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Center for Teaching and Learning 2016-2017 YEAR-END REPORT


Center for Teaching and Learning 2016-2017 Year-End Report The Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL)

was established on Nov. 1, 2016.

Two

departments with one staff member each,

the Center for Faculty Development and IDEAS, were incorporated into the new

Center. Currently, the Center for Teaching

and Learning has five staff members: Sara

Stephens, administrative assistant; Barbara Szyjko,

instructional

specialist;

Laura

technology

Mender,

staff

applications

systems analyst, Steven Jones, assistant

director for faculty development; and Jeanne Sewell, interim director.

In addition to the Center for Teaching and

Learning staff, an undergraduate student worker, Kyle Schreiber, assisted with the

support ticket system during fall 2016 and

spring 2017. An instructional technology graduate student, Kathy Hill, completed an

internship as an instructional designer during spring 2017.

This report summarizes the teaching and

learning activities from June 1, 2016 to May

31, 2017.


Support Tickets The Center for Teaching and Learning staff support the learning management system, D2L Brightspace (GeorgiaVIEW). Support tickets are logged into a database and used to improve services for faculty,

Table 1 – Support Tickets by User Type and Contact Type User Type Faculty

Contact Type Telephone Calls

staff and students. The Application Systems

Consultations

Analyst, the primary administrator for GeorgiaVIEW,

Emails

is assisted by two other staff who provide

Walk-ins Total

administrative assistance backup. The Applications Systems Analyst tests new learning management system features and performs application

# of Contacts

Staff

Telephone Calls

integrations. She is supported by the Instructional

Consultations

Technology Staff Specialist. The Instructional

Emails

Technology Staff Specialist, the primary educator

Walk-ins Total

for the learning management system, supports

167 11 199 29 406 24 1 103 4 132

faculty use and troubleshoots technology problems. She is assisted by two other staff members.

Students

Telephone Calls Consultations

57 3

There were 677 support tickets between June 1,

Emails

49

2016 and May 31, 2017. Table 1 displays the

Walk-ins

27

Total

support tickets by user type and contact type.

136

There has been a reduction in support tickets and that is primarily due to: • changes in what and how information is captured • improved communication with faculty and staff • continued improvement in faculty and students’ understanding of the GeorgiaVIEW platform

ITS/3rd party

Telephone Calls

0

Consultations

0

Emails

3

Walk-ins

0

Total

3

• availability of newly developed self-help faculty and student resources Figure 1 - Phone Call Help Tickets by User Type The comparison for phone calls is similar to the previous year (See Figure 1) as faculty generated the majority of the support calls; however, the most significant difference is the number of calls. Faculty represented 43% of the calls, followed by staff with 34% and students with 22%. ITS/3rd Party refers to the University Systems of Georgia Information Technology in Athens and 3rd Party refers to 3rd party vendors that are integrated into the learning management system. ITS/3rd Party represented an insignificant percentage of the phone calls.

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Figure 2 - Phone Calls Support Tickets Comparing 2015/2016 with 2016/2017

There were 248 phone calls for support FY 2016/2017 (See Figure 2).

600 500 400 300 200 100 0

Figure 3 - Email Support Tickets by User Type

Regarding email support, as shown in Figure 3, faculty represented 53% of the inquiries, followed by staff (28%) and students (19%). Students were the #2 origin of email in the previous year. 5 | CENTER FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING 2016-2017 ANNUAL REPORT | GEORGIA COLLEGE


Figure 4 - Email Support Tickets Comparing 2015/2016 with 2016/2017

There were 354 emails sent for support FY 2016/2017 (See Figure 4).

1000 800 600 400 200 0

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Table 2 displays support tickets by type of system, topic and number of contacts. A review of the support ticket system shows 60% of the support tickets were generated from faculty. Staff and students were about 20% each. Brightspace (GeorgiaVIEW learning management system) was the reason for 84% of the support tickets. The top seven support tickets were for enrollment, quizzes/survey, create account, name change, grade book and password. Table 2 - Support Tickets by System and Support Topic Category System

3rd party - Brightspace

Topic

# of Contacts

3rd party Integrations

15

Kaltura

16

SoftChalk

12

Turnitin

15

WebEx

6

Total Brightspace/GeorgiaVIEW

Other

Enrollment

64 125

Quizzes/Survey

75

Create Account

60

Name Change

49

Grade Book

43

Password

43

Content

29

Overall GeorgiaVIEW

29

Assignment

26

Discussions

26

Copy/Import

19

EXO-Sandbox create

19

Groups

8

Cross list

7

Navbar/Home Page

6

Checklist

3

Grade Challenge

3

Rubric

2

Total

572

Faculty Web Site

Setup and Use

9

GOML

New/Revised Entries

8

Software/ Campus

Training/Info

10

Referrals

Referred to IT, Registrar, FinAid

14

Total

41

Grand Total

677

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The highest number of support tickets (125) related to enrollment.

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Analysis The highest number of support tickets (125) related

Password support tickets are generated by a number

to enrollment. Support tickets categorized as

of factors. For example, when the students did not

enrollment were from eReqs (electronic requisitions)

update their Unify passwords. Students who have a

from Human Resources for Enrollment related to new

long name (more than 25 characters), must contact us

employees and students from other institutions who

to create an internal GeorgiaVIEW password. We

were enrolled in summer courses taught by Georgia

have to create GeorgiaVIEW passwords for students

College faculty. We were enrolling all new hires into

from other universities who are enrolled in study

GeorgiaVIEW to take the Ethics course and quiz, until

abroad courses that our faculty teach. Finally, there

we determined that Human Resources was no longer

are circumstances when GeorgiaVIEW users are both

using that course. We now enroll new employees at

and students and employees. Because students and

the request of Human Resources. Some faculty who

employees are in separate databases, Information

teach Study Abroad courses have students from other

Technology Systems Administrative staff must make

institutions enrolled in their courses. The enrollment

changes to provide the user access to GeorgiaVIEW

number includes those students, which is less than

as an employee.

20. GeorgiaVIEW quizzes (75) and grade book (43) were the second and fifth support requests. Quizzes/ surveys and grade book questions/issues stand out both by ticket count and anecdotal evidence. Workshop opportunities and marketing of available support resources for these topics could possibly lower these numbers. In addition, offering a service of allowing the Center for Teaching and Learning to build the course grade book for the faculty should reduce grade book questions and promote quality design structure. Copying content (19) and resolving grade books remains a support ticket high point at the beginning and end of semester. Dissemination of support resources just prior to the end of a semester should prove helpful. Create account (60) and name change (49) were the third and fourth highest support requests. We were manually creating accounts for students prior to the continuous updates syncing Banner and GeorgiaVIEW. We anticipate that number to decrease the upcoming year. Name change requests are generated when a student name is changed. We have no control over name change requests.

Faculty Resources Website The Faculty Resources website was created to assist faculty in gaining information and finding resources. The site has over 180 links /resources distributed over seven main categories: General Interest, Campus Services for Faculty, CTL Update Archives, GeorgiaVIEW, Quality Matters, State Authorization and Tools for eLearning. Examples of self-help resources on the website include: • 21 Quick guides were created on how to use GeorgiaVIEW. Each quick guide is 1-2 pages that assist faculty in completing tasks in GeorgiaVIEW such as How to Post Final Grades, Giving Special Access in a Quiz, etc. • 28 Full length tutorials were created for GeorgiaVIEW. The tutorials are based on the tools in GeorgiaVIEW such as the Gradebook, Quizzing, Assignments, etc. • 47 different resources in the section on E-Learning tools which consists of a mix of created self-help tools and links to third party documentation.

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Student Resources Website The Student Resources website was created to assist students in gaining information and finding resources. The site has links to resources that are pertinent to students. Examples include the Academic Calendar, GeorgiaVIEW support, RAVE Guardian and Disability Services.

• LibApps Automajic Tool • Credo • InQuizitive

GeorgiaVIEW Near Real Time Integration with Banner The Center for Teaching and Learning staff worked

Introduction to GeorgiaVIEW and WebEx Courses

closely with Information Technology in the creation of a

Two courses were built in GeorgiaVIEW to introduce

decreased the number of support tickets to have student

participants to GeorgiaVIEW and WebEx. One course

enrolled in courses.

process that picks up student registration data four times a day and updates GeorgiaVIEW. This has greatly reduced the lag time between course registration and the student having course access in GeorgiaVIEW. It also has

was built for new faculty and the other course was for students. Faculty and students self-enroll for the courses.

Kaltura Multimedia Hosting

Faculty Information Manual The Center for Teaching and Learning staff developed a Faculty Information Manual as an interactive PDF file to

Kaltura is a video management platform that gives faculty

address common questions that faculty ask: Where can I

and students the ability to upload and share video, audio

find? Do I need? How do I? Where can I find more

and other media files. This is a streaming service - similar

information about? The manual also has a glossary of

to YouTube, but secured for Georgia College use. During

terms and acronyms commonly used at Georgia College.

this past year, several upgrades and enhancements were

Examples of topics covered include athletics, campus

added. Kaltura now offers Closed Captioning, Video

maps, campus events, class preparation and teaching,

Chaptering, Interactive Quizzing and an enhanced Screen

faculty support services, forms, policies and procedures

Recorder.

and student services.

Third Party Integrations in GeorgiaVIEW

The manual was designed to use online as it has

Five new third party integrations were added to

in July of each year to reflect new changes and updates.

GeorgiaVIEW.

The Faculty Information Manual is available from the

• Curriculum Builder

Center for Teaching and Learning website at

• LibApps

gcsu.edu/ctl .

hyperlinks to pertinent resources, including policies of the University and the University System of Georgia. During the development, it was widely distributed to faculty, staff and administrators for input. The manual will be updated

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Quality Matters Center for Teaching and Learning provides workshops for Applying the Quality Matters Rubric. Table 3 below summarizes data from the workshops provided over this past year. Table 3 - Applying the Quality Matter Rubric Workshops, Participants and Evaluations Criteria

Number

# Workshops

9

# Participants

79

# Evaluations

54 (68% Completion)

Discussion: Overall, the evaluations were excellent. For the question “I was satisfied with the workshop,� 38 (70%) strongly agreed and 16 (30% agreed). All participants who attended plan to use the Quality Matters Rubric except one, who will not be teaching.

To date, 134 individuals are certified for the Applying the Quality Matters Rubric and 165 who have registered for the Quality Matters database.

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FY 2017 Faculty Research Grant Recipients The purpose of the Faculty Research Small Grant Program is to provide seed funding up to $5,000 for faculty research projects. Funds can be used for supplies, equipment, software, or travel expenses incurred in carrying out the research. Fourteen faculty received a total of $50,023.30 to support faculty research. The faculty names, research title and

Fourteen faculty received a total of $50,023.30 to support faculty research

amount awarded are noted in Table 4 below.

Table 4 - Recipients of the 2016-2017 Faculty Research Grants, Research Grant Title and Amount Awarded Dean Baker, associate professor of

Peggy Elliott, assistant professor of

Amanda Reinke, assistant professor,

nursing, Georgia College Campus

French, world languages and cultures,

government and sociology, Policy-

SBIRT Project, $2,900.00.

Channeling Enlightenment Love: The

Drive Restorative Justice

Letters of Marie Le Prince de

Implementation in Virginia, $1,201.00.

Andrei Barkovskii, professor of microbiology, biological and environmental sciences, Analysis of Vibrio, Shigella and Salmonella pathogens in Georgia sites proposed for oyster aquaculture, $3,200.00. Scott Butler, assistant director School of Health and Human Performance, Condom Express: A Mail-in Condom Delivery Program at College

Beaumont (1711-80), $4,943.00. Allen Gee, associate professor, English and rhetoric, At Little Monticello: a biography of James Alan McPherson, $3,813.15 Kevin Hunt and Emily Simonavice, assistant professors, School of Health and Human Performance, Promoting Global Health Awareness Through Community-based Engaged Learning

Bruce Snyder, assistant professor, biological and environmental science, Constructing a Preliminary Phylogeny of the Native Earthworm Genus Diplocardia, $4,978.00. Katie Stumpf, assistant professor of biology, biological and environmental sciences, Avian Community Analysis at Lake Laurel Research Station,

in San Ignacio, Belize, $4,992.69.

$4,990.00.

Tsu-Ming Chiang, professor,

Monica Ketchie, assistant professor,

Allison VandeVoort, assistant

psychology, Emotional Coaching for

nursing, Nurses' Attitudes, Beliefs and

professor, biological and environmental

Autistic Spectrum Characteristics

Barriers Toward Physiologic Birth,

sciences, Investigating the Long-term

Children, $1,200.00.

$3,964.50.

Impacts of Agriculture on Andalusia

Campuses, $2,581.00.

Nicole DeClouette, associate professor of special education, Teacher Education, Cross-Cultural Diversity in Special Education (Tanzania), $1,259.96.

Hasitha Mahabaduge, assistant professor, chemistry, physics and astronomy, Spectrometer System for

Farm Soil: A Soil of Historical, Agricultural and Literary Importance, $5,000.00.

Sputter Deposition Monitoring, $5,000.00.

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Table five summarizes the Faculty Research Grant Program over the past four years: Table 5: FRG Comparison Data: 2014-2017 Number of grant proposals

Number of awarded

Total funds requested

Total funds awarded

2016-2017

17

14

$63,997

$50,050

2015-2016

40

23

$124,233

$58,263

2014-2015

30

19

$108,555

$49,626

2013-2014

47

25

$147,575

$64,842

Year

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The purpose of the Faculty Research Small Grant Program is to provide seed funding up to $5,000 for faculty research projects. 14 | CENTER FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING 2016-2017 ANNUAL REPORT | GEORGIA COLLEGE


Outcomes of Faculty Research Grant Program: 2016-2017 In comparison with previous years, there was a decline in the number of Faculty Research Grant proposals and the number of grants awarded during the 2016-2017 academic year. It is unclear why this decline occurred. One possible reason may be that the grant application form had to be reconfigured to a new webform format, the result of which was that the Round 1 (fall semester) call for applications went out a few weeks later than usual. However, that would not explain the decline in Round 2 (spring semester) applications compared to previous years. Another possibility is that some faculty members were not aware of the grant deadlines and were not able to submit proposals in time. Anecdotally, some faculty shared that they did not know about the calls for proposals with Center staff. However, there was no change in the Center's communication strategy for notifying faculty of the availability of funds and the proposal deadlines. The Center will work with the Faculty Research Grant committee to improve faculty awareness of the Faculty Research Grant process and timelines. We asked each of the 2016-2017 grant recipients to provide an update on their projects, even though many of them are still working on their research projects. Of the fourteen recipients, ten provided preliminary progress reports with comparison data comparable to the survey results summarized for 2014-2016. • Six of the ten respondents reported involving students in their research projects. Those six faculty members have worked with 18 undergraduate students and four graduate students so far. • Two of the respondents, Dr. Tsu-Ming Chiang and

with her at The Society for Research in Child Development and the Southeastern Psychological Association conferences. Three of Dr. Mahabaduge’s students co-presented papers with him at the American Physical Society conference. In addition, Dr. Mahabaduge and one of his students, Nowsherwan Sultan, are conducting research at the University of Nebraska as part of the NSF-funded Research Experiences for Undergraduates program. • Six of the ten respondents reported having already made scholarly presentations based on their research projects and another respondent has a conference proposal under review. • Two of the respondents, Dr. Peggy Elliott and Dr. Allen Gee, have book proposals under consideration. Dr. Gee has a journal article accepted for publication, Dr. Amanda Reinke has a journal article under consideration for publication, Dr. Scott Butler has a book chapter under consideration and Drs. Kevin Hunt and Emily Simonavice plan to submit a journal article. • Three of the respondents, Dr. Peggy Elliott, Dr. Bruce Snyder and Dr. Amanda Reinke submitted external grant proposals based on their research projects: Dr. Elliott to the National Endowment for the Humanities, Dr. Snyder to the National Science Foundation and Dr. Reinke to the Law and Society Association. Faculty members who received Faculty Research Grants between 2014 and 2016 were surveyed. The survey was sent to 56 of the 68 grant recipients from 2014, 2015 and 2016. Seven of the grantees no longer worked at Georgia College and three had received two grants during the period and two recipients decided to not accept their grants. Thirtythree surveys were completed, a response rate of 59%. The key findings of the survey are listed below: • Twenty-six of the thirty-three respondents (79%)

Dr. Hasitha Mahabaduge, reported co-presenting

reported working with students on their research

multiple conference papers with undergraduate

projects. The respondents reported working with a

students at professional conferences. Seven of Dr.

total of 154 undergraduate and 18 graduate

Chiang’s students co-presented papers and posters

students.

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• Nearly half of the respondents (16/33) reported

• Nearly 40% of the respondents (13/33) reported

students as co-presenters and co-authors in the

scholarly publications or juried

faculty members’ scholarly presentations and

exhibitions/performances resulting from their

publications.

faculty research grants.

• Twenty-six of the respondents (79%) reported

• Two respondents reported receiving external

making scholarly presentations based on their

grants to support their research and another five

FRG-supported research at regional and national

reported applying for external grants.

conferences.

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Faculty Development At-A-Glance Table 5 summarizes the total number of faculty who participated in some of the faculty development activities June 1, 2016 through May 31, 2017.

Table 5 - Faculty Development Activities Faculty Development Activity

Number of Faculty Participants

New Faculty Orientation

36

Faculty Development Workshops

84

Faculty Learning Communities

24

Book Discussions

20

SOTL Fellows

4

Total

196

Outcomes of Consultations with

Department Chairs: During June and July

professional development needs of their

Faculty/Student External Award Recommendations

faculty members. Most of the chairs

The Center for Teaching and Learning made recommendations for

emphasized the need to support faculty in

two COPLAC awards, the Charles Dunn award for faculty and the

their scholarship. As a result, the Center for

David Prior award for students. We supported Dr. Jennifer Flory for

Teaching and Learning made preliminary

the Charles Dunn award and Samantha Clapp for the student

plans for a full-day conference that would

award. Dr. Flory was not an award recipient; however, we believe

bring in university presses and journal

she is very deserving, so we plan to submit her application again

editors and educate faculty on existing

next year. Samantha Clapp was honorable mention for the student

resources that support research and

award.

2016, individual meetings were held with many department chairs to discuss the

publishing. The Center will work with the Library, Grants and Sponsored Projects and

The Center also worked closely with Dr. Jan Hoffman-Clark to

others to organize a conference for the

prepare her application materials for the American Association of

2017-2018 academic year.

State Colleges and Universities American Democracy Project’s Barbara Burch Award in recognition of her campus and off-campus

During March and April 2017, individual

civic engagement activities.

meetings were held with all but four of the department chairs to share the list of award opportunities that the Center had identified for their respective departments and to solicit their recommendations for ways to encourage and support faculty in applying for these awards. To date, the Center has identified a total of 415 external award opportunities for departments.

To date, the Center has identified a total of 415 external award opportunities for departments.

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Number of workshops

Faculty Development Workshops

17

Workshops included the initial New Faculty Orientation plus four follow-up workshops for new faculty; a weekly series of Monday

Total number of faculty development workshop participants

Morning Mentor and Lunch and Learn workshops; two SOTL Fellows

120

workshops; and a Spring 2017 Brown Bag on Reacting to the Past. In addition and not included in these numbers, the Center for Teaching and Learning supported five faculty members' attendance at a regional workshop on Reacting to the Past that was held at the

Average number of participants per workshop

University of Georgia in January, 2017. Those faculty members

7

conducted a subsequent Brown Bag discussion and organized a book discussion group of the book, “Minds on Fire,” by Mark Carnes, the creator of the Reacting to the Past pedagogy.

Faculty Development Workshop Data Analysis There were few attendees at the Monday Morning Mentor and Fall Lunch and Learn workshop. The highest number for any of these meetings was three. To better meet faculty development needs, we will plan topics for faculty development workshops for the coming year in consultation with the directors of the Liberal Arts Council and focus on faculty development needs relative to the implementation of Goal 2 of the Georgia College Strategic plan. Thirty-six faculty attended the initial New Faculty Orientation, which was required of new faculty. The attendance for the four subsequent new faculty workshops was 16, 14, 5 and 5 respectively. The decline in new faculty participation could be the result of many factors:

• the first two workshops were held on consecutive weeks with a one-month gap between the subsequent workshops resulting in a relative lack of continuity across workshop participation; • new faculty had other obligations, such as attending department meeting or committee service; • decline in interest in the workshop topics. Past mid-year and end-of-year surveys of new faculty have indicated that lower-than-hoped-for attendance was usually due to scheduling conflicts. During the 2015-2016 academic year, the Center switched from following the posted University Governance Calendar schedule for professional development to once-amonth meetings with new faculty that were repeated: one on Friday mornings at 11 a.m. and repeated the following Tuesday at 2 p.m. On average, about 10 faculty attended the monthly workshops with their attendance split across two days. This is a scheduling approach worth considering for the 2017-2018 academic year.

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Outcomes from Workshop Evaluations: The only

one that has been prominent in the past evaluations of

workshops for which complete evaluations are

new faculty orientation, was that the sessions are too

available were the initial new faculty orientation

close to the beginning of classes. Furthermore, many

workshops. The following table summarizes the

of the respondents did not find helpful the emphasis

respondents’ overall evaluation of the various

on backward course design as the Monday afternoon

components of the initial new faculty orientation. Of

topic, nor did they find the presentation style valuable.

the 36 faculty who participated in the two-and-one-half days New Faculty Orientation, 15, or 44%, responded

Based on this feedback, the 2017 New Faculty

to the survey.

Orientation will be held during the first week of August and will be comprised of four half-day sessions

Based on the information collected in the survey, the

covering “nuts and bolts” issues. Information on the

respondents generally found the sessions to be

university’s liberal arts mission will be included in the

valuable or very valuable. However, the responses to

2017-2018 Faculty Information Manual. Pedagogical

the open-ended questions offered constructive

approaches will be included in workshops and self-

feedback for the program. A frequent comment and

help resources.

On-Demand Workshop The Center created an on-demand webinar for faculty to assist them in preparing the Faculty Information Form for the Student Rating of Instruction Survey. To date, the webinar has been viewed 147 times and downloaded 12 times.

Faculty Learning Communities

submitted an article for publication to a peerreviewed journal. • Dialogue on Inclusive Excellence and Distinctive Curricula: Ten faculty members, guided by Dr.

Beauty Bragg, met six times between Feb. 3 and April 14 to discuss ways of integrating diversity topics into their courses and to make their courses more inclusive. The group hosted a guest speaker, Dr. James Barta, to speak on “The Role of Culture in Mathematical Thought and Application: Ethnomathematics, Social Justice and Other Implications.” Dr. Barta is the Dean of the Tift College of Education at Mercer University. The group

The Center for Teaching and Learning sponsored three

generated several resource lists, which will be posted

Faculty Learning Communities and two book discussion

on the Center for Teaching and Learning website.

groups during the 2016-2017 academic year. The

• Sustainability: Five faculty and staff participated in a

Faculty Learning Communities topics and membership

Learning Community whose work contributed to the

were as follows:

proposal for a Certificate Program in Sustainability.

• Faculty Writing Circle: Seven former ENGAGE

The proposal was eventually accepted.

Fellows, Dr. Chavonda Mills, Dr. Kristin English, Dr.

Book discussions: A group of ten faculty members met

Kirsten Rodgers, Dr. Sandra Godwin, Dr. Dana Wood,

during the fall 2016 semester to discuss the book,

Dr. Heidi Fowler and Dr. Karen Berman, collaborated

“Make it Stick: The Science of Successful Learning,” by

on co-authoring conference presentations and a

Peter C. Brown. In spring 2017, ten faculty members

journal article based on their ENGAGE work. They

participated in a discussion of “Minds on Fire,” by Mark

have made several conference presentations and

Carnes.

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The Student Resources website was created to assist students in gaining information and finding resources.

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SOTL Workshop Four faculty members participated in the Center's SOTL Workshop series. One of the workshop participants, Dr. Hasitha Mahabaduge, was selected as one of 10 fellows in the University System of Georgia’s SOTL Fellows program. Outcomes from SOTL Workshop: In order to improve the outcomes and quality of the SOTL Workshop program and to align the work of the Georgia College SOTL Fellows with the Georgia College Strategic plan, the Center is revising the program to mirror the USG SOTL Fellows program. As such, the Center program will work with a cohort of faculty for the full academic year and ask that they focus their projects on Essential

Mentored Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavors (MURACE) The Mentored Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavors program supports mentored undergraduate research. A faculty from the College of Business, Dr. Doreen Sams, assists staff in the Center of Teaching and Learning with the program initiatives. A committee also assists with guiding the program initiatives. The following charts summarize the primary initiatives:

Learning Outcomes and transformative learning experiences.

Student Travel Grants The Mentored Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavor program funds students with approved research presentations to attend conferences. Students are funded up to $500 to cover conference fees, hotel, food and gas used for transportation. This past year, 102 students received funding. Figure 5 displays a comparison on the numbers of student travel grants between 2014-2017. The number of grants for 2017 is the same as 2014. We need to plan to keep the numbers sustained in the upcoming year. Figure 5 - Comparisons of Student Travel Grants FY 2014-2014

120 100 80 60 40 20 0

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Student Research Presentations

Figure 6 - Student Research Presentations FY 2011-2017 200

The Mentored Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavor program plans

150

an annual research conference. This past year, 142 students did podium or poster presentations at the April

100

conference. Figure 6 shows a comparison of the numbers of student research presentations between 2011

50

and 2017. That number was less than last year, probably because, for the first

0

time, the proposals went through a peer review process. The peer review process assisted with improving the quality of the presentations so that practice will continue for next year.

Figure 7 - Numbers of Summer Research Grants

Student Summer Research

10 8

The Mentored Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavor program also sponsored faculty mentored summer research. This year, three students are completing summer research projects. The Figure 7 depicts a comparison of the summer research grants for the past five years.

6 4 2 0

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In the Fall 2016 / Spring 2017, MURACE funded 107

In 2015/2016 (fall/spring), MURACE funded 77 student

student researchers for a total of $31,861.50 at an

researchers to present at conferences in the United

average of $245.82 per researcher to present at

States. Twenty-five (25) faculty or staff mentors mentored

conferences in the United States. To qualify for funding,

these 77 student researchers. There was an increase of 25

all students had to have presentation proposals accepted.

student researchers funded and additional seven (7) faculty or staff mentors participating in the 2016/2017

Thirty-Two (32) mentors mentored these 102 student

(fall/spring) over 2015/2016 (fall/spring).

researchers. (See table below for 2016/2017 – the table data does not include mentors for summer research

Table 6 displays the names of the research conferences

grants, implementation and planning grants, nor GC 20th

that students attended, number of students that

Research Conference.)

attended, number of mentors, average dollars award and average dollars expended. Table 6 - Research Conferences Number of Students

Number of Mentors

Average Dollars Award

Average Dollars Expended

Academy of Economics and Finance Conference

8

1

$448.50

$427.48

$3,419.85

American Musicological Society Conference

1

1

$500.00

$500.00

$500.00

Atlantic Marketing Association

2

1

$383.00

$393.57

$$758.85

IntellectBase International Consortium,

2

1

$195.00

$195.00

390.00

Association of Third World Studies Conference*

4

1

$236.00

$71.00

$1,291.94

Atlantic Marketing Association Conference

2

2

$383.00

$379.43

$758.85

COPLAC Conference, Wise Virginia

4

4

$120.19

$120.19

$796.94

Conferences

Total

Academic Conference

Georgia Association of Historians Annual Conference**

1

1

$81.00

$0.00

$00.00

Gulf-South Summit

2

1

$400.00

$207.28

$414.56

GURC Conference

16

6

$50.00

$50.00

$750.00

Intellect Base Conference

2

1

$195.00

$195.00

$390.00

NCUR Memphis

19

6

$346.82

$494.13

$10,868.18

SE Chapter of Am College of Sports Medicine

1

1

$132.00

$132.00

$132.00

SEPA Conference

24

9

$348.35

$287.59

$6,902.09

SE Regional Am. Chemical Society Conference

11

1

$190.70

$106.45

$1,064.47

SE Section of Am Physics Society Conference

6

3

$300.48

$232.56

$2,790.66

Southern Political Science Association Conference

1

1

$470.00

$470.00

$470.00

UNCG-RMSC Conference

1

1

$315.00

$163.11

$163.11

107

42

Totals *Issues with faculty payment of student costs **Student became ill and could not attend conference

average dollars awarded and average dollars expensed to student researchers from MURACE Funding

24 | CENTER FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING 2016-2017 ANNUAL REPORT | GEORGIA COLLEGE

$31,861.50


Table 7 displays the names, title and department for faculty mentors during 2016-2017. Beginning 2017-2018 we will keep track of the number of students that the faculty mentored Table 7 - Faculty Mentors, Title, Department Last Name

First Name

Title

Department

Arias

J.J.

Professor

Economics and Finance

Bodaghee

Arash

Assistant Professor

Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy

Chiang

Tsu-Ming

Professor

Psychology

Chiorescu

Marcela

Assistant Professor

Mathematics

Clark

Christopher

Associate Professor of Economics

Economics and Finance

Conaway

Brooke

Assistant Professor of Economics

Economics and Finance

Domingue

Donovan

Professor of Physics and Astronomy

Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy

France

Ralph

Associate Professor of Physics

Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy

Gillis

Lee

Chair/Professor

Psychology

Godwin

Sandra

Associate Professor

Government and Sociology

Gorzelany-Mostak

Dana

Assistant Professor of Music

Music

Hammack

Jennifer

Associate Professor

Government and Sociology

Heppner

Whitney

Assistant Professor

Psychology

Isaac

Walter

Professor

Psychology

Karen

Kasey

Assistant Professor of Biology

Biological and Environmental Sciences

(Microbiology) Lewis

Robin

Director, Office of Grants and

Office of Grants and Sponsored Projects

Sponsored Projects Lisse

Catrena

Professor of Chemistry

Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy

Mahabaduge

Hasitha

Assistant Professor of Physics

Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy

McGill

Ken

Chair

Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy

Mijena

Jebessa

Assistant Professor

Mathematics

Mills

Chavonda

Professor of Chemistry

Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy

Monroe

Derek

Lecturer in Exercise Science

Health and Human Performance

Mutiti

Christine

Assistant Professor of

Biological and Environmental Sciences

Environmental Sciences Opperman

Stephanie

Assistant Professor

History and Geography

Pilllay

Indiren

Chair; Professor

Biological and Environmental Sciences

Reinhard

Kristina

Professor

Psychology

Rosado Flores

Peter

Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Chemistry, Physics and Astronomy

Sams

Doreen

Professor of Marketing

Marketing

Taylor

Ashley

Assistant Professor

Psychology

Tchamna-Kouna

Simplice

Assistant Professor

Mathematics

VandeVoort

Allison

Assistant Professor of

Biological and Environmental Sciences

Environmental Science Winchester

James

Coordinator, Program of Philosophy

Philosophy and Liberal Studies

Young

Diana

Associate Professor

Psychology

25 | CENTER FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING 2016-2017 ANNUAL REPORT | GEORGIA COLLEGE


Department Goals: 2017-2018 Year 1 – Staff partners with other key departments, such as the library staff and committees, such LAC (Liberal Arts Council) and URACE. Address key GeorgiaVIEW Help Requests (priority is grade book and syllabus) Goal

• Sponsor an optional trolley tour of historic

1. Provide technical and academic faculty development for Goal 2 of the Georgia College (GC) Strategic Plan • Become knowledgeable about key resources so that we can provide informed support.

Milledgeville. • Sponsor an optional bus campus tour, which introduces faculty to the west and east campuses of Georgia College and some of the local sites where

• Work closely with the library staff to learn more

students and faculty work with community partners

about resources offered, e.g. multimedia, 3-D

to address mutually identified needs and promote

printing, library as a makerspace, curriculum

public well-being though teaching, learning,

builder, Films on Demand.

scholarship and outreach. The tour will end with

• Work with the Learning Center staff regarding assistance with support of student learning resources, e.g. time management, note-taking,

lunch and with ENGAGE . 3. Update the Faculty Information Manual. Replace any broken hyperlinks. Add information about Georgia

writing styles. • Become proficient with Portfolium in order to

College designation as Georgia’s Public Liberal Arts

provide support services to faculty, staff and

University, faculty grants, the GC Journey’s Program,

students.

the Liberal Arts Council and the ENGAGE program.

• Be involved with Freshman orientation. • Learn about Library Reference Guides.

4. Develop a new faculty (new to teaching) monthly

• Offer support for GeorgiaVIEW Daylight.

series to include information such as preparing a

• Become proficient understanding the AAC&U Value

focused vita, preparing for the first annual evaluation and pedagogy.

Rubrics, e.g.: • How to use the rubrics in courses • Provide professional development, especially with

5. Implement a faculty mentoring program.

GC1Y and GC2Y courses • Participate in an AAC&U workshop for CTL staff

6. Host interactive and personal consultation workshops

• Be informed about High Impact Practices (HIPs)

on GeorgiaVIEW grade book and quizzes tools at the

(known as Transformative Experiences at GC)

beginning of fall and spring semesters.

2. Develop and Implement a New Faculty Orientation

7. Host interactive and personal consultation workshops

Program that prepares participants for roles teaching

on GeorgiaVIEW grade book three weeks prior to

at Georgia College as well as introducing the historic

the end of Fall and Spring semesters.

aspect of the University. • Put together gift bags for new faculty. • Redesign the GeorgiaVIEW orientation course for new faculty. Make sure that it meets accessibility requirements.

8. Develop a GeorgiaVIEW course with resources that Academic Advising Staff can use for the First-Year Academic Seminars, taught every fall semester for incoming freshman. The resources will be provided

26 | CENTER FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING 2016-2017 ANNUAL REPORT | GEORGIA COLLEGE


by the coordinating committee members (Cara Smith,

11. Develop faculty-learning communities (FLCs) to

Cynthia Alby, Erin Weston and Nadirah Mayweather)

provide the best mechanism to support the GC

how to access? Students enrolled? A course? Make a

Journey’s Program. Each FLC should address 1)

module?

research on best practices, 2) integration of HIPs with classroom teaching, 3) how to assess. Plan a

9.

Offer all faculty development sessions in three

one-day conference near end of Spring semester

formats: face-to-face; WebEx synchronous sessions;

2018 for FLCs to report on their work to faculty-at-

and WebEx recordings for asynchronous viewing.

large. FLCs should focus on:

10. Further redesign the support ticket system. The ticket support staff met to develop consensus on

• High Impact Practices (HIPs)/Transformative Experiences:

how to classify the tickets. The improved ticket

• Study Abroad/Study Away

system will be created using Access, which allows

• Community-based engaged learning

the ability to generate reports based on table and

• Leadership

queries.

• Undergraduate Research • Internships • Integrative Capstones • Thinking skills reflected in core: • Inquiry and analysis • Problem solving • Critical thinking • Creative thinking • Quantitative reasoning • Ethical reasoning

27 | CENTER FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING 2016-2017 ANNUAL REPORT | GEORGIA COLLEGE


Center for Teaching and Learning 2016-2017 YEAR-END REPORT University Printing 06/2017

Georgia College Center for Teaching and Learning Annual Report 2017  
Georgia College Center for Teaching and Learning Annual Report 2017