Page 1

The Fine Arts Magazine

FREE March. 2017 Issue

John Steck Jr. Turning Memories

–Cliff Cavin Briscoe Western Art Museum

–Hausmann Millworks

George Tobolowsky

Response

–New Spaces 195 & More

Art in the Garden Reviews/ Commentary/ Exhibitions/ News/ Events


2/

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

3


IN THIS ISSUE Response On / Off Fred Tours @ Hausmann Millworks

NOTA

The Arts Magazine March. 2017

Briscoe Western Art Museum

PUBLISHER Gabriel Diego Delgado Contributing Writers Gabriel Diego Delgado

IN EVERY ISSUE A Note from the Publisher –P.10

All artwork photography courtesy of Gabriel Diego Delgado and notated contributions when appropriate

On the Cover—P.09

Prices are for current artwork, and can change at any time

Contributors— P.09

© 2017 Delgado Consulting and Appraising Boerne, Texas 78006 210-723-1338 Edited by Gabriel Diego Delgado, Melissa Belgara Design by: Gabriel Diego Delgado

6/

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

5


The Fine Arts Magazine

FEATURES March 2017 Issue No. 2

New Artists

Weldon Lister

John Steck Jr.

Master Engraver

Turning Memories

George Tobolowsky San Antonio Botanical Gardens 6/

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

7


A Note from the Publisher The first edition launched last month of Contemporary Texas, The Fine Arts Magazine . Now, we are in our second edition for the March copy. The milestone has been met. The hurdle cleared. We look forward to the spring and summer events. This issue takes on new spaces opening throughout the san Antonio metro, like 195 and Trebla, as well as two in-depth articles on George Tobolowsky at the San Antonio Botanical Gardens and John Steck Jr. in the Project Space at Blue Star Contemporary Museum. Other tidbits in these following pages include spotlights on Intermezzo in Comfort, TX, an engraver in Boerne, a group exhibition at Hausmann Millworks, the Night of the Artist exhibition at the Briscoe Western Art Museum and other should know news. Although there is not a lot of original written content except for the two essays, the pictorial journal of what’s happening around San Antonio and the Hill Country is important to document and archive; which is what makes this journal a necessity, and a published archival process vs. social media and Facebook. Long Live the PRINTED WORD!

Contemporary Texas , The Fine Arts Magazine hopes to use its pages as a vehicle to educate, entertain and enlighten our audience on a variety of topics ranging from reviews, news, artist narratives, interviews, criticism and a cohort of other art related stories from within the gallery walls to the major metro centers. I hope you find this informative and hope you continue to follow the artistic happenings around you in your local neighborhoods.

Sincerely,

Gabriel Diego Delgado Publisher

delgadoconsultingandappraising@gmail.com

8/

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


On the Cover / Contributor

“Fog in the Texas Hill Country!” This is a picture taken from my backyard, overlooking a wonderful greenbelt, deep in the heart of the Texas. As you can see, the fog engulfed everything. Eventually, the Texas sun burned everything away. For a few hours the view was nil and we sat in the humid air, enjoying the birds’ songs. There are no worries on mornings like this, no worries indeed. The fog blocks all the negative from out small pocket as we feel the time creep by. I hope you enjoy looking at this picture as much as I did being in the day’s gift.

Gabriel Diego Delgado is the owner of Delgado Consulting and Appraising and is the former Gallery Director at .R. Mooney Galleries in Boerne, Texas. He has spent almost a decade in Nonprofit Art Management- working as a Curator of Exhibitions at the Station Museum of Contemporary Art and ArtCar Museum, both in Houston; and as Project Manager of Research and Development at the Museo Alameda, a Smithsonian Affiliate, San Antonio. He has been an Arts Reviewer and critic for over a dozen local, regional and national publications. His artwork has been shown in Arco 2012 Madrid, Spain; New York, New York, MOCA D.C. as well as numerous galleries and venues throughout the U.S. He is competent to appraise fine art and personal property in affiliation with the code of ethics and USPAP standards for the International Society of Appraisers (ISA).

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

9


Image Courtesy of Blue Star Contemporary

Blue Star Contemporary

TURNING MEMORIES John Steck Jr. Project Space, Blue Star Contemporary Feb 2017—May 2017 —By Gabriel Diego Delgado

It’s funny, there are so many things I seem to forget now, aside from the usual – “Where are my car keys? My hat? and, “Did I turn off the oven?” …to new dilemmas like names, exits, and especially pin numbers. But, yet I can still retain the: up, up, down, down, left, right, left, right, B, A, Start, Select code to receive infinity lives in Contra, the arcade game, on my Nintendo game system while I sit Indian style in my He-Man pajamas staring at the T.V. screen in my bedroom. But memories, oh, the memories that stick with you…those precious possessions are the true treasures of the mind.

10 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


I can still smell the sweet mothball smell of my great grandmother’s house in Ohio. That memory will be forever locked away, tucked up there somewhere… if I need it – the comforting smell that makes me four years old again, knowing I will need to practice reading out loud to her to get my peppermint candy treat.

Artist, John Steck Jr. made that sweet mothball smell come back to me that day in the gallery as I perused his artwork. I know one day I might not remember the smell, as I don’t recall exactly where she lived and which house we visited. And yes, I must admit my memories of her are foggy. But, as I gather my thoughts of this great woman, I seem to remember less and less of the details, but I want to though! Then, I begin to think my memories are built on the remembrance of the last time I thought about the memories, not the facts themselves – what I am remembering is a memory of the memory.

Image Courtesy of the author

We all have those kind of memories: of loved ones, of tragedy or pain, of happiness, of content-ness, of calm, of people and places.

Then I begin to think about this evolution of thought, of memories, it now becomes a conceptual equation that the mind plays as it tries to piece together these intangible equations to make sense of something chronologically. And here I am, seven paragraphs into an art critique and I have not even begun to talk about the artwork. However, I reflect on a premise that this was maybe one of the intentions of the exhibition by Steck; to lose ourselves in the nostalgic collection of our own reminiscences, and the ‘photographs’ act as a catalyst for inner reflection of the ephemeral qualities of these mental belongings we all lug around called, ‘Memories’. At quick glance and on the surface, this exhibition, “Turning Memories”, is the fact these images, created on photographic gelatin silver paper will disappear. In essence, as Blue Star Contemporary states, in so many words, and paraphrasing, “traditional darkroom techniques have not been employed”; meaning the photo paper will remain ‘sensitive to light’ and in the end, only a grey drab

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

11


Blue Star Contemporary

Image Courtesy of the author

drab ‘blank’ image will be left on the wall, in the frames, and of our vision…Then, all is lost, and the fluorescent lights in the gallery would have darkened the temporary images, and they will be gone forever in some dimension of ‘who gives a fuck hipster art making oblivion’. Obvious Right!... Yes!!! Well, yes of course… we all ‘get it’. But, I want to take time to investigate…I want to move past the physical qualities of the art, because once someone like you reads this, it’s probable that the images will be gone already, leaving ‘blank’ images on the gallery walls, and only the archived documentation of the exhibition will remain. “Oh, look what it used to look like.” I don’t give a shit about that, I don’t think that’s the real intent anyway. Disappearing images…yes….it is clever, unique and so multi-layered; in a satirical, sarcastic, innovative, conceptual tier of layered art cake that is iced with so many emotional undertones that I must listen to Bsides of Joy Division as I write this, to immerse myself in the dark romantic qualities of such artistic wizardry. Back at the nursing home to visit my German great grandfather, we never went to his personal room, but instead visited him in the communal game room. He would be seated in his wheelchair, hunched over, not sure who was in the room with him, looking down at the ground in his ‘tied-from-the-back’

12 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


Image Courtesy of Blue Star Contemporary

hospital gown. But to get inside the communal room, you had to walk down this long hall, passing many other rooms. That hallway always smelled like piss and Lysol. Once my family entered the doors to the game room, on the left inside of the main doors was her…. HER… Always there, every visit. An old lady in a wheelchair, yelling… not at anyone in particular... neither entering nor exiting, but at the curtains by the door, the curtains that closed off the room. Profanity at the upholstery. Mind lost and memories faded. Flash back to the art. The exhibition felt a bit institutional, simplistic, not over simplistic, formal, but not too formal. Should I sign a guest book, or wait for my number to be called before I enter the gallery. There was ample space for me to contemplate each image, or contemplate the lack of image. I want to believe this was intentional, for when you have art that strikes directly at the conceptual contexts of the brain, the void is large, we get lost in the Freudian self, and the artist should know this. Steck leaves voids or spaces between the works for us to linger in as we are to self-absorbed and strive to balance what we see before us and what we see behind us…past and the present. The artist uses fading images of landscapes, rooms, and flowers which act as banal objects in the photos that are just generic enough for all of us to have familiarity with. Trigger images that give us enough information to guide us in a direction of thought.

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

13


Blue Star Contemporary

On the floor of the project space are two photographing wood boxes, roughly three by four feet, each with highly decorative floral arrangements laid on top of the photographic paper, slowly creating a visual record of the real still-life; only to decompose itself in some morbid time-lapse and unpredictable darkening process. Laid out like some funeral coffin metaphor with dying flowers, how appropriate for my deepening depression as I corroborate an essay on this exhibition. I remember hearing from my mom, that the doctor said that my Grandpa ‘PIE’, was ‘dead before he hit the ground’ from his massive heart attack while he mowed the grass. I wasn’t there when it happened, but I could picture it happening. I knew what the front yard looked like, I played in it every weekend as a kid. I knew the lawnmower, I used it too. I knew the shirt he probably had on. That memory is painful, faded, and somehow calming to think of him, not dying, but the memory of just him. It’s just there. You know…of just that person and what they mean to you.

Image Courtesy of Blue Star Contemporary

What I liked about this exhibition was the simplistic presentation. Simple black frames and simple wood boxes. Looking intently for some deepened meaning for this contemporary exhibition, I noticed something…as the pictures fade, the photographic paper begins to curl up on the edges. My first reaction was… ‘Well damn, he should have fixed the paper better to the inside foamboard or frame backing. But then, I thought, ‘Shit! He got me again.’ That simple act of leaving the paper do what it’s going to do from the humidity in the frame and the degradation of the paper itself as an organic material elevates itself to be something so deliberate. The ‘memories’ themselves sometimes warp when they fade. Don’t they? Fiction becomes fact and details are sometimes filled in with falsities but its ok.

14 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


Image Courtesy of the author

As I peered down into the flower boxes, there was condensation on the inside of the glass, evidence that the flowers were emitting moisture as they died, yet their image will be captured in the photographic paper beneath, to retain that moment. But, those images will be lost too. Creation and destruction. Generations of memories will be lost as thoughts, facts, events, discourses and opinions never pass on to the next, and things will begin to fade along the way too. “Turning Memories”, by John Steck Jr. forced me to evaluate so many sentimental and ephemeral memories with his exhibition. But on the flip side, he gifted me a reason, with his art, for those people, mentioned above, to be alive again for me, for that instant – animated in my mind, in my memory and in my heart.

Image Courtesy of the author

Detail, Image Courtesy of the author

Detail, Image Courtesy of the author

Thank you, Mr., Steck, Thank You!!

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

15


March 11

Don Darst

Oil Painting

April 15

Marin Phillips

Plein Aire

May 13

Kristen LaRue

Soul Storyteller

June 10

Paula Lay

Watercolor

For More Information and to Register, Go To: www.hccarts.org The Mission of the HCCArts is to develop and sustain an environment that supports and promotes awareness, appreciation, education and access to all the Arts in Kendall County and the other eighteen Hill Country counties which include Bexar (San Antonio) and Travis (Austin).

Save the Date: April 1 - Crafted BierFest - Benefitting Boerne Village Band

$10.00 OFF COUPON GOOD FOR ONE MINI-WORKSHOP *MENTION THIS AD WHEN REGISTERING*

16 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

17


“21st Century Tutil li Mundi:, Jung Hee Mun

Hausmann Millworks

“THE EXCHANGE” The Hispanic Society of New York Hausmann Millworks: A Creative Community Feb. 2017 As discussed in the Feb. 2017 edition of Contemporary Texas, The Fine Arts Magazine we featured the travel images of the art group from San Antonio led by Rex Hausmann and Hausmann Millworks, as they galivanted around New York in preparation for their premier tour of the Hispanic Society of America. Stated below is an excerpt from the press release about this special trip for this select group of artists.

18 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


“Solo Goya”, Hector Garza

“An invited group of 24 artists and writers mainly from San Antonio, and with Hausmann Millworks colleagues and friends from New York NY, Brooklyn NY, Lawrence KS, Houston TX, and Savannah GA spent the week of October 17-21, 2016 in New York, exploring the collections of the Hispanic Society of America (www.Hispanicsociety.org). Founded in 1904, the Society is the preeminent American museum and resource for the study of Spanish, Portuguese, and Latin American Art and culture and displays important works by El Greco, Velazquez, and Goya. The Millworks (www.Hausmannmillworks.com) was invited by the institution, who was providing an in-depth discovery of the Society and its extraordinary art holdings; most not open to the public. As a bonus, the South Texas group had the opportunity to take notes, sketch and create their own art in the Hispanic Society's galleries, in an anticipation of a respond themed exhibition back in Texas in the months after the trip. Members of the Texas delegation also visited the Dia Beacon, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, multiple galleries in Chelsea; through self-guided tours and administrative walk-throughs. An exhibition based on the group members' experiences will be on display at the Hausmann Millworks during On and Off Fred Rd Studio Tour to share with the public the artists’ responses, all of which have been created in a uniform 18" x 24" format.”

Now it’s time to take time to look at the artwork that was created in ‘response’ to the ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ experience at the Hispanic Society of America, done by the group of San Antonio artists that was on display for Hausmann Millworks On/Off Fredericksburg Tours weekend events (Feb 17-18, 2017). In discussing this ‘exhibition’, we must, upfront, note that the artworks in this theoretical visual response are made by a plethora of artists; of different education backgrounds – Master and Bachelor graduates to self-taught and hobbyists. Thus, this exhibition cannot be critiqued in the normal fashion of critical analysis. It seems best to me, that the presentation is deserving of no deliberate evaluation. As in a previous

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

19


20 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine “Majestad Rose”, Giselle Diaz

“Triangle from a Hole in the Sky”, Jon Cowan

“Byzantine Cross”, Gene Hausmann

“Portrait of a Little Girl”, Denise Homer Pintor

Hausmann Millworks


discussion with Rex Hausmann, he described it as, “If you were not there, you won’t understand.” That I think sums it up. These artists were allowed to view private collections within the Hispanic Society of America; ones that are normally closed to the general public. The visual responses by the individual artists are more of a personal keepsake of an individual experience.

“The Hispanic Society”, Rex Hausmann

A very treasured experience indeed!

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

21


“Untitled”, David Almaguer

Hausmann Millworks 22 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

23


24 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

25


“Waiting on the Masses”

Image Courtesy of the Author

Botanical Gardens

“Art in the garden” George Tobolowsky

San Antonio Botanical Gardens Feb. 2017—Dec. 2017 -Written by Gabriel Diego Delgado

“I collect them, I combine them, and I sell them…” -G.T.

Texas Sculptor, George Tobolowsky has 32 metal assemblage sculptures on display at the San Antonio Botanical Gardens (Feb 2017- Dec. 2017) as a continuation of the Art in the Garden program. Curated by international artist, Bill Fitzgibbons and Botanical Gardens Executive Director, Bob Brackman, Tobolowsky artistic aura radiates a combination of a skilled recycling based artisan and a matured contemporary artistic master.

26 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


Currently working out of his studio in Mountain Springs, Texas, Tobolowsky holds a B.B.A in Accounting and a minor in Sculpture, along with a J.D. from Southern Methodist University. As stated on his website, Tobolowsky affirms:

Image Courtesy of the Author

“…My output over the past ten years has been enormous: over 425 sculptures, 23 Solo Museum and Public Art Exhibitions and 30 Group Exhibitions throughout the U.S. I make abstract metal sculptures from steel and stainless steel “found objects”. These found objects however, are not of the everyday sort, but rather bulky industrial metal castoffs that I scour scrap yards and fabrication plants to find. I rarely alter theses metal pieces but instead work to fit the individual scraps together – much like the pieces of a jigsaw puzzle – into balanced compositions. My sculptures are one part assemblage and one part recycling…My works represent a logical extension of the welded steel sculpture tradition that can be traced from Julio Gonzalez to David Smith. My sculptures are now located in over 26 National and International Museums, Universities and Public Art Collections and in numerous Private Collections…

Scattered throughout the 38 acres of various ecosystems, arboretums, landscapes, and colorful flora and fauna of the San Antonio Botanical Gardens, Tobolowsky’s artworks, created in a wide variety of sizes from miniature to magnificent, adds another level of conceptual observation of the never-ending foil of man vs. nature with his signature approach to his grand-scale, but visually balanced, sculptural site insertion into the signature tranquility of this city based sanctuary. “I want people to really see art and nature complement each other. They can work together even though it [the art] is metal and consumes its own space; they can work together…Where they are placed they don’t surprise you. I believe they are integrated quite nicely. You see them and you are attracted to them,” says Tobolowsky. “When I was first asked to do the one man show at the gardens, I called up James Surls. He and I still talk about three times a week… I think we first met in 1969… I said, ‘I gotta make flowers!’ He said, ‘Get over it, just do it…So I started making plants,” Tobolowsky jokes. The first piece that demands your attention is the large floral sculpture, “We Grow Them Big”, in the front parking lot of the botanical gardens. It greets you with a masculine energy that emits from the various metal outcasts like the metal base / potted vase, A.K.A a recycled oil rig’s pulsating mud damper to the twisted metal, gears, and numerous angular attachments.

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

27


28 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine Image Courtesy of the Author, “We Grow Them Big”

Botanical Gardens


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

29

Image Courtesy of the Author, “We Grow Them Big”


Botanical Gardens

“That piece [pulsating mud damper] was an enormous find, I had it for years,” says Tobolowsky. Although this introductory sculpture is dominated by the cold, rusted and aged metal tones, three areas of “original color” exist to give credence to origin; or as Tobolowsky explains, “…it is preserved color and history of the found object.” “Many times, art is classified as masculine,” says Tobolowsky. “But, usually seeing flowers… like going to the botanical gardens, is a woman’s decision…When a man goes in the space, he can now relate too, because he sees heavy, recycled found objects…metal.” Walking through the San Antonio Botanical Gardens with my family, I felt like we were on some artistic egg hunt. My daughters would run ahead of my wife and I, screaming: “There’s one!”, when they found another sculpture placed within its botanic surroundings. Another large potted floral sculpture, “The Happy Flowers”, roughly seven feet tall, mimics the large trees around it, up on a hill about five hundred yards from the main building. Image Courtesy of the Author, “ Happy Flowers”

A thin vertical sculpture, “Growing Season”, with three main circular devices attached to a metal post, stands erect, frozen like some primordial skeleton, or indigenous and ceremonial fetish doll; backdropped by the angular beams of the buildings behind– illustrating Tobolowsky’s determination to compliment the natural surroundings with his art. A squat, square sculpture sits amongst the sago palms

30 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

31

Image Courtesy of the Author, “ Stainless Planter Box”


32 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine

Image Courtesy of the Author, “ Growing Season”

Botanical Gardens


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

33


Botanical Gardens

and miniature succulents. Titled, “Stainless Planter Box”, this heavily gridded and angular rectangular contrivance has an unanticipated sense of movement that seems confined within its whimsical adornments. The attached pinwheels, gears, and wheels mimic the astrological element above, like the sun and moon, while simultaneously identifying with the visual aesthetic and organic characteristics of the plants surrounding it. Tobolowsky dominates the interiors of the Palm and Cycad Pavilion, Northrup Tropical Room, Kleberg Desert Pavilion, and the Exhibit Room buildings with mini-masterpieces. Nestled among the interiors and curated vegetation are smaller metal assemblage sculptures, hidden surprises to unsuspecting spectators. “The Crazy Gardener”, is like some abstract metal Kokopelli, presiding over the agriculture; a trickster god, playing his music while shepherding the cactus.

“Corporate Guardian 1” and “Corporate Guardian 2” stand as protectors on either side of the Fern Grotto entrance, standing resilient; like metal armored sentries, but still somehow delicate. These purposeful companions are welcoming in their warm and rusted steel hue. Inviting. Again, evidence of proper placement; one that tells a story, the continuation of the artist’s story. With so many sculptures adoring this majestic landscape, Tobolowsky shows us how his vision to marry the dichotomy of metal and nature can be achieved. On display till the end of 2017, George Tobolowsky “Sculpture Exhibition”, sponsored by the Russell Hill Rogers Fund for the Arts, the John L. Santikos Charitable Foundation Fund of the San Antonio Area Foundation, and the San Antonio Botanic Gardens is an outing not to be missed. For more information, go to www.sabot.org. George Tobolowsky is the Treasurer for the locally based Lone Star Art Alliance. More information about this organization and its unique mission can be found at: www.lonestarartalliance.org.

34 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

35

Image Courtesy of the Author,

Image Courtesy of the Author, “ Corporate Guardian 1 & 2”


36 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine

Image Courtesy of the Author, “ The Dancing Fool”

Botanical Gardens


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

37


Casa Navarro

Image Courtesy of Gabriel Diego Delgado

“Casa Navarro” National Historic Landmark Plaque Dedication HOME OF TEXAS' TEJANO FOUNDING FATHER DESIGNATED A NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK —Special to Contemporary Texas, The Fine Arts Magazine AUSTIN, Texas—The National Park Service has designated the Texas Historical Commission's Casa Navarro State Historic Site as a National Historic Landmark. The National Park Service deemed Casa Navarro nationally significant as the home of Tejano statesman and historian José Antonio Navarro (1795-1871). Born under Spanish colonial rule in the town of Béxar, Navarro’s life and career spanned four sovereign nations—Spain, Mexico, the Republic of Texas, and the United States. A signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence, a writer of the Texas State Constitution and the namesake of Navarro County, he was a champion of civil rights for Hispanics.

38 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


Image Courtesy of Gabriel Diego Delgado

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

39


40 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine

Image Courtesy of Gabriel Diego Delgado

Casa Navarro


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

41


Image Courtesy of Gabriel Diego Delgado

Today, Casa Navarro is the best-preserved historic property in its original location directly associated with Navarro. Located in a San Antonio neighborhood once known as Laredito, or Little Laredo, Casa Navarro consists of three contributing buildings— Navarro’s house constructed in the 1850s, and a free-standing kitchen constructed in the 1830s, as well as a two-story mercantile and office building, also constructed in the 1850s.

Administered by the National Park Service, the National Historic Landmarks program highlights places of exceptional historic significance to the nation. These landmarks are designated by the Secretary of the Interior because they possess extraordinary value and illustrate the heritage of the U.S. in history, architecture, archeology, engineering, and culture.

There are now 47 National Historic Landmarks in Texas. Other National Historic Landmarks in San Antonio include the Alamo, the Espada Aqueduct, and Fort Sam Houston. The Texas Historical Commission manages two other National Historic Landmarks: the Sam Rayburn House (Bonham) and the HA. 19 (Japanese midget submarine), part of the collection at the National Museum of the Pacific War in Fredericksburg. Image Courtesy of Gabriel Diego Delgado

Casa Navarro

“As custodians of this historic property, we are gratified for this national designation,” said Mark Wolfe, executive director of the Texas Historical Commission. “Navarro's story of patriotism, liberty, and equality for his people is one that can inspire not only Texans but people across the nation.”

Casa Navarro is open Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. and 12 – 5 p.m. on Sunday. For more information about Casa Navarro State Historic Site, call 210-227-4570 or visit www.visitcasanavarro.com.

42 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

43

Image Courtesy of Nano Calderon

Image Courtesy of Nano Calderon


Artisan & Craftsman

Image Courtesy of Weldon Lister

“Commemorative engraving” Weldon Lister Special Collections Boerne, Texas —Edited by Gabriel Diego Delgado, Quotes submitted by the artist

Weldon Lister, third generation master engraver is back at it again with his signature style of engraved embellishments. Presenting an antique Colt as part of a contemporary twist on traditional grade engravings, he delivers a wonderful fine art pistol that showcases his pedigree lineage of a time honed skill.

44 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


Image Courtesy of Weldon Lister

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

45


46 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine

Image Courtesy of Weldon Lister

Image Courtesy of Weldon Lister

Artisan & Craftsman


Image Courtesy of Weldon Lister

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

47


48 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine

Image Courtesy of Weldon Lister

Artisan & Craftsman


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

49


Artisan & Craftsman

“On this commemorative edition, three grades of engraving were offered (listed as grade 1, 2 or, 3). While grade 1 guns were intended to be completely custom, grades 2 and 3 were offered with standard patterns of embellishment ( grade 3 having the least amount of coverage and, grade 2 being more robust). Most of the 200 were grades 2 & 3 with only a few number 1 grades having been done. I was given great latitude by the client in regards to what engraving should be done on this piece. Because of its inherent significance as serial number one, I designed embellishment that would be linked historically to the engraving used on the original group of guns done in the 1970's and in addition, adding elements that are exclusive to my repertoire. Specifically, the sculpted tulip borders and sculpted floral elements are features that I've developed. The American scroll that covers over 80% of the gun is cut in deep relief to add additional contrast. Decorative borders and engraving on all screw heads places this Colt in line with best quality engraved pieces. Antique nickel plating with selected fire blue accents completes the package.

Image Courtesy of Weldon Lister

I wanted to create a blend of styles that while divergent, would still fit together in a seamless fashion. In my mind that would be the best way to do this most unique piece...... remain true to the history and character of the Commemorative series and at the same time put my stamp or hallmark on it, bringing number one into the 21st century while still having the great vintage vibe of an old antique Colt�, says Weldon Lister.

50 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

51


Image Courtesy of Gabriel Diego Delgado, Installation View with Jane Bishop

Comfort, TX

“Heart

And

Soul”

Laura Mijangos Rapp, Julie Jarvis, Jane Bishop, and Rose Harms A collection of paintings, printmaking, jewelry, photography and textiles. Feb. 1, 2017—March 19, 2017 IntermezzoGallery.com 716 High Street, Comfort, TX 78013 830.995.3899

52 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

53

Image Courtesy of Gabriel Diego Delgado, Installation View with Jane Bishop


54 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine

Image Courtesy of Gabriel Diego Delgado, Installation View with Laura Mijangos-Rapp

Comfort, TX


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

55

Image Courtesy of Gabriel Diego Delgado, Installation View with Julie Jarvis and Rose Harms

Image Courtesy of Gabriel Diego Delgado, Installation View with Julie Jarvis


SUBSCRIBE NOW!!!

56 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

57


Briscoe

—Special to Contemporary Texas, The Fine Arts Magazine

“Night of the Artist” The Briscoe Western Art Museum Announces 2017 Night of Artists Art Sale and Exhibition Preview & Artist Awards: Friday, March 31

Art Sale & Reception: Saturday, April 1

PUBLIC EXHIBITION & SALE: April 2 – May 14 The Briscoe Western Art Museum presents its 16th annual Night of Artists Art Sale & Exhibition featuring 73 of the country’s top Western artists. Each year Night of Artists draws art enthusiasts, collectors, and visitors to the Briscoe Campus on the iconic San Antonio River Walk for a chance to view and purchase over 260 works from the best in contemporary Western Art. Opening weekend kicks off on Friday, March 31 with an Artist Award Ceremony and Preview that is open to event sponsors, artists, and their guests. Cash prizes for all award-winning artists will be presented including the highly-coveted Museum Purchase Award. The main event takes place on Saturday, April 1 with the Art Sale & Reception where guests can enjoy food and libations while bidding on art work and mingling with participating artists and other art patrons. The evening concludes with live entertainment and dancing under the stars. A public exhibition follows from April 2 to May 14 with all unsold art available for purchase. “Night of Artists continues to grow in popularity and exceptional artwork and 2017 promises to be our biggest show yet,” said Jessica Elliott, Chair of the Board for the Briscoe. “Art enthusiasts won’t want to miss this showcase of the best contemporary Western Art in the country.” Night of Artists marks the largest fundraiser for the Briscoe Western Art Museum with a portion of the proceeds supporting the institution. The exhibition coincides with San Antonio’s largest annual cultural event, Fiesta, which attracts more than 250,000 visitors to the Alamo City each year.

58 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

59

“Texas Pinwheels”, Cliff Cavin

“Spring Breeze”, Cliff Cavin

“Spring Oak”, Cliff Cavin


“Coming Storm”, Cliff Cavin

Briscoe

60 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

61


195

All installation images of 195 Gallery, Courtesy of Gabriel Diego Delgado

“New kid on the block” Gallery 195 Boerne, Texas On February 25, 2017 Gallery 195 opened its doors to friends and family for a private ‘soft opening’, as they ramped up for the coming months of activities. However, on March 11, 2017, they will once again celebrate with a ‘gallery opening’ to coincide with Boerne’s Second Saturday Art & Wine events from 10 am – 8 pm. Stay Tuned!!! Their ‘Grand Opening’ is currently planned in April to help kick off the Boerne Professional Artist event, THE PARADE OF ARTISTS: April 9 – 10, 2017. For more information visit: www.boerneprofessionalartists.com and www.gallery195.com Roster of artists Include: Kim Felts, Virginia Floyd, Jim Heupel, Mark S. Holly, Grady Jennings, Bob Lombardi, and Linda Manning.

62 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

63


195

64 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

65


195

66 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

67


Albert / Trebla

“DIVERSE VIEWS” TREBLA ART GALLERY San Antonio, Texas —Special to Contemporary Texas, The Fine Arts Magazine On March 4, 2017 Trebla Art Gallery opened its doors as a new gallery to within the wonderful art community of South Town in San Antonio. Headed by Texas artist, Albert Gonzales, Trebla Art Gallery will host monthly art exhibitions from local, national and international artists. Their inaugural exhibition is titled, “Diverse Views” and features artists: Chris Riggs, Elias Vieyra, Kristen Phipps, Paul Cooley, Raul Gonzalez, Diego S Martinez, Cherise Munro, Victoria Waite, Ana H Burwell, Chris Koenig, Braydon Gold, Mauro C Martinez “Trebla Art Gallery will be hosting a number of extremely talented artist from different areas of San Antonio, Texas and other states in our country. Trebla Art Gallery wants to showcase a diverse group of artist from different viewpoints of life and of the world”, says Gonzales.

For more information visit: www.facebook.com/treblaartgallery/

68 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

69


“Hound”, Lithograph, Fernando Andrade

Berlin / San Antonio

“Next Round of Berliners” Blue Star Contemporary Museum San Antonio, Texas

BSC announces its 2017/2018 Berlin Residents —Special to Contemporary Texas, The Fine Arts Magazine

Blue Star Contemporary (BSC) is pleased to announce its 2017/2018 Blue Star Berlin Residents — Fernando Andrade, Andrei Renteria, Ethel Shipton, and Jared Theis — awarding these San Antonio- based artists the opportunity to live and conduct their studio practice in one of the world's most significant art centers, Berlin, Germany.

70 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


Thanks to the efforts of Dr. Angelika Jansen Brown, Blue Star Contemporary awarded its first residency opportunity in 2013 and acts as one of the only US partners with Künstlerhaus Bethanien (KB). While in residence, the artists are given a studio and living space, as well as access to workshops; exhibition opportunities; and studio visits with international curators; and inclusion in BE Magazine, which is published by KB and puts the artists’ work into critical perspective while addressing topical issues of the international art scene. Following the completion of each artist’s residency, an exhibition of artwork inspired by his or her experience will occur at Blue Star Contemporary. Dedicated to the advancement of contemporary visual arts, the Künstlerhaus Bethanien aims to establish a critical dialogue between artists from various backgrounds and disciplines, and the public-at-large. About Fernando Andrade Fernando Andrade was born in Acuña Coahuila, Mexico. He relocated to San Antonio in his youth and studied Graphic Arts at San Antonio College. During this time, he became involved in the community and socially engaging art by volunteering on numerous mural projects. Fernando works in both realistic and abstract styles and is interested in the representation of spirituality and social political events. Reflecting on the recent cartel violence brought to the neighborhood where Andrade was raised, the artist illustrates imagined vignettes and objects with children as one of the primary subjects. The content of the work is developed and sourced from personal experience, stories told by friends and family, online media, printed matter, and news reports. Andrade grapples with the direness of the violence, the disappearance of victims, and the loss of innocence, using his work to respond to the events and his feelings. Andrade was a resident at the Vermont Studio Center in 2016, was awarded the Linda Pace Foundation Grant from the Artist Foundation of San Antonio in 2015, and participated in the Artist Lab program at the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center in 2014. Andrade recently exhibited at Ruiz -Healy Art, San Antonio, TX; Centro de Artes, San Antonio, TX; and the Southwest School of Art, San Antonio, TX. About Andrei Renteria Andrei Renteria was born in 1986 in Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico. He received his Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Texas at San Antonio in 2015 and his Bachelor of Fine Arts from Sul Ross State University in 2010. Raised in Presidio, Texas, Renteria's work reflects his active and longstanding interest in socio -political issues along the U.S./ Mexico border. Eager to expand his ideas, he continues to investigate how painting, printmaking, assemblage and installation might address and embody broader political issues (including torture and violence) beyond international borders. His work incorporates printmaking, painting, assemblage, and installation, focusing on the experiences of victims of crimes and exploitation due to class, gender, and ethnicity. Renteria provokes the audience to consider the impacts of colonialism and globalization in third world countries, specifically in Latin America. Additionally, he attempts to destabilize the border between artist, artwork, and audience— analogous to the sociopolitical border. In 2016 Renteria was awarded the Friends of Chuck Ramirez Award for Visual Arts from the Artist Foundation and participated in the Artist Lab program with the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center. Recent exhibitions with Cinnabar Gallery, San Antonio, TX; Centro de Artes, San Antonio, TX; Mexic -Arte Museum, Austin, TX; and the Galveston Art Center, Galveston, TX. Renteria currently teaches at UTSA and serves as Gallery Coordinator for UTSA's 136 Gallery.

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

71


Berlin / San Antonio

About Ethel Shipton Ethel Shipton was born and raised in Laredo, Texas. She received a BFA from the University of Texas at Austin in 1989. Ethel worked for the Texas House of Representatives as a photographer for more than eight years. Prior to settling in San Antonio, Shipton spent a couple of years living and working in Mexico City. Through painting, installation, photography, and text, Shipton spotlights instants of clarity that flit by in the comings and goings of daily life. Deeply rooted in her native habitat, Shipton represents the seventh generation of her maternal family born in Laredo, with family, friends, and cultural influence from both the US and Mexico. She grew up speaking English, Spanish, and a combination of the two – its own dialect. Rasquache, a guiding principle of border tradition Shipton celebrates in her work, is an approach to materiality using whatever is at hand to make something new. Growing up in a ranching family, Shipton's work has continually had a practical backbone, utilizing scraps of wood from construction projects, an extra sheet of vinyl, and workman like techniques as materials and to inform her vocabulary. More recently Shipton's work has focused on the tensions, militarization, politics, and other themes about the US-Mexico border, a space she formerly knew as porous. Shipton has exhibited at numerous galleries, including Artpace San Antonio, TX, Museum of Fine Art, Santa Fe, NM; Blue Star Contemporary, San Antonio, TX; Shore Institute of Contemporary Art, Long Beach, CA; Austin Museum of Art, TX; Women and Their Work Gallery, Austin, TX; Sala Diaz, San Antonio, TX and Studio Santa Catarina, Mexico City. About Jared Theis Jared Theis is a multidisciplinary artist who received his BFA in 2001 from UTSA and his MFA in 2012 from UC Davis. He began his practice primarily as a sculptor and throughout his education and travels expanded the media he worked in as a response to his experiences and cultural surroundings. Most recently Theis builds sculptural suits, objects and environments, which are utilized in performances and documented through video. The videos become a means of building mythologies that explore human vulnerability, utopian states of being and ritualistic activities. He has shown his work in solo and group exhibitions in the United States and Europe. In 2014 he received a government artist grant from Kulturådet, Norway Arts Council to pursue a one-year project in Norway. In 2012 he received a Joan Mitchell MFA grant and the Robert Arneson Award at the University of California, Davis. Theis has exhibited nationally and internationally at Manetti Shrem Museum, Davis, California; Kunsthall Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway; Mass Gallery, Austin, TX; and Oslo Prosjektrom, Oslo, Norway. He now lives in San Antonio and teaches at the Southwest School of Art. Support for the 2017/2018 Berlin Residency Program generously provided by: Capital Group Companies Charitable Foundation; Micheal McGowan; the Berlin Brunchers; with a special thanks to Dr Angelika Jansen Brown for her integral role in establishing the program. More Information: For more information about Blue Star’s Berlin Residency Program, call 210-227-6960 or visit www.bluestarart.org/berlin and www.bluestarart.org

72 /

CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine


CONTEMPORARY TEXAS The Fine Arts Magazine /

73


Profile for Gabriel Diego Delgado

Contemporary texas magazine march 2017  

Contemporary Texas, the Fine Arts Magazine, March 2017 edition

Contemporary texas magazine march 2017  

Contemporary Texas, the Fine Arts Magazine, March 2017 edition

Advertisement