Page 1

These are some of the cities we have worked with Gehl Architects’ vision is to create cities that are lively, healthy, diverse, sustainable and safe - and thereby improve people’s quality of life.

CITY PROJECTS


Research as the foundation The work of Gehl Architects builds on Professor Jan Gehl’s 40 years of extensive research on life in public spaces. Along with new research this continues to build the foundation for our work in small and large cities in all corners of the world. The human dimension Gehl Architects - Urban Quality Consultants is a consulting firm offering expertise in the fields of architecture, urban design and city planning. Our work is based on the human dimension – the built environment’s effect on activity patterns and interaction between people. We consider the attractive and lively public realm to be one of the most important keys to quality in cities. Although the physical aspects of humans such as our senses and the way we walk and sit are timeless, the physical environment influences social interaction and this is a phenomenon in constant change and evolution. We

Life Between Buildings (Jan Gehl). First published in 1971, the book continues to be a widely used handbook on the relationship between public spaces and the social life in cities. It is published in 18 languages. A number of articles and contributions to books are being produced by the research unit at Gehl Architects. This reflects our belief that working with the public realm requires a multi-channelled approach. You can buy the English language books at www.arkfo.dk (DK) or www.islandpress.com (US), and download project reports on www.gehlarchitects.dk

continually work to develop our knowledge regarding how and why the physical environment influences social interaction. An integral part of our work is to keep track of current research and knowledge, and to continue to carry out own research projects and analysis.

Empirical analysis We develop solutions based on detailed analysis of the existing social and built context in the form of public life and public space surveys. Thus our design and planning solutions are based on a comprehensive understanding of people’s use of public space and the way people experience urban quality. Gehl Architects work both to improve existing cities and city areas, as well as to consult on the planning and design of new city areas, urban residential developments and new towns.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

The research manifests itself not only in books. Gehl Architects are featured in Louisiana’s (Danish Museum of Modern Art) in their 2012 summer exhibition entitled ‘ New Nordic Architecture. Part of the ‘Reconquering of public space’ section of the exhibit, our component is comprised of three themes vital to urban quality– Life, Mobility and Scale. The content for each theme is based on the principles established by Jan Gehl and continually evolved by Gehl Architects to the many different types of projects and scales of intervention.


EMPOWER

The Gehl office as a platform for change

common lunch

Guests and Hosts

GOVERNANCE

and openness; a networked ecosystem for good ideas about cities for people to flourish. In the studio we produce ideas and solve complex problems. To address them, we create a co-creative environment where people with a wide range of expertise and knowledge can come together to experience new perspectives firsthand and work toward a resolution.

PROCESS MANAGEMENT

skills

interaction and work to cultivate guest-host relationships to ensure that we advance both our own ideas and those of others

TEACHING

QUALITY

bike share

urban designers, landscape architects, graphic designers, sociologists, anthropologists and cultural theorists. Additionally, Gehl Architects employ a network of internationally recognized experts as specialist consultants. We are a young, dynamic

CULTURE & TRENDS CITY LIFE & SOCIAL ASPECTS COMMERCE & MOBILITY URBAN LIFE

nyc

FORM

16

TRANSIT HUBS ARCHITECTURE & URBAN DESIGN

babies in 2010

pek cites for people

500 LECTURES/YEAR

86 ACTIVE

Copenhagen

HOSTING

architects, landscape, urbanists, anthropologists, graphic designers

10 NATIONALITIES

PRJECTS

STAFF

ENGAGING

and enthusiastic team that collectively apply 45 years of

PEOPLE FIRST DESIGN

urban design research, theories and ideology into professional practice and consultancy. Cities for People (Gehl, 2012) In this revolutionary book, Gehl presents his latest work creating (or recreating) cityscapes on a human scale. He clearly explains the methods and tools he uses to reconfigure unworkable cityscapes into the landscapes he believes they should be: cities for people. The book is extensively illustrated with over 700 photos and drawings of examples from Gehl’s work around the globe.

cph

PEOPLE

35

Our interdisciplinary team of 35 people include architects,

dozens of study tours

PLANNING

LEARNING Passionate, experienced & diverse

ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD

PROCESS DESIGN

PLANNING

While we embrace virtual networks, we cherish physical

ON SITE

STRATEGIC

PROCESS

The philosophy of the Gehl studio is based on generosity

PEOPLE 25%

New City Life (Gehl, Gemzøe, Kirknæs & Søndergaard, 2006) Over the past 50 years, the use of public space has changed dramatically. New City Life is a handbook describing how to improve the quality of life in the city by responding to the challenges facing cities in the 21st century. Published in Danish and English.

New City Spaces (Jan Gehl and Lars Gemzøe, 2001) provides an international perspective on the renaissance of public life and public spaces. City strategies from Barcelona, Lyon, Strasbourg, Freiburg, Copenhagen, Portland, Curitiba, Cordoba and Melbourne are presented as well as 39 remarkable new public spaces. Published in Danish, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech and Chinese.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


s e in

Planning for & with people Regardless of the complexity of a project, our process always begins with people. We measure how the city is performing for people to provide guidance for planning, empowerment and design.

Strategic Planning We take a holistic view to strategic planning, mediating between the typical silos of disciplines to ensure that urban interventions are rooted in a comprehensive understanding of how the City is serving its citizens.

Empower People From large public events, to small workshops, we work to cultivate relationships and build capacity, so that leaders with a wide range of knowledge and expertise can come together with a shared goal of making places better for people.

People First Design From specific spaces to large scale masterplans, we create design solutions that prioritize the needs of people first. Then we work with collaborative partners to design the interface between buildings and the space between them.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

ol a

nd

in

sp

i ra

Planning for & with people

people-focussed approach, utilizing empirical analysis to understand how the built environment design to empower citizens, decision makers, company leaders, and organizations.

a to

n

Empower People

Gehl Architects is an urban research and design consultancy. We address global trends with a can promote human flourishing. We apply this analysis to strategic planning and human-centred

C o p e nhag e n a s

t io

We focus on the relationship between the built environment and people’s quality of life

eu W

o se

ba ur

People First Design

Strategic Planning


Livable & sustainable Our vision is to create resilient places that are livable today and sustainable tomorrow. Places are never finished but continue to evolve over time. Our clients share with us a common long-term commitment to holistically yet incrementally respond to people’s needs to improve the environment in which people live. We aspire to create places for people that are: • Healthy & Prosperous

• Lively & Diverse

• Accessible & Inviting

• Attractive & Competitive

• Safe & Secure

Cultures are different..

tin vi In

Li ve ly &

& le sib

Di ve rs e

s ce Ac g

..climates are different..

Places for people & Safe

Se c

u re

Hea lt

hy &

P ro

sp e rou

s

Attractive & Competitive

..but the way people inhabit and use space is universal. Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


Copenhagen / Public spaces - Public life / 1996

Copenhagen

/ DENMARK / 1968 and onwards

LITET GÅ-KVA ACTICE BEST PR GUIDE

PROJECT: PUPLIC SPACE PUBLIC LIFE STUDIES

olis A metrople for peop april 2006

CLIENT: CITY OF COPENHAGEN

egi

se >Strat

>Analy

g

en

sgrund

Bryghu

af rbejdelse on til uda gerstrategi Inspirati avns Fodgæn Københ

talo >Idéka

For more than 40 years Jan Gehl and Gehl Architects have been involved in several studies of urban life in Copenhagen. Four large scale City Life Studies have been carried out, one every decade from 1968 to 2005.

An ls for urb And goA n 2015 Visions enhAge life in Cop

Copenhagen / New City Life / 2005

CITY PROJECT

From 1962 and onwards streets and squares in Copenhagen have been transformed to create people friendly urban spaces.

Puplic Space Public Life Studies in Copenhagen are a pioneering work introduced in Copenhagen in 1968. The methods were originally developed as part of a research project at the School of Architecture, Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. Put simply the methods involve mapping and assessing city space and registering the city life that takes place there. Typically urban life registration brings to light the extent of pedestrian and staying activities at selected times and days in various seasons of the year. In Copenhagen, Puplic Space Public Life Studies have developed into a key

‘The City of Copenhagen estimates that it’s cyclists save the city 90 000 tonnes of C02/year’ - City of Copehangen

planning tool that makes it possible for politicians and urban planners to acquire knowledge about how the city is changing, as well as to get ideas about how the city can be further improved. Life in the city becomes visible, and over the years it has been a decisive factor for carrying out the many qualitative improvements of Copenhagen’s public space. Puplic Space Public Life Studies are applied by Gehl Architects all over the world. The work in many different cities has provided a detailed picture of the character and extent of city life in the various cities for use in local urban planning. In a larger context, the studies have provided a valuable overview of the cultural patterns and development trends in various parts of the world.

“37% commute by bicycle in Copenhagen. Even in winter 70% of these commuters continue to bicycle.“

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


99,770 95,750 99,770 95,750 82,820 82,820

First pedestrian promenade in 1962: 15,800 m2

66,150 66,150 49,200 49,200

By 1973, the network of pedestrian streets connected the most important locations in the city centre: 49,200 m2

22,860 15,800

22,860 15,800

‘The City of Copenhagen aspires to be the best metropolis in the world for people’

1962 1962

1968

1973

The network of car-free streets and squares in 2005: 99,770 m2

1988

1992

1996

1968

1973

1988

1992

1996

2005

2005

The graph shows the development of pedestrian areas in the parts of the inner city where studies have been conducted from 1968-2005. The numbers indicate m2

- City of Copehangen

City leaders understand that the socially oriented targets they can still achieve

benefits to the individual have the largest impact on behavior and choice

are environmental goals of CO2 emission reduction, economic growth and

and as more people choose NMT, the co-benefits for society are increased

global competitiveness. Three people centered goals are to increase the

exponentially. Therefore, our challenge is to align the co-benefits and direct

amount of time Copenhageners choose to spend in urban space by 20%,

benefits as much as possible to create a virtuous cycle – the ultimate win-win

increase the amount of pedestrian traffic by 20%, and ensure that 80% of

for both you and the society to which you belong. Specifically for mobility the

Copenhageners are satisfied people with opportunities for taking part in urban

city can still accommodate motorists and public transit riders by prioritizing

life (City of Copenhagen and Arup, 2011).

proximity and high quality conditions for pedestrians and cyclists. Experiences from around the world show the converse is not true; we cannot create good

The Copenhagen case provides a powerful lesson - people don’t change their

environments for people by prioritizing the needs of motorists and public

behaviour when you tell them to but when the context compels them. Direct

transport capacity alone. Number of outdoor café chairs throughout the inner city study area 1986-2005 7,020

4,780 2,970

1986

1995

2005

The number of outdoor café chairs rose by 61% from 1986-1995. The number increased by another 47% from 1995-2005.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


New York City

Remaking New York

City’s Public Realm

WORLD CLASS STREETS : REMAKIN G NEW YORK CITY’S PUBLIC REALM

World Class Streets:

World Class Streets:

Remaking New York

City’s Public Realm

/ USA / 2007

PROJECT: URBAN REALM & BICYCLE STRATEGY NEW YORK CITY DEPARTM

CLIENT: CITY OF NEW YORK, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Remaking New York City’s Public Realm

ENT OF TRANSPO

Gehl Architects is working to promote quality of life and livability in New York. Our strategic recommendations have helped make New York a more lively, attractive, safe, sustainable and healthy city. The work informs both long-term and short-term improvements that are in line with the Mayors PlaNYC Initiative: A 20 year vision for a “greener, greater NYC”.

World Class Streets:

www.nyc.gov/dot

RTATION

2

3

Read the report http://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/html/home/home.shtml

CITY PROJECT

centered data, and clearly communicating it to the public, the World Class

LEV ARD

The Public Space Public Life survey method. By rigorously collecting people

CO CIR LUMB CLE US

OU

In 2007 Gehl Architects analysed the condition of NYC’s public realm using

35,000 m 2 of new public space reclaimed in the middle of Manhattan

CE N PA TRAL RK

BRO AD WA YB

Above: New public space and bicycle lanes on Broadway Boulevard and public life in Times Square

Streets Document, established an empirically based decision making framework for City leaders in developing the Green Light for Midtown Campaign. With

TIM SQ ES UA RE

this framework established, the DOT effectively reclaimed underused space and made the experience of moving through the city more enjoyable for all; pedestrians and cyclists are safer and more comfortable for more and more journey types, and when people need to drive or take a taxi, they are able to also do so more safely and conveniently.

HE R SQ ALD UA RE

The Green Light for Midtown Campaign alone reclaimed over 35,000 m2 of

GR E SQ ELEY UA RE

public space (the equivalent to 3 Piazza Navona’s) radically changing city-goers perception of the city, whilst contributing to increased traffic speeds in the CBD by 6% between 2008 and 2009. There is a 2.5% overall reduction in

MA SQ DISO PA UARE N RK

motorized traffic volume, yet 17% improved travel times through Mid-town. Along Broadway 35% decrease in pedestrian injuries yet an 11% increase in pedestrian volumes. The percentage of area employees satisfied with the Times Square experience increased by 72% (from 43% to 74% of those surveyed in 2007 and again in 2009) and 74% of New Yorkers say Times Square

UN SQ ION UA RE

has improved dramatically.

Pilot projects along Broadway Boulevard

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

Access is allowed but through traffic is prohibited


The project aspires to expand the use of bicycling, as an efficient, safe, and not to mention healthy and environmentally friendly mode of transportation. Since 1998, New York City has implemented over 200 miles (320km) of bicycle lanes and tracks yet a 72% decrease in the average risk of a serious injury experienced by commuter cyclists in New York City. This goal is in-part achieved through new protected ‘Copenhagen style’ bicycle lanes along major streets. Over the same period new policies, including allowing bicycle parking inside office buildings, and awareness campaigns contribute to a two-fold increase in New Yorkers commuting to work and education by bicycle.

5min 10 min 0,75 mile 1,5 mile

Most New Yorkers are never more than a

63% decrease in

10 min bikeride

traffic injuries

away from a train or metro station

Protected bicycle lanes along ‘Broadway Boulevard’ and ‘Copenhagen Style’ bicycle track along 9th Ave, Manhattan.

Creating new people friendly urban spaces

Making use of the streets for non-motorized public events

35% decrease in

pedestrian injuries

Access for all users on Times Square

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


London

/ UK / 2004

PROJECT: URBAN REALM STRATEGY CLIENT: TRANSPORT FOR LONDON, CENTRAL LONDON PARTNERSHIP

The introduction of congestion charge moved London into a new era where car dominance is replaced by a better balance between vehicular traffic, public transport, cycling and pedestrian traffic. The report “Towards a Fine City for People” describes the present conditions in London and pinpoints the barriers and obstacles pedestrians have to overcome when walking in London. CITY PROJECT

London / Towards a Fine City for People / 2004

...where the car is king and other users are not prioritized

Recommendations The analysis of the public spaces and the public life of London points to different problems and potentials at all levels of the scale. But rather than presenting a fixed future plan for the city the recommendations set out measures of success and quality criteria that won’t be outdated as they are based on understanding how people use and experience cities.

Capitalise on the unique qualities. Southbank, London, UK

Create a better balance between traffic and other city users. Lyon, France

Improve conditions for walking in the city Copenhagen, Denmark

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

Improve conditions for walking in the city. Lyon, France


Change in policy in the city The launch of ‘Towards a fine City for People’ in 2004 was an important wave in a sea change era of London’s relationship to its public space. The report came at a time when the Mayoral position had been reinstated and fast change was possible. The report proved hugely influential in the policy of both the commissioning Mayor Livingston and subsequently Mayor Johnston. Schemes such as the 100 public space programme gained political clout and popularity as the Gehl report highlighted that in London ‘car was king’ and called Trafalgar square ‘merely a roundabout’ placing it well behind all other European cities in terms of urban quality. The provocative findings of the report have had a lasting political legacy as it is referred to by policy makers, journalists and planners as a bench mark for a change in ambition in the city and the beginning of a new wave of projects. In a letter to the Times newspaper 2011 on the potential dissolution of CABE (Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment) Richard Rogers write:

While London is probably the city I love best, for many years our capital’s urban environment was miserable. 15 years ago Jan Gehl, the Danish doyen of public space, found that London had the worst ‘spaces for people’ in Western Europe. Over the past ten years, however, a subtle change has crept over London and other British cities. We have begun to benefit from the standards of architecture and urban design that we once envied in continental neighbours. 0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

In the book ‘Urban design. The British Urban Renaissance’. John Punter (2009) describes how the ‘Towards a Fine City’ report’s description of the street level conflict between cars cyclists and pedestrians and contributed to the rising shift in sustainability and transport thinking within the city administration and beyond. Flag ship projects which have been delivered by the city subsequently are the pedestrianisation of Trafalgar square, Exhibition Road shared space scheme Oxford circus and Granary square.

The regenerated Elizabeth Street is one of the many projects carried out by local contractors and landscape architects but based on the advice and strategies presented by Gehl Architects.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


Melbourne

ES PLACPEOPLE FOR

/ AUSTRALIA / 1994 - 2004

PROJECT: URBAN REALM STRATEGY CLIENT: MELBOURNE CITY COUNCIL

2004 URNE MELBO agen

In 1994 Jan Gehl was invited to Melbourne to conduct a survey examining the issues and opportunities regarding public space and to collect data on public life. The data was presented in ‘Places for People’. In 2004 Gehl Architects conducted an update and the results were clear and concise: Melbourne has achieved an impressive rebirth of public life in the city.

enh with ants Cop ration Consult collabo rne in Quality Melbou CTS, Urban City of ITE ARCH GEHL

‘Places for People’ edition 1994 and 2004 was awarded the ‘Edra Places Award’ in 2006 as well as ‘The Australian Award for Urban Design’ in 2005.

CITY PROJECT

Melbourne improved the quality of the public realm and has introduced 71% more people-oriented high-quality urban spaces from 1994 to 2004. Over the last decade Melbourne has experienced an urban renaissance through a gradual but consistent transformation of streets, lanes and other spaces into public places that are culturally engaging and diverse, and that response to the city’s intrensic physical character. Some of the achievements reached between 1994 and 2004 following the recommendations from ’Places for People’ are shown to the right.

A revitalised network of lanes & arcades.

Article by Norman Day 1990.

Daytime pedestrian traffic has increased:

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

40%

Stationary activities have increased:

300%


...upgrading the bicycle network

Ambitious programme for city-wide bicycling

From 2006 to 2016 an ambitious bicycle strategy will turn Melbourne into a very bicycle friendly city using the so called “Copenhagen Style Bicycle Lanes”.

A larger residential community.

A 24-hour city.

More places to sit down.

Night time pedestrian traffic has increased:

An increasing student population.

New squares, promenades & parks.

100%

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


Sydney

/ AUSTRALIA / 2007

PROJECT: URBAN REALM STRATEGY CLIENT: CITY OF SYDNEY

Gehl Architects was invited to cast a critical view on to how the public spaces in the city centre of Sydney are performing in relation to green mobility and public life. Building on this the City of Sydney has begun a process of improving the public realm and Gehl Architects continue to advise the city in its endeavours.

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• •••••• •••••••••••••••••••

SYD NEY

Sydney Pub c Space Pub c L e 2007

CITY PROJECT

great for parties...

..but not for everyday life

Recommendations The ana ys s showed a c ty chok ng n veh cu ar traffic and w th poor

The extraord nary phys ca qua t es are poor y ce ebrated and the c ty s

ba ance between the var ous transport modes Pedestr ans and cyc sts are

gradua y os ng qua ty Chang ng the current s tuat on n Sydney demands a

consequent y at the bottom of the agenda and as a resu t the cond t ons are

change of m ndset V s ons for the c ty needs to be created and mp emented

qu te poor for peop e who choose the most susta nab e transport modes An

Sydney needs a more ho st c approach to p ann ng wh ch Geh Arch tects

equa y mportant po nt s the prob em w th the v sua env ronment and not

ass sted w th

ce ebrat ng and ut s ng the waterfront

A Wa e on C y

A Be e C y o Wa k ng

A Be e C y o Cyc ng

A T a fic Ca med C y

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

A S ong C y den y

An nv ng S ee Scape


Challenges

“The goal for Sydney is to develop a diverse, inclusive and lively city with a strong identity”

Sydney enjoys a wonderful setting created by natural landscape features. A lot of things have changed since the early settlement but the foresight of the First Colony is still present. These landscape features create a world class city, but has also resulted in the planned development of the city not receiving the required interest and focus. Sydney has over time experienced many great improvements and new developments and some are worth mentioning in terms of issues of overall importance for the public realm. Despite these obvious qualities the City Centre appears to be suffering from an overload of vehicular traffic and is at present not living up to its full potential.

CBD CBD

building heights

the introvert city

CBD

parallell streets building heights

A freeway environment.

the introvert city

Heavy through traffic.

parallell streets building heights

the introvert city

High cityscape and narrow dark streets.

parallell streets

Many small squares - but same layout and same function.

major problems major problems

roblems

An Introverted City

A Traffic Dominated City

B

major problems

major problems

major problems

A Mono-functional City

A High City

A

B

A Lack of Street Hierarchy

A

B

Scattered Open Spaces

A

CULTURAL DISTRICT CULTURAL DISTRICT

BUSINESS DISTRICT

CULTURAL DISTRICT

BUSINESS DISTRICT

BUSINESS DISTRICT

CBD

CBD CONSUMER DISTRICT

FUN DISTRICT

building heights

the introvertmonofunctional city city

parallell streets

traffic dominated city divided city

CBD

CONSUMER DISTRICT

CONSUMER DISTRICT

FUN DISTRICT

FUN DISTRICT

open spaces - bits and monofunctional pieces city

building heights

traffic dominated city building heights divided city

open spaces monofunctional city - bits and pieces the introvertparallell city the introvert city streets

traffic dominated city divided city

parallell streets

open spaces - bits and pieces

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

diagrammen är skalerade 50% av originalfilen!!!

diagrammen är skalerade 50% av originalfilen!!!

diagrammen är skalerade 50% av originalfilen!!!


Perth

/ AUSTRALIA / 2009

PROJECT: PUBLIC SPACES & PUBLIC LIFE SURVEY CLIENT: CITY OF PERTH & DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING & INFRASTRUCTURE, WEST AUSTRALIA

In 1993 an extensive Public Space Public Life Study was carried out in Perth by a team headed by prof. Jan Gehl. 15 years after the first Perth study Gehl Architects was once again commissioned to do a follow up study to document the quality improvements achieved in the city and to study how public life has responded to the many changes.

PER

TH 200 9 PUB LIC SPAC ES & PUB LIC LIFE GEHL ARCHITECTS

N

0

100

200

300

400

500

m

CITY PROJECT

1993

2009

Above: Public space upgrades have considerably improved walking conditions in central Perth.

The 2009 study reveals that a number of people-first strategies following the recommendations of the 1993 Public Space Public Life Survey have been successfully implemented in central Perth. The pedestrian environment has been greatly improved through physical as well as visual measures, more places to stay are offered and access to the city centre has been enhanced through extended public transport services. The result is an expanded city heart with substantial growth in city life - more people walking and spending time in the city centre. However, in 2009, a number of challenges and obvious potentials still need to be addressed in order for Perth to become a world class city for the 21st

Daytime pedestrian traffic has increased:

13%

Daytime stationary activity has increased:

57%

century. Perth’s future development relies heavily on physical projects taking full advantage of the city’s greatest assets - the fabulous landscape setting and wonderful climate. Further focus should be placed on processes that introduce more experimental and leisure oriented uses of the city. Processes that invite and encourage the use of the city centre as a 21st century meeting place for the people in the region.

Public Space and Public Life registrations show that Perth city centre has experienced a significant increase in city life over the past 15 years.

15%

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

more seats on public benches

74%

more seats on cafe chairs


Visions In collaboration with the client, Gehl Architects have formulated that an important goal for Perth should be to continue expanding the central city functions, becoming even more diverse and vibrant. Unique qualities, especially the river and topography, should be celebrated and the climate should be capitalised upon to make Perth a more fabulous place. The many historical and low rise buildings should be preserved and their scale and degree of detailing should be used as an inspiration for future city developments. The public space network should be expanded even further allowing the city centre to be well connected to surrounding city areas, as well as the beautiful foreshore. The public space network should be accessible for all at all times to contribute to a more vibrant public life, as well as safety, both day and night. Public spaces should occur at one-level - ground level - ensuring accessibility for everyone. There should be a balanced mix of residential and commercial activities and excellent access to the city centre by foot, bike or public transportation making it possible to live a sustainable life in Perth.

‘The waterfront is the key. The Perth city centre should be developed into a riverfront city taking full advantage of the greatest asset: the location by the Swan River.’

Vision for new waterfront

‘Provide more invitations for enjoying the city. Focus should be placed not only on physical projects but also on processes that introduce more leisure oriented uses of the city.’

Vision for reoccurring Sunday closures of city streets

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


Mexico City

/ MEXICO / 2009

PROJECT: BICYCLE MOBILITY PLAN CLIENT: THE SECRETARIA DE MEDIO AMBIENTE DEL DISTRICTO FEDERAL & UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL AUTÓNOMA DE MÉXICO

In Mexico City the average time spent in traffic every day is 2.5 hours, 26 pedestrians are killed every day in traffic accidents and due to pollution residents are losing their sense of smell. The city is facing tremendous challenges in the process of adopting more livable and sustainable solutions. CITY PROJECT

...To a safe, comfortable, and enjoyable city for pedestrians and cyclists

From a car dominated city...

The bicycle mobility strategy Gehl Architects has been asked by The Secretaria de Medio Ambiente del Districto Federal (City of Mexico City, Environmental Department) & Universidad

Vision Document

Strategic Document

Toolbox

Nacional Autónoma De Méxicoto to provide consultancy services to advise on a transport improvement project: establishing new bicycle infrastructure in Mexico City. The ambition is to establish a total of 300 km new bicycle tracks

VISION MEXICO BICYCLE CITY

STRATEGY MEXICO BICYCLE CITY

TOOLBOX MEXICO BICYCLE CITY

over a period of four and a half years. Gehl Architects consultancy has resulted in the Bicycle Mobility Strategy for Mexico City which integrates a series of initiatives and recommendations and also targets all relevant stakeholders, from December 2008

December 2008

December 2008

politicians to city officials to the city staff responsible for the operational level. Gehl Architects’ overall vision for the Bicycle Mobility Strategy is to create a

Best Practice

Branding- Culture

Bicycle Account

more competitive, equitable, and sustainable Mexico City. In this sense, the project is much more than a project providing bicycle paths for cyclists. The project will have a tremendous impact on the daily life of every citizen in Mexico

BEST PRACTICE MEXICO BICYCLE CITY

ACCOUNT ACCOUNT MEXICO BICYCLE Mexico bicycle cityCITY

CULTURE MEXICO BICYCLE CITY

City - how they perceive and experience their city, the quality of air, how they use their time, and where and how they move. The Mobility Strategy Plan for bicycles aims to be part of the overall solution to Mexico City’s issues and will December 2008

be part of achieving the city’s overall goals.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

December 2008

December 2008


Recommendations

TOOLBOX TOOLBOX MEXICO MEXICO BIC YCLE CIT BICY Y CLE CITY

The Toolbox document describes the frame for the physical layout of the bicycle infrastructure. The document has three main parts: a conceptual part, a technical part, and a methodology part. All together they will ensure the implementation of a Unique Mexico City Model - a safe,comfortable, and enjoyable bicycle network. A quality checklist, the ‘Bicycle Quality Criteria’ has been developed to ensure

December

2008

The toolbox offers a practical and conceptual description of the bicycle project’s infrastructure.

that all bicycle infrastructure being planned and built will provide the best possible conditions for bicyclists in Mexico City. The ‘Bicycle Quality Criteria’ is to be used to maintain a people first design focus when planning, implementing, and evaluating bicycle facilities.

‘the toolbox provides a methodology and a checklist for quality’

The first implemented bicycle lanes in Mexico City

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


China Sustainable City Program

/ VARIOUS CITIES IN CHINA / FROM 2008 -

PROJECT: SUSTAINABLE PLANNING PROGRAM CLIENT: THE ENERGY FOUNDATION

Since 2008 Gehl Architects has been collaborating with the Energy Foundation in Beijing focusing on sustainable city development -environmental, social and economic.

152%

more people engaging in

stationary activities in small scale traditional areas than on the large contemporary shopping street called Jie Fang Bei.

CAPACITY BUILDING / BEST PRACTICE

The Gehl team provides key note lectures at several regional and national conferences about sustainable urban development and mobility.

Above: Gehl team Working on site with local planners.

The China Sustainable Transportation Center (CSTC) is a non-governmental,

Build Capacity

non-profit organization founded and supported by The William and Flora Hewlett

Capacity Building has always been key to our collaboration, as we want to

Foundation and The Energy Foundation. The goal of the Energy Foundation

empower the China Sustainable Transport Center (CSTC), politicians, decisions

is a more sustainable China. Since Gehl Architects have been involved, a

makers and local planners to improve their methods and approach to planning

Sustainable City Program has been added to the CSTC program, focusing on

liveable and sustainable cities in a Chinese context. We utilize lectures,

the clear links between urban development, public space, public transport and

workshops, study trips, and publications in order to build capacity in China and

sustainability - environmental, social and economic.

empower the CSTC.

As part of this commission Gehl Architects provide a variety of services to our

Implement Best Practice

Chinese collaborators in order to assist them in handling the rapid changes

To embed the knowledge and inspire the locals to take ownership of the

the Chinese cities are undergoing currently. The services include lectures and

sustainable planning approach, we have extended our initial educational

workshops with city officials, design reviews, development of documentation

masterclasses with project workshops for ongoing projects in a number of

and reports on best practice, pedestrian and bicycle strategies and toolboxes, as

cities. Rather than just delivering a plan, we collaborate on developing the plan

well as development of design guidelines and concrete pilot projects.

together with the local planners to ensure that the design, the principles and the strategy is understood and anchored. Projects in Guangzhou, Chongqing,

Gehl Architects have launched a strategy which will optimize our continuing

Kunming, Beijing, Shanghai and Kunshan have already been implemented or are

collaboration with the China Sustainable Transport Center (CSTC). Together

in process to be implemented.

we have many goals to reach and it is important to have a strong vision and a focused working process in order to achieve the necessary changes, both in

Change Policies

behaviour and in the physical sense, on the streets. Our continued focus is on

Ultimately our goal is to faciliate change and alter the Chinese policies on a

changing policies, building the necessary capacity for change, and implementing

local and national level. In order to achieve this goal, we belive that a close

Best Practice, for example via pilot projects that exemplify how great urban

collaboration with the local action groups and stakeholders is key and we nurish

spaces can look and what they can do.

these relationships through regular visits to the Chinese cities.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


1. Upgrading of the pedestrian routes in the lively, dense, small-scale neighbourhoods of Chongqing is part of Gehl Archittects’ overall strategy to make the city more accessible. 2. Before and After - one of Gehl Architects’ pilot projects is implementation of a pedestrian sidewalk that includes traffic signals and a perceptible crossing area. The ‘after’

1 2

image shows how pedestrians are now visible and prominent in the street life. 3. Based on studies of public space and public life, Gehl Architects has developed strategies for creating a pedestrian network and recommendations for public space quality in Chongqing.

Before

After

Preserve local culture and small-scale meeting places in the aim for a sustainable future

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

3


Muscat

/ OMAN / 2010

PROJECT: STRATEGIC URBAN PLANNING & PUBLIC SPACE DESIGN CLIENT: MUSCAT MUNICIPALITY

Muscat has undergone significant development the past decades. Today Muscat has a unique opportunity to set itself apart from other capital cities in the Gulf region. Gehl Architects assists Muscat in achieving the vision of becoming a livable city in the region in delivering a humane and people-driven vision for city life.

...to a comfortable people’s promenade

CITY PROJECT

From a warm and traffic dominated water front...

Example district strategy: Muttrah Connected

Towards a liveable city Like other cities that are in a process of rapid growth and transformation Muscat today faces complex challenges that must be dealt with if satisfactory conditions for urban life are to be ensured for all of its citizens. Symptoms of the challenges that need to be tackled are very visible when moving around the local neighbourhoods and city destinations. For instance the neglect of creating outdoor comfort in the hot and humid climate, complete car dependency and a spread-out and fragmented urban fabric. Four key areas of action are identified and form the thematic structure for all district strategies and pilot project initiatives. Key areas of action are: inviting, connected, comfortable and

Comfortable

intensified public spaces.

Muscat City for people

Intense

The work of Gehl Architects is focussing on capacity building in the local authority to improve the quality of city development and the public realm in the future. In 2010 Gehl Architects is leading the design and construction of two

Inviting

demonstration public space projects in the city.

Key areas of action are; inviting, connected, comfortable and intensified public spaces. Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


From car park...

...to recreational square by the water

Example pilot project: Waterfront Square at Shatti Al Qurum

Vision & Toolbox

The Vision & Toolbox document provide the strategic framework to improve quality in all of Muscat.

District Strategies

Area-wide strategies to strengthen a rich network of public spaces with appeal to a diverse group of people. The strategies guide transformation in areas with exsisting development pressure.

Pilot Projects

A number of exemplar public space projects that propose the transformation of public destinations to become more vital and diverse.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


Brighton New Road

/ UK / 2007

PROJECT: STREET DESIGN CLIENT: BRIGHTON & HOVE CITY COUNCIL

The improved New Road, one of Brighton’s most important streets, is one of the few shared-surface multi-modal non-residential streets in the United Kingdom. The design is informed by a detailed understanding of how people use the street and the historically sensitive surroundings of Brighton’s Royal Pavilion and its Gardens, where people walk and where they choose to spend time.

legibility study

BRIGHTON & HOV E

introduction.indd

· public space · pub

lic life

1

Brighton & Hove Legibility study - Public Space - Public Life

21-03-2007 11:12:55

CITY PROJECT

From an ordinary traffic street...

New Road after

New Road before

Achievements

...to a vibrant, inclusive & people oriented street

After the renovation, New Road became one of the most popular places

priority. Partnership working and involving road users from the outset has

to spend time in Brighton. Based on consultation with local users a broadly

resulted in a good understanding of the scheme and its potential benefits. The

accepted vision for new urban life on New Road was achieved. Today New

people in the street have been positive about the project, even as work has

Road incorporates interests of different user groups and encourages bicycling,

temporarily affected their businesses.

sitting, standing and walking activities based on people-focused public space programming, making it sustainable in both a social and environmental way.

English Partnership has selected this project as a exemplary best practice

Cars are allowed at all times but the character of the street signals pedestrian

example for the forthcoming Urban Design Compendium in the United Kingdom.

Pedestrian traffic has increased:

175%

Staying activity has increased:

600%

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

A multi modal street with pedestrian priority


A holistic public space network

high activity low activity

Gehl Architects also developed strategies for improving the urban realm of the entire Brighton and Hove community over the next 7-10 years. In a dynamic working process with the local authority and local residents, the

The future hot spots of Brighton All the spaces highlighted in the diagram are ‘hot spots’ (people magnets), but some spots attract more people than others.

design team identified problems and devised a long-term plan for improvement. The overriding strategies were exemplified in five specific Public Space Programmes for areas whose improvement is vital to initiate a new era in the city. Gehl Architects worked closely with the city to develop new working processes to ensure greater collaboration between city departments. Working in multidisciplinary teams, strategies were devised to establish greater collaboration amongst city departments utilising their unique competencies and insight to achieve a holistic, high quality urban environment.

“a place where all transport modes are welcome – but where the pedestrian is king”

Gehl Architects continue their involvement with Brighton and Hove acting as public realm consultants providing quality assurance.

A safe street at night

New Road has become a destination with invitations to stay and enjoy city life

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


Figueroa Corridor

/ LOS ANGELES / USA / 2010-2011

PROJECT: STREETSCAPE REGENERATION CLIENT: CRA/LA

Gehl Architects, in collaboration with Meléndrez and Troller Mayer, have developed a new public space design for Figueroa Street, aimed at creating a balance between the various modes best of transport, prioritising the pedestrian environment and reconnecting South Los Angeles to Downtown in order to rejuvenate local communities and stimulate commercial interests. CITY PROJECT Mobility Hubs

stations & interchanges

1. 7th to 8th

Mobility Hubs

22’-6”

stations & interchanges

Urban Activity Centers

14’

4’-6”3’

24’-6”

7’

11’

7’

3’ 4’-6”

16’

Ex

k al ew id ne .S la Ex ge ike na B ai ed Dr at 1’ reg g g in nt Se r la ffe / P Bu ng i rk Pa B N ne La s Bu B N ne la e iv Dr B N ne la g e in iv nt la Dr /P ne g la in rk ke Pa Bi r d ffe ate Bu eg e gr ag Se ain Dr k al ew id

1’

city life & commercial focus

44’ 90’ ROW 9’-6” 9’-6”

.S

Urban Activity Centers city life & commercial focus

Mobility Hubs

stations & interchanges

Recreational Network

pedestrian, local routes & spaces

Recreational Network

pedestrian, local routes & spaces

Urban Activity Centers city life & commercial focus

4. Olympic to Pico 23’-6”

31’-6”

10’

15’

4’-6” 3’

10’

10’

12’

31’-6”

10’

15’

e

ad

en

x)

le (F

om

B

Pr

N

10’0’’ flex lane

36’0’’ multi-purpose median with pedestrian promenade

B

generous, green spaces

k al ew id .S Ex

ne la

n

a tri

Separated bike path

City Parks

e iv

s de

12’0’’ streetcar & bus lane

Dr

Pe

generous, green spaces

15’

pedestrian, local routes & spaces

N ne La us /B ne r la tca e iv ee r Dr St + B N ne la e iv Dr SB ne la ne e la iv ke Dr Bi r d ffe ate Bu reg ge g a Se ain Dr 1’ k al ew id .S Ex

City Parks

32’ 112’ ROW

Mobility Hubs Recreational Network stations & interchanges

Urban Activity Centers city life & commercial focus

Running for 30 miles (48 km.) on a mostly north-south path through Los

as encourage economic and social regeneration of the wider Figueroa corridor.

Angeles, Figueroa Street is the longest street in the city. But for most of

In collaboration with the client, Gehl Architects engaged the local community in

those 30 miles, this crowded street was not attractive nor accommodating

a public outreach process, asking them what they actually wanted the budget of

to pedestrians; it was up to 120 feet wide and largely unshaded with small

$20 million US dollars to accomplish, utilizing public meetings and workshops,

sidewalks and nowhere to sit.

mailing postcards and soliciting feedback on various online social networking

City Parks

generous, green spaces

Recreational Network

sites and blogs. The campaign proved very successful; residents and business

pedestrian, local routes Gehl Architects public space strategy aimed to transform the street, from &a spaces

owners were enthusiastic and advocated for a drastic change - which they got

utilitarian corridor to a cultural boulevard that increase the quality of life for the

with Gehl Architects’ streetscape design vision.

growing local residential and working communities, that draw in visitors as well

7. 23rd to Expo

34’

15’-6” 8’-6”

3’

7’

10’

49’ 10’

99’ ROW 7’ 3’

n

ria

st

de

Pe om

Pr d

a en

ke Bi ed at eg gr Se ” -6 4’ r ffe Bu g in rk Pa B N ne la e iv Dr SB ne la e iv Dr ke Bi g d in te rk Pa r ega r ffe eg Bu S ge ” a -6 n 4’ ai k Dr al 1’ ew id .S

Ex

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

41’


The design seeks to implement a reduction in use of private vehicles which will lead to improved overall carrying capacity of the street; new inviting and welcoming open spaces which will transform the street use and street culture; as well as space and facilities for bicyclists,

7th Street Hub Improved transit facilities. Focus on staying opportunities on the west side of Figueroa Street next to new Target shop.

making this form of transport safe and attractive. While

7th Street Paseo ‘Go to’ public space destination with public life day and night, all days of the week.

From traffic corridor to an L.A. Icon

infrastructure for pedestrians and bicyclists are improved, new public transport modes will offer alternative ways of reaching major events, improving the urban realm and stimulating public life.

7t

h

St

re

et

Pico Union

Figueroa & LA Live Urban Intensity Area 1 Figueroa & USC Urban Intensity Area 2

11 th

’Go to’ public space destination serving visitors on event days. Serving local users all other days.

St

re

et

Gateway space where local academic and passing non-academic street users meet

Pic

oB

lvd

Introducing a fair balance - Figueroa Street at Galen Center

.

Bill Robertson Lane Recreational promenade for walking and cycling connecting key Expo Park destinations. Natural History Museum entrance and Jesse A Brewer Jr Park are connected by full road closure and the design of a new square. Full road closure creates safe and inviting destination for local community outside Expo Center.

South Park Pico Transit Hub

North University Park

A key transit interchange location with excellent facilities for people on the move. A best practice example of a mobility hub in the US. Wa

sh

ing

ton

Blv

d.

LA Trade Tech 23

West Adams

Ad

am

sB

lvd

rd

Stre

et

.

Human Scale - Southern edge, Exposition Linear Park

Green Network

USC

Je

f fe

rso

nB

lvd

A recreational network of parks and linear, green routes in close proximity of Figueroa Street. A pedestrian, ecological system for local activities and movement.

.

Exposition Blvd.

Exposition Park Paloma Walk A local square with markets and other programmed events. New public recreation areas under the freeway. Linear park connecting USC Real Estate East of Figueroa with local community.

MLK Jr. Blvd.

Exposition Park Running & cycling track. Leisure cycling and running along marked heritage information trail in Expo Park.

MLK Linear Park High quality community park facility with new entrance gateway into Expo Park. Improved sidewalks and new quality bus stops by Vermont Ave.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


Draft: Christchurch Central City Recovery Plan (aug. 2011)

Christchurch

/ NEW ZEALAND / 2011

PROJECT: RECOVERY PLAN CLIENT: CITY OF CHRISTCHURCH

After a series of devastating earthquakes, the citizens of Christchurch, New Zealand engaged in a comprehensive public participation process in which 106,000 ideas were collected. In close collaboration with the City Council, Gehl Architects synthesized this input into a redevelopment plan for the Central City. CITY PROJECT

Distinctive City

Destinctive City: A new lively, fine-grain low-rise city is envisioned for the rebuild.

Gehl Architects arrived in May to a devastated city. The City Art Gallery, one of the few public buildings to survive the Earthquake more or less unscathed, had

Typical Central City block:

become the temporary home for the council as well as emergency centre for rescue

‘Corner’ buildings

services. Varied Roof Forms

Open space for building occupants

An extensive community engagement process collected over 100.000 ideas from Christchurch residents. Gehl Architects played a leading role in this conversation through keynote presentations and targeted community engagement as well as the ongoing influence of Gehl Architects 2009 Public Space Public Life report. Gehl Architects provided thought leadership through lectures, media liason,

Retention of heritage buildings through adaptive re-use Green roofs

Building forms maximise solar aspect

Photovoltaic panels

Building services screened from view

Weather protection to footpaths

Maximising natural light

internal and external workshop leadership, document structuring, storyboarding, masterplanning, identification and illustration of key projects, management of team input as well as having the overall quality assurance responsibility. The synthesis of the engagement process as well as informed council input served as the basis for the Central City Recovery Plan. Gehl Architects with Council Partners lead the formulation of the document structure, it’s contents, key projects,

Retail and activity to ground floors Concealed carparking within ‘block’

illustrations, diagrams and key passages of text. The Recovery Plan outlines over 70 projects and it ensures a new way of growth focusing on a low-rise, resilient,

Green technologies & stormwater collection in new buildings Internal block courtyard District Heating piping to individual buildings

Internal parking access concealed to side laneways

Shared surfaces for pedestrians, cyclists and cars

safe and sustainable city. It puts forward a vision that places people first and its production has helped serve as part of the healing process of the communities and individuals affected by the quake.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk

Christchurch City Council Central City Plan Christchurch urban city block - a vision for a denserDraftcity centre

60


Community engagement Gehl Architects arrived in Christchurch in May 2011 to a devastated city, to partner in preparing a plan for recovery. An extensive community engagement process was already underway entitled ‘Share an Idea’. In the end over 100.000 ideas from Christchurch residents were collected, and Gehl Architects played a leading role in this conversation. Taking insights from the 2009 Public Space Public Life survey Gehl Architects provided leadership through lectures, media liaison and internal and external workshop leadership. The synthesis of the engagement process served as the basis for the Central City Recovery Plan. Gehl Architects with Council Partners led the formulation of the plan, it’s structure, contents, key projects, illustrations and text. This included ‘behind the scenes’ work of document structuring, storyboarding, identification and illustration of key projects, management of team input and overall quality assurance. The Recovery Plan outlines over 70 projects that aim to enable a new paradigm of growth focusing on a low-rise, resilient, safe and sustainable city. It puts forward a vision that places people first and its production has served as an ongoing part of the healing process for the communities and individuals affected by the quake.

Listening First Gehl Architects gave a multi-faceted contribution to the community engagement program. Our keynote presentation entitled ‘What kind of city do you want’ at Share an Idea received widespread public acclaim and prominent coverage on local newspaper and radio. We led workshops with local business leaders and city governance. We visited kindergartens, public workshops and churches. We listened to countless people whose stories and visions inspired us. We also worked with the data team to take leading themes from community engagement into design work and we structured the end plan to reflect this process. We have now formed a partnership with the digital team behind Share an Idea as we feel this process has enormous potential for application in other cities.

Lectures, media liaison and internal and external workshops as part of the services provided by Gehl Architects

Avon River / Õtakaro, meandering through the heart of the Central City, will be celebrated as Christchurch’s new riverfront park in the redeveloped city centre.

Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants · Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark · www.gehlarchitects.dk


Gehl Architects · Urban Quality Consultants Gl. Kongevej 1 · DK 1610 Copenhagen V · Denmark Tel: +45 32 950 951 · Fax: +45 32 950 958 mail@gehlarchitects.dk · www.gehlarchitects.dk

JAN GEHL URBAN QUALITY

PER RIISOM KNOWLEDGE CITIES LARS GEMZØE URBAN QUALITY

OVE KAJ PEDERSEN ECONOMICS

JENS RØRBECK MOBILITY & TRAFFIC KLAS THAM URBAN FORM STUTTGART TRANSSOLAR

GOTHENBURG

8-80 CITIES

RED DEER

VANCOUVER

OSLO

TORONTO

EDMONTON

EDINBURGH GIL PENALOSA COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

PHILADELPHIA

DUBLIN

RICCARDO MARINO URBAN GOVERNANCE

SEATTLE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

MOSCOW

NORDIC CITY NETWORK MARIA WASS DANIELSEN MOBILITY & TRAFFIC

DANISH CYCLE EMBASSY LEVENDE STAD

ROTTERDAM

LIFE - COPENHAGEN UNIVERSITY LUND UNIVERSITY

BORDEAUX ZURICH

I-SUSTAIN

RIGA GEHL ARCHITECTS, COPENHAGEN

CAMBRIDGE LONDON

PENN

ST PETERSBURG STOCKHOLM

REAL DANIA THE ROYAL DANISH ACADEMY OF ARCHITECTURE

SCAN|DESIGN FOUNDATION SAN FRANCISCO CLIMATE WORKS HEWLETT FOUNDATION BERKLEY LOS ANGELES

NEW YORK

COPENHAGEN/AALBORG/ÅRHUS

UN GLOBAL COMPACT

UNIVERSITY OF COPENHAGEN

CHINA SUSTAINABLE

ITDP

ROSKILDE UNIVERSITY

CITIES PROGRAM

BEIJING

TOKYO

AMMAN

WASHINGTON DC

DANISH DESIGN CENTRE

EMBARQUE

SOCIAL ACTION

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

DANISH INSTITUTE FOR STUDY ABROAD

SHANGHAI

LOUISIANA

CHONGQING DOHA

MARTIN DE THURAH

KAO

KUWAIT CITY

KUNMING

MUSCAT

FINAL CUT FOR REAL SOCIAL ACTION MEXICO CITY

SOCIAL ØKONOMI FOD

CTS

SOCIAL INNOVATION

HONG KONG

TRYGVESTA

CHENNAI

BOGOTA SINGAPORE

LIMA

ZAMBIA

RIO SÃO PAULO

NEWCASTLE

PERTH

CAPE TOWN

SYDNEY ADELAIDE

CURRENT PLATFORM

PETER NEWMAN ENVIRONMENT

MELBOURNE

HOBART

PROJECTS EDUCATINAL INSTITUTIONS (RESEARCH and Development) NGO’s (COLABORATOR and CLIENT) COMPANIES (for SKILLS and INSPIRATION) PROFESSIONAL NETWORKS

AUCKLAND

THE UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE

ROB ADAMS URBAN GOVERNANCE

DARYL LEGREW UNIVERSITIES & CAMPUS

WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH

Gehl Architects' Major Projects Book  

Gehl Architects’ vision is to create cities that are lively, healthy, diverse, sustainable and safe - and thereby improve people’s quality o...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you