Page 1

PLUMAGE PLUMAGE--TX

Winter 2015 Issue 

Hill Country Magazine  FREE 

Women Who Dare Feminism in the arts

Doc Spellmon The Doctor is in   

Texas Vintage

Outside In Personal Reflec on  of Naïve Art of Naïve Art  

Provenance in Boerne 

Windberg Cri cal Essay 

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events


Photography and Design by: Gabriel Diego Delgado 

Available at JR Mooney Galleries—Boerne / www.jrmooneygalleries.com / 830-816-5106

Russell Stephenson “First Frost” Oil on Panel 24” x 24”

2 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  3


PLUMAGE PLUMAGE--TX

IN THIS ISSUE Insight of the Outside Naïve Art Analysis  

14 52

PLUMAGE PLUMAGE--TX Winter 2015 Issue 

Frames New selec ons of home decor 

PUBLISHER Gabriel Diego Delgado Contribu ng Writers  Gabriel Diego Delgado

IN EVERY ISSUE 

Katherine Shevchenko

A Note from the Publisher –P.8 

Melissa Adriana Belgara Gina Mar nez

On the Cover—P.10  All artwork photography courtesy of J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art  Prices are for current artwork, and can change at any  me 

Contributors— P.11 

© 2015   JR Mooney Galleries 

Designer’s Quill—P.52 

305 S. Main  Boerne, Texas 

78006 830‐816‐5106 

Edited by Gabriel Diego Delgado, Marla Cavin, Katherine Shevchenko , Be y Houston  Design by: Gabriel Diego Delgado 

4 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  5


PLUMAGE PLUMAGE--TX

FEATURES Winter 2015 Issue No. 8 

32

28

New Acquis ons Recent selec ons at J.R.  Mooney Galleries of Boerne 

Women Who Dare

42

Ar st  Analysis 

Rolla Taylor A er Market Stories 

The “Doc” Is In Art Consultant Cri cal Analysis  on Doc Spellmon 

6 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015

64


A Note from the Publisher  

As I write this, the wind is gus ng at around 45 miles per hour.  The trees down by the river are brown, and leaves and pecans  li er the streets of downtown Boerne. The city is humming with  prepara ons for the Dickens on Main events, and the onslaught  of the Christmas season.  Holiday lights dangle from every  storefront façade.  Winter coats, scarves and cozy dress are the  new wardrobe for the Main street shoppers. We are entering  into the winter season here in the Hill Country. The smell of  fireplaces, fire pits and burning leaves wa  through the crisp air.   The merchants talk of the Holiday Stocking Stroll, rub their  bellies full of exo c meats from the Wild Game Dinner and hope  for des na on shoppers to visit the Historic Mile.  Soon Santa  Claus will be on his North Pole throne at his signature spot at  the Nature Store and the Dickens on Main One Man Plays stages  are going up.  Don’t lose focus on what’s important during this  wonderful season.  Shop local, support local and remember art  makes a great gi  to yourself and others; its ba eries will never  die! 

PLUMAGE‐TX hopes to use its pages as a vehicle to educate, entertain and enlighten our audience on a variety of topics ranging  from reviews, news, ar st narra ves, interviews, cri cism and a cohort of other art related stories from within the gallery walls to  the major metro centers.  I hope you find this informa ve and hope you con nue to follow the ar s c happenings around you in  your local neighborhoods. 

Sincerely,  

Gabriel Diego Delgado, Publisher  gabrieldelgadoartstudio@yahoo.com  gabrield@jrmooneygalleries.com 

8 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  9


On the Cover 

As the cooler crisp air engulfs the Hill Country, the mornings are so beau ful. This image was captured si ng at the stop sign at the corner of San Antonio St. and Main St. With mornings like this, it is easy to see why the Hill Country is the vaca on spot for a lot of Texans. Although the mornings might be chilly, the call of the small town charm is enough to persuade anyone. Boerne is indeed a gem nestled in the gateway to the Texas Hill Country. Founded by Free Thinkers and the like, this close knit community has an abundance of family friendly events, including the park and recrea ons des na ons, restaurants and many other a rac ons.

10 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


Contributors

Gabriel Diego Delgado is the Gallery Director at J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art, Boerne, Texas. He has spent almost a decade in Nonprofit Art Management‐ working as a Curator of Exhibi ons at the Sta on Museum of Contemporary Art, Houston; Project Manager of Research and Development at the Museo Alameda, a Smithsonian Affiliate, San Antonio. He is a Freelance Curator and Arts Reviewer for several publica ons. His artwork has been shown in Arco 2012 Madrid, Spain; New York, New York, MOCA (Museum of Contemporary Art) D.C. as well as numerous galleries and venues throughout the U.S. He is currently working on his Fine Art Appraisal License.

Katherine Shevchenko has a ended the San Francisco Academy of Art University and the University of Texas at San Antonio where she received her Fine Arts Degree with an emphasis in Pain ng. Her experience ranges from interning as a curatorial assistant at Southwest School of Art to teaching art to students of all ages. Currently, she is an art consultant/framing designer at the J.R. Mooney Gallery in Boerne. Some of her contribu ons include wri ng ar cles, hos ng and edi ng the J.R. Mooney podcast, "Mooney Makes Sense" and art catalog design. She is also an ar st that specializes in pain ng in oils and other media.

Melissa Belgara, a na ve Texan that grew up in Houston, lived in San Marcos and San Antonio has recently moved with her family to Boerne. Her experience in Commercial Real Estate Marke ng provides a unique perspec ve of this quickly expanding area of Texas. She holds a Bachelor's degree from the University of Houston in Communica ons, as well as a Masters degree in Organiza onal Management. Currently, she spends most of her me caring for her two daughters, subs tute teaching and looking for crea ve ways to explore and discover the Hill Country's ar sts' communi es. Gina Mar nez graduated from AEW College of Photography and Louisiana State University with degrees in photography and communica ons, respec vely. Her photography has been in several Louisiana galleries including The Baton Rouge Gallery, The Shaw Center for the Arts and the Louisiana Ar st Alliance, and at the Movements Gallery and the Monarch Events Center in Aus n, Texas. She has published a book called “The Kuna Yala” based on her stay with the Guna Yala tribe of Panama.

                                                                                               Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  11


Photography and Design by: Gabriel Diego Delgado 

Available at JR Mooney Galleries—Boerne / www.jrmooneygalleries.com / 830-816-5106

Arthur McCall “Light Snow” Acrylic on Panel 24” x 24”


Gallery & Community   14 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


Insight of the Outside “My Personal Experience with Naïve Art” By: Gabriel Diego Delgado 

                                                                                              Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  15


Gallery & Community  

I

bought my first major art  purchases and pain ngs a  few months a er  gradua ng with my Bachelor’s  Degree in Fine Art.  A Fine Art  Studio major and colleague  persuaded me to join him (Jon  Read) and another friend (Tex  Kerschen) to visit the studio of  Rev. Albert Wagner.  It was with  Wagner’s work that I would  begin my explora on into  “Outsider” or “Naïve Art”.   Wagner was one of those art  community figures who existed  by Michael Stravato; Courtesy of the Sta on Museum of Contemporary Art   outside the norm of tradi onal  fine art prac ces; someone you  would hear stories about.  Thrown into the naïve “Outsider Ar st” genre, Wagner was a self‐taught ar st  and self‐proclaimed preacher with a church in his basement who lived on the east side of Cleveland, Ohio.   We were making a holy trek to see his work,  in what has been described by those  covering the economic development of  Cleveland as a signature crack neighborhood,  undoubtedly in one of Forbes most  financially miserable ci es.  I was unfamiliar  with his legacy and was curious to see why  his persona had such an impact on a trusted  art associate.  The story goes that he was a  fana cal womanizer and heavy drinker, who  in prepara on for his fi ieth birthday was in  his basement cleaning when paint spla ers  on the floorboards began speaking to him.  It  was the voice of God telling him he needed  to change his life and turn to God and  preach.  From that day on, he painted holy  by Michael Stravato; Courtesy of the Sta on Museum of Contemporary Art   relics of the gospel and conducted informal  church sermons in the basement.  As a  prolific ar st he was able to create well over  3,000 works of art within his life me; most  of the sales of his work while he was s ll  

“Wagner was one of those  art community figures who  existed outside the norm of  tradi onal fine art  prac ces; someone you  would hear stories about…” 

16 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


alive were undocumented (like mine) where he took cash on the spot and sold the works off the walls of  his home.  A er his death in 2006 at 82, his children held an auc on and sold over 800 works of art.    Upon arriving at Wagner’s studio we were greeted by a person, whether friend, colleague, family member  or caretaker was not apparent.  We were told that the Reverend was s ll sleeping, but we could look  around if we wanted.  When we went upstairs to the second floor, we saw the ar st. S ll woozy from a  late a ernoon nap, he was s ll  reclining in his bed when he invited  us into his room to share his art.  Stacks of pain ngs were amassed  on the floor around his bed, some  li ered on the peripherals of his  sheets.  On that cold and windy  Ohio day I took home with me two  small religious pain ngs of the  baby Jesus and the Holy Mother.   A er mee ng the ar st, seeing the  house full of his vision, the way he  lived his life, you could not help  but be impressed and acknowledge  you were in the presence of  someone living on a higher plane  than yourself.   As my professional art career took  many turns and twists at several  art ins tu ons, I would go onto  meet other ‘outsider’ ar sts who  would have an impact on my  outlook of this genre.  Jesse Lo , a  Image courtesy of Jon Read  Houston based African American  ar st who called the 5th Ward  home, shared a studio with me in  the early 2000’s, or I shared it with  him.  I felt his magic, his ar s c mojo, his Rastafarian energy.  Lo  is credited as one of the founding  members of the Project Row Houses in Houston’s 3rd Ward.  Lo  was/ is the mys cal godfather of the  African American Art community from the 1960’s to today.  Texas Evangelical Forrest Price, with his  poli cal statements and divine teachings, showed me how to make art filled with hope, despair,  redemp on, guilt, gra tude, salva on and other worldly repentances.  Price strived to live his life in a way  that complimented the Dead Sea Scrolls.  An ar st beyond descrip on, his gentle demeanor allowed him  to serve the Lord in his own way but s ll maintain an aura of ar s c importance in the collec ve Houston  art community.                                                                                                 Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  17


Gallery & Community  

When I recently saw the artwork of F.L. “Doc”  Spellmon, I knew I found my next “Outsider Art”  interest.  For the exhibi on “Texas Vintage” at J.R.  Mooney Galleries of Boerne, we were able to  curate in three pain ngs by Spellmon in order to  help recognize his importance in the African  American art community of San Antonio during the  1950’s – 1970’s.  A pioneer of African American  “Outsider Art”, Spellmon’s vision included  historical documenta ons about slavery atroci es,  ba les concerning the Buffalo Soldiers, aspects of  everyday life, gin dis lleries, African cultures,  religion and everything in between. Through the  renowned collector of Texas vintage art, Johnny  Wright from Fredericksburg, Texas, I was fortunate  to witness a wonderful array of over 40 original  Doc Spellmon pain ngs.  Wright had purchased a  large estate of his work directly from the ar st  before he died.  Wright was offering the gallery an  opportunity to share with our clients some of this  wonderful collec on.  I immediately knew we  needed to have more of his selec ons in the  gallery for our patrons to experience.  A er selec ng about 18 more pain ngs with the considera ons of  Art Consultant, Katherine Shevchenko, the decision was made to bring in a body of work as sort of an  appendage to the exhibi on; work that would be available for consulta on and reference the importance  of his career in the “Outsider” genre.  As we began to document his artwork for the exhibi on catalog, we  also began to document the backs of the pain ngs along with the front image. The backs of canvases,  

18 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


serving pla ers, boards, discarded wood other devices held an almost biographical anthology.  Spellmon  would make his own art and exhibi on labels and affix them to the backs of the art. You could see labels  showcasing the various organiza ons and businesses he founded like the “Black Art Studio” LTD and “Art  By DOC”.  Others included side jobs where he was immersed in the arts community bringing collectors  and patrons to art studios and organiza ons like the Carver Community Center with labels like, “Art Tours  by Appointment” and “Art You Can Iden fy With”.  His comical side would emerge with s ckers on his  hangers, which read: “Guaranteed Life me Hanger”.  This was o en placed on a crooked piece of recycled  wood or par cle board that was affixed to the back of the pain ng by way of nails, staples and glue with  an offset and non‐centered wire  hanger.  In 1977 Mayor Lila  Cockrell declared F.L. Doc Spellmon   Texas Emissary of the Muses and  gave him his own City of San  Antonio sponsored Proclama on.   In Spellmon’s own way of ar s c  genius and merit he photocopied  that proclama on in various sizes  and affixed this document to the  back of his pain ngs a er August  24, 1977.  So from a historical  context we can now see from the  back of the pain ngs when they  were roughly created, by way of  which s ckers were affixed to the  backing.  Always accompanying  most pain ngs was a large self‐ portrait s cker with what would be  considered a business profile head  shot complete with a small two  paragraph bio of him with the  highest merit of quotes referencing  him back to Jackson Pollock,  Grandma Moses and others.  O en  considered an “Outsider Ar st”  due to his visual and playful, and  mistakenly, naive imagery,  Spellmon actually acquired four degrees in his life me including a Masters in the Arts and taught pain ng  and drawing at Lackland Airforce Base in San Antonio.  A prolific ar st as well, Bill Banks and Andrea  Marshall in the biography: F.L. Spellmon “The Life and Works of an African American Ar st”, published by  Banks Fine Art, LLC, men oned he par cipated in over 19 exhibi ons from 1986 – 1989.                                                                                                  Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  19


Gallery & Community  

Within the appendix selec on of pain ngs, four pieces stand out as ones that need further men on and  spotlight: a pain ng sketch  tled “Bath Time” measuring 8” x 10” and it’s formalized larger complete work  “Bath Time” measuring 15” x 13”; two  pain ngs from the Buffalo Soldiers series  including “Ge ng Away” and “Two Iron  Men: Black Seminole Indian Collec on”.  

“A pictorial assimila on of  the heavyset house slave  who took care of the slave  children…” 

The “Bath Time” series can be categorized  into his autobiographical series of  artworks.  They harken back to the  mes  of slavery or post‐Civil War with aspects of  the everyday life of freed slaves.  A  pictorial assimila on of the heavyset house  slave who took care of the slave children,  “Bath Time” is a childlike illustra on of two children in a washtub being hovered over and scrubbed by an  African American woman in a red headscarf and blouse covered by a white apron.  We see a shantytown  shack structure in the background  complete with paper‐collaged flowers in  the final larger pain ng.  Both give credit  to the matriarchal role in African  American culture as well as the  rudimental outdoor plumbing that  existed in this  me era.  In today’s  contemporary art world reference, the  children’s faces remind me of the neon  body sculptures by American ar st, Bruce  

20 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  21


Gallery & Community  

Nauman.  I half expect the children to be animated and start poking each other in the eye or move their  heads in a mechanized jaunt of angular rota ons.  Addressing the overall physical en ty of the actual  pain ng, both pain ngs have deliberately painted outer frames and course overlays of thick paint, marker,  ink, and other mixed media to give a layered concoc on of visual pleasure. Yes we see the children, the  mother and the house, but what we need to do is take  me to ingest all the underpain ng; the layers we  can see only by bubbled protrusions under the final composi on.  To first see the ‘Bath’ paint sketch and  compare it to the final pain ng, we can begin to dissect the ar st’s inten ons, his decisions and  formula ons to make one of his many pieces.  

Historically, the pain ngs in the “Buffalo Soldiers” series of artwork are comprised of documented events.   In “Ge ng Away”, a smaller 13” x 17” pain ng, we see a Buffalo Soldier on horseback, facing backward,  shoo ng at what looks like Na ve Americans.  However, contextually within the Buffalo Soldier’s legacy,  we know the Buffalo Soldiers were one of the only regiments that were able to sustain the harsh  condi ons of desert figh ng and chase the famous war chief, Geronimo, through Arizona.  This could be  the famous Geronimo and his soldiers engulfed in a shoot‐out and daring escape from the 10th regiment.   “Two Iron Men: Black Seminole Indians Collec on” on the other hand portrays the Black Seminole scouts,  in some cases runaway and freed slaves, who ini ally joined the Seminole Indian camps in Florida and  

22/  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


were asked to enlist in the Army and fight in the Texas‐Indian Wars, where they had documented  engagements with Comanche, Kiowa, Apaches and Kickapoos, a ached to and figh ng alongside the  Buffalo Soldier regiments.  The  tle can  refer to the weaponry, par cularly the  sword and saber, or the tenacity of these  men.  

“Outsider Art should not be  dismissed, ignored or  deemed irrelevant.  In most  cases, these ar sts exist on  the peripherals of today’s  society…” 

In conclusion, “Outsider Art” should not be  dismissed, ignored or deemed irrelevant.   In most cases, these ar sts exist on the  peripherals of today’s society.  However, a  few, like Price, Lo  and Spellmon have  become intrinsically important to the civic  makeup of their respec ve art  communi es. Their artworks drive an  importance that allows their legacy to  con nue, influencing future genera ons of ar sts, collectors, and appreciators.  The outsider has now  become the insight‐er, revealing aspects of our collec ve cultures in a fresh light.  Maybe we are the ones  looking in from the outside and they are the ones in their own profound earthbound nirvana.  

                                                                                              Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  23


1.800.537.9609 www.jrmooneygalleries.com

305 S. Main St Boerne, TX 78006 830-816-5106


Custom Framing Conservation Museum Fine Art Photography Shadow Boxes Ready-Mades More... Original Paintings Giclees & Prints Picture Lights

8302 Broadway St San Antonio, TX 78209 210-828-8214


Gallery News        

Staff Profile Name: Gina Mar nez  Posi on: Art & Framing Consultant—Boerne, Texas  Summary:  I graduated from AEW College of Photography and Louisiana  State University with degrees in photography and communica ons,  respec vely. My photography has been in several Louisiana galleries  including The Baton Rouge Gallery, The Shaw Center for the Arts and the  Louisiana Ar st Alliance, and at the Movements Gallery and the Monarch  Events Center in Aus n, Texas. I started ginimar ni photography in 2007  and worked extensively in Central and South America for 5 years. I  published a book called “The Kuna Yala” based on my stay with the Guna  Yala tribe of Panama. I have worked as an assistant to the painter Charles  Barbier on several murals in the city of Baton Rouge. I curated pop up shows of Louisiana ar sts at  various venues in Louisiana and Texas. Favorite Song:  This is always changing! “Sixteen or Less” Calexico and Iron and Wine, “It’s Raining” Irma  Thomas, “Cupid” Sam Cook  Favorite Ar st: Monet, Van Gogh, Charles Barbier, David Nino, Gauguin, Edward Cur s, Deborah Hay,  Yoshitomo Nara  Favorite Art World Memory:  (I have many): Having Sandy Skoglund favorably review my por olio while  she was a guest instructor at my university is a fond art world memory. She liked my piece: “Jungle  Room” from my Graceland por olio and said she had seen images of this many  mes but not from my  perspec ve. When I lived in Berlin, the curtains in my bedroom were made from the fabric that Christo  used to wrap the Reichstag building. Going to see the “Silence” exhibit at the Menil Collec on in 2012,  and pain ng murals with one of my favorite living ar sts, Charles Barbier, for home town improvement  projects are other favorite art memories. Par cipa ng in paint night, a weekly event for many years in  my life where my friends and I would gather together one night a week to paint, cook, play music and  create, is also a cherished art memory.   Goals:  : My goal is also to promote the ar sts of JR Mooney Galleries of Fine Art to the best of my  abili es. My personal goals are to keep producing work: to write, photograph, dance and paint; to  perform more aerial silks rou nes, publish my book and show more of my work.   

26 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


Feel confident entrusting your cherished memories and fine art. Master framers with over fifty years experience in custom framing and shadow boxes. We carry a versatile selection of framing mouldings and mats from: Laron Juhl, CMI Moulding, AMPF, Max Moulding and many more! Come in today and have a consultation with one of our framing designers and be inspired!

Custom Framing Conservation Museum Fine Art Photography Shadow Boxes Ready-Mades More... Original Paintings Giclees & Prints Picture Lights 305 S. Main St Boerne, TX 78006 830-816-5106

8302 Broadway St San Antonio, TX 78209 210-828-8214

                                                                                              Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, October2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  27


Gallery News        

New Gallery Acquisitions “An Art Consultant’s Analysis” By Gina Martinez “Where’s My Lunch” by R. Henderson  R. Henderson’s portrait of a cow  is no ordinary farm animal.  Instead of the natural browns,  whites and greens that one might  expect from a tradi onal bovine  pain ng, the ar st uses bold  bright colors: reds, purples, and  blues to create his animal. This  adds an element of excitement to  the pain ng, but there is more to  it than just wild colors. Even with  a non‐‐tradi onal pale e, the cow  appears realis c. This effect is  achieved by the ar st through use  of a pale e knife technique to  create texture and dimension in  the paint.  The result is a Post‐ Impressionis c pain ng with a  pop art twist. The psychedelic  cow has a life like quality that  makes this a fun and lively  pain ng. The electric white paint  becomes fur falling around the  ears and the so  friendly eyes of  the cow. This texture creates dimension and movement. His face is gentle and sweet, begging for a bit of  grass as he saunters over to the fence, s cking his head out in expectance of a nibble. 

28/  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


“Watching Proudly” by R. Mizoy This large majes c oil pain ng features  a Na ve American warrior si ng on his  white steed. The horse stands in  shallow water and in the background is  the warrior’s village. He wears a halo  war bonnet or headdress. These  headpieces were originally worn by  Plains Indian men who had earned a  place of respect in their tribe. The  headdress was worn only for special  occasions and was a display of courage  and honor. They were and s ll are  made of golden eagle feathers and are  some mes painted red to  commemorate certain events. To  obtain the feathers the men would  climb into the golden eagle’s nests and  pluck them from the young. Today, in  the United States, only enrolled  members of a tribe may legally possess  eagle feathers as the species is  protected. In the past, each feather  was earned, either in ba le or for a  good deed. If the warrior acquired  enough feathers one of his family  members would sew together the headdress. The warrior had to have the permission of the chief to wear  it and only few were awarded this high honor, as a man may collect only two or three eagle feathers  during his en re life.  Since the halo war bonnet was worn only during special occasions and by special people, it is likely this  warrior is reflec ng upon his life while on his way to a ceremony or other tribal event. His headdress has  much red painted into it, indica ng that he has a lengthy history of heroic deeds. The fact that his horse is  white is a symbol of his good character. Together, their physical reflec on in the water visually symbolizes  personal reflec on. The headdress he wears is a testament to the deeds and achievements that created  his legacy. He stands erect, alert in front of his village, s ll the protector. He has fought hard, hunted and  worked his en re life to keep his people safe and prosperous as is indicated by the headdress. Now, he  takes a moment for silent, proud reflec on.  “Where’s My Lunch”, R. Henderson, oil, 24” x 20”, $525.00 

“watching Proudly”, R. Mizoy, oil, 40” x 30” , $1,735.00 

                                                                                              Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, October2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  29


Photography and Design by: Gabriel Diego Delgado 


Come See Our New Lines of Custom Framing Designs


San Antonio Spotlight     32 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


Women Who Dare “Reflections from an Artist’s Perspective” Curated by Anel I. Flores and Sarah Castillo

Written by Katherine Shevchenko

                                                                                              Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, October2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  33


San Antonio Spotlight    “Women Who Dare” was an all women ar sts exhibi on that was curated by Anel Flores of Artery Studios  and Sarah Cas llo of Ladybase Gallery and held at the Carver Cultural Community Center in near  downtown San Antonio and ran from November 5 – November 27, 2015.   The core theme of the exhibit  was to present the works of “San Antonio women ar sts who s mulate, provoke, and capture her  viewers; allowing space for the movement and speed of the compe ng world to fall away.”  The outcome  of a theme of such a transcendent nature facilitated a contempla ve flowering of many dis nct ar s c  languages with interpreta ons ranging from self‐portraits, dissec on of mys cal feminine archetypes to  conceptual mixed pieces that explored topics such as heritage, race, fears and self‐discovery.  In  disclosure, I was one of the par cipa ng ar sts curated into the exhibi on, and my contribu on was a  pain ng created specifically for the curatorial premise.  Upon observing and processing the exhibi on as a  whole, I felt it was integral to highlight how these dis nc ve artworks correlate to one another in a  gender specific exhibi on.         

34 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


One of first pieces that immediately captured my  a en on was Audrya Flores’ “Hand Talker,” created  from various fabrics, yarn, pins, and prickly pear cac‐ tus.  According to her ar st statement, anxiety has  been a struggle that insidiously “manifests itself in my  hands through fist clenching, fidge ng or swea ng.”  

“...anxiety has been a  struggle that insidiously  “manifests itself in my  hands through fist  clenching, fidge ng or  swea ng.”...    “Hand Talker” essen ally is a visual metaphor that  unveils this internal ba le by depic ng a figure made  of cut out fabric, curled up in sheets, with white  menacing hands advancing towards her.  In the met‐ al wrought frame, appendages made from dried cac‐ tus hang, visceral metaphors of the destruc ve na‐ ture of anxiety coming forth within the subconscious  dream state.   Le cia R‐Z’s “Psychopomp Altar I,” is a three dimen‐ sional work which presents two anima figures con‐ structed of wool felt with animal skulls for heads  posed and mounted on circular fabric covered  frames.  Psychpomps, whose origins are from Greek  mythology, are en es that act as intermediaries to  guide souls to the other side or through states of  transmuta on. In reference to the Roman Catholic  tradi on of milagritos, R‐Z has placed a receptacle to  accept offerings from supplicants that are in need of  the psychpomp’s assistance, as evidenced by the  presence of a lock of hair that has already been  placed within.                                                                                                   Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, October2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  35


San Antonio Spotlight   

In my submission, I also  scru nize death and transi on  through my oil and egg tempera  pain ng  tled “La Mys ca.”  In  this old masters’ mixed  emulsion technique pain ng, I  present a portrait of a woman  that is half alive and the other  half is being consumed by many  vibrantly hued fungi and other  natural elements of decay, in  order to confront the viewer  with the constant transitory  state that existence always  resides in.  The subject’s  s mulus stems from momento  mori, the La n phrase meaning,  “remember you will die,” which  has fueled a whole thema c  branch of art, notably the  vanitas, s ll lifes that are made  to depict the earthly realm’s  most impermanent nature.            “Take One. Just Begin” by  Stephanie Torres is an  interac ve work, fabricated of  handmade li le journals with colorful  paint spa ered covers that each  represent the ar st’s “…own willingness  to take a risk,” placed upon a table with  crayons and other drawing tools.  The  ar st simply asks the par cipant to take  the miniature journal and start  something, in any form or fashion; a  cheering taunt to start a journey that one  has been reluctant to venture forth on,  due to fear, or in her case a “paralysis of  perfec onism” brought on by anything  that is crea ve.   

36 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

“...woman that is half alive and  the other half is being  consumed ...in order to  confront the viewer with the  constant transitory state that  existence always resides in.” 

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


Maria Luisa Carvajal de Vasconcellos embraced “the story telling power of the paintbrush” to heal from a  crippling nine year depression that was the result from grief of losing her husband when she was thirty‐ nine.  Within her pain ngs are the stories of many women in all the many stages and phases of their  lives, with a so  and voluptuous styliza on.  In “Tequila,” one can only fathom what the lady seated is  pondering, seated alone at a table, with a half  empty bo le, surrounded by melancholy blue.     Linda Arrendondo has created a quadriptych  en tled the “Medusa” series that are female  portraits that are painted with fluorescent  colors complete with writhing sinuous snakes  for hair.  She describes her medium of choice,  watercolor: “feminine, loose, delicate, light… It’s not a material that is controlled or  dominated but one where some of its best  parts are fueled by serendipity and  compromise.”  It seems those traits are the  exact ones the Medusa women are channeling, sensuous, so ness and a hint of unpredictability. The  portraits are arranged in a square format, crea ng a striking visual affect, due to the bold colors, and  solidarity of contrast.  They gaze out, fierce and enigma c, challenging the viewers.   Viewers had the opportunity to be educated about an uncomfortable episode of racial tensions from  Texas history brought to light from the archives in Claudia Zapata’s installa on project, “Dedicated to  Hazel Sco ” about the African American pianist who cancelled her 1948 performance at the University of  Texas due to segrega on of the audience members.  Hazel Sco ’s legacy is reexamined, through videos  of her performing playing on screens installed above the gallery space, poster media and informa onal  ‘zine’ style pamphlets.    Ques ons about racial and cultural supremacy are also scru nized in Raquel Zawrotny’s “Melanin in  Gold” a quadriptych done in acrylic ands mixed media that was ini ally inspired by the controversy the  Miss Japan contestant winner generated because of her mixed racial heritage.  The theme of “Melanin”  seeks to “ques on society’s views of women, par cularly Black women…”  Zawrotny’s second goal was to  present Black women and their cultural heritage in an engaging light.  In each of the portraits she adorns  her subjects with exquisite costumes and colorful embellishments with vibrant colors on a field of gold  leaf in order to illuminate their dignity and humanity.     Ashley Mireles has created a series of portraiture “…..And To All Those Who Died, Scrubbed Floors,  Wept, And Fought For Us, which is a series of mixed media portraits that have been produced on  handmade paper derived from organic materials that come from the ar st’s immediate surroundings,  such as “Texas soil, debris, and fallen pecan trees.”  The subjects are rendered in amber hued stylized  lines on a Plexiglas that has been mounted over a mauve textural paper.  Depicted are “significant  figures” that Mireles has manifested from stories told by those close to her.  Through these portraits she  seeks to enshrine their tales of perseverance and contribu ons to her life and others.                                                                                                             Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, October2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  37


San Antonio Spotlight   

Some of the ar sts chose the method of portraiture to facilitate the theme’s  interpreta on as a method of self‐reflec on.  Adriana M. Garcia has painted her self as a  way of rela ng with the world around her. Her use of transparent oil glazes and  geometric elements work in tandem to facilitate a sense of a transcendent space within  her canvas, her  gaze looks off  toward the side  off the panel, in a  contempla ve  percep on, with a  resonant calm  that is further  accentuated with  her choice of  showing a desert  horizon  background, with  white intersec ng  lines that are  etheric indica on  of connec on.   

“Overall, the effect of the  exhibi on produced an  in mate and confessional  atmosphere, a self‐portrait of  each of the ar st’s inner  psyches, and an establishment  of trust to unveil those  innermost thoughts and  emo ons.” 

Kristel A. Puente’s  “Disambigua on  of the Introverted  Megalomaniac” is a photograph of the ar st herself, imbued with decora ve elements  that reflect her own contemporary style and at once channeling the infamous Mexican  ar st, Frida Kahlo. The photograph is framed in ar ficial roses that reference the flowers  that are adorning her hair, in homage to Kahlo’s iconic style.  Instead of na ve Mexican  folk dress, the ar st is dressed in a contemporary  T‐shirt, and is brandishing ta oos and the ‘bird’,  confronta onally gazing out at the viewer,  channeling the defiant spirit of the celebrated  ar st, uncompromising and comfortable in her  own skin.    Amanda Bartle ’s sculpture piece “Un tled”  consists of two pieces, one being a spiky metallic  armature shell that resembles a stylized  anatomical heart.  A feminine touch is evident  within the inner lining, as it appears to be encased  in lacey and so  material protected by the metal  

38 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


armature, an undeniably an intricate testament to the strength, vulnerability and resilience of emo on.             Overall, the effect of the exhibi on produced an in mate and confessional atmosphere, a self‐portrait of  each of the ar st’s inner psyches, and an establishment of trust to unveil those innermost thoughts and  emo ons.  The Feminine is redefined in many mul faceted expressions, manifes ng through each ar sts’  own unique hands, as individual  as a fingerprint.    Women Who Dare was on  exhibi on at the Carver Cultural  Community Center   November 5 – November 27,  2015  ©Katherine Shevchenko, Art  Consultant   For More Informa on about the  Exhibi on:   h p://ladybasegallery.com/2015/10/20/women‐who‐dare/  Source:  Flores, Anel, and Sarah Cas llo. "Women Who Dare." Ladybase Gallery. N.p., n.d. Web. 

                                                                                              Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, October2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  39


Design by Katherine Shevchenko 

Design by Katherine  Shevchenko 


Cri cal Analysis    

The “DOC” Is In

The Art of F.L. “Doc”  Spellmon: A Closer  Look     By: Katherine Shevchenko 

42 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, October2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  43


Cri cal Analysis    

I

recently had the pleasure to become acquainted with the artwork of F.L. “Doc” Spellmon, an  African American ar st who produced works in various media in San Antonio, Texas, and was most  prolific during the 1980’s.  Known as having an affable and joyous nature, Spellmon created pieces  that were informed by recent Black history yet emulated experimental processes that included  collage, found objects, and layers of painterly applica ons.  On the surface, Spellmon’s pain ngs and  drawings appear naïve and are even categorized as “outsider” due to their character of dispropor onate  figures, use of found materials, collaged elements, and a pale e that at  mes bordered on the fringes of  Day‐Glo in its earnestness, all sealed with a finishing touch of sprinkled mul colored gli er.  The  applica on of the layers of paint and ephemera some mes buckle and create undula ng surfaces.  A  textural narra ve topography, his artworks were born of sincere contempla on of prime issues that  permeated his consciousness: civil rights, the nearly forgo en and overlooked Black culture of the rural  South, and religious themes.  Through his crea ve process a transmogrifica on occurs with the touch of  his hand, and suddenly  mundane materials are  transmi ng drama c  parables of  mes past,  present and future.     

44 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


“Girls Picking  Berries” is an acrylic  painted on an oven  baked serving  pla er that is  mainly octagon‐ shaped, portraying a  slice of life subject.  It shows a  microcosm of a  me  and a place, through  a subset of a more  idyllic and  sen mental lens,  due to the presence  of two black girls  with skin painted in  exaggerated depth  of cartoonish tone,  almost bordering on  Blackface caricature  that all his figures  seem to possess in  his works.  They are  in search of berries  growing along the  riverbank, with  sacks hopefully  becoming heavy  with bounty. In the  distance is a quaint  looking village: a  cluster of white houses with red earth colored roofs with a focal point of a church and a white cross,  exaggerated in scale.  The ruby red sun is the only other subject that competes for a en on, located in the  upper central por on of the composi on.  In the middle ground, there is a body of water with a boat  carrying two fishermen who are in repose, contribu ng to the poignancy of a moment of leisure.  Perhaps  it is Sunday, the day of rest, as in mated by the cross that is a guidepost for the community.  The chance  to catch a moment of respite and to catch up on life’s pleasures, however humble, is in no way diminished  by its significant meaningfulness bestowed on well being, like a fresh berry in all its succulent sweetness.  

                                                                                              Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, October2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  45


Cri cal Analysis    

In contrast to tranquil moments, Spellmon also explores inner  nightmares and demons that emerge from the murky psyche,  and can hearken a deathlike night of the soul.  “That Day,” a  mixed media piece, emotes an undeniable power, as  disembodied faces with menaced expressions float in a field that  covers the picture plane.  The color scheme has taken a  departure from bucolic pleasantry to one dominated by black  with sickly greens and yellow tones with jarring accents of  aggressive orange.  The dominant faces are primi ve, made by  black, almost crude scrawling strokes. Mask‐like and resembling  skulls, they are posi oned in quadrants around the composi on.  Interspersed throughout are a mul tude of smaller faces, done in  a simpler fashion, yet the expressions are not lost, as they sink in  a morass of anonymity.  Various hues of paint are layered upon  the collaged paper, plastered upon black board.  The ar st has  not le  or revealed any other reference to an event or in  par cular a clue as to the context this piece could be alluding to.   What is revealed in plain sight is a ges cula on of observa on of  human moral fallibility. An overall consensus of oppression overwhelms, and transcends beyond just a  specific range of linear historical  me as the layers of faces cluster and get subsumed in the overall chaos  but are yet held in place by the monumentally sta c posi on of the anchored specter heads. The urgency  is all too apparent in the frenzied applica on of the colors slashing across the panel, crea ng a  thunderous monument to the voiceless  downtrodden.    

“...his crea ve process  a transmogrifica on  occurs with the touch  of his hand, and  suddenly mundane  materials are  transmi ng drama c  parables of  mes past,  present and future.” 

Spellmon was the son of a minister and spent  hours poring over the illustra ons in his biblical  texts, kindling his lifelong love for art, which he  “never outgrew.” “Madonna and Child” is an  example of Spellmon incorpora ng religious  archetypes into his signature style, infusing the  Madonna’s skin tones with an exaggerated  “blackness.” As she holds the infant, his  ny  elongated arms reach out for an embrace.  Gli er is used as an element, perhaps as a  unifying sealer of the en re surface, as it has  been applied liberally all over the pain ng. A  radia ng halo of various colors and lines  emanates from the Madonna’s head and is  representa ve of spiritual light and energy.   The features of the Madonna and child are  rendered in a naïve and outsider fashion, with  

46 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, October2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  47


Cri cal Analysis    

white brush stroke outlines for the eyes and mouth, yet the expressions of calmness are apparent.  Even  though Spellmon has an art degree and is formally trained, he makes deliberate choices with rendering  inordinate figura ve propor ons and using an outsider applica on with his methods, which are the core of  his expressionis c appeal.  There seems to be an underlying imbuement of frenzied applica on as  evidenced in the many layers of vibra onal linear brush strokes that compromise the halo rays; the  mul ple layers of gli er produce chroma c excita on that unify the pain ng as an energe c prayer.       Philosophically and aesthe cally his intent stems from the inward need to express and tap into the  powerful connec ve ability of art that builds bridges from past memories of a specific culture,  me, and  place that could have been forgo en to be seen and viewed by the light of the present day.        ©Katherine Shevchenko, Art Consultant, Boerne  Sources:  Banks, Robert H., and Andrea Marshall. F.L. "Doc" Spellmon. Dallas: Banks Fine Art, 2014. Print. 

48 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, October2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  49


Photography and Design by: Gabriel Diego Delgado 


Custom Framing Conservation Museum Fine art Photography shadow boxes Ready-Mades More

Original Paintings Giclees & Prints Picture Lights

1.800.537.9609 210.828.8214 830.816.5106

www.jrmooneygalleries.com


Home Accessories 

antastic rames From Art Nouveau to Traditional, framing is very versatile. As seen in the two new selections by LARSON-JUHL, home décor can include elements of nature in the frame itself. As described by Gina Martinez, we witness the elegance of framing a landscape with a flair for juxtaposing traditional with ornate. 52 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  53


Home Accessories 

A Frame at the Water’s Edge “A Framing Consultant Spotlight”  By Gina Mar nez 

Art and Framing Design Consultant

“Selec ng the right frame for a piece of artwork can be a challenge. It is important to find the right  materials and framing design to compliment the work and to understand how it relates to it. A  frame is a design element itself and there are several aspects to consider.”   The Water’s Edge” by  J. Yoon is a large and colorful oil pain ng that shows a floral landscape mee ng a pond. It is  important to consider the size, texture and feeling of the pain ng when considering a frame.  

54 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


For this work, we stacked two moldings together to create a  frame size that is to scale with the pain ng. There is no rule of  how wide a frame must be, but in this case it must be wide  enough to cover the borders and strong enough to support the  weight of the canvas. The next element to consider is the  texture of the pain ng. This oil pain ng makes use of impasto  techniques and that paint becomes the layers of grass and  growth reaching out towards an abundantly thriving pond. For  this example, stacking not only creates a frame that is the  proper size, but also one that has layers just as the pain ng  does. Texture also exists in the materials chosen for the frame.  Distressed wood and gold leafing comprise the frame, all  natural looking just like the pain ng. Finally, the overall  aesthe cs are important to consider when framing. It is  important to choose a frame that will be congruent with the  style of the pain ng.     The slip moulding is Roma brand, Palladio #760055. This  moulding features natural wood fillet aligned with a gold carved hand finished frieze that has a C‐Scroll  pa ern that resembles leaves or grass blowing in the wind and completes the sight edge of the frame. The  frieze por on of the sight edge is very delicate. Roma’s website describes it saying: “More than ten layers  of colorant, hand‐applied leafing, pa nas and wax are applied to achieve the desired finish of this highly  architectural moulding.” It brightens the pain ng and the warm tones enhance the subtle ligh ng that  bathes the flowers and reflects off the water. The gold mo f por on of the sight edge also breaks up the  complimen ng woods which add another layer of texture to the overall frame. For the back edge (or  principal moulding), Roma Cabane #261059 was used. Roma describes: “Our Cabane mouldings rus c  charm, rich hues and subtle highlights of color are hand applied and distressed by skilled ar sans whose  careful a en on to detail evokes the beauty a ained only by  me and nature.” The thick distressed wood  has a warm tone that compliments the rich hues of dark green, purple, and blue found in the pain ng as  well as the hand finished gold and wood of the sight edge. It is solid and sturdy just like the mighty trees  that are in the forest behind the pond, and it is in keeping with the natural style of the artwork.    Overall, the organic ornate sight edge paired with the distressed wood back edge of this frame does not  overwhelm the serene scene near the water, but rather encapsulates the jewel tones of the pain ng like a  filigree band holds a brilliant emerald or sapphire. The overall design creates a uniform frame that is  classic, natural and elegant.     Source: A Guide to Appraising Fine Art, course manual Ch. 7  www.romamoulding.com  www.larsonjuhl.com/glossary.aspx 

                                                                                              Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  55


Home Accessories 

LARSON‐JUHL Moulding  “Nouveau”  Series  3 3/16” wide    A collec on celebra ng the  elegant, nature‐inspired designs  of the Art Nouveau  style. This  selec on is available in bronze,  gold and silver. Decora ve floral  and organic plant designs adorn  the profile of this stylized  moulding. More informa on can  be found at:  www.larsonjuhl.com 

56 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


LARSON‐JUHL Moulding  “Imperial”  Series  2 7/8” wide    Ornate Tradi onal as described  by Larson‐Juhl, this highly  decora ve frame moulding will  add a touch of elegance to  any  pain ng. Available in wood,  silver and gold. More  informa on can be found at:  www.larsonjuhl.com 

                                                                                              Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  57


58 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


305 S. Main St Boerne, TX 78006 830-816-5106

8302 Broadway St San Antonio, TX 78209 210-828-8214

Custom Framing Conservation Museum Fine Art Photography Shadow Boxes Ready-Mades More…

Original Paintings Giclees & Prints Picture Lights

Fine Art for All Occasions                                                                                               Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  59


8302 Broadway St

305 S. Main St

San Antonio, TX

Boerne, TX

78209

78006

210-828-8214

830-816-5106

Custom Framing Conservation Museum Fine Art

Original Paintings

Photography

Giclees & Prints

Shadow Boxes

Picture Lights

Ready-Mades

60 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Fine Art for All Occasions

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


“Texas Vintage” -Spotlight-  ©Katherine Shevchenko, Art Consultant, J.R. Mooney Galleries, Boerne,TX  

Quietly the night falls in  Dalhart Windberg’s oil  pain ng, “Up Late.”  A  muted bluish pale e,  casts a slumberous  atmosphere, yet  beneath the moon glow  ripples so ly disturb the  reflec on of a pond as  two ducks swim  languidly in unison.    Windberg, known for his  immaculate and detailed  technique that was  inspired by viewing the  Old Master’s pain ngs in  Europe, has presented a  nigh me scene that is  true to life.  Windberg’s  signature “smooth  surface” pain ng  technique is ideal for  recrea ng delicate features of a nocturnal moment such as the slivers of moonlight illumina ng the bare  branches of trees that encircle the midnight blue pond.     A gentle lunar radiance highlights muted earthy green tu s of grasses that are growing upon the moonlit  water's bank, further showcasing Windberg’s eye for capturing detail.  The reflec on of the moon brings  a en on to the two feathered inhabitants of the pond.  The highlighted ripples are zigzagging and leading  the eye to travel further back into the distance, across the grassy plain that harbors a variety of reddish  browns and golds, towards the horizon, where a couple of dwellings  are nestled in the blue‐gray shadows.   A lone light is on in one of the homes, the only indicator of a presence that is awake in this late hour, a  me for restora ve contempla on.       ©Katherine Shevchenko, Art Consultant, J.R. Mooney Galleries, Boerne,TX                                                                                                  Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  61


Custom Framing Conservation Museum Fine art Photography shadow boxes Ready-Mades More

Original Paintings Giclees & Prints Picture Lights 305 S. Main St Boerne, TX 78006 830-816-5106

8302 Broadway St San Antonio, TX 78209 210-828-8214

1.800.537.9609 www.jrmooneygalleries.com


Photography and Design by: Gabriel Diego Delgado 


Value

Fair Market / After Market

64 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Summaries of Current Art Market  Selec ons from A er Market 

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


The pain ng by ar st, Roll Taylor  tled, “Gilbeau  House, South Flores St.” is an oil pain ng on Morilla  Company canvas panel, measuring 12” x 16”. With a  horizontal landscape composi on, “Gilbeau  House’s” subject ma er is a pink, yellow and brown  two story house with an A‐frame front sec on and a  rectangle back sec on. (The Gilbeau House is  referenced in a later pain ng as a slave quarters  house in the south.)      A large cross shape adorns the front door which is  bookended by two ver cal window sec ons. Two  small windows are centered above the front door,  acknowledging the second level. One side of the  house under the pitched roof on the le  is encased  in a shadow with the opposite right side more  illuminated. The composi onal foreground of the  pain ng consists of a 2” sepia toned ground  between the house and the front of the canvas.  The  ar st has signed the pain ng on the lower right  corner with: “Rolla Taylor 62”.  The 62 is offset and  slightly below the ar st signature. Both signature  and date are in a darker brown color. The  background behind the house is of minimal  vegeta on that consists of mul ple hatches of an  array of green hues. The sky behind the house is a  pale blue color with hits of blush in a sec on where  the sky and trees meet by the angles of the roof.      The house, which takes up a majority of the composi on, is pocked by two main yellow patches of color  on either side of the front door. The right side of the angled roof that spreads over the right side of the  house extends off the picture plane of the canvas. The top roof of the back sec on of the house has  painted lines that slant down toward the front of the house that mimic a metal roof. The ar st has painted  this pain ng with a flat brush.  On the reverse side of the pain ng, (back), the ar st has  tled the pain ng  in the sec on provided by the Morilla Company labeled: “Title”. It reads “Guilbeau House S. Flores St. SA”,  wri en in pencil. Also on the back is a provenance from another gallery. This s cker is a white Altermann                                                                                                  Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  65


Value

Fair Market / After Market Summaries of Current Art Market  Selec ons from A er Market 

Galleries & Auc oneers business s cker with black print that gives the name of the gallery and contact in‐ forma on. The lower part of the Altermann s cker has the gallery label on it for this pain ng reading:     Rolla Taylor (1872 ‐ 1970) Guilbean House  Oil on Canvasboard  12 x 16 inches  CP‐156668    This label is placed on the lower le  backside of the canvas panel. Also on the lower right side of the canvas  panel is a set of numbers and le ers in black pen ink that reads: “V821”. There are also several swabs of oil  paint on the back panel of the canvas board. There is a tear on the dust cover on the back canvas board on  the top le  side. There is also dust cover bubble separa on of the paper from the back of the board about  3” from the right side.     Rolla Taylor Bio  Born:  1872 (Galveston, Texas)  Died:   1970   Known for:  cityscape/ landscape pain ng of Texas and Mexico  Rolla Sims Taylor, originally from Galveston, Texas, started pain ng at the age of 14. Before arriving in San  Antonio, Texas in 1889, the Taylor family spent several years in Houston and then traveled to Cuero, Texas  by covered wagon.    Taylor graduated from the Cuero Ins tute and later studied in San Antonio with Robert Jenkins Onderdonk,  Jose Arpa and Theodore Gen lz. Later he studied in France for 3 months, and with Arthur W. Best in San  Francisco, and Frederick Fursman in Michigan. Taylor was a personal friend of the ar st Julian Onderdonk.    Taylor exhibited frequently for 60 years, including local, state and numerous na onal exhibi ons through‐ out America. His first exhibit was in San Antonio in 1894, at which he won first prize of $500 and later sold  the pain ng for another $500. He painted in the impressionist style, lively with color and flooded with sun‐ light, which represents Jose Arpa's influence. His subjects were mostly old buildings, shacks, landscapes,  San Antonio River scenes, missions of San Antonio, blooming cactus, and scenes of old Mexico. During his  earliest years, his subjects would be a pair of shoes, a cat, some books, Mexican jugs or anything in the  home. Many of his local pain ngs are now of historic interest that recorded buildings that no longer exist.     

66 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


“Irish Flats SA” 

“Old Stone Shed” 

“The Guilbeau House”  

12.3” x 16” 

16” x 20” 

12” x 16” 

Unknown date 

Unknown date 

1962

Oil on Canvas  

Oil on Canvas  

Oil on Canvasboard  

Sold  04/30/2014 

Sold  10/18/2014,  

Sold  08/10/2013 

Dallas Auc on Gallery  2235 Monitor Street  Dallas, TX  75207 

Heritage Auc ons  3500 Maple Avenue  Dallas, TX  75219 

Altermann Galleries  345 Camino del Monte Sol  Santa Fe, NM  87501 

*Source: www.askart.com  

*Source: www.askart.com  

*Source: www.askart.com  

This pain ng is of similar size, but on canvas  instead of canvas board. The date is unknown,  but its  tle references San Antonio, TX. The Irish  Flats were a real geographical boundary in San  Antonio which does not exist any longer. The  pain ng was auc oned off over one year from  this appraisal’s effec ve date. The composi on  is similar but not exact; this pain ng has more  landscape elements. It is signed but not dated.  It seems to be a less impressionis c with more  smooth brush stroke edges signifying earlier in  the ar st’s career. Dallas Auc on Gallery had a  high es mate of $2,500 and a low es mate of  $1,500. The final hammer price was $1,500 with  an auc on fee to the buyer at 20%.     The final sale price was $1,200, excluding fees.  Since this seems to be from the earlier part of  the ar st’s career and less impressionis c of the  ar st’s more mature style, I would es mate  “Gilbeau House” slightly above the $1,200 sale  price of this pain ng. Over one year has passed  from this auc on date and the art market on  Texas Vintage has increased in popularity and  higher sales in the San Antonio area, which can  be jus fied by regional and local auc on houses  recording increased sales. 

This pain ng is slightly larger than the  “Gilbeau House” pain ng and is an oil  pain ng on canvas. However the similarity is  in the subject ma er and composi on;  including painterly style with looser  brushstrokes. Although the date is unknown  we can see from the style of brush stroke this  pain ng was nearing the same  meframe as  “Gilbeau House”.  The ar st did sign it on the  front, but did not date it. Heritage Auc ons  placed a high bid of $3,000 with a low bid of  $2,000.  The hammer price was $2,000 with a  20% buyer’s fee from the auc on house. The  final sale price of the pain ng excluding the  fees was $1,800. Although we do not know if  this is a place in San Antonio, TX the  architecture is similar to the ar st’s Texas  landscapes.  

This auc on was in 08/2013 which is over two  years ago. The resale market for Texas Vintage  artwork has increased along with its interest.  The auc on high es mate for this pain ng was  $1,000, with a low es mate of $800. The  hammer price was $720. This includes a 20%  buyer’s fee from the auc on house. The final  sales price of the pain ng, excluding the fees  was $576. As compared to the previous  comparables, this past sale is in the lower end  of a er‐market auc on prices. I feel it was not  a true fair market value and placed well under  the low es mate of the auc on house’s  projected bid. Its elements of San Antonio  reference, oil on canvasboard and not  watercolor, mature style and dominate  composi onal structure all play a role in its  value.  

Since the size of this pain ng is bigger than  “Gilbeau House”, I would place the value of  “Gilbeau House” slightly lower in price than  the $1,800, but taking into account we know  the date and loca on of the “Gilbeau House”.  Plus, over one year has passed from this  auc on date and the art market on Texas  Vintage has increased in popularity and  higher sales in the San Antonio area, which  can be jus fied by regional and local auc on  houses recording increased sales.  

The house was painted several  mes by the  ar st, making it a constant reference in his  artwork, similar to his con nuous series of the  San Antonio Missions. I would place the  current fair market value of this work well  above the $1,000 high bid es mate of  Altermann Galleries in their auc on of  08/2013.  

                                                                                              Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  67


Custom Framing

Original Paintings

Conservation

Giclees & Prints

Museum Fine art Photography shadow boxes Ready-Mades More

Picture Lights


s

Feel confident entrusting your cherished memories and fine art

Master framers with over fifty years experience in custom framing and shadow boxes

We carry a versatile selection of framing mouldings and mats from: Laron Juhl CMI Moulding AMPF Max Moulding and many more! 1.800.537.9609 210.828.8214 830.816.5106

www.jrmooneygalleries.com

305 S. Main St Boerne, TX 78006

Come in today and have a consultation with one of our framing designers and be inspired!


Art Opening   70 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

The “Texas Vintage” exhibi on  

Behind the Scenes 

at J.R. Mooney Galleries  

&

of Boerne 

Opening Night 

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  71


Art Opening    72 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  73


Art Opening   74 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  75


Custom Framing Conservation Museum Fine Art Photography Shadow Boxes Ready-Mades More... Original Paintings Giclees & Prints Picture Lights 305 S. Main St Boerne, TX 78006 830-816-5106

8302 Broadway St San Antonio, TX 78209 210-828-8214 1.800.537.9609

wwww.jrmooneygalleries.com


Events  

B

oerne

2

December is full of ac vi es, of course as expected, so what can you do to maximize the fun factor?  Some people  are en ced by the entertainment of sound and lights, others may be more sa sfied by flavors and savory nibbles,  yet another group might enjoy the ability to touch or acquire.  The good news is all of our senses can be fulfilled  by just following the long list of events this month.       Being new to Boerne, I look forward to shopping local, ea ng new flavors special to our cherished Hill Country  and catching a musical act (big or small) that conjures an old world holiday feel or just good ole country!     This is a list by type of event in and around the Hill Country and I hope it’s helpful in sa sfying all of the senses!      Arts and Entertainment: Ford Caroling Nights with Santa at the River, Arneson River Theatre, River Walk, December 4th from 6 p.m. – 9  p.m. and December 5th from 8 p.m. ‐ 10 p.m. h p://www.thesanantonioriverwalk.com/events/ford‐caroling‐nights‐ with‐santa     Stars Over Texas Concerts Christmas Show with Country Music Legend, Recording Superstar and the original  “Urban Cowboy”, Mickey Gilley, and the Grammy Award Winning “Urban Cowboy Band”, and the outstanding back  up vocals of the “Urbane es” on Sunday, December 6th at 3 p.m. in Kerrville  www.caillouxtheater.com      The Ten Tenors Home for the Holidays, Boerne Champion Auditorium, December 17th at 7:30  p.m. www.boerneproformingarts.com   Food and Drink: The Christmas Wine Affair is all about the WINE!  $60/couple or $35/individual  cket includes ONE collec ble  ornament from Texas Hill Country Wineries, a full complimentary tas ng at each par cipa ng winery with a limit of  4 wineries a day and a 15% discount on 3 bo le purchases. December 4‐20th, 2015 h p://texaswinetrail.com/ store/item/2015‐christmas‐wine‐affair  

78 /  PLUME‐TX Magazine

Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015


New to Boerne By: Melisa Adriana Belgara 

Tamales at the Pearl, The Pearl Brewery, enjoy live music and performances, a children's area in the Pocket Park,  as well as delicacies from 40+ tamale makers. Tamales Holiday Fes val is FREE and open to the public, no  cket  necessary. Saturday, December 5th from 12 – 6 p.m. h p://atpearl.com/happenings/tamales   Shopping: Two Days of Oma’s Christmas Cra s Fair, lunch and photos with Santa, Opa’s Chili cook‐off and awards,  December 5th and 6th  from 9 a.m. ‐ 5 p.m. h p://www.kcfa.org/p/ge nvolved/307   Fredericksburg Trade Days, Shop with more than 350 vendors in seven barns, acres of an ques, live music and  more. December 18 – 20th Physical address: 355 Sunday Farms Lane, parking is $5 h p://www. gtradedays.com/   Boerne Market Days, located in the heart of the historical district on Main Plaza. Open Saturday 10 a.m.‐5 p.m.  and Sunday 10 a.m.‐4 p.m., December 12th ,13th,19th and 20th  this event has become synonymous with great  shopping in an outdoor se ng with ar sts, cra smen and vendors with background music of some of Texas' best  home grown musicians. h p://www.boernemarketdays.com/boerne.html    Big and Li le Kid Fun:  Weihnachts Parade, a long standing Boerne Christmas tradi on. 2015 will be the 29th anniversary.  December 5th  from 6 p.m. – 10 p.m. h p://www.ci.boerne.tx.us/564/Weihnachts‐Parade   Random’s Ugly Sweater Party/Contest including a visit from Santa, ornament pain ng and live music, December  19th from 4 to close h ps://www.facebook.com/RandomTexasFamilyFun/    Select your own Christmas Tree at Pipe Creek Christmas Tree Farm, Tuesday ‐ Saturday December 1st ‐ 19th,  h p://www.hill‐country‐visitor.com/event/select‐your‐own‐christmas‐tree‐at‐pipe‐creek‐christmas‐tree‐ farm/105019    

By: Melisa Adriana Belgara 

                                                                                              Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibi ons/ News/ Events, Winter 2015,

PLUME‐TX Magazine /  79


Winter 2015 edition of plumage tx vol 1 12 3 2015  

Outsider art of Doc Spellmon, Texas Vintage exhibition, Essay on Windberg, Women Who Dare exhibition

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you