explained. Tufton ruled out directly replacing the imported grains with local produce, noting that Jamaica does not possess the critical mass needed to grow corn and soybean. Read more…

CHS acquires Eastern European Agri Point

The Agri Point acquisition is part of the company's ongoing global grain origination expansion, adding approximately 1.5-to-2 million tonnes of corn, wheat and barley. CHS Inc, a leading grains, foods and energy cooperative in the US, has acquired Agri Point Limited from East Point Holdings Limited, Nicosia, Cyprus." Acquiring Agri Point enables CHS to further develop its global competency and presence into the high growth areas of Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary and Serbia," says Claudio Scarrozza, general manager, CHS Europe, Geneva, Switzerland. "In addition, we're adding important infrastructure to our global supply chain capabilities with a deep-water port in Constanta, Romania, a barge loading facility on the Danube River at Giurgiu, Romania, and an inland grain terminal at Oroshaza, Hungary." Read more...

Feed prices and dioxin devastate EU pig market

European feed manufacturers (Fefac) President Patrick Vanden Avenne called on the EU Farm Council Presidency to take urgent measures at the Farm Council meeting today to prevent the collapse of the EU pig market. “The current market situation of the EU livestock sector is extremely worrying. In particular the EU pig sector is facing a near market collapse,” Vanden Avenne said. A key reason for this situation lies in particular in the rising cost for feed grains, which have recently reached the levels of 2007/2008, resulting from global demand outpacing supplies of feed grains. The current market crisis has been further exacerbated by the knockon effects of the dioxin incident in Germany leading to a drastic fall in domestic consumption and temporary closure of some important export markets for German pork. In the meantime, however, market experts anticipate that the present tension on the EU and global cereals markets may grow further before the end of the marketing year due to rising global competition for scarce feed grain supplies. Read more...

37


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

January 25, 2011

Gleaning a harvest for the needy by fighting waste

On U.S. farms, gleaning is making a comeback, as a national anti-hunger organization has turned to the ancient practice to help feed the poor. And it also gives farmers a way to use produce that would otherwise be wasted. In the Old Testament, farmers are told not to pick their fields and vineyards clean, but instead to leave the edges for orphans, widows and travellers. In the modern day, gleaning is more about preventing would-be waste. Food gets left in the field for all kinds of reasons. Two big ones are that mechanical harvesting misses a lot — and sometimes the crops aren't pretty enough for supermarket shelves. "The statistics are that 96 billion pounds of food are left — this is pre-consumer food — goes to waste in this country," says Linda Tozer of the Society of St. Andrew, an organization that coordinates farmers around the Southeast and out West. And that food-waste estimate, from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is going up, not down "What we are trying to do is build a network that will take food that would not make it to market for a variety of reasons," Tozer says, "and get it to agencies that are feeding the hungry." The Society of St. Andrew recently added an office in Tennessee. At Jackson Farms in Pikeville, volunteer Nathaniel Smart, 5, heaved a mesh bag of red and green bell peppers from a scale and dropped it on a growing pile. Read more...

US: Will corn supplies be tight for another year?

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) projects that corn stocks at the end of the 2010-11 marketing year will total only 745 million bushels, said University of Illinois agricultural economist Darrel Good. “That projection represents 5.5 percent of projected marketing year consumption. Stocks as a percent of consumption would be the smallest since the record low five percent of 1995-96. And five percent is considered to be a minimal pipeline supply,” he said. Marketing year-ending stocks of soybeans are projected at 140 million bushels, or 4.2 percent of projected consumption. That ratio is slightly smaller than the previous low of 4.4 percent in 2003-04, he said. “The low level of inventories projected for this year reflects different market conditions than those that existed in either 1995-96 or 2003-04. Small crops that required a sharp reduction in the level of consumption just to maintain minimum year-ending stocks characterized both of those years. Year-over-year consumption of corn declined by 8.5 percent in 1995-96, and soybean consumption declined by 9.5 percent in 2003-04,” he said. Read more...

USDA and Purdue researchers say wheat hessian fly resistance genes failing

Many of the genes that allow wheat to ward off Hessian flies are no longer effective in the south-eastern U.S., and care should be taken to ensure that resistance genes that so far haven't been utilized in commercial wheat lines are used prudently, say United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Purdue University scientists. An analysis of wheat lines carrying resistance genes from dozens of locations throughout the Southeast showed that some give little or no resistance to the Hessian fly, a major pest of wheat that can cause millions of dollars in damage to wheat crops each year. Others, even those considered the most effective, are allowing wheat to become susceptible to the fly larvae, which feed on and kill the plants, researchers say.

38


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011 THE GFMT MARKET PLACE

Wheat resistance genes recognize avirulent Hessian flies and activate a defense response that kills the fly larvae attacking the plant. However, this leads to strains of the fly that can overcome resistant wheat, much like insects becoming resistant to pesticides. "The number of genes available to protect wheat is limited. There really aren't that many," says Richard Shukle, a research scientist with the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Crop Production and Pest Control Research Unit and Purdue adjunct associate professor of entomology. "In the Southeast, having multiple generations of Hessian fly each year enhances the ability of these flies to overcome wheat's resistance." Read more...

Analysis & Control Intake and Inline measurement of moisture, protein, temperature, structure, ash, fat, fibre, starch and colour. Recipe management and traceability records.

®

For maximum control and efficiency call:

01473 829188 www.suffolk-automation.co.uk

Cash grain inventories adequate; weak interior basis

U.S. interior cash-basis levels remain soft as adequate inventories in the cash supply pipeline capped basis movement. The supply chain has ample supplies, with large deliveries of forward booked sales in the first few weeks of the year alleviating the need for aggressive end user pricing, a cash connected Chicago Board of Trade floor broker said. The rapid advancement of grain and oilseed prices to over two-year highs in January enticed farmers into selling additional supplies, placing excess supplies in the pipeline, he added. Producers sold sizable amounts of grain last fall for delivery in January, and the delivery of the inventories has pressured basis levels at interior elevators and river terminals. However, farmgate prices did receive mild support from cold, snowy conditions in the central U.S. that limited farmer movement of supplies. The export basis for grains was flat to lower, while the soybean basis climbed at the Louisiana Gulf Monday. Strong export sales in the past week, and a higher than expected amount of soybeans inspected for export lifted CIF basis bids for soybeans. The export basis, or the difference between cash prices and futures, rose by as much as seven cents a bushel for soybeans at the Louisiana Gulf, according to U.S. government data. The increase extended Friday's turnaround from recent weakness. Basis held steady for corn and was unchanged to up three cents for soft red winter wheat. U.S. Department of Agriculture reported 25.874 million bushel of corn were inspected for export in the week ended January 20, below analysts' estimates that range from 30 million to 36 million. Soybeans inspected were 42.082 million above the high end of a range of estimates that span from 25 million to 35 million. Read more...

January 26, 2011

U.S Corn trade continues pullback

U.S. corn futures closed lower for the second consecutive day Tuesday as the market pulled back from 30-month highs. Corn for March delivery, the most-active contract, settled down 11 1/4 cents at US$6.44 a bushel at the Chicago Board of Trade. Widespread selling of commodities weighed on futures prices, as corn slumped with neighbouring soybeans and crude oil, traders said. Crude oil is linked to the grains because ethanol is made from corn. An announcement that the U.K.'s economy contracted 0.5 percent in the fourth quarter of last year, well below economists' expectations of a modest expansion, served as the catalyst that triggered selling across a host of commodities, said Bill Nelson, analyst with St. Louis-based Doane Advisory Services, a St. Louis-based agricultural advisory firm. The neighbouring soybean market lost 2.1 percent.

SILO INSTALATIONS ...

... TO COVER YOUR MARKET NEEDS Ctra. Arenas de San Juan, Km 2.300 13210 Villarta de San Juan - Spain Tel: +34 926 64 05 40 Fax: +34 926 64 02 94 Email: elena.ektova@symaga.com

AquafeedClassified40_2x40mFI

www.symaga.com

Symaga_class.indd 1

03/11/2010 10:3 ®

STYLE CC-XD (XTREME DUTY)

Polyethylene Elevator Bucket

ELEVATOR BUCKETS & BOLTS

St. Louis, Missouri USA

T:+1 314 739 9191• F:+1 314 739 5880 www.tapcoinc.com

WWW.EXTRUDER.NL / WWW.EXPANDER.NL

Almex b.v., Verlengde Ooyerhoekseweg 29 7207 BJ Zutphen, Netherlands, tel.: +31 (0)575 572666 e-mail: info@almex.nl, internet: www.almex.nl

Buhler AG CH – 9240 Uzwil, Switzerland T: +41 71 955 11 11 F: +41 71 955 66 11 E: milling@buhlergroup.com

www.buhlergroup.com

Buhler Class ad_GFMT10.indd 1

11/12/2009 09:0

A Clondalkin Company

FLEXIBLE PACKAGING

CB Packaging is a market leader of multi-walled paper sacks. With over 50 years of experience, we offer solutions for a wide range of industries, including animal feeds, pet food, seeds, milk powder, flour and root crops.

For more information, please call Tim Stallard: +44 (0) 7805 092067 www.cbpackaging.com

39


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

"Sharp losses were posted in corn and soybeans today as funds liquidated their long positions," said Karl Setzer, analyst for Iowa-based MaxYield Cooperative. Commodity index funds sold an estimated 13,000 corn contracts, a healthy amount, traders said. Read more...

Cargill teams up with KSU to build animal feed research centre

Cargill is to give a US$500,000 grant to the Kansas State University (KSU) to help with the construction of the Cargill Center for Feed Safety Research. The facility will conduct studies with pathogens such as salmonella and E. coli to address current food and feed safety issues facing the feed industry. Once operational (expected by the end of 2012), the facility will allow for planned research on a variety of food and feed safety efforts, including feed processing technologies to sterilize feed and lower bacterial/viral introduction to livestock operations and the food chain. The facility will be in the department of grain science and industry complex along Kimball Avenue. It will be part of the new O.H. Kruse Feed Mill and Biorefinery Teaching and Research Center, the groundbreaking for which was in October 2010. The facility also will be near the site of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility, which will conduct research on dangerous and exotic foreign animal diseases. The Cargill Center for Feed Safety Research will be jointly operated by the K-State departments of grain science and industry and animal sciences and industry, and will serve as a critical link between the research, teaching and outreach efforts of the departments. Read more...

Japanese feedstuff manufacturer cuts corn in animal feed

Chubu Shiryo Co Ltd, a leading Japanese feed stuff manufacturer, has started making some animal feed with less corn as the price of corn continues to rise, a company official said on Monday. According to Reuters, the official said that the move would not immediately affect the volume of Japanese corn imports, though this could change when the company starts reducing corn volumes in a broader range of feeds. Chubu Siryo started feed shipments for egg-producing chickens this month, with the use of corn cut from 50 percent to 30 percent, the average mix in compound feed for chickens in Japan, the official said. It plans to extend the move to feed used for pigs as well, although the official declined to set a time frame for this. The company increased the proportion of alternatives, primarily corn meal and wheat bran, without damaging the nutrition quality, helped by a processing technology the company has developed to improve the cost of processing feed from meal, he said. Read more...

New appointment Delacon Phytogenic Feed Additives

Delacon Phytogenic Feed Additives has announced that Dr. Karola Wendler is taking over as ‘head of product management & innovation’ by end of January 2011. Dr. Wendler has already been working five years for Delacon and successfully coordinated all research and developmentwork. Dr. Wendler graduated at Martin Luther University in Halle (Germany) and received her doctorate at the ETH Zurich. After research at the Agricultural & Agri Food Canada Research Centre in Lacombe (CDN) and the Rowett Research Centre in Aberdeen (GB), she continued her career at Delacon.

40


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

In her new position Dr. Wendler will be responsible for management and coordination of the Delacon R&D team. In cooperation with the management, sales and marketing, she will set up research strategies and make decisions about the development of new products and applications to expand the position of Delacon as the global market leader in phytogenic feed additives.

Willful violations assessed by OSHA in grain elevator deaths, insurers named in announcement Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) proposed penalties totaling nearly $1.4 million against two Illinois companies for violations of safety standards that led to the deaths of three workers last summer in grain elevators. Haasbach LLC received 24 violations, including 12 classified as willful, for failing to take steps to workers from engulfed 30 feet deep in corn. Alex Pacas, 19, and Wyatt Whitebread, 14, died at Haasbach's Mt. Carroll site on July 28.

Two other young workers escaped, but one of them suffered serious injuries. In addition to the OSHA proposed penalty of US$550,000, Haasbach was also fined US$68,125 from the Labor Department for child labor violations; it was illegal for under-age Wyatt Whitebread to be working inside the grain silo. The other Illinois firm, Hillsdale Elevator received 22 citations, including 17 classified as willful, for safety violations at its facilities in Geneseo and Annawan. Mr. Raymond Nowland, 49, was killed on August 27 at the Geneseo site when he was engulfed in corn. OSHA proposed a US$345,000 penalty for violations related to Mr. Nowland's death, and another US$384,000 in fines for violations at the Annawan site. Read more...

Six months of price rally continues for grain markets

Although the 2010-corn crop was among the largest crops U.S. farmers have produced, increasing consumption of corn and robust demand have contributed to rising corn prices for several months. “For the March 2011 futures contract, the current rally began on June 30, 2010,” said Darrel Good, University of Illinois Extension marketing specialist. “We’re six months into the current price rally that has gone from US$3.60 to over US$6 now.” The soybean market also has a similar trend.” The January 2011 contract rally started almost the same day as the corn contract,” said Good, who spoke at an educational meeting during the Northern Illinois Farm Show. “The soybean pattern is similar — that contract has gone from US$9 to over US$14 now.” Good discussed several issues that have contributed to this price rally. “The drought in Russia this year really affected the wheat crop; it is down about 30 percent,” the marketing specialist said. Argentina is also experiencing a drought. “They are not a big corn producer, but they are a big corn exporter,” Good explained. “It has not been a good growing season so far and the dry area is a fairly wide area.” Some parts of Argentina have received some rainfall, but not in the corn growing areas, Good reported. Read more...

41


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

January 27, 2011

Neogen: Tests for Salmonella in feed meet FDA draft guidance

Neogen Corporation announced that its rapid tests for Salmonella meet the guidance for Salmonella in animal feed currently being considered by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA's proposed guidance for Salmonella in animal feed seeks to lessen the number of human illnesses linked to contact with animal feed and pet food products, to reduce the risk to the animals themselves, and to prevent vertical transmission to human food. To do so, the FDA is proposing the testing of "direct human contact animal feed" (e.g., pet food and treats, and other feeds intended to be handled by humans) for the presence of any Salmonella, and the testing of other animal feeds for the presence of Salmonella strains of known concern to specific animal species "Advancements in the ability to definitively trace a pathogenic outbreak to its root cause have solidified the link between animal feed and pet food contaminated with Salmonella and human and animal illness," said Ed Bradley, Neogen's vice president of Food Safety. "As we've proven by working with numerous worldwide food and feed industries over the years, we offer the animal feed industry not only exceptional rapid testing options, but also the expertise and experience to put the tests to their best use." Read more ...

Russia says no to poultry from Germany - restrictions in place

Russia has stated that it has placed temporary restrictions on poultry imports from Germany. The restrictions – effective since January 25, 2011 – have come about due to the recent dioxin scandal in which it was reported that the North German company Harles & Jentzsch manufactured fat components for the compound feed industry. It was with this company that the dioxin contamination was discovered. The dioxin is believed to have stemmed from feed contaminated with industrial fats. Authorities believe these fats were substituted for vegetable fats at some point in the tainted feed's manufacturing process. Read more ...

China battles pork meat laced with a poisonous drug

There have been reports of consumers in China becoming ill and ending up hospitalised with stomach pains and heart palpitations after consuming pork laced with Clenbuterol. Clenbuterol, in China is also known as "lean meat powder," and is banned in the country. However, animal feed is sometimes mixed with this dangerous drug because some farmers want to profit on the market – as it is used in animal feed because it can decrease a pig's body fat to a thin layer, which makes the meat appear leaner and while it also makes skin pinker – making the meat look fresher for a longer period. Clenbuterol, in China is also known as "lean meat powder," and is banned in the country. However, animal feed is sometimes mixed with this dangerous drug because some farmers want to profit on the market – as it is used in animal feed because it can decrease a pig's body fat to a thin layer, which makes the meat appear leaner and while it also makes skin pinker – making the meat look fresher for a longer period. Clenbuterol-treated pork requested from pig farmers

42


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

Because of the effects on pork meat, it has made some Chinese meat suppliers request Clenbuterol-treated pork from pig farmers. With using Clenbuterol fat burning and muscle growth happens rapidly, which is why some see it as an ideal a feed additive. Though there have been reports in China of the drug entering the food supply, exactly how much food tainted with this drug is not known currently – the Chinese government will not state how many cases of contaminated meat or related illness occur annually. Read more ...

THE GFMT MARKET PLACE

A Clondalkin Company

FLEXIBLE PACKAGING

5th annual Kemin Poultry Summit features feed safety panel

Industry experts discussed feed safety issues, programs and changing regulations at the 5th Annual Kemin Poultry Summit held at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta (January 25). Kristi Krafka, vice president of regulatory affairs, quality assurance and quality control for Kemin AgriFoods North America, moderated a panel discussion featuring three industry experts. Panelists included: Richard Sellers, American Feed Industry Association; Chuck Hofacre, D.V.M., M.A.M., Ph.D., University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine and Merrill Bishop, CobbVantress, Inc. “Feed safety has received much attention in the past year with several high profile incidents and many new regulations,” said Krafka. “Today’s panel discussion was a unique opportunity to learn from experts in regulatory, research and feed production how new regulations will impact the industry and what additional measures should be taken to ensure the continuing safety of animal feed.” Richard Sellers is the vice president of feed regulation and nutrition for the American Feed Industry Association (AFIA) in Arlington, Virginia. He joined AFIA in 1991 and was promoted to his current position in 2000. He holds a Bachelor of Science from the University of Memphis and a Master of Science from the University of Arkansas in animal sciences. He is a professional animal scientist registered with the American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists. Read more...

Wheat growing belt concerned about the Weather

Dry and cold weather in the Plains states could spell trouble for wheat crop. USDA Meteorologist Brad Rippey says snow cover is eroding in many parts of the High Plains from Montana into Texas."So if you make that short trip across the plains say from eastern Colorado into northeastern Kansas, you are going to find a very brown environment in the western areas," Rippey said. "As you head into northeastern Kansas there is still quite a bit of snow, as much as a half a foot on the ground." The western and southwestern hard red wheat belt remains under significant drought stress and weather extremes. "The producers in that region have been fairly fortunate this winter in that conditions have not been that extreme." Read more...

Seed Companies Set for Corn Hybrid War with DroughtTolerance Traits?

DuPont (Pioneer Hi-Bred) and Syngenta developed the new varieties through traditional breeding techniques – with a little advanced technology thrown in to speed the process of picking which parent plants to try. The duo’s entry into the world market could start decades of fierce competition for rain-challenged growers’ business. Biotech varieties in the pipeline for future release may have an even bigger impact than today’s hybrids, says Kraig Roozeboom, agronomist with Kansas State University Research and Extension.

43

CB Packaging is a market leader of multi-walled paper sacks. With over 50 years of experience, we offer solutions for a wide range of industries, including animal feeds, pet food, seeds, milk powder, flour and root crops.

For more information, please call Tim Stallard: +44 (0) 7805 092067 www.cbpackaging.com

CENZONE TECH INC. 2110 Low Chaparral Drive San Marcos CA92069 USA Tel: 760 736 9901 Fax: 760 736 9958 Web: www.cenzone.com E-mail: cenzone.tech@worldnet.att.net

Croston Engineering Ltd Tarvin Mill Barrow Lane, Tarvin Chester CH3 8JF Tel: 01829 741119 Fax: 01829 741169 E-mail: admin@croston-engineering.co.uk Website: http://www.croston-engineering.co.uk BULK STORAGE, HANDLING, AND PROCESS ENGINEERS FOR THE ANIMAL FEED, GRAIN, FLOUR, BAKERY, HUMAN AND PET FOODS INDUSTRIES


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

“Either way, drought-tolerant corn could expand seed companies’ markets,” he says. “Continued expansion of corn acreage at the expense of other crops, such as wheat and sorghum, will mean greater corn seed sales – which is the most profitable sector of the seed market.” Roozeboom adds that technology isn’t the only reason new-generation corns are arriving so fast, compared to the new offerings for other standard crops. The seed industry for some time has been making larger investments in improving corn yields, largely because corn has been generating more dollars to invest. Herbicide- and insect-resistant corn hybrids, for example, were earlier money-makers. Read more...

300 bushels/acre by 2030

In 1992, Ohio's corn crop achieved a record yield of 143 bushels per acre. Since then, genetic improvements have led to even higher yields, with the state's 2010 crop averaging a very respectable 163 bushels per acre. Now, the buzz across the nation's Corn Belt is that a remarkable 300 bushels per acre is possible by the year 2030. Is such a feat achievable? Ohio State University Extension specialist Peter Thomison will explore the idea during a capstone presentation, "300 bushels/acre by 2030: A certainty? A possibility? Or science fiction?" at Corn University, part of the 2011 Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference, Feb. 24-25 in Ada, Ohio. Corn University is scheduled for 11 a.m. to 5:50 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 24, and will include presentations by specialists from Purdue University, the University of Illinois and the University of Kentucky. Thomison's session will be followed by a panel discussion to wrap up the day. The Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference will be held at the McIntosh Center of Ohio Northern University. Early registration (before Feb. 15) is $50 for one day or $70 for both days. More information and registration materials are available at http://ctc.osu.edu/. Read more...

January 28, 2011

Residual herbicide use with herbicide-tolerant corn

If you have been growing corn and soybean or advising growers for several decades, it’s possible to remember how the ease of controlling weeds has switched back and forth between the two crops. There have been periods when control is easier in corn than soybeans (early days of atrazine) and then those when the reverse has been true (early days of Roundup Ready soybeans). The development of glyphosate resistance issues has resulted in a trend where currently several weeds are more effectively and/or less expensively controlled in corn than in soybeans. Or as Dickens might have said if he was a weed scientist: “It was the best of times in corn, it was the worst of times in soybeans.” This is certainly not true for all growers, since some still have great success in Roundup Ready soybeans. We do believe, however, that for several tougher weeds that have developed glyphosate resistance – giant and common ragweed, marestail and waterhemp – it’s essential to get effective control in corn to reduce the population that has to be managed in soybeans. A number of growers have commented during winter meetings that there was way too much giant ragweed in corn at harvest this year, and we made the same observations. Problems with weather and crop development can contribute to this, but other possible causes that are affected directly by grower decision-making include: Read more...

44


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

Animal feed company president donates US$100 million to UCLA

Animal feed mogul Meyer Luskin and his wife, Renee, have donated US$100 million to the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The 85-year-old Luskin, a UCLA alumnus who lives in Brentwood, is president and chairman of Scope Industries, a Santa Monica-based firm that recycles bakery waste into an ingredient in animal feed. Half the gift goes to the UCLA School of Public Affairs to support teaching and research in public policy, urban planning and social welfare. The rest goes toward construction of an on-campus hotel and conference center. "I live and work in the region and wanted to give back in a creative and unique way that helps UCLA to continue its important work with the broader community," Luskin said. "In addition to educating students, providing them a way to improve their lives, and conducting research, UCLA should apply faculty expertise to help address our society's biggest issues, and I am appreciative of being able to contribute to those ends." The school says the Luskin gift is the second largest ever to UCLA, topped only by entertainment industry mogul David Geffen's US$200 million medical school donation in 2002.

People: New appointments strengthen Optivite

Optivite, a British animal nutrition company, has strengthened its team by making five new appointments. Simon Knowles has been appointed as national sales manager responsible for the sales and marketing of the Optivite range of feed additives and biosecurity products. Mike Duxbury has been appointed national business manager pig and poultry home mix. Mike’s role is to develop the business within the home mix market and is looking to focus on Optivite’s Genex brand and grow the Optomega portfolio. Ellie Harrison has joined Optivite as Assistant Nutritionist. In her role she will give support in areas including product and feed formulation services to customers. Jackie Hill has joined Optivite as export registration co-ordinator. She will monitor regulatory submissions and renewals and coordinate documentation and assemble registration and renewal dossiers. Read more ...

EW Nutrition acquires Agrochemica and Humavet

With the acquisitions of Agrochemica and Humavet, EW Nutrition expands and strengthens its product portfolio in the fields of speciality feed/ feed additives and sanitary- as well as animal care-products for pets and farm animals. With Agrochemica and Humavet Dr. Arndt GmbH, EW Nutrition can optimally supplement the range and know how in innovative feed additives, enhancing animal health and performance. Jürgen Montag, Agrochemica – Humavet Group’s founder is selling the company due to the fact that he will be retiring. Jürgen Montag states: “I am pleased to have found EW Nutrition, as a strong partner, developing and internationalising Agrochemica and Humavet in our employees’ best interest.” According to Jan Wesjohann, managing director of EW Nutrition: “This acquisition is an important milestone in EW Nutrition’s future development and provides enormous synergetic potential in Research & Development, production and marketing. I am looking forward to working with our new colleagues for the benefit of our customers.” Read more...

45


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

Romania wants EU to be less strict concerning GM crops

The European Union (EU) has been asked by Romania's national federation of farm producers to make it possible for the cultivation of more genetically modified crops (GM). The chairman of Romania's national federation stated that the EU should adopt a less conservative view concerning GM crops. It said that the EU's current stance is halting economic prosperity of the continent in the absence of new technologies, according to a report by All Headline News.

January 31, 2011

Mystery of 200 Dead Cows in Wisconsin Solved

Authorities investigating the deaths of 200 cows in Wisconsin have come up with an unlikely culprit: the sweet potato. The cows were found dead in a Stockton pasture two weeks ago. Locals were left scratching their heads about what caused the mass die-off. Investigators from the University of Wisconsin have determined that a poison found in spoiled sweet potatoes that were part of the cattle’s feed killed the animals. "It is likely that a mycotoxin from moldy sweet potato was a major factor in the disease and deaths of these steers," said Peter Vanderloo, associate director of the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. There's been a spate of mass animal deaths in recent weeks, from fish in Maryland and Arkansas to birds in Louisiana and South Dakota. The farmer who owned the cows had thought they might have fallen victim to disease such as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, according to The Wisconsin Rapids Tribune. Vanderloo and his team ruled that out. "None of the major respiratory pathogens of cattle were identified in the samples provided to the lab," said Vanderloo. He also explained that the toxic sweet potatoes were not in the human food supply chain, so there was no threat to people. Read more‌

Visitors Focus on Sorghum

Visitors focus on Sorghum: Spain and Portugal send grain buyers on tour of U.S. farms Last week, the Sorghum Checkoff and the U.S. Grains Council hosted a group of Spanish and Portuguese grain buyers as they visited Kansas and South Texas. The organizations encouraged the use of sorghum in foreign poultry, swine and ruminant industries. Greg Graff, a sorghum farmer from Marienthal, Kan. says this group offers a great opportunity to sorghum producers because they represent very diverse industries. "Presentations were made by everyone from nutritionists and feed millers to producer representatives," Graff said. "They are very interested in the sorghum and its potential in their industry." Spain has been a very important customer for sorghum in the past and now wants to learn the newest practices in feed milling and ration formulation, as well as the current nutritive values of grain sorghum. Sorghum offers them a great value and they recognize that. Read more...

Trade and Investment Mission Leaves Monday for Peru

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA's) Acting under Secretary for Farm and Foreign Agricultural Services Michael Scuse leads 20 U.S. companies on an Agribusiness Trade and Investment Mission to Lima, Peru, beginning Monday. The group will meet with 150 Peruvian and Ecuadorian entrepreneurs and buyers to develop business ties and explore opportunities for joint ventures.

46


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

Scuse says Peru and Ecuador have experienced a decade of political, social and economic change that has created a dynamic environment for economic growth. Both are keen on expanding trade and investment with the United States, as well as with other Pacific-Rim countries through the Trans-Pacific Partnership to which the United States is a party. According to Scuse, this mission provides an excellent opportunity for U.S. agribusinesses to make contacts, exchange information, and sign sales agreements. Read more...

New foliar product available for corn, soybeans

Ratchet, a new foliar product for corn and soybeans, has just been introduced for the 2011 growing season by EMD Crop BioScience. According to EMD, Ratchet enhances photosynthesis and plant growth. It contains the company’s patented LCO Promoter Technology, which is a naturally occurring molecule that EMD says provides early-season plant health benefits to a number of crops. The LCO Promoter Technology is already being used along with an inoculant in EMD’s Optimize 400 seedapplied product for soybeans. Cathy Soanes, Ratchet product manager, says Ratchet is formulated for ease of use. “The product is compatible with the growers’ post-emergent applications, including glyphosate herbicides, so they can capture the benefits of LCO Promoter Technology with no additional passes over their fields.” The product is compatible with most tank mix partners. Read more...

Wheat Resistance Genes Failing, New Approach Needed to Stop Flies

Many of the genes that allow wheat to ward off Hessian flies are no longer effective in the southeastern United States, and care should be taken to ensure that resistance genes that so far haven't been utilized in commercial wheat lines are used prudently, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture and Purdue University scientists. An analysis of wheat lines carrying resistance genes from dozens of locations throughout the Southeast showed that some give little or no resistance to the Hessian fly, a major pest of wheat that can cause millions of dollars in damage to wheat crops each year. Others, even those considered the most effective, are allowing wheat to become susceptible to the fly larvae, which feed on and kill the plants.

Milling Industry Recruitment Specialist www.jcb-consulting.com +44(0)161 427 2402

Block 10 Todd Campus West of Scotland Science Park Acre Road, Glasgow Scotland G20 0XA Tel: +44 141 945 2924 IMD_40x40m_classAD

info@r-biopharmrhone.com www.r-biopharm.com R-Biopharm Rhône Ltd, Unit 3.06 Kelvin Campus, West of Scotland Science Park, Maryhill Road, Glasgow, G20 0SP Scotland Tel: +44 (0) 141 9452924 Fax: +44 (0) 141 9452925 info@r-biopharmrhone.com, www.r-biopharmrhone.com

Competence in Food and Feed Analysis

BiopharmRhoneClass.indd 1

31/03/2010 15:3

Whatever you are looking for in the milling industry? ...

... find it with IMD www.internationalmilling.com

IMD_40x40m_classAD.indd 1

15/03/2010 12:4

Wheat resistance genes recognize avirulent Hessian flies and activate a defense response that kills the fly larvae attacking the plant. However, this leads to strains of the fly that can overcome resistant wheat, much like insects becoming resistant to pesticides. Read more...

Feed expo attracts many, shows few novelties

The 2011 International Feed Expo (Expo), organized by the American Feed Industry Association in conjunction with the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association’s International Poultry Expo, attracted more than 20,000 visitors this year. The event featured a series of speakers and educational programs, and more than 900 exhibitors displayed the latest in products and technologies that are beneficial to the feed, pet food and poultry industries. According to the expo management the visitors came from over 100 different countries. "This year's Expo offered attendees a range of substantive programming and events to make their time in Atlanta as compelling as possible, on top of the hundreds of exhibits on the show floor," said Joel G. Newman, AFIA president and CEO.

47

PALM VIEW TRADE “Your Reliable Supply Chain Manager” Products we produce and Export: • • • • • • •

Banana Meal Banana Powder Crude Tuna Fish Oil Crude Sardine Fish Oil Tuna Fish Meal Sardine Fish Meal Tapioca Chips & Tapioca Powder

Email: palmview@pldtdsl.net Website: www.palmviewtrade.com


THE GLOBAL MILLER | January 2011

Conference attendees received regulatory and legislative updates from industry leaders and key federal decision-makers as well as gained knowledge and insight during the Expo and related educational programs. Read more...

48


For more information about the Global Miller visit: http://gfmt.blogspot.com/ or follow the Global miller on twitter


January - The Global Miller