Issuu on Google+

Chongqing Public Space Public Life Study & Pedestrian Network Recommendations CITY OF CHONGQING NOVEMBER 2010


Client:

Chongqing Planning and Design Institute

The China Sustainable City Program

Center for Urban Development and Research of Chongqing Urban Planning Bureau

The Energy Foundation- Beijing Office

No. 9 Xinnan Road

CITIC Building, Room 1903

Yubei District

No. 19, Jianguomenwai Dajie

Chongqing City

Beijing, 100004 P.R. China

China

Contact:

Contact:

Mr. Hu Hai

Mr. Jiang Yang, Program Specialist

Mr. Yu Jun

Ms. Wang Yue, Program Specialist

CREDITS

Consultant: Gehl Architects - Urban Quality Consultants mail@gehlarchitects.dk

Project Team: Henriette Vamberg, Director, Architect MAA Kristian Skovbakke Villadsen, Associate, Architect MAA Camilla Richter-Friis van Deurs, Architect MAA,PhD Ola Gustafsson, Architect MSA Mary Fialko, student architect Joshua Morrison, student architect Malin Nilsson, student architect

2

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


Content Credits ...............................................................................2

Existing problems .......................................................... 33

Connections to public transportation ............................. 90

Foreword ...........................................................................3

Structure and scale ........................................................ 34

Small scale spaces ......................................................... 94

Content..............................................................................5

Ground floor analysis ..................................................... 36

Users and Interation ....................................................... 96

Urban morphology ......................................................... 38

Next steps

Introduction

Walking along ................................................................. 40

Process and strategies................................................. 100

The Introduction gives a general introduction to the study and the importance of high quality public realm. It reflects on the overall findings in terms of potentials and challenges as well as achievements attained by the city.

Pedestrian movement .....................................................42 Sidewalk interruptions ................................................... 46 Street Crossing................................................................47 Pedestrian comparison .................................................. 50

Planning for people ...........................................................7 Planning for people in Chongqing .....................................8 Public Space Public Life Methodology ...........................10 Executive Summary- City ...............................................12

Analysis: City and Routes The Analysis includes assessment of the physical conditions provided for public life and pedestrians . It includes issues related to the quality of the public realm as well as surveys of how selected streets and squares are used in terms of walking and spending time in the city.

City Analysis City of Chongqing ...........................................................16 Existing Qualities ............................................................18

Activities: Staying and Doing in the City Stationary activities .........................................................52 Users .............................................................................. 56 Typical Chinese activity patterns ................................... 58 Public Space Public Life Survey Summary .................... 60

Recommendations The Recommendations illustrate the overall vision(s) based on the findings in the analysis. It identifies a set of recommendations and case studies for long term strategies as well as concepts for immediate action and quick wins. The Recommendations will be supplemented by a range of best practice examples for the qualitative principals outlined in the strategies to set standards for future implementations and initiatives.

Existing Problems ...........................................................19 Riverfront ........................................................................20

Creating a High Quality Network

Height Differences ......................................................... 22

Overview ........................................................................ 64

Public Transit ...................................................................24

Pedestrian routes and topography ................................. 66

Street Characteristics ......................................................26

High quality streets ........................................................ 68

Parking and Cars .............................................................28

Parking and Streets .........................................................70 Reconnecting to the river................................................74

Pedestrian Routes: Walking and Navigating in the City

Create recognizable routes .............................................78

Routes outline ................................................................ 30

Improve crossings .......................................................... 84

Existing qualities .............................................................32

Improve accessibility...................................................... 88

Create unique sites ........................................................ 80

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

5


Planning for people About Jan Gehl and Gehl Architects With the ‘human dimension’ as a starting point, Jan Gehl has, over four decades, worked to improve city environments in Denmark and abroad. The book 'Life between Buildings', originally published in 1971 and translated to a number of languages, has become required reading in numerous architecture

LIFE

schools worldwide. 'Life between Buildings' studies and describes the life which takes place in the public realm, in both cities and suburbs, and advocates for a stronger effort from planners and architects to understand and create

SPACE

the framework which will provide for and enhance public life in the best possible way. The objective of Gehl Architects is to create a stronger coherence between the life in the city and either planned or existing building structures. Public life is at the top of

BUILDINGS

the agenda and great care is needed to accommodate the people using our cities.

Books by Jan Gehl and GehlArchitects. Four are available in a Chinese language version: Life Between Buildings, Public Space Public Life Copenhagen 1996, New City Spaces and Cities for People.

6

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


Planning for people in Chongqing Context The city of Chongqing has initiated investigations into a series of pedestrian routes across the main peninsula. Gehl Architects were invited to preform a Public Life Public Space Survey on three of these potential routes, prior to implementation, to collect base-line data about the routes for bench-marking purposes. The collection of such information will serve as a useful tool for the ongoing work of improving the quality of the public spaces; it will

Illustration of the planned pedestrian routes in Chongqing as proposed by the City of Chongqing prior to the Public Space Public Life survey.

make it possible to follow new trends in the future and changes in the use pattern of the city; and it will create a general public awareness concerning the overall city quality.

Collaborations As part of the scope, sites visits, discussions with local planners and designers, peer reviews of design proposals, lectures, and workshops have been held in Chongqing. Staff from both the Energy Foundation and the City of Chongqing have visited Gehl Architects in Copenhagen for knowledge sharing, workshops and study trips.

Workshop on making public space at Gehl Architects in Copenhagen with representatives from Chongqing.

Mr. Yu Jun and Ms. Zhang Meining from the City of Chongqing together with Ms. Yue Wang from the Energy Foundation performing a quality of space assessment at site one.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

7


Public Space Public Life Methodology Most cities have rather precise statistics about traffic

Pub c Space Pub c L e S ud es are a oo or ga n ng

flows and parking patterns - and information concerning

a de a ed overv ew concern ng he cond

commercial activities in the city centres are generally well developed. But when it comes to insight and information about the people who move around in the city, and about

or pedes r ans and pub c

ons offered

e as we as or deve op ng

s ra eg es or mprov ng he qua

y o c y d s r c s Th s

ype o survey has been deve oped over a number o years

how the public spaces function for the people who use

and has been app ed o a w de range o c

the city, no such systematic information is generally

par s o he wor d

available.

such as London Sydney New York Me bourne Sea

rom sma

es n var ous

owns o ma or c

es e

San Franc sco Copenhagen Zur ch S ockho m and Ro erdam The surveys have proven o be a nva uab e oo or mprov ng he qua o peop e n he c

Pub c Space Pub c L e surveys conduc ed n c

y o he env ronmen offered

es

es a over he wor d ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••���••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••���••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••���••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••���•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••���•••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••���•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••���••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••���•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

%3"

W S

10

London - 2003

Sydney - 2006

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

T PS Q PQ



C

NF CPVSOF D UZ DFOUSF

SYDNEY

Copenhagen - 1986, 1995, 2005

Q

New Yo k 2007

Me bou ne

994 and 2004


Chongqing Survey Public Space and Public Life The survey maps the potentials and challenges that the

The Public Space Analysis

Study areas

city has in its current state, using on-site recordings and

The public space analysis was mainly be carried out

The counting positions have been chosen to provide the

analysis of public life and quality of public spaces, in order

through fieldwork in the city centre and supplied with

best possible overview of pedestrian traffic. The areas for

to develop a range of recommendations on how to improve

additional relevant information existing in city archives.

recordings of staying activities are equally chosen with

the city quality and create a more user-friendly place by

the intention to achieve knowledge of the study area as a

making it more pleasant and easy to walk, bicycle, and

Public Life Analysis

use the public transportation system.

The Public Life analysis mapped the use patterns of people in the more important streets, squares, parks

These types of surveys have proved to be a relevant

and traffic nodes. It provided information on where and

and very workable tool for a number of cities. The

how many people walk as well as where people sit, stand

survey aims at presenting sometimes very complex

or carry out various stationary activities (recreational

problems in a simple and pedagogical form to invite

activities, standing, sitting, outdoor cafe activity as well

people to participate in the debate and obtain a greater

as specific activities such as street vendors, children

understanding of their city. Public Space and Public Life

playing and other active participants in the public spaces)

Studies tend to be a milestone in the planning process

in the city.

because it helps to formulates a vision and general

whole.

Dates, time and weather Surveys were conducted on days with good weather for the season: sunny with temperatures between 26 and 36 degrees with a 85% humidity, no rain and little wind. Good weather conditions are necessary to ensure comparability to other surveys internationally and for future surveys in Chongqing. The surveys were conducted from 8am to 11pm on four

agreement of where the city is heading and thereby it

Data collection

days:

potentially guides future developments and offers a

The survey was performed by local Chongqing staff from

Route 1+2:

common mind set.

the university under the supervision of representatives

Saturday July 3rd 2010

from Energy Foundation and Gehl Architects.

Wednesday July 7 th 2010

The focus of the Survey was activities and conditions

At 18 selected sites, local staff counted pedestrians and

offered for pedestrians. Major pedestrian routes,

bicyclists and surveyed quantitative stationary activities

Saturday September 11th 2010

footpaths of major streets, important pedestrian

(sitting, standing, playing etc.). Staff from Gehl Architects

Tuesday September 14th 2010

crossings, squares, parks and other spaces in the areas

and Energy Foundation conducted a qualitative survey

which are widely used were surveyed.

of the same 18 sites to assess the standard, problems and

Route 3:

potentials of the sites.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

11


City

Executive summary

12

Topography

Public transit

Riverfront

Cars and parking

Analysis:

Analysis:

Analysis:

Analysis:

Chongqing is situated in mountainous

The city is served by a series of bus

Chongqing has a beautiful natural

There are very many parking spaces in

terrain. This creates many challenges

routes and metro lines. Pedestrian

landscape setting between the Jialing

the city streets. This is also true on the

for pedestrians, particularly the young

connections to these are often difficult

and Yangtze Rivers but access to these

sidewalk as well, where much pedestrian

and the old, when climbing some of the

as stations are placed on desire lines and

amenities are very poor - in very few

space is used instead for private parking,

hundreds of steps and stairs in the city.

stops are crowded without protection or

places are there attractive public spaces

creating very unattractive environments.

Pedestrian routes are not planned with

possibilities for rest.

along the riverfront and often pedestrians

the lines of the landscape but in relation to

have to cross major streets or highways to

left-over space between buildings.

get close to the water.

Recommendation:

Recommendation:

Recommendation:

Recommendation:

Supplement the planned NS routes

Better accessibility for public transport

Create a continuous riverfront park along

Many parking spaces could be removed

with level EW bound routes. Whenever

users, especially distances between stops

the shoreline including pedestrian and

from the streets to create better

possible include ramps into the design

and quality of environments around

bicycle paths. The river park should be

pavements and access for pedestrians.

of any topography rise. Stairs should

transit hubs. Transit stops should always

designed to up stand flooding as create

This would make safer and more attractive

hold possibilities for seating and other

be placed immediately near pedestrian

spaces for many types of users.

streets.

amenities whenever possible.

areas and routes.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


Routes

Executive summary Walking along Analysis: The study found high numbers of pedestrians walking in the city. However, a large number of pedestrians does not necessarily indicate a high level of quality. In fact, most of the connecting spaces such as streets and sidewalks were proven to have very low quality.

Walking across Analysis:

Users Analysis:

Crossing the street is often very difficult as a pedestrian as most considerations are made in favour of the cars neglecting

The city has a high number of children and elders on the streets compared to most European or North American cities.

Activities Analysis: A high number of people choosing to spend time in the city indicates a lively city of strong urban quality. Stationary

the natural desire lines and movement

activities vary dramatically in the city and

which encourages jay-walking and many

are direct reflections on the quality of the

dangerous pedestrian behaviors.

surrounding spaces.

Recommendation:

Recommendation:

Recommendation:

Recommendation:

Street design should be of high quality

Pedestrian crossings should be placed in

Spaces need to be designed for many types

Particular attention should be given to

and materials with great consideration

a direct manner and should never force

of users including the young and the old.

providing areas that are usable for sports

for pedestrians - particularly the weaker

users over or under the street. Many

Seating and shaded ares are important

activities and spaces for small vendors

users. This implies that all minor side

pedestrian crossing lights along the main

when providing for these groups.

and eateries to up-hold the Chinese

streets and parking access streets should

routes should give priority to pedestrians

Community-based activities should be

patterns of life.

respect pedestrian lines.

in the signals rather then vehicular traffic.

provided for the routes.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

13


Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

14


THE CITY Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

15


The City of Chongqing Study Area

Chongqing is a major city in southwestern mainland

Beijing

China and one of the five national central cities. Jialing River

Yangtze River

In 2007, the municipality of Chongqing had a

Chongqing

Nanjing Shanghai

population of 31.4 million. It has jurisdiction over 19 districts, 17 counties, and four autonomous counties. With an area of 82,300 km² it is the largest directcontrolled municipality, and it is possibly the world's

Guangzho Hong Kong

CHINA

CHONGQING

largest municipality by area. The city has an impressive history and its origins date back to the Ba people and was supposedly established during the eleventh century BCE. Today, it is the economic centre of the Upstream

Chaotianmen

Yangtze area, and outsiders have speculated that, 上清寺-大溪沟片区

due to its ever-growing number of river bridges and

Jialing River

hyper-dense skyline, it will be China's "Chicago on the Yangtze".

Hongyadong People’s square 临江门-千雁门片区

Chongqing is the biggest inland river port in western 两路口-七星岗片区

China. Historically, most of its transportation,

Route 1

especially to eastern China, is via the Yangtze

Route 3

解放碑片区

River. There are 25 bridges across the Yangtze River,

Jiefangbei

including half a dozen in the city's urban core.

Culture centre

Chongqing Jiangbei International Airport located north of Chongqing, provides links to most parts of

Route 2 南纪门片区

Pipashan Park 南岭-菜园坝片区

China and to other countries.

南区路片区

Yanziyan

The study area in the main urban peninsula is divided into 8 districts, each with their own character, potentials and problems. STUDY AREA

Yangtze River

16

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

0

500

1000 meters


City scale comparison Studies of other cities will be used for comparison and will act as the frame of reference in this study. Comparisons will be based on similar studies carried out in New York, Sydney, London and Copenhagen. A comparison with these cities will provide insight into the public life of other cities of comparable sizes.

All maps are shown in 1:50.000 0

1

2 km LONDON 24.700.000 m2 / 2470 hectare 1,525,000 residents in London (2001) 617 residents per hectare (12-14 million in the metropolitan area, 7.7 million in Greater London area ) CONGESTION CHARGE FROM 2003 INCREASED BICYCLING 2007Section diagram

SYDNEY 2.200.000 m2/220 hectare 15.000 residents in the city centre (2006) 68 residents per hectare (4 million residents in the metropolitan area)

LOWER MANHATTAN, NEW YORK 1 856 000 m2/185 hectare 55 000 residents in the city centre (2006) 297 residents per hectare (8,4 million in the metropolitan area (2008))

COPENHAGEN

SEVERAL PLANNED PEDESTRIAN ROUTES 2011 -

BEGINNING CONCERN FOR BICYCLES AND WALKING 2010 -

PILOT PROJECTS TO ENHANCE BICYCLING AND WALKING FROM 2009 -

50 YEARS OF DEDICATED FOCUS ON BICYCLING AND PEDESTRIANISM

Section diagram

Section diagram

Section diagram

Section diagram

CHONGQING/YUZHONG AREA 9.500.000 m2 /950 hectare 711.600 residents in the city centre (2006)/ 749 residents per hectare? (14.85 million in the urban metropolitan area, 32 million in the total metropolitan area)

1.150.000 m2 7.600 residents in the city centre (2005) 66 residents per hectare (1,2 million residents in the metropolitan area)

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

17


THE PEDESTRIAN ROUTES


Routes with different characteristics

Route 1 Cultural & recreation

Route 2 Commercial

Route 3 Local & schools

Route 1, 2 and 3 probably include almost

嘉陵江滨江路

江路

江滨

all the important destinations and many

嘉陵

洪崖洞

public centres of Yuzhong district, while each has unique features. For instance, Route 1 is connecting many essential sites including Renmin Square, which is the

人民

largest square of the city and hosts a lot of important events, Youth Centre, Culture

北区路

路 民

人 人民广场

Centre, and Pipashan Park, which use to be the highest point of the island and has a great view of both the city and the rivers. 解放碑

While Route 2 may be less politically

邹容

oriented than Route 1, it is definitely the

八 一

most popular route for both locals and tourists. It not only contains historical interests like Hongyadong City Balcony and the Riverside park, but also includes the city's major shopping and pedestrian road, a lovely flower market and the famous nightlife area.

文化宫

和平路

少年宫

较场口 中兴路

Route 3 is a relatively local route compared to the former 2. It connects

二路 中山

mostly residential neighbourhoods and related infrastructures and facilities, such

枇杷山公园

like Pipashan Park, Zhongshan Hospital, Bashu Primary School and Bashu High School, etc. It begins at Daxigou Metro

枇杷山正街

Station, which is a major transportation

解放西路

node of the District as well as the starting

长江滨江路

point of Route 1.

滨江公园 长江滨江路 珊瑚公园

30

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

Transport Hubs Hospitals Schools Parks Museums Historical sites


Route 1 1 Daxigou Metro Station

2 People's Square

Route 2

Route 3 大溪沟

大溪沟汽车站

11

Daxigou Bus Station

人和街入口

12

Renhe Street

巴蜀幼儿园

13

Bashu Kindergarden

张家花园坎墙

14

Zhang's Garden

人民广场

6 Honyadong

洪崖洞

7 Jiefangbei

解放碑

3 Culture Centre

文化宫

8 Flower Market

鲁祖庙花市

4 Youth Centre

少年宫

9 Jiaochangkou

较场口

10 18 Steps

较场口

5

Pipashan Park

枇杷山公园

15

张家花园平街

中山医院后街

Zhang's Garden Front Street

16 Zhongshan Hospital Backstreet

中山医院入口前广场

17

Zhongshan Hospital Entry

自然博物馆前广场

18

Natural Museum Square

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

31


Walking along

Tough streets for walking Network and links Chongqing has made many impressive efforts to make a pleasant pedestrian environment, including the central Jiefangbei pedestrian streets and new squares at important sites. In general the pedestrian landscape in the newly designed sites is well designed and detailed. Many good considerations have been taken in relation to the pedestrian environment providing both good surfaces, amenities for pedestrians and green elements. There are however many places where improving the physical environment would have a positive effect on the public realm. In older areas and sites the conditions are highly varying: some sites have extremely dangerous and run-down pavement standards with poor protection from cars or unpleasant environments. Streets and paths that link sites together are generally of quite low standard with many poorly designed or ill-maintained solutions.

Beautiful pedestrian areas in the Jie Fang Bei...

40

Pedestrians are often blocked from going along desired routes by fences and bars.

but poor conditions in the connecting streets...

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

and terrible quality in the older areas such as the Flower Market


Walking along

Unattractive walks between beautiful spaces Quality and layout of pavement Chongqing has many fine areas with beautifully designed pavings. These are particularly found in the newer public spaces...

... while the older areas and the linking network are of extremely low quality.

One main challenge is also the transition between different pavings and the incorporation of technical facilities, across side streets etc.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

41


Walking

Comparison pedestrian survey

Chongqing

6000

Sydney

5000

London

4000

Copenhagen

3000

New York

Chongqing 2010: Taken from routes 1 and 2 only. Sydney 2007: Herald Square, Jessie Street Gardens, First Government house, Farrer Place, Philip Lane, Brickfield Square, World Square, Dixon Street, Belmore Park, Hyde Park, Martin Place, Sesquicentenary Square, Austrailia Square, Chifley Square, Richard Johnson Square, Wynard Park, Regimental Square, Queen Square, Pitt Street Mall, Sydney Square, First Fleet Park, Circular Quay London 2004: Charing Cross, Euston Road, Hungerford Footbridge, New Oxford Street, Oxford Street, Regent Street, Tottenham Court Road Copenhagen 2007: Nyhavn, Kongens Nytorv, Magasins Torv, Amager Torv, Højbro Plads, Strøget, Gammel Torv, Kultorvet, Gråbrøgade, Skindergade, Frue Plads, Strædet, Gammel Strand, Axeltorv Syd, Axeltorv Nord, Rådhuspladsen, Søren Kierkegaards Plads New York 2008: Broadway, Madison Square, Herald Square, Woori Square, Greeley Square, Union Square, Prince Street, Spring St., Fordham Road, Fordham Square, Flushing Main St., Flatbush

2000

1000

0 08:00

09:00

10:00

11:00

12:00

13:00

14:00

15:00

16:00

17:00

18:00

19:00

20:00

21:00

22:00

23:00

Mornings and evenings are the busiest times in Chongqing, while daytime is more active in other cities.

When pedestrian movement from all locations are averaged over the two days surveyed, it shows a trend very different from western cities. This is most likely due to a combination of a warm climate, in which it is more pleasant to be outdoors in the morning and evening, and office hours, in which people do not tend to leave work until 6 -7pm. Furthermore Chongqing is not as widely visited by tourists as some of the cities used for comparisons, which might effect the numbers for day-time use. This trend is important to consider in designing use of public spaces, such that they should

The streets of the city are busier morning and evening due to hot climate and long working hours.

accommodate well for evening activity.

50

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


Walking

Comparison main pedestrian streets :72,-882'--

'72:<7 8'2:7@ ;C2C,-

O"P&Q*%1&F"P 354%1RP%1&67-,-9

8'2;<-

,72,:@;2<;-

B"4/1"&.#/""#2&.?+%"? 67--:9

D4%+4% E"1"%#&.#/""#&67--;9

F/4*+$*?G&!"#$""%&=& ;,H#&.#I&*%+&=&;7%+&.#I2& J"$&K4/>&67--:9

.*#A/+*?

="">+*?

.*#A/+*?

.*#A/+*?

="">+*?

;'2':="">+*?

772<@-

'2;8@'2'@-

@;288-

@2<:="">+*?

;,2@,'

7:2<,-

;;2:@.*#A/+*?

;72@--

="">+*?

82-:-

C2---

.*#A/+*?

,'27<-

8'2,--

872<<@@2':-

,72-8,:28@@

,82:,-

8<2---

!"#$""%&'&()&*%+&,-&() !"#$""%&,-&*)&*%+&'&() GJK3&4%L?&M4A%#"+&N/4)&,-&*)&#4&C&()

.#/01"#2&34("%5*1"%& 67--89

Jie Fang Bei - although well designed - does not live up to it´s full potential

The comparison between other important pedestrian shopping streets internationally shows us that Jei Fang Bei is not as busy as might be expected for a city of Chongqing's size and population. Jei Fang Bei is the widest street in the study and could easily hold almost double the amount of pedestrians! This is most likely due to the lack of integration with other pedestrian routes and the lack of major transportation hubs onto the street. The relation between weekend and weekday and between day and night time uses shows that the street is primarily used as a recreational space. The high quality of the materials and the possibility of gathering in a pleasant urban environment means that users choose to gather even though stores are closed. This demonstrates potential for the

Many people enjoy public life in Jie Fang Bei - even several hours before the shops open in the morning.

street to become even more widely used by tying it to a series of other spaces while maintaining the high quality of the seating and design and materials in the future.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

51


Activities

A change in the character of public life In accordance with changing life styles and demands

Optional activities

from users, public spaces in the 21st century face new

Sitting on benches

challenges. As increasing amounts of cars have pushed Sitting on secondary sittingpossibilities

out more “soft” social activities, cities all over the world

realised that public life disappeared with it.

Passive

have lost valuable public space and have only then

As today’s citizens have more options on how to spend

Sitting on cafe chairs

Cultural activities

Sitting on folding chairs

their time, they will only spend it in the public realm if it is of high quality and accessibility and is easy and

Lying down

convenient. There are two principal forms of activity

out of necessity (shopping for groceries, waiting for

Children playing Active

that take place in public spaces, activities that are made

Optional activities taking place in Jie Fang Bei. These take place out of leisure rather than necessity.

Physical activities

transportation etc.), and those that are made our of leisure (going for an evening walk, playing badminton, sitting at a cafe). Leisure activities, or optional activities, are often found in public spaces of high quality, such that residents of a city choose to spend their free time there.

Necessary activities Standing

The survey that follows maps out where activities are taking place along the two walking routes, and also what kinds of activities are taking place.

Waiting for transport

Commercially active

Necessary activities taking place at the flower market of buying groceries and produce.

52

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


Activities

Stationary activities A lot of commercial activities

Overview As part of an estimate of the usage and role of the different public spaces, a stationary activities survey

22 %

Standing

21 %

Commercially active

was undertaken in a selection of public spaces. The survey maps the number of people staying in each place in the categories shown on this page.

Average distribution of stationary activities for all surveys taken based on activity

Average distribution of stationary activities for all surveys taken based on type

A fine balance exists between passive

When investigating the stationary activities

(standing and sitting) and active (doing)

closely is it apparent that many necessary

activities in Chongqing.

activities take place in public space. There are

Many people are physically active

21 %

Sitting on benches

8%

Physical activities

7%

Sitting on secondary sittingpossibilities

6%

Sitting on cafe chairs

5%

Cultural activities

3%

Waiting for transport

2%

Sitting on folding chairs

1%

Lying down

1%

Children playing

often many more recreational type activities in western countries compared with Chongqing.

Standing 25% Doing 39%

Optional 53%

Necessary 47%

Sitting/lying down 36%

ve

Many necessary activities

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

53


Activities

Typical Chinese activity patterns

8%

24%

of the activities involve dancing and sports

Commercial activities

The Public Life surveys documents that some particular Chinese

Another characteristic activity is trading and shopping on the streets

tendencies can be documented. One of these is the extensive use of

particularly early in the day. There are a great number of small

urban spaces for active recreations and sports in the mornings and

businesses, vendors and small temporary places to sit and eat the

evenings. The main participants are mid-aged and older citizens

purchased foods and beverages. Shopping is concentrated to areas

but many spectators of all ages enjoy the daily events. The Public

where many people pass such as pedestrian streets, markets and

Space survey found that spaces that have many landscape elements

main streets. Small urban grain including many small frontages,

or qualities such as trees, good views and peaceful pedestrian

setbacks, ample space on sidewalks and open spaces under the shade

atmospheres with no cars, are the preferred spaces for these activities.

of trees support these activities. Few possibilities presently exist

This means many spaces that are multi-purpose functioned are

in the parks and public spaces where vendors are quite controlled

necessary, both in the central city area, but also in the neighbourhood

and formalized. Often the larger spaces do not provide the physical

areas.

support for these activities.

!"" !!&

)"#

)$)

Temporary seating and temporary shops &%) &#(

Space for dancing and socializing in the city

'!(

678819*)+,-.*/)0)/'

%&'()*+,-.*/)0)/)1( $"!

$"!

''$ '$&

Vendors banned from Youth Centre Square

#"!

#"!

)% "!

"!

%& #&

#$

"

!

& ! 2!

2!

!

! $$

$!

! 2!

2! #3

! 2!

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

#4

! 2!

#5

! #$

2! #!

32

!

! 2!

2! $$

$!

#3

2!

!

!

! 2!

2! #4

! 2!

#5

! #$

2!

!!

!!

!

! 32

58

$!!

#!!

#!!

#!

%&#'$()*+),$*-.$

$!!


Activities

Comparison activities in relation to space and structure

152%

Active frontages lead to a

more people engaging in stationary activities on the

642%

increase in stationary

Eighteen Steps than Jie Fang Bei.

activities taking place along route 3 during the weekend

Jie Fang Bei has some of the highest numbers of pedestrians of all the

Stationary activities along route 3 increase dramatically when the

areas surveyed. However, this does not mean that it is a high quality

frontages on either side of the route are active. A demonstration of

public space in terms of stationary activities. The Eighteen Steps are

this is the difference between Zhang's Garden and Zhang's Garden

a much more local in character and therefore have less pedestrian

Front Street. While pedestrian numbers stay roughly the same, there

traffic, but still more of these pedestrians choose to stay in the

is a 642% increase in stationary activities taking place during the

Eighteen Steps and engage in stationary activities than in Jie Fang Bei.

Saturday surveyed.

!"#$%&!

Weekday total pedestrian movement Weekday total stationary activities

%'$!&#

#$'('

Large scaled space for walking

Total stationary activities registered on a Saturday

#$% !"

Few activities where facades are closed

Local street with small scale invites many staying

!$&&) Active frontages encourage activities

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

59


Public Space Public Life survey summary This presents a systematic overview of the most important urban quality criteria. Before any other deliberations are made, it is crucial to ensure

Protection Protection against Vehicular Traffic • Traffic accidents • Pollution, fumes, noise • Visibility

Protection against Crime & Violence • Well lit • Allow for passive surveillance • Overlap functions in space and time

Protection against Unpleasant Sensory Experiences • Wind / Draft • Rain / Snow • Cold / Heat • Pollution • Dust, Glare, Noise

Invitations for Walking • Room for walking • Accessibility to key areas • Interesting facades • No obstacles • Quality surfaces

Invitations for Stand- / Staying • Attractive and functional edges • Defined spots for staying • Objects to lean against or stand next to

Invitations for Sitting • Defined zones for sitting • Maximize advantages • Pleasant views, • Good mix of public and café seating

Visual, Audio & Verbal Contact • Coherent way-finding • Unhindered views • Interesting views • Lighting (when dark) • Low ambient noise level

Day / Evening / Night Activity • 24 hour city • Variety of functions throughout the day • Light in the windows • Mixed-use • Lighting in human scale

Play, Recreation & Interaction • Allow for physical activity, play, interaction and entertainment • Temporary activities • Optional activities • Create opportunities for people to interact

Positive Aspects of Climate • Sun / shade • Warmth / coolness • Breeze / ventilation

Aesthetic & Sensory • Quality design, fine detailing, robust materials • Views / vistas • Rich sensory experiences

reasonable protection against risk, physical injury, insecurity and unpleasant sensory influences, the negative aspects of climate in particular. If only one of these major problems concerning protection is not met, safeguarding the other qualities can prove meaningless. The next step is to ensure that the spaces offer good comfort, and invite people to the most important activities underlying their use of public space – walking, standing, sitting, seeing, talking, hearing and self-expression. Considerations about the situation during the day and at night as well as in the four seasons of the year are naturally part of the work to optimize city space. Celebrating local amenities primarily involves ensuring a good human scale, opportunities to enjoy the positive aspects of the climate in the region, as well as providing aesthetic experiences and pleasant sensory impressions. Good architecture and design are part of the last criterion. This criterion should be seen as an umbrella concept that should include all of the other areas. It is important to emphasize that architecture and design cannot be dealt with in isolation from the other criteria.

60

Comfort

Delight Dimensioned at Human Scale • Dimensions of buildings & spaces in observance of the important human dimensions in related to senses, movements, size & behavior

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


Evaluation overview Based on the 12 quality point criteria (one

per headline for Protection, Comfort and Delight)

Summary route 3 The route has a very intimate and local character connecting backyards, small markets and schools. The present conditions are however very difficult with low quality materials, tough stairs and challenging orientation.

Summary route 1

Summary route 2

Generally the route has adequate protection

The route has difficult conditions for

from traffic and some crime protection, but

pedestrians in areas that are not completely

quite low levels of comfort on all accounts. Two

car-free. Some sites have very low quality in

sites have very good elements of delight while

comfort but high levels of interest, others are

the rest are very displeasing.

quite the opposite. A better balance should be

Overall, there is a lack of comfort in the pedestrian environment

achieved in these sites. Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

61


62

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


RECOMMENDATIONS Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

63


Recommendation overview General principles

Case studies

The Public Space Public Life surveys found a number

All principles are exemplified by a case study from a

of problems and conflicts in the city of Chongqing. The

particular site along the pedestrian routes.

following pages suggest solutions to these by focusing on

Although the example is made specific in this way we

8 main themes. Each theme is introduced by a series of

underline that the solutions demonstrated are generic

design examples and best case practice .

and should be resolved on all sites possible.

Create a fantastic netwok of high quality streets Case: Route 3 Crossings

Reconnecting to the river Create recognizable routes Create unique sites

Improve crossings

Case: Flower Market & Minquan Road

Case: Route 3 Case: Jiaochangkou

Improve accessibility Improve connections to Public Transportation

Case: 18 Steps area

Provide small scale spaces for the local community Case: Riverfront Park

64

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


Site recommendations Based on the 12 quality point criteria analysis, data from the Public Space Public Life Surveys and best case examples internationally.

Overall there is a great lack of comfort in the pedestrian environment

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

65


Parking and street layout A critical look at parking

Reduce the amount of parking in the city centre

Information on available parking

Transformation

drastically in order to control traffic coming into the city

B E FO RE

Multi-storey parking gets new facade

A F TE R

centre. Aim for a traffic calmed city centre and thereby give higher priority to pedestrians and cyclists. Consider calming the very core of the city centre the most. Regulate parking

On-street parking along the streets should gradually be reduced. Proposed additional on-street parking is a very bad idea. It is not a progressive way of dealing with parking in the future. Instead it is recommended that Christchurch limits the possibilities for parking on innercity streets. •

Improve the information system concerning vacant parking capacity to limit unnecessary driving. Copenhagen, Denmark

A new ‘wall’ with housing is added to an existing parking structure to create a more lively streetscape. Stockholm, Sweden

Parking in bays

Footpaths across side streets

Short term on-street parking is organized in bays (max. 4 cars in a row) under street trees - placed at strategic locations to reduce the dominance of the car parking. Copenhagen, Denmark

Avoid unnecessary footpath interruptions at minor side streets. Ensure that footpaths stay clear of inconveniently placed street furniture. Gammel Kongevej, Copenhagen

Consider a parking zone in the city centre that only offers a limited amount of short-term on-street parking and review pricing of on street parking.

Get as much car parking off streets and open spaces as possible, reduce the traffic numbers and speed in the city centre - this will significantly raise the quality of streets and open spaces.

• •

Improve existing public parking structures. Establish new and modern parking structures at the entry points to the city centre. Review planning controls to reduce car parking ratios in connection with new developments.

70

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

This is a very positive initiative since it transforms the way the building meets the street. The ground floor will now have the possibility of interacting with the street. Seattle, US


Add trees for shade.

BEFORE

Pockets of single-file car parking means more space for people

No car parking in front of buildings

Wider Sidewalk for pedestrians, bike parking, and trees.

AFTER

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

71


Case: Riverfront Park The public space survey found that today there is very

A mixture of high overlooks, ways down to the water,

difficult access to the riverfront although this is one of the

and floating structures, this park encompasses a variety

cities main attractions.

of outdoor activities, green spaces, places to eat, public

Principal diagram: One continuous riverfront park

gathering spaces, bike trails, and out door vendors. All new pedestrian routes should therefore provide citizens and tourists the opportunity of getting closer

Residents and visitors of Chongqing can sail, waterski,

to the water. For this reason it is proposed to plan a

rent bikes and kayaks, play tennis, see outdoor movies,

continuous riverside park along the entire edge of the

take a stroll, pack a picnic, swim, enjoy the waterfront,

peninsula provides connections to the water at all points.

and meet for city wide events. This is a place where families can spend weekends and tourists will get a taste of the city's culture.

Principal plan

Pedestrian area Areas should always provide a safe access to the riverfront.

Embankment landscape Pedestrian crossings

Possibilities for flooding

Safe and at grade crossings

integrated into the design

with pedestrian priority

Bicycle route The riverfront is the only level site in the city. This should be utilized by

Activities along the riverfront

providing a bicycle route.

In certain areas where space is provided activities can be provided along the river such as kayaks, dinning, fishing and walking.

76

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


BEFORE Steps down to the river include secondary seating Enjoying the riverfront at grade - touching the water

Landscape can be flooded without damage

AFTER

Gehll Architects Geh Arch Arch rchite itects ite cts · Urban Urban Quality Qualit Qua lity lit y Cons C Consultants onsult ons ultant ult ants ant s · Gl. Gl. Kong K Kongevej ongeve ong evejj 1, eve 1, 4.tv 4.tv · 1610 1610 Cope C Copenhagen openha ope nhagen nha gen V · Denmark Denm Denm enmark ark · www www.gehlarchitects.dk www.ge .gehla .ge hlarch hla rchite rch itects ite cts.dk cts .dk

77


Create recognizable routes

Design elements

In order to make the route recognizable and easy to both

Identity and visibility Clear marking of entrances to the route will improve knowledge of the route and create a strong portal.

Lighting Good lighting is important to increase safety and wayfinding at nighttime, but can also be a guiding element during the day.

Legibility and navigation Providing guidance for navigation in the form of pavement, maps signs etc. that assist navigation on the route.

Furniture Furniture of similar design also gives coherency to the route, while providing places to rest, to meet other people or for playing.

find and navigate along, it’s important to have unifying elements along its path. Paving, lighting, urban furniture such as benches, trash bins, signs etc. help giving the route an identity of its own and makes it readable in the cityscape. In order for the route to be a success it needs to be integrated within the entire urban pedestrian network. Marking the route clearly adds a guidelines not only for tourists but also for local users. This is particularly important at the beginnings of the route. Navigation can be assisted by a series of maps, but the most preferred solutions are those which are naturally integrated into the physical design of the routes such as illustrative details, legible gateways and connecting pavements.

Paving Using the same pavement along the route help wayfinding and can add to the identity of the route. Using different materials can help define zones for walking, stationary activities etc. Lighting or other patterns embedded in the paving can also add to the identity of the route.

78

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


Examples and best practise Lighting Unique lighting creates important atmosphere and variation within a city.

Cheonggyecheon River, Seoul, South Korea.

Prags Boulevard, Copenhagen, Denmark

The Highline, New York, USA

Paving Attention to paving patterns can create a language of order and separation within a city.

Vejle, Denmark

Aarhus, Denmark

Stockholm, Sweden

Barcelona, Spain

Wayfinding Signage and clear direction are key to helping locals and tourists navigate and enjoy a city.

Barcelona, Spain

London, England

New York, USA

Adelaide, New Zealand

New York, USA

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

79


Case: Route 3

1

Route 3 is an existing pedestrian link through various districts in the city. Since the scale of the route and the

2

spaces along it have an intimate and human scale, the redesign should focus on upgrading and enhancing the pre-existing qualities and improving accessibility rather than transforming the route. Elements such as benches,

3

lamp posts and paving can guide both tourists and locals, 4

however it is important for the local character of the area to remain, because locals will be the most frequent users. 5

6

7

8

9

82

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


Lamp posts for safety and comfort at nighttime and as a recognizable element

Good quality pavement with the same character along the whole route

BEFORE Benches for resting and people watching placed strategically along the route

AFTER

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

83


Improve crossings

Layout of crossings

The surveys found that a number of pedestrian

Widen sidewalk at crossing To provide space for those waiting at the crossing as well as those passing.

crossings are very challenging in Chongqing: long waiting times, short green lights, complicated way

Wide crossing at street level Overpasses are inconvenient for all pedestrians and people tend to jaywalk instead of using them, actually making the crossing more dangerous. Putting fences up is not a people friendly solution.

finding, pedestrian over- and underpasses etc. make the simple act of crossing the street dangerous and difficult. Focusing on the crossings will have a great effect on the overall quality of the pedestrian environment in

!"

Chongqing. Whenever the route crosses a main street, a good

!" !"

crossing should be provided at street level, allowing for people to safely and conveniently cross the street. Making overpasses only makes crossing more difficult, leading people to jaywalk if they can,

!"

actually making the crossing more dangerous.

Lights with generous green times for pedestrians To allow for a safe passage for elderly, children, disabled etc.

Place crossing along desire line People walk the shortest way- that’s where the crossing should be placed! Consider where people want to go and place the crossings accordingly.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

84


Examples and best practise Accessibility Paving is a key element in making safe and smart streets and crossings for pedestrians. By integrating meaning into paving, through texture and surface, we create a situation that is safe and easily used by all people, including the young, the old, and the disabled.

Direct crossings at street level. Copenhagen, Denmark

Graded curb, paving carried across street.

Tactile paving

Cordoba, Spain

Wayfinding / signage By creating a coherent and comprehensive system of signage, cities can function safer and more efficiently.

Generous crossing times

Crosswalk marked with paving, and at same level as sidewalk

Signs marking pedestrian destinations

Layout of Crosswalks Creating wide crosswalks in the proper place, and widening the sidewalk near the sidewalk for additional pedestrian room at busy intersections, an attractive invitation is offered to pedestrians to use the system rather than jaywalk.

Wide crosswalks. Copenhagen, Denmark

Crosswalk placed in the desire line. Copenhagen, Denmark

Wider sidewalk at crossing. New York, USA

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

85


Process and strategies To ensure a continuous process from analysis to recommendations to final project goals, a long-term strategic plan is advisable. This includes a more thorough public space plan and revision of current master plans to enable the recommendations to effect the final outcome. A way to start the process is to plan smaller scale temporary events or pilot projects on a site that helps a user culture to develop and acts as a catalyst for change and development. The following page will present one idea for engaging this concept inChongqing on the market site of route three.

Tr a d i t i o n a l p r o j e c t p r o c e s s

Proposed project process

Contrary to the typical static design process, the Pilot

This process elevates the expectations for the project

project process allows for city officials to ask better

exposing latent potential that might otherwise go

questions and make more informed decisions.

untapped.

TEST

Better de ci sio n s

G EH L IN P UT FIN A L PRO JEC T Success ?

100

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

FI N A L PRO J EC T

ELEVATED EXPEC TA TI ON S

PSPL Rec o m m e n d atio ns D esig n b ri efs

G re ate r li ke l i h oo d

SURV EY R EDE -


Example: Times Square, New York City, USA 1

Placed along the iconic Broadway in New York City the square is known by most of the world for its hectic atmosphere, proximity to the famous theatre district, New Years

4

Times Square 2007

Times Square 2010

In 2007 Gehl Architects preformed a public Space Public Life survey for The Department of Transportation in New York City. This documented that Times Square

5

A 2010 project evaluation report besed on the same methods as the 2007 PSPL report found among other remarkable facts that traffic accidents had dropped by 63% and user satisfaction of Times Square had increased by 84%.

was very unwelcoming to pedestrian : only 11% space allocated to 80 % of the users.

Report published by NYC DOT

3

red tables and chairs and was provided and maintained by the local businesses around the plazas.

Eve celebrations and many neon lights.

2

The next intervention featured gravel pavement, large planters, characteristic

Report published by NYC DOT

In May 2009 large portions of Broadway @ Times Square was closed to vehicular traffic creating separate two pedestrian plazas. The first intervention was quite

6

In 2012 the space will find its final format designed by Norwegian architects Snøhetta after an International architectural competition. The goal is to:

rough; orange cones protected users from traffic and beach chairs furnished the space.

"Improve the quality and atmosphere of this historic site for tourists and locals, pedestrians and bicyclists, while reducing the traffic implementations so the "center of the universe" will retain it´s edge while refining it´s floor." Quote: www.snoarc.no Times Square 2009

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

101


Timeline: knowledge sharing and products Based on the analysis and knowledge of the Chongqing

Additional stuytrips by political leader to Europeancities

To embed a people oriented planning approach in

context gained from the Public Space and Public Life

supplemented by workshops at the Gehl Architects

the culture we suggest continuous evaluations of the

Survey and the project proccess to date, GehlArchitects

Copenhagen office is recommended to gain strong

implemented pedestrian routes to redifine goals and

propose further collaborations that enable many different

political ownership and support for the project.

document succes.

stakeholders to cooperate in the project. Construction work is planned to commend on route three

A national conference on walking and public life in 2012

This includes knowledge sharing through a continuous

by Novemmber 2010. Due to time restrictions fasing the

would be an excellent occasion to showcase Chongqings

learning process and a variety of activities. A series of

work will be advisable as suggested in p. 100 -104. Route

achievements in the coming years.

master classes and workshops to various stakeholders;

one and two can be designed during the spring of 2011 and

the city council, local decision-makers and the general

constructed in autumn 2011 to early 2012.

reports published etc.

Built pedestrian routes,

Hardscapes

public are proposed.

GA = Gehl Architects EF = Energy Foundation

REPORT

PROJECT

PROJECT

Public Space Public Life Survey results and Recommendations

Route three constructed: phase 1 + 2

Pedestrian network, riverfront parks and bicycle lanes

104

workshops, conferences etc.

Knowledge sharing, lectures,

Softscapes

2010

2013 - 2015

2011 - 2012

VISIT

SURVEY

SURVEY

VISIT

VISIT

SURVEY

SURVEY

VISIT

SURVEY

VISIT

Krisitan Skovbakke Villadsen from GA in Chongqing

GA and EF assist in preformning a Public Life Public Space survey of the two initial

EF assist in preformning a Public Life Public Space survey of the third route

EF in Copenhagen to develope project

Jeff Risom from GA in Chongqing

Route three pre-

Route three preformance survey

GA visit in Chongqing to present report at government level

Preformance survey

GA in Chongqing

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


From a car orientated

... to the first high quality local

... to three different examples

network with very poor

route...

of best practice in various

BEFORE

conditions for pedestrians...

contexts...

... to a fully integrated citywide pedestrian network and riverfront promenade in 2015!

AFTER Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1, 4.tv · 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

105


A steep climb toward a great pedestrian network in Chongqing


Chongqing - Public Space Public Life Study & Pedestrian Network Recommendations