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GUILFORD COLLEGE December 2019 | www.guilford.edu

MAGAZINE

The Guilford Edge Enlightening Experiences Abroad

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Friends, THE GUILFORD EDGE HAS ARRIVED — ushering in an exciting new era in the life of the College. Our totally reimagined and unsurpassed educational experience offers great promise in driving Guilford to new heights of national distinction. We are excited to report on the long-anticipated early returns from the unsurpassed student experiences with the Edge. In the cover story for this issue of Guilford College Magazine, Jed Edwards ’20 and Aaron Eisenburg ’20 write about student experiences with the Learning Collaboratively component of the Edge in the U.K., Germany, Spain, India and Norway, as well as domestically during our inaugural 3-week term. As

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

senior honors students, they participated in the U.K. program at Alnwick Castle in Northumberland, England, which was the Hogwarts Castle in the Harry Potter series. Our curriculum has been transformed along with the academic calendar, and the positive changes do not stop there. In this issue, you will read about the multitude of recent facilities improvements, including the restoration of Binford and Milner Halls to provide an outstanding residential experience for students. The restoration of Rachel's Rose Cottage was funded by trustee Fred Taylor '77, creating a beautiful gathering space. Meanwhile, the remodeled Founders Dining Center is bright and welcoming and Hege-Cox Hall has seen upgrades that enhance our Art programs. Philanthropic support is fueling Guilford’s upward trajectory. To date, nearly $5 million has been raised for the Edge from trustees, alumni and other individuals and organizations. The Tannenbaum-Sternberger Foundation of Greensboro provided a large grant


December 2019 On the Cover S T U D E N T S T R AV E L E D T O E N G L A N D D U R I N G T H E FA L L T H R E E - W E E K T E R M . PHOTO BY JENNA SCHAD.

2 Homecoming 6 Philanthropy 9 News

impacting curricular redesign, facilities, scholarships,

12

The Guilford EDGE in Action

13

Collaborative Learning: Enlightening Experiences

faculty development, internships and fellowships.

Abroad

And Steve Trout ’82 and Athena Trout created a fund supporting internships for rising seniors in honor of Paul Zopf, Professor Emeritus of Sociology & Anthropology,

16

New Fund Opens Up

Steve’s academic and thesis advisor at Guilford. Guilford is a remarkable community of students, faculty, alumni, parents and friends. In this issue you

Internships for Students

17

will read about Exel Estrada ’21 and his application of ethical leadership to his studies and his career plans. You will find profiles of recent alums who are doing

Guilfordians, and those whose lives we celebrated with their passing in recent months. Our new Volunteer Program is the cornerstone of our updated alumni engagement model and our commitment to an active and robust Alumni Association that models Guilford values and pride. Volunteers will support Edge-related career preparation for students as well as the planning, promotion and execution of College events, including sharing their Guilford stories with prospective students and their families.

Ethical Leadership: Leading by Example

18

Rallying Campus Spirit: A Rejuvenated Campus

amazing work in their communities, as well as news about alumni awards presented to distinguished

Teaming for Success:

20

Where Are They Now?

23 Athletics 26

Spring Events

28

Community Notes

30

Remembering Guilfordians

32

Introducing the Guilford Volunteer Program

There is so much for alumni, parents and benefactors to be enthused about at this moment in time at Guilford College. For that reason, I am excited to invite you into a new level of engagement with the College as we build our sustainable future together.

Jane K. Fernandes President

Guilford College Magazine is published by the Office of Advancement. The views expressed within these pages do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the College. W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U | 1


HOMECOMING & FAMILY WEEKEND

PHOTOS BY JENNA SCHAD

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hroughout Homecoming & Family Weekend, alumni, family and friends of Guilford College returned to campus, celebrating reunions, dancing in the quad and cheering on the Quakers. Members of the Classes of 1964, 1969, 1974, 1979, 1994, 1999 and 2009 all returned to campus to celebrate the anniversaries of their graduation. While the Class of 1964 met up at a farm for a pig pickin’, the Class of 1974 enjoyed brunch at Print Works Bistro. These reunions allowed classmates to reconnect with members of their own classes while also meeting alumni from other decades. At the second annual Neck of the Woods music festival, cover band Night Years opened with hits spanning the years while attendees enjoyed freshly made funnel cakes, fried fish and ribs from food trucks. Carnival games, a craft fair and a beer garden rounded out the offerings. National recording artist Bas followed Night Years’ danceable set, performing tracks from his recently released album. Armfield Athletic Center remained busy throughout the Saturday of Homecoming & Family Weekend. Although the football team fell to Shenandoah earlier in the day, the women’s and men’s soccer teams triumphed over Sweet Briar and Ferrum. Just outside, alumni, families and students congregated for tailgating and Quakerpalooza, snacking on chicken wings and bouncing on giant inflatables. Homecoming & Family Weekend is an opportunity to see former professors, learn about students’ experiences studying abroad and tour the campus renovations. Join us Oct. 9-10, 2020, for the fun!

W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U | 3


HOMECOMING

M E M B E R S O F T H E C L A S S O F 1 9 6 9 AT T H E I R G O L D E N C I R C L E I N D U C T I O N

Class of 1969 Celebrates 50th Anniversary THROUGHOUT HOMECOMING, members of the Class of

for the first time to wear pants to class and the first black

1969 celebrated their 50th reunion and their induction

student organization, Brothers and Sister in Blackness,

into the Golden Circle. This special weekend gave class

was established.

members the opportunity to see the many parts of

At the Golden Circle Induction Ceremony, Gertrude Judd

campus that have changed since their graduation.

Upperman ‘69 spoke about these changes and struggles and

The Class of 1969 attended Guilford during a time of

how they shaped the class. “Through all of these conditions,

national upheaval and change, including the Civil Rights

we emerged as young adults understanding the Quaker

Movement and the Vietnam War. There were also many

values of community, diversity, equality, excellence,

changes on campus: College convocation was no longer

integrity, justice and stewardship and how these values

mandatory for all students, women students were allowed

would follow us and impact us in life,” said Gertrude.

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MANAGING EDITOR Rachel Young, Assistant Director of Advancement Communications COPY EDITOR Lauren Eberle CONTENT ADVISERS Ty Buckner, Associate Vice President for Alumni & Constituent Relations Roger Degerman, Vice President of Marketing and Enrollment Abby Langston, Director of Marketing CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Karen Alley Allison DeBusk ‘16 Jedidiah Edwards ‘20 Aaron Eisenburg ‘20 Nicolle Holcombe, Assistant Sports Information Director Emma Ross ‘18, Annual Giving Specialist Betsy Seaton, Director of Alumni & Parent Engagement David Walters, Sports Information Director DESIGN Chris Ferguson PHOTOGRAPHY Julie Knight Jenna Schad Lynn Hey Michael Crouch ‘10 ‘12 PHILANTHROPY TEAM Ara Serjoie, Vice President for Advancement Jarrett Stull, Associate Vice President for Philanthropy Kellie Dentler, Director of Annual Giving Sharon Gaskin, Director of Development for Charitable Gift Planning Andy Spencer, Director of Development for Major Gifts Pete Worcester, Director of Development for Major Gifts FINANCE Scott Crabbs, Accounting Manager CONTACT US Office of Advancement Hendricks Hall Guilford College 5800 West Friendly Avenue, Greensboro, NC 27410 P / 336.316.2240 magazine@guilford.edu

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA! facebook.com/guilfordalumni

PAGE 18 We Want Your Help Telling the Guilford Story! As we plan future issues of Guilford College Magazine, as well as our twice-monthly electronic newsletter, the Gazette, we invite alumni, parents and friends to help us tell the Guilford story. We welcome your story ideas and are interested in identifying potential writers and photographers. If you have ideas about the following, let us know: • Stories that portray the impact and character of Guilford College • Celebrations of alumni achievements • Experiences that promote pride, volunteerism and engagement with the College • Photography that illustrates the Guilford experience Submit your ideas to magazine@guilford.edu. If you are interested in writing or contributing photography for the magazine or Gazette, please share a little about your writing and/ or photography experience and include relevant work samples. We appreciate and will respond to all ideas that are contributed.

instagram.com/guilfordalum twitter.com/guilford_alum linkedin.com/school/guilford-college-alumni

W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U | 5


PHILANTHROPY

Tannenbaum-Sternberger Foundation: A Gift That Keeps On Giving “The investment in Guilford College by the Tannenbaum-

THIS FALL, THEATRE TECHNICAL DIRECTOR Brian Coleman joined with Don Smith, Associate Professor of Physics,

Sternberger Foundation will have a significant impact on our

to offer a course titled “Lights at Full: The Science of Theatre

ability to provide an education that is truly transformative for

Stagecraft.” Covering circuitry, optics and color, the course

our students,” said President Jane Fernandes.

taught how to make light plots and implement designs to evoke

Jeanne Tannenbaum had similar sentiments. “The Tannenbaum-Sternberger Foundation board

psychological reactions from an audience. For educators like Brian, The Guilford Edge has provided not only opportunities like this, but also a more enjoyable teaching process. “My class is project-based, and meeting students on consecutive days for longer class periods tightens the feedback loop, which helps us reach our goals quicker,” said Brian. And thanks to a significant gift by The

“The 3-week semester’s

immersive nature let me focus on the subject better than I ever could have with a 15-week one.”

Tannenbaum-Sternberger Foundation of

— Elizabeth Dizon '22

future of Guilford College and its students. Contributing to an excellent experience for students and faculty aligns with our values and mission,” said the Board Chair. As part of the Edge initiative, the College updated its curriculum for the first time in more than two decades and instituted a unique calendar that includes 3- and 12-week terms each semester. The 3-week term features

Greensboro, the impact is sure to continue.

an intensive, single-course, team-based

Launched this fall, The Guilford Edge was designed to ensure that students can thrive through uncommon

is pleased to be able to support the bright

opportunity for every student every semester.

engagement in real-world learning. More than 400 first years

The Edge has four focus areas: learning collaboratively,

started at Guilford this fall and will be the first class to have a

teaming for student success with integrated advising and

four-year Edge experience.

post-college planning, developing ethical leadership and

The Tannenbaum-Sternberger Foundation made a $175,000

rallying campus spirit. Additionally, the College has restored

gift to Guilford College to support this innovative Guilford Edge

Binford and Milner residence halls, remodeled its dining

program. This type of giving falls in line with the Foundation’s

center and added gathering spaces.

commitments to improve the quality of life in Guilford County.

“The Guilford Edge is a bold, comprehensive plan based upon

Potential areas to be impacted by the Foundation’s grant

the results of extensive research. We are excited to help fund

include curricular redesign, facilities, scholarships, faculty

such a worthy project, ” said Bob Klepfer, Executive Director of

development, internships and fellowships.

the Foundation.

BRIAN COLEMAN INSTRUCTS ELIZABETH DIZON ’22 AND JOENN LANZA ’21 ON THE PRINCIPLES OF S TA G E L I G H T I N G D U R I N G T H E J O I N T T H E AT R E / P H Y S I C S 3 - W E E K C O U R S E “ L I G H T S AT F U L L : T H E S C I E N C E O F T H E AT R E S TA G E C R A F T ”

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PHILANTHROPY

President’s International Philanthropy Council Established as New Leadership Group THE GUILFOR D COLLEGE President’s International Philanthropy Council has been established, comprised of alumni, parents and friends who are among Guilford’s most devoted benefactors. “We have selected council members for leadership in this capacity because I firmly believe

PRESIDENT’S INTERNATIONAL PHILANTHROPY COUNCIL

that they have the commitment, wisdom, integrity and foresight

that is necessary to ensure we are successful in realizing our vision for Guilford to be a college of rapidly growing distinction and value,” said President Jane Fernandes. Council members will serve as independent advisors for the President and provide guidance on strategic issues as requested. They will be asked for expertise on projects and programs, to give of their philanthropy for the College’s

WHAT IS YOUR LEGACY? MAKE A GIFT THAT WILL TRANSFORM THE WORK OF GUILFORD COLLEGE FOR GENERATIONS TO COME. YOU CAN DO IT TODAY — WITH A STRATEGIC PLANNED GIFT!

priorities that align with their interests and to assist

3 Preserves your savings and cash flow.

with fundraising.

3 Allows you to be more generous that you ever thought possible.

The generosity of benefactors enables Guilford to develop innovative academic and co-curricular programs that enrich the student experience, makes first-rate facilities possible and helps ensure the College is fiscally strong. Philanthropic commitments to The Guilford Edge, including those by benefactors among College trustees, alumni and foundations — some noted in this issue of Guilford College Magazine — are fueling Guilford's positive trajectory. The new council will meet in conjunction with significant benefactor events twice a year, coinciding with the President’s Dinner in April and the Celebration of Scholarships, Internships & Professorships in September. The council succeeds the Board of Visitors, which was a volunteer leadership group at Guilford from 1968-2018. Individuals or organizations who are interested in becoming part of the council should contact Vice President for Advancement Ara Serjoie at serjoiea@guilford.edu or

3 Easy to arrange. A simple paragraph added to your will is all it takes to make a bequest. 3 Provides you a steady stream of retirement income while providing a tax deduction with a charitable gift annuity. I’m glad to collaborate with your financial advisors to structure your special gift. Sharon Gaskin, Director of Charitable Gift Planning, 336.316.2167 or gaskinsn@guilford.edu

336.316.2320. W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U | 7


MAKE A DIFFERENCE. EVERY GIFT. EVERY YEAR. Each gift to the Guilford College Annual Funds offers more than financial support for the College — it helps provide the students of today and tomorrow with unique and innovative educational opportunities to grow into leaders who will promote positive change in the world.

Join Marcy in making a difference for Guilford students today. Office of Advancement 5800 West Friendly Avenue Greensboro, NC 27410 336.316.2321 advancement@guilford.edu www.giving.guilford.edu

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“I support Guilford College because my experience provided me with critical thinking and writing skills that helped carry me to success in my career and personal life. This was Guilford’s gift to me, and I am grateful for the ways Guilford continues to impact my life.” MARCY MAURY ´74


NEWS

With Honors In her opening remarks at the 2019 Guilford College Alumni Awards, President Jane Fernandes called this year’s recipients the “cream of the crop” of the Guilford

F R O M L E F T T O R I G H T, G E R T R U D E U P P E R M A N ’ 6 9 , W E S G AV I N S ’ 9 2 , D I YA A B D O O N B E H A L F O F E V E R Y C A M P U S A REFUGE, MARIGNY BOSTOCK ’01, HELEN WOMACK, MARTHA T YSON ON BEHALF OF VERNON T YSON ’53 , BEN SNYDER ’ 0 7, R I C H I E Z W I E G E N H A F T, J O H N G O O G E ’ 5 0 , A N D J A N E F E R N A N D E S / P H O T O B Y J U L I E K N I G H T

community, noting that each of the distinguished Values of Guilford, such as

Young Alumni Achievement Awards

stewardship, integrity and

Immigration Law Specialist

community.

Ben Snyder ’07 is a Partner

winners embodies the Core

“All of our awardees were

at Charlotte Immigration

nominated by someone who

Law. Ben studied Peace

saw the work they do and

& Conflict Studies and

the driving force behind

Philosophy and says that

their actions to make life

law has given him an outlet

better for other people,”

to practice his passion

Jane explained at the April

for social justice in a

24 ceremony in Founders

tangible way.

Hall. “We hope stories of our honorees will make an impression on our current students and inspire them.” Here’s a brief round-up of the 2019 recipients. To learn more, visit www.giving.guilford.edu.

Marigny Bostock ’01 is the Senior Program Coordinator for the Tulane University Innovations in Positive Parenting Study. Marigny and her husband, Jon ’99, fund the part-

skills in interdisciplinary

Richie Zweigenhaft,

thinking, Wes also

who started teaching at

coordinates internships

Guilford in 1974, is the

at JPL.

longest-serving current

Through the Googe Family Scholarship Fund, John Googe ’50 has culminated a long entrepreneurial career by providing students with

Receiving the award posthumously was Vernon Tyson ’53 for his work as a champion for racial justice throughout his 60-year career as a Methodist Minister.

Engagement Center.

’69 was among the first

is Chief Information Security Officer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Known for his

Communications minor.

Only the fifth person to be

Gertrude Upperman

major and former Marine,

in establishing the school’s

Honorary Alumna Award

Guilford’s Intercultural

Wes Gavins ’92, a History

he was also instrumental

to a Guilford education.

Coordinator position within

Alumni Excellence Awards

Professor of Psychology,

financial need easier access

Charles C. Hendricks ’40 Distinguished Service Awards

time Immigrant Student

faculty member. Dana

African American students at Guilford College. She helped to charter the first African American student organization, Brothers and Sisters in Blackness, and the Black Alumni of Guilford College.

named an honorary alumna/ us of the College, Helen Womack proudly accepted this year’s distinction. Helen and her husband, Winslow Womack ’50, established the Helen and Winslow Womack Award in 1997 to support academic endeavors for Physics students.

Community Cares Award Every Campus a Refuge, which focuses on providing “radical hospitality” to refugees, has been internationally recognized as a model for all colleges and universities on how to assist those in crisis. W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U | 9


NEWS

Walking the Walk The 2019-20 Bryan Series season begins with two inspiring voices. Education, the environment and trusting your gut were some of the hot-button topics addressed by the kick-off speakers for the Guilford College Bryan Series. On Sept. 10, former First Lady Laura Bush shared thoughts about family and

P H O T O S B Y J U L I E K N I G H T / LY N N H E Y

the “afterlife” — meaning life after the White House — to a crowd of 2,600 at

She also candidly discussed her

the Greensboro Coliseum. She said that

struggle with identity. “Do what

she and former President George W.

you think is right,” Laura recalls

Bush are enjoying life in Dallas, Texas,

her mother-in-law, Barbara Bush,

and shared updates on their daughters

advising.

and grandchildren. Laura said her passion for education

On Oct. 2, The Honorable

going to go away … when do we meddle

Stephen Breyer and CBS News’ Chief

and when do we not?”

guided her time as First Lady and

Legal Correspondent Jan Crawford had

continues to play an important role

an intimate conversation about politics,

then addressed a full gamut of

in the “afterlife.” She talked about

family, Stephen’s latest book and the

questions — from conservative versus

her career as an educator in Texas

inner workings of the Supreme Court.

liberal justices to how to achieve a long,

and how her experiences shaped

The Associate Justice said through

In a Q&A session led by Jan, Stephen

happy marriage. His advice for the

her values regarding literacy and

his book, The Court and the World:

next generation of change-makers?

education. Additionally, Laura

American Law and the New Global

“Read. Think. Talk. Listen.” And liberal

continues to devote time to global

Realities, that he wants to educate

arts helps. “Anything that tells you

women’s issues and the preservation of

people on the impact of the law beyond

about the lives of people you might not

natural resources.

U.S. borders. “Local versus global isn’t

otherwise meet.”

GUILFORD COLLEGE BRYAN SERIES SPRING 2020 The Guilford College Bryan Series invites you to be our guest for the Spring 2020 events, now at the new state-of-the-art Steven Tanger Center for the Performing Arts in downtown Greensboro.

Sally Field MARCH 24 The two-time Academy Award winner is one of our most celebrated and

Colson Whitehead APRIL 23 Author of six novels, including The Underground Railroad, he is a Pulitzer

enduring actors who has played

Prize and National Book Award winner

notable and memorable TV and film

and a significant voice on slavery and

roles such as Gidget, Sybil, Norma Rae and

segregation. As our society grapples with

Mary Todd Lincoln. Her intimate memoir In

lingering race issues, unpacking this history

Pieces was a 2018 New York Times Notable Book of

together is an important exercise. His newest book,

the Year. 1 0 | W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U

The Nickel Boys, was released in May.


Be the wellspring of

SEE WHAT’S NEW!

new possibilities A wellspring is an abundant source. We keep adding new amenities and new opportunities to our dynamic, active community. Come and see them for yourself!

336.545.5400 • Well-Spring.org Greensboro, NC

See concerts, plays, dance, lectures, movies and more in our new theatre.

Enjoy some of the best food in the area in our new bistro & renovated dining room.

Improve your skills in our new woodworking/hobby shop & art studios.

Socialize in our new lounge.

Experience one of the best theaters in North Carolina – right ‘in your own home!’ W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U | 1 1


EXPLORE Learning Collaboratively Guilford students will experience the power of collaboration working side-byside with peers and professors. They will take a deeper dive into their interests as they benefit from hands-on learning in their community and beyond.

REIMAGINING EDUCATION Introducing the

DISCOVER Teaming for Success Led by an expert Guilford Guide, students will discover their own path to success with the help of their own dedicated personal team of advisers. Students will design their education with an eye towards a rewarding career.

Debuting in the fall semester of 2019, Guilford College redesigned its entire educational experience with its students in mind. The Guilford Edge is comprised of four intersecting points of distinction, which work together to serve a central focus — uncommon engagement in real-world learning for every student, every semester. The compelling result is exceptionally prepared graduates who will excel and thrive in a world of change.

Learn more at

GAIN

www.guilford.edu/GuilfordEdge

EXPERIENCE

Ethical Leadership

Rallying Campus Spirit

At Guilford, learning is connected to gaining insights about one’s purpose and potential. Students will be challenged to develop the ethical leadership that will help them live a life of integrity.

Through a welcoming, inclusive community, Guilford students will receive all the best of college life combined with a highly personal and practical experience-based education.

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LEARNING COLLABORATIVELY

Enlightening Experiences Abroad B Y J E D E D WA R D S ' 2 0 A N D A A R O N E I S E N B U R G ' 2 0 PHOTOS BY JENNA SCHAD / MICHAEL CROUCH

Thanks to The Guilford Edge, some of the College’s most collaborative learners spent part of the fall in Spain, Germany, Norway, India and England. One of the most impactful parts of the initiative is the partitioning of semesters to include a 3-week session. Many students took advantage of study abroad options during this time. Some programs were derivatives of already popular areas of study, while others were conceived from a variety of disciplines. Here’s a sampling of student experiences. >>

S T U D E N T S AT T E N D E D C L A S S A G A I N S T T H E BACKDROP OF ALNWICK CASTLE IN ENGL AND.

W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U | 1 3


LEARNING COLLABORATIVELY Galicia, Spain Honors 200: Fantastic Journeys — Pilgrimage & Hospitality: El Camino de Santiago de Compostela This year the Honors program introduced the redesigned Honors 200: Fantastic Journeys with director Heather Hayton taking a flagship group of 22 students to Spain. After a week of reviewing the components of pilgrimage and hospitality on campus, the group spent four days walking the Camino de Santiago, visiting cities like Lisbon, Pontevedra and Santiago. One of the major Christian pilgrimage routes of the Middle Ages, the Camino de Santiago and the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela have attracted guests for more than 1,000 years. the Brothers Grimm, Thomas Mann

and Psychology Professor Eva McGuire

challenging, magical, full of joy and

and Marlen Hauschofer, among others.

for their team-taught course comparing

camaraderie,” Heather said. “We

The movies followed the same theme,

prisons in the United States and Norway.

discovered things about ourselves and

including Die Weiße Rose (The White

The course began locally with the study

the larger world, and were humbled

Rose), a 1982 film about a group of

of the American prison system. From

by the small towns along the Camino

Munich University students who lead a

there, the students traveled to Norway

that have dedicated themselves to

resistance against the Nazi Regime.

to compare its structure, which is widely

“Our journey was at turns exciting,

welcoming poor or tired strangers.” Heather, who has led seven Guilford study abroad programs, remarked that the new semester schedule has

Additionally, the Guilford group trekked the beautiful trails and mountains of Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Senior English and German double-

considered more humane. On campus, the class took field trips to the North Carolina Correctional Institution for Women, Central Prison

great potential for study abroad

major Lana Heltzel ‘20 says that “there

and Wake Correctional Center, and met

opportunities. Designed for second-year

was a lot of satisfaction in knowing no

with North Carolina Department of

Honors students, the new Honors 200

day was wasted. One day we would hike or

Public Safety leaders.

component will shift its focus every year

take a cable-car to the top of a mountain,

but always include a “fantastic journey.”

and the next we would be seeing a ferry

women’s maximum-security prison,

ride across stunning lakes — always with

a men’s maximum-security prison,

the mountains in the backdrop.”

as well as a men’s minimum security

Munich, Germany

Once in Norway, students visited a

Alp Dreams – Forest Tales and Mountain Trails

of Guilford’s study abroad programs is

responsible for the prison’s operations.

Guilford has been sending students to

now an ideal fit for The Guilford Edge.

The group also met with a Professor in

Germany for 41 years. For this term’s

Indeed, what may have been the gem

prison where the incarcerated are

the Department of Criminology at the

3-week session, Professor of German

Oslo, Norway

Dave Limburg led 20 students on a quest

Norwegian Prison Administration.

while traveling the countryside. The

Justice and Policy Studies & Psychology: Comparison of Prison Systems in Norway and the USA

syllabus largely consisted of what Dave

Eighteen students joined Justice and

the current North Carolina Commissioner

refers to as “dark mountain tales” by

Policy Studies Professor Sherry Giles

of Prisons, says he plans to share these

to study German literature and cinema

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University of Oslo and leaders from the Back at Guilford, students gave presentations to the NC DPS. Todd Ishee,


DIGITAL BONUS

For a photo gallery from other 3-week courses, visit www.guilford.edu/ Edge3Week

S T U D E N T S S T U D I E D I N A N U M B E R O F FA R AWAY P L A C E S , S U C H A S E N G L A N D , S PA I N A N D I N D I A , F O R THE INTENSIV E 3-WEEK COURSE.

Jamkhed, CRHP’s system includes helping

the Harry Potter series — and studied

and improving local farming efforts. “We

medicinal practices in the western

chose this organization because it takes a

world with an emphasis on the role and

holistic and multi-dimensional approach

perception of magic.

to addressing its mission,” says Lavon. As part of their studies, students

findings with other directors. Maya Brown ‘21 spoke on the value of using the 3-week as an opportunity for

“The space we were using was probably best known for its commercial

interacted with locals. Translators

or theatrical popularity,” says Michele.

helped conduct interviews and focus

“That was the backdrop for a more serious

groups about community issues that the

conversation about causal systems to

students had been studying.

make a rich cultural exploration.”

“It was interesting to hear what they

From studying the medicinal properties

students to travel for shorter periods of

had to say and compare it to our own

of local herbs, to re-enacting 19th century

time: “I wasn’t sure if I would like a full

prior knowledge,” says Alec McMahon

England’s reaction to Charles Darwin’s

semester abroad. The three weeks were

‘20, a Biology major. “It was truly an

Origin of Species, to discussing the beliefs

a good way of testing my interest.”

enlightening experience.”

behind sympathetic magic in the gardens

Michael and Lavon’s biggest goal in

of Medieval priories, combining two

Jamkhed, India

creating this course was to provide an

Business & Public Health: Community Health & Development

experiential learning environment.

the classes more engaging, noted

Emma Chaiken ‘20, a Theatre major, says

Chloe Wells ’20, a Religious Studies

Eleven students took part in a community

that was achieved. “If it weren’t for this

major and recipient of the CPPSET

health and development course during

trip or The Guilford Edge, I never would

Endowed Scholarship. “I was really glad

The Guilford Edge’s 3-week session.

have gone abroad.”

to see all the ways religion and biology

Following one week of on-campus

seemingly different disciplines made

come together.”

study, the group traveled to Jamkhed,

Alnwick, England

India, with Business Professor Michael

Biology & Religious Studies: Mechanisms of Magic & Medicine

neighboring towns and castles, including

Dutch and Public Health Professor Lavon Williams to work alongside the

Biology Professor Michele Malotky

Edinburgh. Hannah McKinnis ‘20

Comprehensive Rural Health Project, an

and Religious Studies Professor Eric

particularly enjoyed scenic hikes along the

organization that provides healthcare

Mortensen’s course was the only one

northern sea. “The community-building

options to India’s marginalized and poor.

to spend the full three weeks abroad.

aspect was incredible,” she says. “We all felt

The group lived in Alnwick Castle — one

a bond after having gone through living in

of the famous filming locations for

a new place for three weeks together.”

Working to improve the overall health quality of the rural area surrounding

Students enjoyed day trips to Lindisfarne, Bamburgh, Craster and

W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U | 1 5


TEAMING FOR SUCCESS

S I E R R A M E N D E Z- N E F F ' 2 0 I N T E R N S F O R T H E G R E E N S B O R O FA R M E R ' S M A R K E T, L E A R N I N G H O W T H E GROW TH OF LOCAL FOOD AND ARTISAN GOODS BUSINESSES IMPROVE GREENSBORO'S ECONOMY AND BUILD SOCIAL AND COMMUNIT Y CONNECTIONS.

NEW FUND OPENS UP INTERNSHIPS FOR STUDENTS THE CHANCE TO GAIN real-world work experience just got a little easier for students at Guilford College, thanks to the new Annual Internship Fund created by Steve Trout ’82 and Athena Trout. “Financial constraints often impede a student’s pursuit of internships, as many internships are unpaid or pay a wage that does not cover living expenses,” says Karrie Manson ’82, Director of Integrated Career Advising. “Thanks to the support of Steve and Athena, this fund will provide financial assistance to help mitigate these financial hurdles.” The fund will be awarded to one rising senior per year, chosen through an application process. This is part of the reinvigorated

“Steve, a Dana Scholar, has

remained one of the most authentic, kind, intellectually curious and successful people I have ever met. He values greatly the education and relationships made at Guilford, which is so consistent with the ways he exhibited that in his friendships and academic work as a student.” — Karrie Manson '82

Steve created the fund as a way to reciprocate the financial support he received during his own academic career. “When I visited Guilford as a senior, I was blown away by the engaging faculty and staff and the friendly and inspired students,” Steve says. He has seen first-hand the value of work experience. “My employer, Wintrust Financial, invites 100 college students to explore careers in banking as summer interns, and we hire many of our interns upon graduation,” Steve says. “Having professionally relevant work experience offers graduates a significant advantage in securing employment and admission to graduate and professional schools.” Steve says he also created the

emphasis on internships and

Annual Internship Fund in honor of

networking created by Guided

Professor Emeritus Paul Zopf, who

Discovery. The new advising program connects students with Guilford

in engaged learning, and allows students

has always been dedicated to helping

Guides, academic and career advisors

the ability to gain basic workplace

students achieve their goals. “He

that help them explore and prepare

proficiencies such as adaptability,

not only was a great lecturer, but

for internships. The newly launched

collaboration, communication skills

supported me in following my ideas

Advancement Volunteer Program also

and the ability to solve complex

and helped me grow as a student, and

connects students with alumni to find

problems,” Karrie says. “Guilford

this fund will help other students

internship opportunities and mentors.

remains committed to supporting the

pursue their passions.”

“The internship is a critical component 1 6 | W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U

development of these proficiencies.”

— K. Alley


ETHICAL LEADERSHIP

EXEL ESTRADA

LEADING BY EXAMPLE WALKING ALONG THE TR EE-LINED sidewalks of Guilford, Exel Estrada ’21 looks like any other college student. But just six years ago in Guatemala, he was working as a carpenter’s assistant and going to night classes. “I told my classmates I wanted to be in school forever because I really enjoy learning, and they thought I was crazy,” Exel says. “If you’re a carpenter you stay a carpenter all your life. I wanted more.”

’21

“I have not encountered

another student as dedicated to helping out on the campus and in the community as Exel is. He is able to identify a need and really drill down to find out how he can help specifically.” — Liz Torres Melendez

At the age of 14, Exel’s life changed

California with an Immigrant Student Coordinator. Liz Torres Melendez serves as a resource for Exel and all of Guilford’s immigrant population, helping navigate the world of FAFSA applications, health services, residency determinations and much more. “At a campus without this service these students have to do the leg work themselves, and it’s a big emotional and mental strain,” Liz says. Exel, who is interested in working

dramatically when he was able to join

in the healthcare field, also volunteers

his mother in Baltimore, Md. “High

with Cone Health, Hospice and the

school was a struggle in many ways,”

Alzheimer’s Association. “I am really grateful for the

Exel said. “I was having to learn English,

Sciences major volunteers as a guide

take a full load of classes and work to

for an after-school assistance program

scholarships that enabled me to attend

help the family.” With the support of his

at Northeast Guilford High School,

college here,” Exel says. “They have not

teachers and guidance counselors, Exel

helping students explore post-high

only given me the opportunity to pursue

not only performed well in high school

school options, and is developing a

the education I always dreamed of, but

but was able to earn a number of merit-

website of resources for immigrant

also opened my eyes to so much more.

based scholarships to help him attend

students. “I know first-hand how

I have the opportunity to give back to

Guilford College, including the Bonner

important it is to have a support system

others through volunteer work, and

Scholarship, the Eugene Thompson

in place to help you succeed in school,”

also have met many new mentors and

Scholarship and the Mirabelli-Heller

Exel says.

developed strong friendships. I was

Natural Sciences Award.

That support system doesn’t stop with

looking for a college with diversity and

Today, Exel uses his experiences to

high school. Thanks to a gift from Jon

a great sense of community, and I found

help others struggling to find their way

Bostock ’99 and Marigny Bostock ’01,

that here at Guilford College.”

in America. The Biology and Health

Guilford is the only school outside of

— K. Alley W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U | 1 7


RALLYING CAMPUS SPIRIT

A REJUVENATED CAMPUS BY K AREN ALLEY

State-of-the-art-demonstration kitchens, glass-windowed lounges full of natural light and large-screen TVs are just a few of the exciting new features around Guilford College’s campus. “It’s really important for our students to have updated spaces for living, studying, learning and coming together as a community,” said Len Sippel, Vice President for Administration and Finance. “We found a need for more gathering places around campus, and it’s exciting to see how these restorations are making historic old buildings new and vibrant for our students.”

BINFORD HALL When Binford Hall was built in 1962, the new dorm was a class act with terrazzo flooring and marble in the bathrooms. Now, almost 60 years later, beautifully refurbished marble and terrazzo flooring are still star features in the restored building. After over a year of construction, students moved into Binford Hall in 2018 to enjoy updated bathrooms and dorm rooms, all freshly painted and furnished with new mattresses. In addition, the glass-walled Orangerie was built next door. “The Orangerie is a fantastic place for studying or having meetings,” said Henry Freeman ’22.

RACHEL'S ROSE COTTAGE MILNER HALL

This year, one of the oldest buildings on campus found new

Like Binford Hall, Milner Hall was built

life. Rachel’s Rose Cottage was

in 1962 and has undergone a much-

built in 1903 to house the power

needed restoration, with construction

plant for the campus. And while

finishing up just in time for students

the building has seen many

to move in the fall of 2019. Walnut

different uses over the years

paneling, hidden for many years under

after the power plant expanded,

drywall, has been uncovered and

its most recent transformation

restored, along with terrazzo flooring

into a coffee shop and hangout is

similar to Binford Hall. One of the

bringing new life to the building

highlights of the Milner restoration

most recently known as the Hut. A

is the lower level. “We put in a large

fresh new whitewash brightens up

demonstration kitchen, as well as

the exterior, and inside has great

large-screen TVs and a foosball table to

gathering space. Grab a locally

create a gathering space for students,”

roasted coffee, tea, cupcake or

Len said.

snack and enjoy the music.

1 8 | W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U


DIGITAL BONUS

To see an online photo gallery of each renovation, visit www.guilford.edu/ EdgeRefresh

FOUNDERS DINING HALL Gathering together to share a meal is an important part of community and renovations to Founders Dining Hall, completed in the fall of 2019, brought a new light to Guilford's central gathering space. The new facility is in the same building, but is a total renovation, adding stations and creating a space where people are excited to sit down and eat together. The nine stations include the traditional hot line, along with pizza, a chef’s station where foods are prepared in front of the students and the beloved vegan station to accommodate different preferences of the Guilford College community.

HEGE-COX HALL Arts have always played a large part in the life of Guilford College, and now the Art Department has a building worthy of the students and faculty’s time and talents. Hege-Cox Hall underwent a complete renovation, opening up with grand fanfare in it and created an entirely new space dedicated to art,” Len said. Two buildings that

WOMEN'S LOCKER ROOMS

share an internal patio and outdoor teaching space provide plenty of space for

Building campus spirit means

students to work and create. Other additions include a new art gallery, fully equipped

supporting the whole gamut of college

ceramics and sculpture studios and senior art studios.

life, from academic to the arts to

the fall of 2018. “We took what was a residence hall turned art building, and gutted

athletics. With the recent renovations to the women’s locker rooms, each women’s sports team has its own space. “The renovation took the old racquetball courts, which were used as a dance studio and storage, and created a two-floor area with locker rooms on the first floor and a dance studio on the second floor,” Len said. “It’s a great design that allowed us to keep the dance studio and give every sport their own space, which helps immensely when recruiting athletes.” W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U | 1 9


AWESOME ALUMNI

WHERE ARE THEY NOW? MARK EDWARDS '90

CHAKA STEWART '01 “During my time at Guilford, I experienced growth, change, love, challenges and community. Guilford rewarded me with my wife, Stephanie Melesky Stewart ’01, as well as life-long friends and a top-notch education.” About Chaka >> Since graduating from Thurgood

“Guilford College was the perfect place for me to attend college. The small college setting with challenging and attentive professors served to encourage me and push me when I needed it. Now, Guilford has an even larger role in my life. This year, my daughter, Avery Edwards '23, is enrolled as a student. She had her choice of schools to go to, but she picked Guilford for reasons all her own. I couldn’t be more proud as a father, and as an alum, I’m excited that the Guilford family has added another amazing new member.”

Guilford introduced me to the power of possibility! During my time as a student, I was challenged to be a critical thinker and a creative doer. When those forces combine, anything can be achieved and a possibility becomes a project.”

Marshall School of Law in

About Natalie >> Natalie is the CEO of Rudy's

2010, Chaka’s primary focus

Girl Media located in Martinsville, Va. She

has been entertainment

holds a Bachelor's degree in Justice & Policy

law, with clients including

Studies and African American Studies from

artists, musicians, music

Guilford College and a master's degree in

producers, filmmakers,

African American Studies from Cornell

screenwriters and authors.

University. Natalie has over a decade of

Additionally, he has been

experience in the higher education field and

working with Guilford alums

entertainment industry and is currently

Pierre Cadore ’03 and Isa

a Project Director for Ross Innovative

Stokes ’05 on building Isore

Employment Solutions. She oversees the

Records, an independent

successful administration of the Workforce

record label based in

Innovation and Opportunity grant for the

Greensboro. Chaka loves

West Piedmont region of Virginia. The grant

what he does and enjoys

provides federal funding for individuals

being a part of the growing

with barriers to employment including but

entertainment scene in

not limited to Returning Citizens. Discover

North Carolina.

more about Natalie's multimedia offerings at nataliehodge.com.

2 0 | W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U


About Mark >> Mark serves as

LEON PINKETT '93

the Deputy Secretary at the North Carolina Department of

“I’m grateful for my time at Guilford. The friends I made and the memories that I had will endure forever. I hope that I can be a part of carrying on the rich legacy of leadership established by generations of Guilford alumni who prioritized service, integrity and a genuine concern for the welfare of others over all else.”

Administration. In this position, Mark oversees the state’s catalog of real property, managing the State Property Office, the State Construction Office, State Facilities Management and the State Parking Office. He also serves on Governor Roy Cooper’s Climate Change

About Leon >> Leon studied Economics while at Guilford College and credits his

Interagency Council and the

education with helping him gain a deeper understanding of how economic systems

Governor’s Task Force Connecting

impact communities across the nation. While he rarely finds himself discussing

North Carolina. In addition, Mark

Keynesian economics, Leon says he finds himself “looking at the problems that face

is a member of the Department’s

our city from the perspective of how economic opportunities or the lack thereof

Executive Team and advises the

are a driver to much of the disparities that we see in urban centers, like Baltimore,

Secretary on matters involving the

throughout the nation.” Leon was elected to the Baltimore City Council in 2016 and

North Carolina General Assembly,

currently serves as the Vice Chairman of the Budget and Transportation Committees.

the Council of State and the media,

Recently, Leon announced his candidacy for Baltimore City Council President in next

among others.

year’s election.

NICOLE ZELNIKER '17 “Guilford really prepared me for what I'm doing now. The Guilfordian has helped me a lot in my journalistic writing, but it also allowed me to explore different components of journalism. Through the Bonner Center, I developed a voice, became a leader and gained a community that has stayed with me past graduation. I learned so much through the folks there, and from the professors in the English Department, who encouraged me and taught me to think in new ways.” About Nicole >> Nicole published Mixed, a non-fiction book about race and mixed-race families with The Nasiona, and is working on a podcast about the same topic. Her second book, a collection of short stories with Atmosphere Press, will be published in early 2020. Four of the short stories in the collection were written at Guilford with Professors Jennie Malboeuf and Mylène Dressler. Nicole is currently an editor at The Conversation US, an online outlet that commissions academics to write about their expertise for the general public. Nicole was a Rachel Lindner Leahy ’14 Award recipient as a Guilford student.” W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U | 2 1


2 2 | W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U


ATHLETICS REPORT

INTRODUCING NEW TEAMS This spring, Guilford will compete in

Over the summer, National championship appearances, conference tournament berths, new varsity staff and teams, plus renovated spaces highlighted a banner calendar year for Guilford Athletics. The College’s continued commitment to excellence and equity in the fields, gyms and diamonds bears fruit in the over 500 studentathletes competing for 22 varsity teams, the most in school history. After hiring the School’s first full-time director of athletics since the mid-1990s, President Jane Fernandes teamed with senior leaders to pave the way for two new teams, renovated athletics facilities and a softball field. The investments showed early dividends as the Quakers’ basketball teams enjoyed successful seasons and Guilford’s golf team turned in another top-five national finish.

Jane announced

Tier 2 of the National Intercollegiate

the addition

Rugby Association (NIRA) under the auspices of USA Rugby. Emily

of women’s

Record, a former Assistant at Queens

rugby and women’s triathlon to the Quakers’ list of varsity offerings. Since

E M I LY R E C O R D

University in Charlotte, was named the team’s Head Coach.

2002, women's rugby has been considered

"Emily is ideally suited to lead and build

an emerging sport by the NCAA, which means it is intended to help schools provide

an outstanding rugby program as we usher

more athletics opportunities for women

in a thrilling new era in women's athletics,"

and more sport-sponsorship options for the

said Jane. "The experience and enthusiasm

institutions, and also help that sport achieve

she brings as a highly respected coach and

NCAA championship status.

mentor will be a winning combination."

Also an NCAA emerging

Aquatic Center. Cycling training will take

sport, women’s triathlon

place on bike-friendly roads in Guilford County.

starts competition

Marty Owens, Guilford’s Director

in the fall of 2020.

of Track and Field and Cross Country

“We are proud to welcome Guilford to the women's collegiate

Operations, serves as the Quakers’

triathlon family, as the sport

first Director of Triathlon. Marty is

achieves another milestone on its way to full NCAA inclusion," said Rocky

MART Y OWENS

a certified triathlon coach, a 2015 USA Triathlon All-American and has twice competed in the IRONMAN World

Harris, USA Triathlon CEO. "Guilford

Championships in Hawaii.

is well-placed to compete regionally

Brad Herndon, in his second

while offering an education that will

season as the Quakers’ Women’s

attract talented student-athletes."

Swimming Coach, serves as the

Guilford received a three-year grant from USA Triathlon in support of

BRAD HERNDON

triathlon team’s Head Coach. He has

the new program. The Quakers will run on

three IRONMAN finishes under his belt and

campus trails and swim at the Greensboro

is a Level 4-certified swim coach.

Guilford Strong After unveiling new locker rooms in August 2018, the College embarked on a renovation of the Mary Ragsdale Fitness Center in 2019. The $250,000 giftfunded project titled ‘Guilford Strong’ provides new flooring, equipment and branding in the College’s primary fitness space for the benefit of all community members.

W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U | 2 3


ATHLETICS REPORT

JENNIFER KING ’06

Tackling Stereotypes and Pushing Boundaries learned how to relate to people of different backgrounds and experiences.

After basketball season, Jennifer joined the Quakers’ softball team, where

“Entering college you come from

she was a four-year starter. She was

motto used by the College’s admissions

your little bubble in high school, and

more than an athlete at Guilford and

office in the early 2000s: “Be the change

then you’re suddenly somewhere where

developed administrative and relational

you wish to see in the world.”

there’s all types of people,” Jennifer

skills through participation in different

said. “Guilford laid the groundwork for

campus organizations. A resident

diversity, which is huge in coaching.”

advisor and Judicial Board member, she

GUILFOR DIANS MAY R ECALL the

Jennifer King ’06 lives out that slogan, some 13 years after her graduation, as a football coach. The former two-sport

After a decorated high school career

coordinated musical acts for Serendipity

standout started coaching college

at nearby Rockingham County High

and participated with the Blacks

basketball, but her love and hunger for

School, the accolades continued to

Unifying Society club. Jennifer was

football, plus the willingness to risk and

pile up in Greensboro. Jennifer earned

chosen for a developmental coaching

grind for a dream, have her on the cusp

Guilford’s top athletics honor, the

program sponsored by the Women’s

of a full-time coaching position in the

Nereus C. English Athletic Leadership

Basketball Coaches’ Association of

National Football League (NFL).

Award, along with the school’s 2005 Best

America, which helped crystalize her

Undergraduate Female Athlete Award.

coaching dreams.

Jennifer didn’t play or coach football at

After graduation, she assisted the

Guilford, and instead starred in basketball

As a senior, she was named Best Female

and softball. The Sport Management

Athlete and received the Jack Jensen

women’s basketball team at Greensboro

major built a network of friends and

Ideal Student-Athlete prize.

College. She spent nine seasons with

24 | W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U

P H O T O C O U R T E S Y O F T H E C A R O L I N A PA N T H E R S

B Y D AV E WA LT E R S / AT H L E T I C S


the Pride, during which time the

security of her JWU post for work as the

school made four NCAA Division III

Arizona Hotshots’ Assistant Receivers

Tournament appearances.

Coach. Moving across the country wasn’t a risk to Jennifer, who had worked as

Jennifer’s Greensboro experience led to her 2016 appointment as Head

a police officer in High Point before

Women’s Basketball Coach at Johnson

taking the Greensboro College post. The AAF folded after eight games,

& Wales University (JWU). She guided her team to the 2018 United States

and Jennifer returned to the Panthers

Collegiate Athletic Association’s

to intern with the team’s running

Division II title, the Charlotte school’s

backs through the 2019 preseason. She

first national championship of any kind.

coached all-star Christian McCaffery

Meanwhile, her football fever grew. She studied the game, connected with the Female Coaching Network and played in the Women’s Football Association. Jennifer quarterbacked the Carolina Phoenix for nine years and earned All-America honors five times. She played with the New York Sharks in 2018 and commuted from Charlotte for weekly practices. Jennifer claimed her second national crown in less than a year as the Sharks won the WFA’s Division II title. Her experience as a player and a winner connected her with those she coaches.

“It’s kind of surprising to me

because I started out doing this because I love football and I love coaching. It was a great opportunity for me. I didn’t set out to be any type of role model. I didn’t even think about the weight. I had no idea it would affect so many people, but it has.” — Jennifer King

and company in a preseason game when the wife of Carolina’s full-time backfield coach went into labor. “I wasn't expecting it, but I was able to show what I'm capable of — capable of having a position," Jennifer said afterward. "I've run things before (with the Hotshots), and it was cool to get to run things with the backs.” Jennifer now works as an Offensive Assistant at the Ivy League’s Dartmouth College. But don’t be surprised to find her back with an NFL team in the nottoo-distant future. The rise of talented women and professional football’s growing interest in gender equity has

“Once they learn you’ve played, I think

led to a handful of women working in

it adds another level of validity to you,” Jennifer said. “You’ve been hit. You’ve hit

2018 minicamp and impressed the

full-time roles with NFL organizations,

people. (Players) are like, ‘OK, maybe she

Panthers enough to earn an extension

including Tampa Bay and Atlanta.

knows what she’s doing.’”

through the full training camp. The

Jennifer’s love for football and passion for coaching increased with each new opportunity. It didn’t hurt that

Jennifer keeps in touch with the

experience gave Jennifer confidence to

growing community of female football

pursue her dream of coaching in the NFL.

coaches, which is no different than the

"It's time," Ron said on WSOC-TV. "We're

networking and camaraderie found

JWU’s campus sits next door to Bank

in a game that's very popular, and it's

in most coaching communities. She’s

of America Stadium, home to the NFL’s

watched by everybody, and so it should be

committed to learning more about the

Carolina Panthers. When she was one

coached and managed by everybody."

profession, expanding her network and

“That’s one thing that people don’t

preparing for the next opportunity. She

of 50 women chosen for the NFL’s 2016 Women’s Careers in Football Forum,

really realize — it’s not just something

wants to make her players better and

Jennifer seized the opportunity to make

that just happened for me,” Jennifer told

help her team to victory. She also wants

significant connections.

the Panthers’ Will Bryan. “I didn’t just

to inspire the next generation of women

get this opportunity out of nowhere.”

who want to coach football.

She met Panthers' Head Coach Ron

“I’ve had people come up to me or

Rivera there, and the relationship

Others noticed Jennifer as well.

between the downtown Charlotte

She coached at JWU until a startup

message me saying that their little girl

neighbors led to her hire as Carolina's

professional football league, the

wants to coach football or wants to play

first female coaching intern. She worked

Alliance of American Football (AAF),

football now,” Jennifer told WSOC-TV.

with the team's receivers during their

called. Jennifer left the success and

“How cool is that?” W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U | 2 5


SPRING EVENTS

Making an Impact: Guilford College’s Physics Reunion BY K AREN ALLEY

IN MARCH, ALUMNI, STUDENTS and

robotics, Biology and Physics and showing what machine

MARK YOUR CALENDARS

learning can do to help us solve all sorts of problems.” In anticipation of the

Physics Reunion, March 27-28, 2020

reunion, Guilford talked with William and Don about their thoughts on Physics, a liberal arts education and the Guilford experience.

professors associated with the Physics

GC: What do you feel is one of the things

Department will converge on campus

that makes Guilford College unique?

for the bi-annual Physics Reunion,

Don: For me, it’s the Quaker heritage.

which is a chance for students to

I believe Quakerism is a faith that

present their research and get a glimpse

focuses on the journey more than the

of how a degree or classes in physics can

destination. There’s a very strong

lead to a multitude of careers.

synergy in figuring out where I am in

It’s also an opportunity for alumni to

the universe as a physical being and

reconnect with colleagues and former

where I am in the universe as a spiritual

professors and learn about the impact of

being. Here at Guilford College I can

philanthropic support on the experience

honor that, with me and my students.

of current Guilford students.

William: One of the most important

“As a student at Guilford College, the

things I got out of my years at Guilford

physics reunions were one of the most

was the relationships and the focus on

important experiences I had, meeting

the human endeavor. You didn’t just

alumni and hearing about their work,”

take a class with a professor, you got to

says William Hahn ’08. “They were at

know them and work alongside them in

NASA, in labs at Chapel Hill, at national

research. It was extraordinary to have

labs doing medical physics -- changing

their faith in us that we would go out

the world in 100 different directions.”

and change the world.

At the reunion, William will give the 18th Sheridan A. Simon Distinguished Alumni Lecture, funded by the philanthropy of Sheridan’s family and friends. An Assistant Professor of Mathematics at Florida Atlantic University, William is founder and codirector of the Machine Perception and Cognitive Robotics Laboratory. “William is doing really exciting interdisciplinary work at FAU, and has created a very hands-on, interactive, student-centered research lab,” says Donald Smith, Associate Professor of Physics. “The reunion is the perfect opportunity for him to share with others his innovative way of bringing together 2 6 | W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U

R I G H T: D O N S M I T H , A S S O C I AT E P R O F E S S O R OF PHYSICS; BELOW: WILLIAM HAHN '08 AND O T H E R P H Y S I C S A L U M N I AT T E N D T H E 2 0 1 8 PHYSICS REUNION

GC: Why is Physics an integral part of a liberal arts education?

Don: There’s a long history of science and math being

part of the liberal arts. It’s all a part of figuring out who we are as human beings (humanities) and figuring out our part in the world (sciences).

William: One thing that really made an impression on me was in a Physics class the professor read a poem written by Richard Feynman, who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965. I realized these physicists I was studying were more than just two-dimensional scientists, they had all the passions and desires that I had. It really opened my eyes that there could be physicist humanitarians. I believe that in a nutshell is the goal of a liberal arts education, to help us learn to be well-rounded, thoughtful and compassionate human beings.


Astrophysicist and Quaker to Receive Honorary Degree AT COMMENCEMENT on May 16, Dame Susan Jocelyn Bell Burnell will add yet another credit to her achievements: honorary degree recipient from

P H O T O C O U R T E S Y O F R O YA L S O C I E T Y O F E D I N B U R G H

Guilford College. Born in Northern Ireland, she attended The Mount School, a Quaker girls’ boarding school in York, England, where she discovered an aptitude for physics. She graduated from the University of Glasgow with a Bachelor of Science in Natural Philosophy (Physics) and obtained a Ph.D from the University of Cambridge. While a postgraduate research student at Cambridge in 1967, Jocelyn co-discovered the first radio pulsars. This finding is credited as one of the most significant achievements of the

Empire for services to Astronomy and promoted to Dame Commander in 2007. Currently, Jocelyn is Chancellor of the University of Dundee, Visiting Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of Mansfield College. Since her time at The Mount School, Jocelyn has been an active Quaker and served as Clerk to the sessions of Britain Yearly Meeting. In 2013, she gave a lecture which was published in a book titled A Quaker Astronomer Reflects: Can a Scientist Also Be Religious?, where she addressed the merger of science and faith. Jocelyn lives out Guilford Core Values. In 2018, she was

20th century and was awarded the 1974 Nobel Prize in Physics.

awarded the Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental

In addition to multiple visiting professorships at renowned

Physics, and she decided to use the prize money to create

universities across the globe, Jocelyn has served as President of

the Bell Burnell Graduate Scholarship Fund to help female,

the Royal Astronomical Society and the Institute of Physics. In

minority and refugee students to become Physics researchers.

1999, she was appointed Commander of the Order of the British

Commencement will take place on Founders Lawn.

W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U | 2 7


COMMUNITY NOTES

We want your news Share your news with classmates and friends! Go to www.giving.guilford.edu to submit your community notes online through our Alumni Directory. Note: Community notes may appear in print or online. Please share information that is appropriate for all audiences. Roy Cuneo ’48 was recognized as a 2019 Honoree for Distinguished Service to the Union by New York State United Teachers for his participation in the 1970 teacher strike and for serving as Secretary of TAL from 1973 until 1985, when he retired from teaching.

’40s

Richard Arculin ’69 was recently recognized by the Chesapeake Sports Club in Virginia and inducted into the club’s Legends of Honor.

’60s

John Batchelor ’69 retired his restaurant critique column for the Greensboro News and Record after over 20 years. Linda Mercer ’69 and three Mary Hobbs friends, Patricia Davis Crenshaw ’69, Susan Hester ’71 and Brenda Smith ’71, visited New York City for a few days.

’70s

Tanya Feagins ’71 was installed as President of the Greensboro Airport Rotary Club.

Jay Terrell ’72, who taught at Southern Guilford High School for 30 years, is to have the new agricultural complex named after him. World B. Free ’76 is one of 12 individuals selected for the Small College Basketball Hall of Fame.

2 8 | W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U

Lisa Hayes ’80 has been named President of the Board of Directors for Executive Alliance, a statewide not-for-profit organization that promotes the advancement of women in professional and executive roles.

’80s

Robert Linville ’80 was named to the Guilford County Sports Hall of Fame. Darlene Joyner ’81 retired from her role as coach at Northwest Guilford after 33 years. Robert Katz ’83 joined commercial real estate services company Avison Young as a Principal focusing on office tenant and buyer representation and advisory services in the Washington Metro area and across the U.S. Jeffrey Schreiber ’88 joined FinanceIt, a Toronto-based financial technology firm,

as their U.S. Director of Risk Management. He also qualified and competed with Team USA Triathlon in the 2019 age-group world championship in long distance swim and bike in Pontevedra, Spain. Donna Newton ’89, Director of Workforce Initiatives at the Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro, received the Vision Award from Guilford Apprenticeship Partners.

’90s

David Hopkins ’91 was appointed CEO of the Urban League of Greater Hartford.

Elizabeth Voltz ’91 was named Chair of the Board of the North Carolina Triangle-area nonprofit housing development organization DHIC. Heidi Waddell ’91, former Guilford tennis and basketball standout, was profiled by The Boston Globe. She is

Jon Bostock '99

currently working as a teaching professional for the U.S. Tennis Association and was recently inducted into her high school athletics hall of fame. Michael Waddell ’91 was named the Chief Operations Officer for the 2022 Special Olympics USA Games, held in Orlando, Fla. Jeffrey Albright ’94 has been named to the 2019 class for the Eastern Randolph High School Hall of Fame. David Heggie ’98 will fill the role of Interim CEO/President of the YMCA of Greensboro during their search to identify a permanent CEO. Lori Khamala ’99 has been named the Director of Partnerships for Code the Dream. Lori will be helping to develop new partnerships and expand programming.

In February of this year, Jon and a colleague founded Truman’s, a revolutionary cleaning supply provider based in Lexington, Ky. Truman’s has grown exponentially since the company’s introduction, and Jon leads the company as CEO. Prior to launch, more than 10,000 people signed up to become the first to experience a new, more sustainable way to clean. Today, the company has fans across the globe. Truman’s was recognized by Fast Company as part of its “World Changing Ideas” Awards program and has been featured on Digital Trends Live, Inhabit.com, Forbes.com and Better Homes and Gardens, among others. Most recently, Truman’s announced a significant investment partnership with consumer products giant Henkel, the maker of brands like Dial, Purex and Snuggle. Keep an eye out for Truman’s!


Anna Lena Phillips Bell ’00 was appointed the Gilbert-Chappell Distinguished Poet for eastern North Carolina for 201921 by the NC Poetry Society.

’00s

Rebecca Gibian '13

The RBG Way: The Secrets of Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Success, Rebecca’s first book, was released in November. Offering wisdom from Justice Ginsburg based on comments she’s made on topics like women’s rights, overcoming hardship and creating lasting change, the book comes from a seasoned journalistic perspective. Rebecca is an international freelance journalist and author whose work focuses on issues affecting women and children, such as crises in education, reproductive rights and immigration. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post and ABC News, among others. In the book, the experiences of “RBG” are translated into life lessons we can all apply to our own lives. The RBG Way is available for purchase through Sky Horse Publishing.

Jimmy Lamour ’00 graduated from California University of Pennsylvania with a Master's Degree in Performance Enhancement and Injury Prevention. Colin Berry ’01 has been named the new Executive Director of the Human Society of Washington County. Molly Gochman ’01, an experiential artist, will create a 350-foot-long trail of red sand across a field at the SeattleTacoma International Airport. She hopes Red Sand Project: Border US-MX will inspire conversations about immigration and human trafficking. Bradley George ’02 is a Reporter and Host at WUSF, a public radio station in Tampa, Fla. Merritt Johnson ’02 has been selected for Women in IT Networking at The International Conference for High Performance Computing Networking, Storage, and Analysis to help build SCinet at SC Conference 2019. Merritt was selected for the wireless team. Christina Repoley ’02 joined the Forum for Theological Exploration as its new Director of Strategic Partnerships for organizations serving young adults. Erin Wamsley ’02, Furman University Assistant Professor of Psychology, received a grant from the National Science Foundation to research how

daydreaming might work to form long-term memories. Crystal Waitekus ’03 recently organized a Guilford alumni "Happy Hour" in Washington, DC. James Tatum '03, Peter Morscheck '00, Jenny Akman '01, Naz Urooj '03, James Norton '00 and Crystal met at Cantina Bambina in the new District Wharf area. Kenneth Gamble ’04 was hired as the new Town Manager of Denton, N.C. Robert Mallonee ’05 joins Alderson Broaddus University in West Virginia as the Battlers’ next Head Men’s Lacrosse Coach. Evan Welkin ’07 and his wife, Federica, are excited to build an ecovillage and folk school this year on their eco-tourism farm and bed-and-breakfast in central Italy. Emily Sullivan Burnett ’09 successfully defended her dissertation and earned her Ph.D in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from Clemson University.

Shaina Machlus ’09 released her first book, La Palabra Más Sexy es Sí, a Spanish-language guide to consent.

Matt Reid ’16 has accepted the position of Director of the Greensboro Youth Jazz Ensemble.

Casey Blake ’10 has been honored by the National Society of Newspaper Columnists with first place in column writing among publications with 50,000 circulation or less for two of her 2018 opinion pieces.

Stephanie Sides ’17 and Mason Morrison ’19 are engaged. Mason asked Stephanie, his Guilford College sweetheart, to join him in marriage during a Fourth of July parade in Faith, N.C.

’10s

Wendy Poteat ’10 joined nonprofit organization Say Yes Guilford as its new Chief Executive Officer. Tonya Baldwin ’11 published her debut book of poetry, Freedom: A Southern Girl’s Truth. Rebecca Sullivan ’11 and Suzanne Cole Sullivan were married on March 23 in Jackson, Miss. In attendance were Kieran Brackbill '12, Grace Sullivan '14, Chandler Zirkle '15 and Damian Romney '11. Jack Haymore ’15, CPA, has been promoted to Audit Supervisor at Cannon & Company, LLP. He has been with Cannon since 2015.

Maureen “Sunshine” Smith ’17 graduated from UNC Greensboro with her Master's in Applied Arts and Sciences. Holly Kozak ’18 is attending Wake Forest University Law School. Yasmain Rice ’18 has been promoted to Decedent Affairs Coordinator and has begun a Master's program at Wake Forest University Law School. Mitchell Stumpo ’19 signed a free-agent contract with Major League Baseball's Arizona Diamondbacks and headed west to start his professional baseball career. W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U | 2 9


IN MEMORIAM

REMEMBERING GUILFORDIANS These members of the Guilford College community died in the past year. A full list of obituaries is available on the Community Notes page at www.giving.guilford.edu.

Talmadge Neece ’44

Tom Evaul ’51

Doug Galyon ’53

A lifelong Quaker,

Tom, as a professor at

Doug’s long career in

Talmadge enrolled

American University

the textile industry

at Guilford College

and Temple University,

included positions

at 15. He was a Navy

was a widely

with Burlington

officer for a unit that

published and highly

Industries, Allied

included jazz great

regarded scholar in

Chemical and Guilford

John Coltrane, and he met Dr. Martin

his field of Health, Physical Education

Mills. He served on Greensboro City

Luther King Jr. and Nelson Mandela. He

and Recreation. He was a Guilford

Council and Guilford County Board

worked for the U.S. Weather Service and

College trustee and served as Alumni

of Commissioners as well as the N.C.

had a long insurance career. He also

Association President. He served in the

Department of Transportation Board,

helped found a Brooklyn, N.Y., school

Army in Korea and founded a newspaper

including as Chair. Greensboro’s multi-

for children with learning disabilities.

in his hometown of Merchantville, N.J.

modal transportation center was named

Talmadge died Jan. 31.

Tom died March 23.

in his honor. Doug died April 7.

Vivien Bauman For more than 30 years Vivien and her husband, Ed, were generous benefactors and active members of the Guilford community, despite not having matriculated at the College. Their gifts supported construction of Bauman Telecommunications Center in 1991 and the 2004 Founders Hall renovation. Founders’ front plaza and galleries also bear their names. Vivien died April 13.

Mary Kim '60 Hughlene and Bill Frank

A native of Korea, Mary learned about

Hughlene and Bill were two of Guilford’s most generous benefactors and Greensboro’s

Guilford through an

most engaged citizens for many years. They were members of Guilford’s Board of

international pen

Visitors for 15 years, benefactors at the President’s Club level and members of the

pal. She worked her

Bryan Series Legacy Society. In 2017, Bill and Hughlene were honored with the Spirit of Philanthropy Award. Hughlene and Bill died tragically in a fire in their home May 19.

way through school washing dishes, waiting tables and sewing dresses for faculty wives.

3 0 | W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U


She earned a Master’s in Statistics and Mathematics, became a higher education administrator, CFO for the Minnesota Department of Revenue and a global consultant. Mary died June 11.

James E. "Monk" Cummings '46 Monk was born in the Guilford College community and attended Guilford College until he joined the Merchant Marines in 1943. After World War II, he dairy farmed first in Orange County, and then Alamance County. In the early 1950s, he opened a Nationwide Insurance Agency in nearby Liberty. A resident of Friends Homes West, he died June 20 just shy of his

Claude Mourot Hoffman

95th birthday.

Claude taught French at Guilford for 34 years and developed the French summer

Lou Fike A collector of World

program in Paris. She was an extraordinary French chef who loved hosting dinner parties for her friends and family — the more the merrier. She traveled extensively and loved good music, theatre, opera and movies. Claude died May 14.

War II artifacts and a scholar of the English philosopher and political theorist

Barbara Blake

with several textile companies before

Herbert Spencer, Lou as

A biologist who

joining Renfro Corporation in Mt. Airy,

Associate Professor of Political Science

earned her Ph.D at

one of the leading global manufacturers

taught at Guilford from 1969-2002. He is

Yale University and

of socks. He became President and Chief

the most recent of at least 11 long-term

a Guilford parent,

Executive Officer and retired as Board

and/or retired faculty who have died in

Barbara was a long-

Chair. He served as a Guilford College

the last three years. Lou died July 19.

term benefactor and

trustee. Warren died Aug. 30.

supporter of Guilford, along with her husband, Tony. They established

Tommy Grayson '68

Tom, who was serving

the Anthony and Barbara Blake

Tommy was an All-

as Guilford County’s

Scholarship in gratitude for the

America baseball player

Chief District Court

experience of their daughter Eliza ’91.

at Guilford and also

Judge, was recognized

Barbara died Aug. 18.

played football

Tom Jarrell '85

for his excellence in

and basketball.

and Domestic Violence Court by Court

Warren C. Nichols '59

Triple-A level of the minor leagues before

Watch of North Carolina. He created the

Warren was a textile

embarking on a successful high school

first DWI Traffic Court in the state. As

executive when

coaching career in various sports in

a senior at Guilford he was president of

the industry was at

Guilford and Rockingham counties. He

the student body and spoke for the class

its height in North

was inducted to Guilford’s Athletic Hall

at Commencement. Tom died Aug. 3.

Carolina. He worked

of Fame. Tommy died Sept. 1.

Child Support Court

He reached the

W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U | 3 1


MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI & PARENT ENGAGEMENT

INTRODUCING THE ALUMNI & PARENTS VOLUNTEER PROGRAM IN OCTOBER , GUILFOR D COLLEGE launched a

prospective students in your area — or even other

volunteer program for our alumni, parents and friends

alumni. This is a great way to embrace Guilford for

of the College. I spent a lot of time talking with alumni,

those of you who don’t live locally. Finally, if you like to

parents, campus colleagues and students. I spoke to

volunteer from the comfort of your own home, you could

each of them about what Guilford means to them. Over

simply hand-write some notes to prospective students or

and over, I heard the same thing: Guilford College is so

parents about your experience here at Guilford.

special because of the relationships that are built here. —­creating networks that can help support students. Through the program, today’s students can work with our alumni to learn, grow and

You can learn more by visiting www.giving.guilford. edu/volunteer. There you’ll find more examples of

This new volunteer program simply builds on that

LEARN MORE

To begin your volunteer experience, visit www.giving.guilford.edu/volunteer

ways to get involved as well as an easy online form to begin your volunteer experience. Through The Guilford Edge, we’ve made a strong commitment to our

succeed during their time here at Guilford. But most importantly, it will impact their

students to help guide them through their time at Guilford

success after they leave the safety of Guilford’s grounds.

and prepare them for whatever comes next. But we can’t do

There are a lot of ways to participate. You can have a one-on-one conversation with a student in an “Informative Interview,” which may last 30 minutes to an hour. During this phone call, you could discuss your

it without your help — we need your advice, your expertise and your guidance to make this program a success. Through your support and with your help, we can truly make a difference in the lives of today’s students.

career path, answer questions a student may have about graduate school or help review their resume. Another way is to host an event for incoming or 3 2 | W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U

Betsy Seaton Director of Alumni & Parent Engagement


BY THE NUMBERS

In the 2018-19 Academic Year, Guilford College achieved:

83%

10,000 Pounds of food grown at the Guilford Farm

GRADUATES Employed

within a year of 2018 Commencement

20,000

Student service hours

1,411

3,482

Gifts raising more than

$6,600,000 627

Gifts raising more than

$213,000

on Day for Guilford alone

Donor funded scholarships awarded

292 5 GRADUATES at 2019 Commencement

Master's in Criminal Justice degrees awarded W W W. G U I L F O R D . E D U | 3 3


www.guilford.edu 5800 West Friendly Avenue Greensboro, NC 27410

SAVE THE DATE! DAY FOR GUILFORD April 1, 2020 One day each year, the wider Guilford College community comes together to rally campus spirit and celebrate philanthropic gifts to the College. Last year, Guilfordians raised over $213,000 on Day for Guilford, and this year, we will raise even more! There are three simple ways you can help: • Make a gift: We will be sharing giving links throughout the day on social media and through email. All gifts make a difference. • Post on social media: Tag Guilford College and Guilford College Alumni and use the hashtag #DFG2020. • Make a fundraising page: You can learn more about how to join our crowdfunding initiative at www.guilford.edu/dayforguilford.

We can’t wait to celebrate with you on April 1.

Go Quakers!

PHOTO BY JENNA SCHAD

Profile for Guilford College Magazine

Guilford College Magazine - December 2019