Issuu on Google+


CONTENTS

STAFF

Publisher | MARGO DUBOS Administrative Director | MARK KARCHER EDITORIAL Editor | KEVIN ALLMAN Managing Editor | KANDACE POWER GRAVES Political Editor | CLANCY DUBOS Arts & Entertainment Editor | WILL COVIELLO Special Sections Editor | MISSY WILKINSON Staff Writers | ALEX WOODWARD, CHARLES MALDONADO

Editorial Assistant | LAUREN LABORDE listingsedit@gambitweekly.com Contributing Writers

March 20, 2012 + Volume 33

+ Number 12

43

17

JEREMY ALFORD, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, RED COTTON, ALEJANDRO DE LOS RIOS, MEG FARRIS, KEN KORMAN, BRENDA MAITLAND, IAN MCNULTY, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS, DALT WONK Contributing Photographer | CHERYL GERBER

Intern | MEGAN PERRY PRODUCTION Production Director | DORA SISON Special Projects Designer SHERIE DELACROIX-ALFARO

Web & Classifieds Designer | MARIA BOUÉ Graphic Designers

LINDSAY WEISS, LYN BRANTLEY, BRITT BENOIT, MARK WAGUESPACK Pre-Press Coordinator | GEORGIA DODGE

DISPLAY ADVERTISING fax: 483-3159 | displayadv@gambitweekly.com Advertising Director | SANDY STEIN BRONDUM 483-3150 [sandys@gambitweekly.com] Advertising Administrator | MICHELE SLONSKI 483-3140 [micheles@gambitweekly.com] Advertising Coordinator | CHRISTIN JOHNSON 483-3138 [christinj@gambitweekly.com] Sales & Marketing Coordinator | BRANDIN DUBOS 483-3152 [brandind@gambitweekly.com] Senior Account Executive | JILL GIEGER 483-3131 [ jillg@gambitweekly.com] Account Executives JEFFREY PIZZO

483-3145 [jeffp@gambitweekly.com] LINDA LACHIN

Bullied to Death Baton Rouge lawmakers will soon take up an anti-bullying bill that’s fiercely opposed by conservative organizations .................17 Seven Things to Do This Week ..........5 My Darlin’ New Orleans, Old Algiers River Fest, KISS and more

ABBY SHEFFIELD

483-3141 [abbys@gambitweekly.com] AMY WENDEL

483-3146 [amyw@gambitweekly.com] MEGAN MICALE

483-3144 [meganm@gambitweekly.com] STACY GAUTREAU

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MARCH 27 > 2012

ON THE COVER

7 IN SEVEN

483-3142 [lindal@gambitweekly.com]

4

27

483-3143 [stacyg@gambitweekly.com ] MARKETING Marketing Director | JEANNE EXNICIOS FOSTER Interns | MADELINE NICKELS, LANA SAMAD CLASSIFIEDS 483-3100 | fax: 483-3153 classadv@gambitweekly.com Classified Advertising Director | SHERRY SNYDER 483-3122 [sherrys@gambitweekly.com] Senior Account Executive | CARRIE MICKEY-LACY 483-3121 [carriem@gambitweekly.com] BUSINESS Billing Inquiries 483-3135 Controller | GARY DIGIOVANNI Assistant Controller | MAUREEN TREGRE Credit Officer | MJ AVILES OPERATIONS & EVENTS Operations & Events Director | LAURA CARROLL Operations & Events Assistant | RACHEL BARRIOS

NEWS + VIEWS

News ................................................................7 The state legislature is mulling the creation of dozens of laws that would create new crimes in Louisiana Bouquets + Brickbats .............................7 Heroes and zeroes C’est What?..................................................7 Gambit’s Web poll Scuttlebutt................................................. 11 News in brief Commentary ............................................. 12 In support of House Bill 407 Jeremy Alford ........................................... 13 Gov. Bobby Jindal’s crackdown on dissident legislators may backfire on him

Clancy DuBos .......................................... 14 The education of Bobby Jindal Blake Pontchartrain.............................. 15 The New Orleans know-it-all History of the Final Four ....................24 New Orleans hosts the hoops playoff for the fifth time

EAT + DRINK

A + E News ................................................43 REVIEW: The Lion King Music ............................................................45 PREVIEW: Wolter Wierbos’ Bare Bones............................................47 Film................................................................49 REVIEW: The Hunger Games ................51 Art ..................................................................53 REVIEW: Tony Fitzpatrick and Michael Pajon ........................................58 Stage ............................................................57 REVIEW: The Light in the Piazza...........58 Events ..........................................................60 PREVIEW: My Darlin’ New Orleans .....60 Crossword + Sudoku ...........................70

SHOPPING + STYLE

CLASSIFIEDS

Review .........................................................33 Sal’s Seafood Fork + Center ..........................................33 All the news that’s fit to eat 5 in Five ......................................................35 Five spots for boudin balls 3-Course Interview ..............................35 Horst Pfeifer of Middendorf’s What’s in Store........................................32 Gott Gourmet

ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

Big Easy Music Awards ......................27 This year’s nominees for the best in local music GAMBIT COMMUNICATIONS, INC. Chairman | CLANCY DUBOS + President & CEO | MARGO DUBOS

COVER DESIGN BY Dora

Sison

Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. (504) 486-5900. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2012 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.

EASTER

We treat all foot conditions including: Ingrown Toenails Ankle Sprains Corns & Callus Removal Bunions • Fungus Hammertoes Diabetic Foot Care Dr. Maria Markiewicz, DPM Dr. Leon T. Watkins, DPW, FACFAS Heel Pain • Injuries Dr. D. Elaine Fulmer, DPM Arch Problems

8131 Hampson St. 866-9666 @ The Riverbend

Mon-Sat 10-6 Thurs til 8pm

2520 HARVARD AVE., SUITE 2B METAIRIE, LA 70001 • 504-454-3004 www.gulfsouthfootandankle.com

Weekend Appointments & House Calls Available

Market Place ............................................63 Employment..............................................64 Mind + Body + Spirit........................... 65 Weekly Tails ..............................................65 Real Estate ................................................66 Northshore Properties ........................71

LILY ARRANGEMENTS & CENTERPIECES

815 FOCIS STREET [OFF VETERANS ]

837-6400


i

DELI-STYLE

LUNCH SERVICE TUES-SAT 11AM-2PM OUR MENU CHANGES DAILY BASED ON THE AVAILABILITY OF FRESH INGREDIENTS

TO GO ORDERS 522-8880

SIGNATURE FAVORITES

Deep Fried Shrimp Po-Boy Seasoned shrimp battered and fried and piled on 8” buttered french bread.

Chicken and Andouille Gumbo Pan-braised chicken, Chef Paul’s own andouille sausage made in chef’s meat plant in Melville, LA. w/ fresh vegetables, cooked in a chicken stock and dark roux. Served with rice.

Pecan Crusted Flounder Salad Fresh flounder fillet seasoned, covered w/ olive oil and chopped pecans then baked. Served on a bed of mixed greens w/ caper dill dressing.

join the jefferson Parish sheriff’s office

Looking for work?

D I N N E R M O N - S AT 5 : 3 0 - 1 0 P M

416 CHARTRES STREET

positions AvAilAble immediAtely • 504-376-2333 • www.jpsojobs.com

5 9 6 - 2 5 3 0 W W W. K PAU L S . C O M

FREE MARTINI Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

safety . stability. answer the call.

Want full benefits for you and your family? Ready to help keep our community safe? Apply to be a 911 Dispatcher or Correctional Officer with Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office

W E TA K E R E S E R VAT I O N S

6

community.

Gambit readers have graciously voted The Bombay Club as having the best martini in the city 8 times - including once again in 2011.

We would like to give back to you for your kindness. "Like" us on Facebook & "Check In" when you arrive at the restaurant to receive the deal that is on our Facebook page.

Show your server that you have checked in & you will receive (1) FREE MARTINI OF YOUR CHOICE. Valid 4 pm - til • 7 days a week. Only (1) free martini per table & (1) free martini per party at the bar. Offer expires March 31, 2012.

830 conti st. (in the prince conti hotel) french quarter • 504.586.0972 • 800.699.7711 www.thebombayclub.com

live entertainment & dinner 7 nights a week

Our Family Protecting Your Family. Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office


newS

viewS

+

BouquetS + brickbats ™

S C U T T L E B U T T 10 C O M M E N TA R Y 12 J E R E M Y A L F O R D 13 C L A N CY D U B O S 14 B L A K E P O N TC H A R T R A I N 15

knowledge is power

Crime & Reason Many lawmakers have made a name out of being tough on crime, but how many are smart on crime?

Ralph Romaguera Sr.,

a Metairie photographer, has won the International Photographic Council’s (IPC) 2012 Professional Photographer Leadership Award. Romaguera, who has been working as a photographer in the New Orleans area since the early 1970s and who currently serves as vice president of the Professional Photographers of America, will be honored in New York in May at an IPC luncheon at the United Nations.

Jean Knight,

the New Orleans R&B singer best known for her hit single “Mr. Big Stuff,” will be in-ducted into Tipitina’s Walk of Fame at a ceremony outside the club next month. Tip’s is holding its annual Instruments A Comin concert April 30 to raise money to buy musical instruments for schoolchildren, and Knight will join other local musicians who have been honored with a lighted sidewalk medallion for her contribution to the New Orleans sound.

By JEREMY ALFORD

A

Remi Braden,

his convenience store in Forest Hill earlier this year. State Sen. J.P. George Steimel, lobbyist for the Morrell says his bills Louisiana Association of Crimito stiffen mandatory nal Defense Lawyers, said there sentences for heroin already are laws on the books dealers is ‘literally that are sufficient when it comes about life and death.’ to certain crimes, such as theft. “The cost of operating our criminal justice system is a big issue, as it should be,” he said. “And I think, from the district judges to the public defenders to the district attorneys to Department of Corrections, everyone is trying to be more efficient. But whenever you start creating new laws, it slows down the process. Basically, it costs more money.” Leger has some ideas on how to improve the system — but he’s willing to wager that his colleagues don’t have the political will to approve them. Even now, in the first year of this new term (traditionally the easiest time to pass a controversial bill), criminal justice reform is an uphill battle. Just consider Leger’s House page 8

c’est What effect do you think the New Orleans Saints bounty scandal will have on this year’s football season?

?

the spokeswoman for the New Orleans Police Department, will be reimbursing the city for use of a take-home vehicle she was not authorized to drive. The incident came to light after a report aired on WVUE-TV about Braden getting into a minor collision in February. New Orleans Inspector General Ed Quatrevaux released a report in early March saying violations of the city’s take-home vehicle policy, long a problem in New Orleans, continue to be a headache.

Sean Payton

was suspended for one year without pay by the NFL for his role in the New Orleans Saints bounty scandal. The NFL’s investigation found the Saints head coach conspired with Saints assistant coaches to hide the scandal, lied about it to investigators and took no action to end the bounties, even after the league was looking into the matter. New Orleans will be forever grateful to Payton the coach, but last week brought disgrace to Payton the man.

Vote on “C’est What?” at www.bestofneworleans.com

38%

Not much

35%

Some

27%

A lot

tHiS weeK’S question:

How’s this year’s allergy season working out for you?

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

t 33, state Rep. Walt Leger sticks out at most legislative gatherings as the youngster in the room. But in political dog years — experience gleaned from a stint as a former assistant district attorney for Orleans Parish, four years as a lawmaker and now as speaker pro tem of the House — he’s much older than he looks. Experience has taught him quite a few lessons about crime and lawmaking. “You’ll never be attacked when running for re-election if you file bills requiring new sentences or mandatory minimums,” said Leger, D-New Orleans. Being tough on crime is among the easiest policy decisions a lawmaker can make, in fact. All it takes is a piece of legislation, which staffers can draw up in a heartbeat. But being smart on crime — well, that’s another situation altogether. Prosecutors complain that their budgets are stretched thin because defendants, now more than ever, are going to trial. Jury trials are expensive, but they are every defendant’s right in felony cases. Judges and district attorneys argue that their hands are tied. State and local governments have to come up with the money to keep the criminal justice system humming. Defense attorneys, meanwhile, have to keep up with new crimes that are constantly created by the Legislature. Prison officials contend they need more space as offenders get slapped with mandatory minimum sentences and harsher penalties — all the result of “tough on crime” lawmakers. According to the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank, an avalanche of anti-crime policies has led to a problem known as “overcriminalization.” The definition is a doozy: “the promiscuous use of the criminal law to remedy numerous perceived social ills by relegating them to the principal government actors in the criminal justice system (police, prosecutors, defense counsel, judges and jailers) in order to regulate through criminalization.” It’s not a new trend. Back in 2001 and 2002, all of Louisiana’s criminal justice stakeholders spent considerable time poring through the criminal code, section by section. The end result was a legislative reform package that repealed many of Louisiana’s mandatory minimum sentences and reshaped crime categories — but only those for nonviolent offenses. Since then, lawmakers have just about come full circle. “The legislation just keeps coming back,” says Pete Adams, executive director of the Louisiana District Attorneys Association. “The way the process goes is somebody has a horrific situation or they know a victim and the offender doesn’t get a stiff enough jail sentence. So they file a bill creating a new crime or harsher sentences thinking it’s going to stop.” It doesn’t. This year there are roughly 150 bills related to crime, of which 20 create new crimes. Rep. Lance Harris, R-Alexandria, filed House Bill 48 to create “the crime of theft of copper and other metals.” Why can’t it just be considered plain old theft? In Harris’ case, maybe it has something to do with the thieves who trashed

heroes + zeroes

7


news + views

TEACHER FAIR MARCH 31, 2012

LAFAYETTE ACADEMY CHARTER SCHOOL • 9AM-1:30PM 2727 S. Carrollton Avenue at Walmsley and Carrollton RSVP to Stacey Clark at (504) 861-0951 by March 26th Winner of the MetLife/National Association of Secondary School Principals Breakthrough Schools Award

Esperanza Charter School

Lafayette Academy Charter School

McDonogh 42 Elementary Charter School

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

Choice Foundation has a new charter school for the 2012-2013 school year.

8

Come Savor all the

Elements of Spring

AWAR D WIN N IN G “ S E C R E T C HE F ” ER I C LA B OU CHI ER E UN F O L D S HIS N E W S E A S ON A L CU ISIN E

ENJOY BRUNCH IN THE OPEN AIR

SATURDAY & SUNDAY 11AM-2:30PM IN NEW ORLEANS FAVORITE COURTYARD

891-8495 · WWW.MARTINIQUEBISTRO.COM FRIDAY LUNCH • SAT & SUN BRUNCH • TUES-SUN DINNER

page 7

Bill 104, which removes simple possession from the list of offenses that can be applied to Louisiana’s habitual offender law. while working in the district attorney’s office, Leger said drug cases were an everyday task and he often saw men and women draw a 20-year sentence for “one small crack of rock” because it was their fourth drug offense. A single 20-year stint costs taxpayers roughly $600,000, he added. And what was the end result? “The only thing accomplished is you get someone with a drug addiction off the street,” Leger said. On the flip side, the crime package being pushed by Gov. Bobby Jindal will get only cursory glances from lawmakers before they dutifully approve it. As he has done every year, Jindal is targeting sex offenders. it’s an issue he has bragged about on the national stage. (Jindal loves to boast that he has made sex offenders unwelcome in Louisiana — as if any other state welcomes them with open arms.) But it’s also an issue that has ended up in the courts. Last year, Jindal pushed a law banning sex offenders from websites such as Facebook. A federal judge ruled it unconstitutional. Now Jindal’s back with a similar bill, plus another to ban sex offenders from libraries. New York recently passed a similar bill, but an appeals court struck it down. sometimes lawmakers have good reasons for wanting to drop the proverbial hammer. As chairman of the senate Judiciary B Committee, sen. J.P. Morrell, D-New Orleans, will hear many tough-on-crime bills. A few, like senate Bills 66 and 67, are his. Those bills increase the mandatory sentences for distribution and possession of heroin. “i targeted heroin in particular because in parts of my district, like st. Bernard, there have been a disproportionate number of deaths,” he said. “Over the past year there have been 80 overdoses and 12 deaths, of which six were heroin-related. what that tells me is a lack of deterrence is leading to deaths.” He added that criminals pay attention to the law — and they know the cost of breaking it. “some of the most well-versed people on the criminal code are drug dealers,” Morrell says. “when i was fresh out of law school and working as a public defender, they could do a cost analysis of what they did and then tell me how the court would interpret the law.” Rep. Joseph Lopinto, R-Metairie, chairman of the House Criminal Justice Committee, says judges need more leeway in handing down sentences. “To add some balance, we’re going to try this year to give judges as much discretion as possible,” he says. “some offenses should have harsher penalties than others, and the hammer should be slammed down, but we don’t need to do it every single time. in my opinion, we already have too many laws on the books.” Adams, who represents Louisiana’s district attorneys, says keeping up with the ever-changing face of criminal justice in Louisiana can sometimes be like “drinking water from a fire hydrant.” As an alternative to mandatory minimums, he expects legislation this year that would allow DAs to pursue lesser sentences, except in cases involving murder and rape. while Adams likes the idea (it was recommended by the Louisiana sentencing Commission as a way to reduce the state’s prison population), Jindal’s administration has voiced concerns. As it stands now, the Bayou state leads the nation in incarceration rates. According to the Pew Center for states, one in 55 Louisianians is behind bars. The courts don’t fare any better, especially as criminal cases battle with civil dockets for attention. Clogged dockets make judges look bad, but often they can only do so much to speed things along — especially if defendants opt for jury trials, which not only cost more but also take longer than bench˛trials. in an effort to target violent gun offenders, Mayor Mitch Landrieu has encouraged judges to use their discretion by setting higher cash bonds for charges relating to illegal possession of a firearm. “Gun offenders are a significant threat to the community. As a condition of bonded release, defendants facing gun charges should be required by the court to pay for electronic monitoring so the NOPD can watch and restrict their movements,” Landrieu wrote in a recent letter to judges. Morrell says the mayor is pushing new penalties for first-time possession, but it may not be enough. “All of these things sound good on paper, but i don’t know if it’s politically viable. it’s like trying to ban assault weapons,” he says. “People are tired of all the saber rattling. we should hang our hopes on ideas that can make it through the legislative˛process.” Morrell says he has more confidence in proposed laws that address juvenile crimes, or those that crack down on offenders who use juveniles as mules and shields. “The most violent offenders out there usually cut their


+ news  views

teeth as violent juveniles,” he says.     steimel, who lobbies for defense lawyers, says reforms to the public defender system would go a long way toward improving efficiency — not just  in New Orleans, but statewide. “The whole system is facing a fiscal crisis,  and policymakers need to resolve this,” he says.      in New Orleans, the public defender’s office has suffered severe cuts over  the past year and has lost 21 attorneys. sen. Karen Carter Peterson, D-New  Orleans, who was among several dozen high-profile attorneys appointed to  pick up the slack by Criminal Court Judge Arthur Hunter — has filed senate  Bill 434 to direct more resources to the battered local office.     Then there are the Hail Mary passes. House Bill 758 by Rep. Austin  Badon, D-New Orleans, would authorize the governor to call out the National Guard to help protect his hometown. He calls it a “short-term solution  until the violence is under control and new recruits are able to plug the  13 percent gap in our police force.” Badon, a candidate in last saturday’s  primary for an at-large seat on the New Orleans City Council, announced his  intention to sponsor the bill to bring in the National Guard around the time he  announced his candidacy for the council.     For lawmakers like Leger, it’s another chapter in the never-ending struggle  to make bad people act good. But it’s also a debate that’s difficult to balance,  especially given today’s political climate. “There’s a real education gap here,”  Leger said. “Once people do learn about how the system works, they realize  there are other methods. But for many representatives and senators, they just  want to appear tough on crime and pro-law enforcement. That’s just the way  things are.”  Jeremy Alford is a freelance journalist in Baton Rouge. His website is www. jeremyalford.com. Follow him on Twitter at @alfordwrites.

ease into allen allen

wood white black sea

clothes + accessories 7732 maple 865 . mon - sat 10-6

9625

Creating Crimes This year, like most years, has seen a rash of bills up for consideration by state lawmakers that would create new crimes — and stiff penalties. Here’s a sample:

ALLERGY SEASON TRIPPING YOU UP? SOLUTION: INTERIOR TRACK. Spring brings several new challenges to stall your fitness regime. With its beautiful natural light overlooking our basketball court, the NOAC’s track is a great jogging venue. So come join us for a jog, and do a couple extra laps to keep on focused.

Everything you want and more at the NOAC. For more on what we offer, call 525-2375 or visit us at 222 N. Rampart today. Free Parking.

www.neworleansathleticclub.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

   • HB48: Creates the crime of theft of copper and other metals  • HB63: Creates the crime of reckless discharge of a firearm on a  school campus  • HB70: Creates the crime of unlawful presence or contact of a =  sex offender relative to a former victim  • HB96: Creates the crime of online impersonation  • HB204: Creates the crime of reckless discharge of a firearm in a  residential area  • HB231: Prohibits the sale of dogs or cats at certain public locations  • HB600: Creates the crime of failure to report a missing or   deceased child  • HB616: Creates the crime of filing a false lien against a court or law  enforcement officer  • HB759: Creates the crime of female genital mutilation  • SB59: Creates the crime of utilizing or permitting the presence of a  juvenile in drug trafficking • SB74: Creates the crime of failure to report that a child is dead   or missing • SB121: Creates the crimes of domestic abuse assault, domestic  abuse aggravated assault, and domestic violence • SB199: Creates the crime of illegal transmission of monetary funds • SB243: Creates the crime of failure to report certain felonies • SB254: Creates the crime of aggravated domestic abuse battery • SB330: Criminalizes the act of performing an abortion where the abortionist is not a licensed physician • SB428: Creates the crime of unlawful presence or contact of a sex  offender relative to a former victim

9


scuttlebutt Quotes of the Week

Keratoconjunctivitis

We treat dry eyes in a blink.

    “Hubris is a very dangerous  thing, and the pride and arrogance  that apparently emanated from the  head coach through the ranks is  now showing to be very costly. I’m  not sure the penalties would have  been more severe if Sean Payton  had bet on football.” — WWLTV sportscaster emeritus Jim Henderson, reacting to the news that the New Orleans Saints head coach had been suspended from the NFL for one year without pay for his role in the bounty scandal     “Tough day. Respect NFL’s  decision. Support our coach &  look forward to his return. We have  overcome before & will overcome  again. #whodat” — Mayor Mitch Landrieu, (@MayorLandrieu) reacting to Payton’s punishment on Twitter

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

Answering in Kind

10

The Doctors of Optometry at St. Charles Vision are experts in the treatment of Keratoconjunctivitis, a condition that results in dry, irritated eyes. And we treat you quickly, offering same-day appointments for patients suffering discomfort. Avoid the hassles of hospitals, waiting rooms and parking garages. Come to St. Charles Vision, where there’s not a dry eye in the house. UPTOWN | ELMWOOD | SEVERN | MANDEVILLE | WESTBANK | CHATEAU www.stcharlesvision.com

TRAFFIC TICKETS ALCOHOL-RELATED OFFENSES EXPUNGEMENTS

4223 MAGAZINE ST. CLOTHING

apparel shoes jewelry

872-9230 | Free Parking Mon-Sat 10-6 | Sun 12-5

facebook.com/ryeclothing

ANN R. BAEHR

CHEESE IS NOT A VICE.

3900 Veterans Blvd, Ste 300 • Metairie, LA 70002

5004 prytania st • 899-4737 www.stjamescheese.com

I can help to Prevent Increased Insurance Premiums, Protect Your Driving & Criminal Record, Affordable Fees.

ATTORNEY AT LAW

(504) 835-9248 (EXCLUDING

COSTS)

FANNING SLAPS BACK AT PERRICONE     Local criminal defense attorneys  were among the favorite online  targets of former Assistant U.S.  Attorney Sal Perricone, who  posted anonymous rants at nola. com under the moniker Henry L.  Mencken1951 and several other  noms de plume. Last week, one of  them decided to answer Perricone  in kind — but not anonymously.     Pat Fanning, a former prosecutor who years ago began a criminal  defense practice, sent a letter to  Deputy Attorney General James Cole and included a copy of one of  Perricone’s posts in which he refers to Fanning as “an idiot and an  ***hole.” Fanning notes in the letter  (a copy of which he gave to Gambit)  that he considered suing Perricone  for defamation but decided against  it because, “while I was able to  find a friend or two willing to testify  that I am not an idiot, I couldn’t find  anyone, not even my wife, to say  that I am not an ***hole.”     Fanning goes on to recount that  he was once prosecuted by the  feds and acquitted — a fact that  Perricone noted in one of his  anonymous posts. In that post,  Perricone says that “if it wasn’t for  incompetent prosecutors” Fanning would have been convicted.  That’s a tad ironic (and typical of  Perricone it seems) — because  it was Cole, the now-deputy attorney general, who prosecuted  Fanning in that case. Fanning  wryly asserts in his letter to Cole  that the reason the government  failed to convict him was because it had a bad case, not bad  lawyers.     On that note, Fanning closed 


news + views with a tongue-in-cheek (or not) request of Cole: “i ask that Mr. Perricone be allowed to continue in his employment at the Department of Justice. in fact, i ask that, if at all possible, he be assigned to prosecute all of my clients. This episode tells us that he is not very bright and he has now managed to alienate every judge in the eastern District of Louisiana. i would be happy to close out my career trying all of my remaining cases against him.” Unlike Perricone, Fanning signed his real name to the letter. — CLanCy DUBos

The Jefferson scandal

Makin’ Grocery stores GROUNDBREAKING IN MID-CITY steam shovels provided the backdrop for last week’s groundbreaking for the new winn-Dixie shopping complex at south Carrollton avenue and st. Louis street in Mid-City. The lot — site of a former Bohn car dealership — has sat fallow since Hurricane Katrina and the federal floods. Mayor Mitch Landrieu, District a City Councilwoman Susan Guidry (above right) and representatives of the supermarket chain and developer stirling Properties were on hand for the ceremony. “Though the lot was not technically blighted,” Guidry told the crowd, “it was a blight to our souls.” “we’re not building the city the way it was; we’re building the city the way we want it to be,” Landrieu said, adding that the shopping complex is expected to provide 365 permanent jobs in the market and in the satellite businesses, which now include office Depot, neighborhood Pet Market by Jefferson Feed, Felipe’s Taqueria, Five Guys Burgers and Fries, Pei wei asian Diner and the frozen yogurt chain Pinkberry, “which i am really pumped up about,” Landrieu added. (Hizzoner can be spotted at the Magazine street location fairly regularly.) Guidry referred to the complex as “a premier shopping as well as recreational area,” making reference to the Lafitte Corridor, the 3.1- mile greenway that will eventually run through Mid-City to the French Quarter. in December, the city agreed to let the supermarket build a one-way car crossing on st. Louis street connecting the main parking lot with a smaller satellite lot, which will cut across the greenway — a move opposed by the group Friends of the Lafitte Corridor (FoLC). Before the shovel-turning, Landrieu made oblique reference to the

811 Conti St. • 504-523-8619

Monday-Sunday 10am-6am erinrosebar.com

“Since 1969”

contretemps, thanking FoLC “for taking what could have been a very big conflict.” The market and its attendant businesses are scheduled to open in early 2013. according to stirling Properties, 80 percent of the retail space has been leased. Construction on the greenway has not yet begun. — Kevin aLLMan

Mitt, Bath and Beyond GOP CANDIDATES BARNSTORM LOUISIANA Though two independent polls showed former Pennsylvania sen. Rick Santorum far ahead of former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney in the days leading up to the March 24 GoP presidential primary, no candidate was conceding ground in Louisiana. on March 23, santorum spoke at a ouachita Parish rally; U.s. rep. Ron Paul, r-Texas, held a town hall in Pineville; and former speaker of the House Newt Gingrich stumped in Port Fouchon. Meanwhile, romney had an afternoon engagement in shreveport, but first he held his own rally in Metairie — in a meeting room at Clearview Mall. The Clearview rooms are two modest meeting spaces that normally host small baby and bridal shows, not rallies for the presumptive republican candidate for president of the United states. according to the mall, the Clearview rooms comprise more than 3,000 square feet when combined, can accommodate up to 300 people and provide direct access to the food court. romney has been endorsed by several Louisiana politicos, including Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne, agriculture and Forestry Commissioner Mike Strain, U.s. rep. Rodney Alexander of Quitman, Jefferson Parish President John Young and Jefferson Parish assessor Tom Capella. Gov. Bobby Jindal, who came out early and enthusiastically for Texas Gov. Rick Perry, has said he will make no endorsement until a republican nominee is chosen. — Kevin aLLMan

COUPON

all blooming plants in stock

25

%

OFF

EXPIRES 4/27/12

CASH & CARRY ONLY NOT VALID W/ ANY OTHER COUPONS. COUPON MUST BE PRESENT AT TIME OF PURCHASE.

COVINGTON 1415 N. HWY 190 (985) 809-9101

METAIRIE 750 MARTIN BEHRMAN AVE

(504) 833-3716 VISIT US ON

WWW.VILLERESFLORIST.COM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

WHITMER PLEADING SHEDS NEW LIGHT Former Jefferson Parish Chief administrative officer Tim Whitmer pleaded guilty last Thursday, March 22, to one federal count of misprision, or concealment, of a felony. whitmer has agreed to cooperate with federal prosecutors in the ongoing case against whitmer’s ex-boss, former Jefferson Parish President Aaron Broussard, in exchange for the reduced charge. as part of his plea deal, whitmer will not face any additional charges related to the Broussard case. others are implicated in the widening federal inquiry into Jefferson Parish government. Broussard’s lone remaining co-defendant is former Parish attorney Tom Wilkinson. However, the factual basis that was introduced as part of whitmer’s plea refers to “one other high-ranking Jefferson Parish official” who allegedly knew about and helped hatch the scheme in october 2003 to give Broussard’s then-future wife, Karen Parker, a job for which she was not qualified. Broussard and Parker married in May 2004. Parker has already pleaded guilty to misprision and is cooperating with the feds. in return for arranging for Parker’s position — at a higher rate of pay — and for subsequently giving Parker several raises, prosecutors allege that Broussard raised wilkinson’s salary several times. asked why his client didn’t report the alleged conspiracy to authorities, whitmer’s attorney, Pat Fanning, said whitmer was trying to keep his own job. “The guy had 25 years in parish government. He was working toward retirement, so what are you going to do?” Fanning said. “He made a bad decision.” Fanning also took time in court to tell U.s. District Judge Mary Ann Vial Lemmon that the recent revelations about former assistant U.s. attorney Sal Perricone did not affect whitmer’s decision to plead guilty. Fanning noted in court and afterwards that his client would have had a very difficult time showing a connection to his own decision to plead guilty and Perricone’s anonymous online rants, several of which disparaged whitmer. after his

plea was accepted, whitmer shook hands with federal prosecutors. Broussard (who recently was diagnosed with cancer) and wilkinson have both pleaded not guilty to 38 counts of conspiracy, fraud and theft of programs receiving federal funding. in a press conference after the hearing, U.s. attorney Jim Letten would not name the other parish official implicated in the factual basis, but a state legislative auditor’s report in 2010 identified the official as former Parish President Tim Coulon. Letten also declined to shed light on another detail in the factual basis, which stated that Broussard “directed whitmer to do whatever he could to steer Jefferson Parish business” to a contractor referred to as “Company a,” which had paid roughly $40,000 in consulting fees to Broussard. whitmer faces up to three years in prison for the misprision charge. sentencing is set for June 28, though it is likely to be postponed as whitmer cooperates with prosecutors. — CHarLes MaLDonaDo

11


commentary

Antiques & Interiors

wholesale to the public.

over 15,000 square feet of european antiques.

& decorators alike 300 Jefferson Highway(A cr oss fr om Lowe’s) New Orleans 504.231.3397 www.dopantiques.com

Raphael Academy Educating students with Asperger’s, Autism Spectrum Disorder, & other Intellectual Disabilities

Become a

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

Mentor!

12

Enrolling Now

grades 6 through 12 for the 2012-13 school year!

Open House

NEXT SESSION: MARCH 31ST

Saturday, March 31st 2:00 to 4:00 pm 517 Soraparu Street

SPRING & SUMMER

Visit our website at www.raphaelacademy.org or call 504-598-3227 for more information on the following:

Spring 2012 After School Program

mentor training sessions

504.896.9979 eachonesaveone.org

2012 Summer Camp Raphael Academy admits students of any race,color,creed, & national or ethic origin.

URGENT CARE • NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

SChOOL, SPORTS & CAMP PhYSICALS

Doctors Express is open 7 days a week. We treat adults and children for everything from coughs and colds to fractures and sprains.

Mon-Fri: 8AM-8PM Sat & Sun: 8AM-5PM www.DoctorsExpressMetairie.com

3348 W. Esplanade Ave., Suite A, Metairie, LA 70002

504-315-7788

thinking out loud

the Price of Bullying n the 2011 legislative session, Louisiana lawmakers defeated State Rep. Austin Badon’s anti-bullying bill after heavy pushback from religious conservatives. The Rev. Gene Mills — president of the powerful “family values” group Louisiana Family Forum — referred to it as the “Homosexual Bullying Bill,” and John Yeats of the Louisiana Southern Baptist Convention said, “Homosexual activists are hijacking the bullying statutes to promote homosexuality.” Ridiculous, any way you look at it. Last year’s bill, like this year’s House Bill 407, the proposed 2012 Louisiana School Bullying Prevention Act, didn’t single out gay and lesbian youth. Rather, it protected all children from bullying — including children of Southern Baptists and religious fundamentalists. It gave no one special privileges; it simply put all students on equal footing when it came to having the right to attend school without being verbally or physically harassed or attacked. It’s not as if bullies just pick on kids they perceive to be gay. They also target the new kid, the overweight kid, the kid with a learning disability, the kid who developed faster or slower than his or her peers, the kid who wears glasses, the kid who wears the “wrong” clothes — or any kid who is unlucky enough to catch a bully’s eye for any reason. Like Tesa Middlebrook. On March 2, Middlebrook, a senior at Pointe Coupee Central High School, walked onto the school’s athletic field and hanged herself from the bleachers. Middlebrook was a transfer student from Nebraska who had good grades, an affinity for the arts and few friends in her new home. She was also the victim of repeated bullying at the school, her family says. Then there was 14-year-old Savannah Robinson of Slidell, who killed herself in August 2011 after what her family said was relentless bullying at school. After Robinson’s story was shared by Anderson Cooper on his CNN program AC360, her grandmother wrote to Cooper, “I am very grateful that you have taken a stand on the issue of bullying in school because her story never reached the local media here in Louisiana. I have lost my granddaughter to this terrible demon that society cannot seem to erase.” HB 407, by Rep. Pat Smith, D-Baton Rouge, comes too late to save those girls’ lives, but it will give their schools — all schools — a mechanism to address future bullying, just as the law gives police a framework to address adult forms of harassment. The passage of HB 407 will take away no one’s rights to his or her opinions on any matter. What it will do is codify the right of children to attend school without being verbally or physically threatened or attacked. HB 407

also does not set forth punishments or disciplinary actions, leaving that to local schools and school districts. The watchdog organization Bully Police, which scores states based on their anti-bullying laws, gives Louisiana a C. Texas — hardly a bastion of liberalism — got an A from the group for its 2011 overhaul of its bullying laws. Texas law now recognizes cyberbullying and includes a program to transfer bullied students to other campuses. It also provides intervention and prevention programs aimed at youth suicide. It’s a good model for Louisiana to emulate, and passage of HB 407 would get us much closer to that goal. When HIV and AIDS became news in the 1980s, many Americans rightly decided that frank discussion about condoms and safe sex practices could save lives. Back then, some objected on grounds of self-styled morality, or because the topic was just too uncom-

Passage of HB 407 will take away no one’s rights to his or her opinions on any matter. fortable for them. It’s much the same today with laws about school bullying. We need to be able to talk about this “terrible demon” honestly — and do something about it. In a March 20 speech in Arlington, Texas, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said, “We have an obligation to protect young people who are targeted just because they’re perceived as ‘different’ — and to make sure they know that … those who have been targeted by their classmates are not alone.” Holder added, “No one deserves to be bullied, harassed, or victimized because of who they are, how they worship, or who they love.” How that simple restatement of the Golden Rule could be so abhorrent to some who portray themselves as devotees of Christianity and “family values” is baffling. The Louisiana Association of Educators, the Louisiana School Counselors Association, the National Association of Social Workers and the National Alliance on Mental Illness-Louisiana, among many other groups, have all urged passage of HB 407. We add our voice to that chorus, and we urge lawmakers to have the moral courage to pass it.


jeremy alford

STEP INTO FASHION AT THE TENNIS SHOP.

reporting from red stick

CindaB • The Buckhead Betties Ascot • Court Couture • Lija • Nike

jindal the Liberator? By treating dissident lawmakers harshly, Gov. Bobby Jindal is actually freeing them to question his policies.

A

be accessed. “I don’t want the law to be too tight,” he said, adding, “I think there are a lot of public records that need to be opened up. I do believe there are some things that could be brought out for the public that would help us deliberate on the budget.” richard also is pushing House Bill 328, which outlines a plan for trimming government consulting contracts. The plan, first floated by state Treasurer John Kennedy as a member of the now-defunct Commission on Streamlining Government, calls for a 10 percent reduction in professional, personal, consulting and social services contracts under the jurisdiction of the division of administration’s office of Contractual review. Kennedy and richard fought for that idea last year without success. richard said he expects the treasurer to testify on its behalf this year. Kennedy also is backing richard’s

‘It’s hard to describe the intimidation the governor tries to exert on the Legislature.’

uptown

5918 Magazine St.

(near transcontinental) 504.457.4401

(between Eleanore & State) 504.899.6700

RACQUET STRINGING AVAILABLE

the

of O n e A K FA S T RE N .O . B T S BE t s in Spo

Breakfast ALL Day WEEKEND BRUNCH

MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARYS

Jeremy Alford can be reached at jeremy@ jeremyalford.com.

FesTival cockTail Menu FeaTuRinG

TRY OUR

JUICY BURG ERS 8oz hand-for med patty, grilled to order & served on an onion bun. BUILD IT YOUR WAY or try our

PATTY MELT

Apple Barrel Gosling’s Rum, Lemon Juice, Apple Bitters & a dash of Simple Syrup over ice w/ a Cinnamon Stick

Berry Bomb Blackberry & Raspberry infused Stoli Vodka & Triple Sec served up w/ a “Berry Bomb”

CARRIBBEAN SOUR Rye Whiskey, Lemon, Ginger Syrup & Mole Bitters w/ a Gosling Rum floater & an Orange twist

MID -CITY

139 S. CORTEZ ST · 309-5531 DOWNTOWN

200 MAGAZINE ST · 525-9355

www.therubyslippercafe.net House Bill 327, which would eliminate 15,000 jobs from the executive branch over a three-year period. Team Jindal opposed both ideas last year. In opposing the legislation last year, the Jindal administration described the streamlining bills as “overly broad” and potentially a threat to jobs in key agencies, such as those dealing with veterans and prisons. “I thought it would be a good idea to bring them back,” richard said of his bills. “We do have a different legislature now.” of course, by “new,” richard means freshmen lawmakers. But the definition also might include chastened veterans like ritchie, who certainly has a new outlook on politics — and Jindal — these days.

SALUT 5 7 Y’ALL8

4501 TchoupiToulas sT.

504-894-9880 www.dickandjennys.com

Ask your Veterinarian about the

Flea Free Guarantee from

Buy 3 doses get 1 free

Buy 3 get 1 free at participating clinics.at participating clinics.

Present coupon at purchase

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

second-term lawmaker says it was “horrible” how Gov. Bobby Jindal’s ally stripped a vice chairman of his title earlier this month for voting against the administration. “That’s just terrible to me. That’s public intimidation,” said rep. Truck Gisclair, d-raceland. “I’ll tell you this, they are not going to scare me into voting a different way.” Gisclair’s seatmate on the House floor is rep. Harold ritchie, d-Bogalusa, who lost his position as vice chairman of the House Insurance Committee. ritchie voted against a Jindal-backed bill that creates a tax rebate for donations to nonprofits that support grants or scholarships for private schools. ritchie’s vote against the bill was inconsequential; the measure passed out of committee 15-4. a day later, House Speaker Chuck Kleckley, r-lake Charles, removed him from the insurance committee. Kleckley assumed the speakership with Jindal’s backing. “It’s hard to describe the intimidation the governor tries to exert on the legislature,” Gisclair said. “But it’s there.” It certainly is — but there could be an upside. once Team Jindal beats a lawmaker down, there’s no way to go but up. Just ask rep. dee richard, a Thibodaux independent who believes Jindal should open more records from his office to public view, reduce state consulting contracts and cut the public workforce. richard has spent the past few years offering alternatives to Jindal’s policy initiatives — without success. Some of richard’s bills were supported by lawmakers, but not by the governor, who vetoed four of them. This year richard has House Bill 291, which would place Jindal on par with other state agencies under louisiana’s public records law. Currently, documents used in the governor’s “deliberative process,” particularly intra-office communications, are kept secret under a “transparency” law that Jindal pushed through the legislature in his first term. Team Jindal has used the “deliberative process” rationale to deny innumerable public records requests, which makes his “transparency” law the american equivalent of Britain’s official Secrets act. It also earned him the dubious honor of america’s least transparent governor. richard’s legislation would eliminate the “deliberative process” rubric and put in its stead a seven-day period after which records of confidential meetings could be released — and another 10-year waiting period before “protected documents” could

METAIRIE

4931 West Esplanade

13


BLAKEPONTCHARTRAIN Hey Blake,

What’s the address of the building where on May 1, 1936, the FBI located Karpis in New Orleans? Donald J. Landry Dear Donald, What a day it was — such excitement at 3343 Canal St. near Jefferson Davis Parkway. You should have been there. FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover came to New Orleans to personally capture Public Enemy No. 1 Alvin Karpis — a leader of the BarkerKarpis gang — and become a hero. Karpis, also known as “Old Creepy,” was born Aug. 10, 1907, in Montreal, Canada. His first prison sentence was in 1926. Just three weeks before his arrest in New Orleans, Karpis had rented an apartment on Canal Street under the alias Ed O’Hara. On May 1, the area around Karpis’ apartment was crawling with federal officers armed with machine guns and pistols. The agents had been working on the case for two years and were ready to make the arrest. But Hoover wanted to get the credit, so he showed up in New Orleans three days before the capture. When Old Creepy left his apartment at 5:30 p.m. that day in May, more than 12

“WHERE THE UNUSUAL IS COMMONPLACE.” 5101 W. ESPLANADE AVE. METAIRIE, LA 70006 504-885-4956 • 800-222-4956

NEW ORLEANS KNOW-IT-ALL

agents, led by Hoover, were waiting for him. As the story goes, they shouted “Stick ’em up,” perhaps a nod to Karpis’ history of robberies. Even though he was armed, Karpis did as he was told and the whole event was over in minutes. There was one unusual problem: When Hoover told agents to handcuff Karpis, he discovered no one had brought handcuffs because they had planned on having to kill him. They tied up Karpis with an agent’s necktie. “He didn’t have a chance,” Hoover told a reporter. Karpis told a different version. “I noticed someone peeping around the corner of a building,” he said. “Several agents begin shouting, ‘It’s OK. Come on Chief. We got him. You can come out now.’” Either way, capturing Karpis made Hoover famous, and he became Public Hero No. 1. After the arrest, Mrs. J. B. Mayer, owner of the apartment Karpis rented, said, “He was such a nice, quiet little man. He is just a boy. I can’t imagine such a slim fellow being as bad as they say he is.” (Karpis was 5-foot-10 and weighed 128 pounds.) Karpis was the only man Hoover ever arrested, and Hoover was the last person ever to arrest the outlaw. Old Creepy spent 26 years in Alcatraz federal prison — longer than any

It is perhaps fitting that a bank now sits on the property where FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover arrested gangster Alvin Karpis (inset) in New Orleans in 1936.

other prisoner. In April 1962, Karpis was transferred to McNeil Island Penitentiary in Washington, because Alcatraz was closing. He was released in 1969 and was deported to his native Canada. Karpis wrote his memoirs, Public Enemy Number One: The Alvin Karpis Story (McClelland and Stewart,1971), and retired to Spain before he died in 1979. Upon his death, the following appeared in the Chicago Sun-Times: “Gangster Alvin Karpis apparently died of natural causes, police said, contradicting earlier reports that he had committed suicide by taking an

overdose of sleeping pills. Karpis, triggerman for the notorious Ma Barker Gang that terrorized the Midwest with blazing machine guns in the 1930s, was found dead Tuesday at his home on Spain’s Costa del Sol. He was 71.”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

First Communion PRAYER BOOKS

Questions for Blake: askblake@gambitweekly.com

15


Opponents of an ANTI-BULLYING BILL say it promotes a ‘gay agenda.’

But families of VICTIMS

DEMAND A CHANGE in how Louisiana schools handle bullies.

T

ieler Garsaud, a sixth-grader at Abita Springs Middle School, testified before Louisiana’s House of Representatives last year. Up for a vote: an anti-bullying bill dubbed the Safe Schools Act, authored by State Rep. Austin Badon, D-New Orleans. Garsaud, 12, who came out as gay to his parents at age 10, told lawmakers that all students, not just gay students, deserve to feel safe in school. Badon’s bill failed to pass. “I was bullied a lot, in fourth and fifth (grade), but (I saw) other people get bullied a lot, like the special kids, and not the cool kids. Everyone ‘below’ that,” Garsaud says. “Middle school is a shark tank: Cool, smart, dumb. That’s how they do it.” He says he was inspired to speak out after watching others get bullied — and getting bullied himself. Garsaud will be back this year. State Rep. Pat Smith, D-Baton Rouge, has introduced House Bill 407, the Bullying Prevention Act of 2012. An identical Senate version, authored

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

BY A L E X WOO DWA R D

17


COVER STORY no payments until april $0 initiation fee / $0 march dues

march mania at the jcc REbOuNd fROM MARdi GRAS ANd SCORE biG SAviNGS outdoor and indoor Boot camps trX indoor cyclinG ZumBa

yoGa tai chi Karate reformer and mat pilates

racquetBall adult and children’s sports leaGues sWimminG pools nutrition counselinG

personal traininG studio up to 50 free Group eXercise classes!

JOiN TOdAY AT ThE GOLd LEvEL ANd SAvE uP TO $225! Jewish community center - uptown 5342 St. Charles Ave. New Orleans, LA 70115 504.897.0143

Goldring-Woldenberg Jcc - metairie 3747 W. Esplanade Ave. Metairie, LA 70002 504.887.5158

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

www.nojcc.org

it’s why you shop. Saks Fifth Avenue Allen Edmonds Anthropologie Brooks Brothers BCBGMAXAZRIA French Sole Michael Kors Morton’s The Steakhouse

333 Canal Street | 504.522.9200 | Monday-Saturday 10-7 | Sunday 12-6 | www.theshopsatcanalplace.com The Shops at Canal Place

18

theshopsatcanal

by Sens. Yvonne Dorsey-Colomb, DBaton Rouge, and Rick Ward, D-Port Allen, was filed last week. The bills aim to protect students of all backgrounds and identities, making it easier to report instances of bullying on campus and online. The bill has the support of the Forum for Equality, the Orleans Parish School Board, the Louisiana School Boards Association, the Louisiana Association of Educators, the Louisiana School Counselors Association, the National Alliance on Mental IllnessLouisiana, the National Association of Social Workers-Louisiana, the Louisiana Association of Public Charter Schools, and the East Bank Collaborative of Charter Schools, among others. But some groups, chiefly the Louisiana Family Forum (LFF), oppose the bill, saying it promotes a “gay agenda” and forces the teaching of what they call alternative lifestyles. LFF is a non-profit organization with stated religious goals but which functions largely as a lobbying group for evangelical conservative values. It is a powerful voice in the state Capitol. Garsaud is a slight boy with light brown hair and a collection of bracelets on his wrist. Sitting down for an interview at the Gambit offices with his mother, Tahmi Hawsey, he lifts his green-armed glasses from his face and wipes tears from his eyes with the neck of his shirt. He says he has his “amazing” days at school, but they’re often cut short by his peers who harass him for his sexual orientation. Facebook messages from students have threatened Garsaud with violence — shoving his head through a window, or “I will f—king kill you.” “He says it’s exhausting, it wears you out,” says Hawsey. “You don’t know what to expect on any given day. He’s popular — it’s not like he’s not popular, it’s not that he doesn’t have a ton of friends. ... Walking through the

halls, a kid tells him, ‘Hey, Tieler, want to be my boyfriend?’ and laughs in his face and follows him in the bathroom. “And he doesn’t know what’s going to happen in the bathroom.” Last year, Mother Jones reported a “teen epidemic of suicide” in Rep. Michele Bachmann’s small Minnesota district, where, in a two-year span, nine children committed suicide — four of whom were gay or perceived as gay. All had been bullied. Rolling Stone followed up the story earlier this year, adding that the school district “(cultivated) an extreme antigay climate.” Smith says stories like these inspired her to introduce her bill this year. “We just don’t have a means of dealing with bullying on campuses, not a structured means,” she says. “I’d like to see us be more proactive in intervention, and that’s what the professional development (element of the bill) would provide — opportunities for recognition of bullying, and provide intervention. It’s for training teachers and administrators to recognize when a child comes to you about bullying that it’s taken seriously.” In 2008, Tesa Middlebrook moved from Omaha, Neb., to Point Coupee Parish in the wake of her parents’ divorce. After her mother died of cancer last year, she moved in with her grandmother Joan Derson. The 17-year-old Point Coupee Central High School student excelled in school. She had a 3.9 GPA and was bound for college in Arizona, says her uncle, Michael Derson. “She was an artist, she taught herself to play piano, she taught herself to play guitar,” he recalls. On March 2, a school day, a coach found Middlebrook hanging from the school’s football bleachers. She had tied one end of an electrical cord to the side of the bleachers and the other around her neck. The Point


#1 - Gambit - 02-28-2012

Abita Springs Middle School student Tieler Garsaud says he’s been the target of bullying because he’s gay. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

Coupee Sheriff’s office says she died sometime around midday. Her grandmother called the school to find out why Middlebrook didn’t get off the bus. Her uncle, a part-time police officer for the City of New Roads, arrived at the school at 5:30 p.m. “How in the world can a 3.9 GPA student that doesn’t cause any problems in her school not go to any classes after lunch, and nobody checked to find out where this kid is at?” he says. “That’s our issue right here.” Michael Derson says Middlebrook was the victim of bullying “on a daily basis — she’s walking down the hallway, they’ll knock her books on the floor, shoving, calling her names.” Point Coupee Sheriff’s Office public information officer Capt. Steven Juge says the only cases of bullying the sheriff’s office found at the school were two incidents that happened “way before this,” which were both handled by the school. As of press time, the sheriff’s office hadn’t produced any evidence of bullying cases prior to Tesa’s suicide. But her family is adamant: she was the target of bullies. “We have testimony from several kids, text messages — we’ve got a whole bunch of stuff,” Derson says. “You can see it in her artwork. It doesn’t take a genius to figure it out.”

Forty-seven states currently have anti-bullying legislation on the books — including Louisiana. But Louisiana’s current law doesn’t address categories of protection, including students’ sexual orientation or gender identity. More than a dozen states, from California to most of New England, have strengthened anti-bullying laws by adding specific categories of protection. Last year, New Jersey adopted its “Anti-Bullying Bill of Rights” following the 2010 suicide of 18-year-old Rutgers University student Tyler Clementi. Clementi jumped to his death from the George Washington Bridge after fellow students installed a webcam in his dorm room, got footage of him kissing another man and spread the word on Twitter. Some haven’t been willing to wait for state legislation. The Trevor Project, founded by the producers of the 1994 short film Trevor (about a 13-year-old who attempts suicide when his classmates discover he is gay), operates a 24-hour crisis line that has received more than 200,000 calls since 1998. This year, the documentary Bully — which follows several students and their experiences with bullying — has made headlines for its R rating, which keeps it from the very audience that needs to see it. The film has received support from Anderson Cooper and Johnny Depp, among others, who have petitioned the Motion Picture Association of America to give it a more teen-friendly rating. Tens of thousands of people have uploaded “It Gets Better” messages to YouTube after columnist and gay activist Dan Savage founded the campaign in 2010. He launched the

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

Last year, Badon’s anti-bullying legislation passed the House Education Committee 8-4 after debate between bill supporters and social conservatives like the LFF. The bill died on the House floor — after opponents deleted mentions of “race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity or expression, physical characteristic, political persuasion, mental disability, or physical disability, as well as attire or association with others identified by such categories.” State Rep. Alan Seabaugh, RShreveport, contended that the bill “was intended to promote an agenda and force teaching alternative lifestyles to our children.” “It’s a sad day in Louisiana,” Badon said later. “For us to sit here and say that the conservative, religious right is going to dictate to us how we’re going to vote, I’m embarrassed by that.” In an editorial last week, The Shreveport Times, which publishes in Seabaugh’s district, endorsed Smith’s bill, writing that it would “empower teachers who might want to act but are reluctant to buck administrators who fear controversy or who have their own prejudicial blind spots.” The paper added that the bill “enumerates protection for students

with physical or developmental disabilities, emotional health disorders, problems with language ability, differing political ideas or affiliations or those who associate with any of these students.” Seabaugh did not respond to Gambit’s request for an interview before press time, but in an email he sent in 2011 to constituent Debbie Buchanan Engle, who wrote the lawmaker to express her disapproval of his vote, he wrote, “There are currently 28 laws, statutes and regulations in Louisiana which prohibit bullying. This bill added nothing except to open our schools to the teaching of the LGBT agenda. I have studied the teachings of Jesus Christ and I agree with his teachings regarding homosexuality. It is a sin plain and simple and it does not need to be taught in our schools. I was taught long ago to avoid getting into a debate with an idiot.”

19


COVER STORY

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

Slidell High School student Savannah Robinson, 14, committed suicide last year. Her family says she was bullied.

20

project after reports of spikes in teen suicides. President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and dozens of celebrities, including Ellen DeGeneres, have also uploaded their own “It Gets Better” messages. In his video, Obama says, “We’ve got to dispel this myth that bullying is just a normal rite of passage, that it’s some inevitable part of growing up. It’s not.” New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees submitted his own anti-bullying message (independent of the “It Gets Better” campaign), saying, “I want my fans to know that if you’re making fun of someone because they’re different, then you are no friend of mine.” The Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN) debuted its “Think Before You Speak” campaign to curb the use of slurs like “fag” and “dyke” — it keeps a tally of those words — and “… so gay” used as a pejorative on Twitter. The numbers are stark. In 2009, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 20 percent of high school students said they were bullied at school. GLSEN surveyed more than 7,000 American junior high and high school students in 2009 and found more than 84 percent of LGBT students reported verbal harassment at school, 40 percent reported physical harassment, and 18 percent reported physical attacks. While only 8 percent of all students said they’d missed classes because of concerns for their physical safety, the number of LGBT students who had done so was 30 percent. “Our kids need to feel safe in school, and there are some who don’t,” Rep. Smith says. Badon, who signed on as a co-author of this year’s bill, agrees: “Schools must be

completely safe. They can’t have any prejudice or discrimination.” Orleans Parish School Board president Thomas Robichaux, one of the few openly gay elected officials in Louisiana, says the bill is his “personal crusade.” “Having a general anti-bullying law, such as we have now, is statistically the same as having no law at all,” Robichaux says. “The enumerations in the law are the only way that children actually become more protected from the abuse of bullying. “This is not just about kids fighting in the schoolyard, nor solely about saving the lives of the direct victims. This is also about changing the culture of violence in our society and breaking the cycle of hate and violence that lies at the root of our crime problems. We cannot arrest ourselves out of our crime problem; we can only educate ourselves out of our crime problem.” Louisiana Family Forum (LFF) director Rev. Gene Mills says that categorizing potential victims creates “winners and losers.” This year, LFF is drafting its own version of an antibullying measure. Mills says Smith’s bill, with its inclusion of what he says are “legally undefined characteristics or character qualities” (read: sexual identities) excludes others “by virtue of the fact they’re omitted.” “When you introduce a category of protection that doesn’t have a clear legal definition, how do you administer that law in equitable fashion?” Mills says. “It’s better to have no measure than to have one that ties us up in litigation and confuses the school system and kids (and) move forward with the long, potentially confusing litigation.” In a recent newsletter to its supporters, LFF wrote: “There is no doubt about it; the ‘bullying’ theme is agenda-driven propaganda. The irony is that groups like Forum for Equality and GLSEN … have chosen this issue to bully you and me into allowing them access into our schools and to our children. To express concerns about anti-bullying bills is portrayed in the most unfavorable light.” “Do we have a duty to prevent bullying? Absolutely,” Mills told Gambit. “And we all share it, and everyone agrees that it needs to be prevented. Do we have an obligation to accept a sexually charged political agenda to accomplish that? I think that becomes an unnecessary detour in the case against bullying.” Garsaud offers a different take. PAGE 22


join us for lunch TuEsday -friday

Lent Specials

COVER STORY page 20

State Rep. Austin Badon, D-New Orleans, is a coauthor of this year’s antibullying legislation.

11AM - 2:30PM

Shrimp, crabmeat & fresh vegetables

PHOTO CREDIT

2035 METAIRIE ROAD

www.marktwainspizza.com

Lenten Specials OPEN

EASTER SUNDAY

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

5606 Canal Blvd. • 504-483-7001 www.lakeviewbrew.com

22

MEXICAN & CUBAN FOOD

536 Frenchmen St.

504-298-TRIO

www.thethreemuses.com

4:00-Till for Dinner Closed Tuesdays Happy Hour: Wed-Fri 4-6:30

Don’t PASS OVER our CHOCOLATES for your SEDER

Kosher for Passover Chocolates

Best Fajitas in Town!

PUERCO FRITO - $10.50 ROPA VIEJA - $8.15 Come Have Lunch With Me!

COUNTRY FLAME

620 IBERVILLE STREET • 522.1138 OPEN EVERYDAY ‘TIL 8:30PM

www.BlueFrogChocolates.com

NOW SERVING ICY HOT CHOCOLATE

O

R YA ONLI DER KO NE NO @ LA. CO M

MI

5707 Magazine St. 504.269.5707

Join Us for LUNCH Specializing in

HOT PASTRAMI & CORNED BEEF • FALAFEL CHOPPED LIVER • MATZOH BALL SOUP

Buy 1 Sandwich & Get 1 FREE

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

starting from $5.50

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

G

of equal or lesser value.

G

Dine in only. Up to $6.95 Value. Expires 4/16/12

“Best New York Deli

in New Orleans”

3519 SEVERN

Mon-Thur 10am-7pm Fri.& Sun. 10am-3pm www.koshercajun.com

888-2010

    “I think everybody has gotten  picked on for something,” the 12-yearold says. “If they (the bill’s opponents)  have a child, what if he gets bullied?  Then you pretty much stop that bill  from helping him.     “But [the bill’s authors] put that one  word in there to stop it, and they’re  against it.” Two weeks before she shot and killed  herself on Aug. 22, 2011, 14-year-old  Slidell High School student Savannah Robinson wrote one of her last  Facebook updates: “I refuse to go  back to school.”     Last week, Savannah’s mother  Angele McKnight sat in her kitchen  with Jahmal Robinson, Savannah’s  father. The kitchen is sparse, much  like the rest of the Slidell home where  McKnight and her two sons moved  after Savannah’s death. Savannah,  who her parents describe as smart,  quiet, creative and energetic, would  have turned 15 on April 1.     McKnight left for work early on the  morning of her daughter’s suicide.  Savannah was entering the third  week of her freshman year. She told  her mom that she was still getting  dressed — she had to put on her  shoes and contact lenses — before  she would be ready to leave with her  brother. He left to pick up his friend  around the corner. When they came  back five minutes later, Savannah  was dead, with a handgun next to  her body.     Later that day, Facebook pages  lighted up with messages of support.  “The kids found out what happened  and started doing this Facebook  page,” McKnight says, “and started  posting, ‘I knew she was being  bullied,’ and ‘It’s a shame children 

mess with her like that.’ That’s how  we started finding out more and more  information that started coming out.”     McKnight says Robinson had visited a school counselor the Thursday  before she died but left feeling uncomfortable. “She said something,”  McKnight says. “I don’t know what  she told that counselor.”     McKnight noticed a change in Robinson’s behavior while her daughter  was still in middle school — she would  come home saying, “I hate school.”  In her first weeks of high school, she  received a detention for not dressing  out for P.E. “She never made it to that  detention,” McKnight says.     The family says it hasn’t received  any information about her death or  evidence of bullying from the St. Tammany Parish Sheriff’s Office or from  Slidell High School. The entire school  community has been quiet, McKnight  says. The police report regarding  Savannah’s death outlines the events  of that morning, and St. Tammany  Parish Coroner Peter Galvan ruled  her death a suicide. Yet, Slidell High  School didn’t host a memorial or offer  condolences to the family, McKnight  says. “Everybody went back to whatever they were doing,” she says.     Savannah’s motive for committing  suicide remains unclear, but McKnight says she was able to retrieve  a handful of text messages from her  daughter’s phone. “To me, it seemed  like she liked girls. I’m not 100  percent sure about that,” she says.  “Those text messages seemed so  out of character for her. She wasn’t  talking about guys. This was strictly  talking about girls. I’m assuming that  might have been a part of it.” Given the LFF’s influence among  state lawmakers, Badon and Smith  don’t know what to expect from their  colleagues this year. “This is a strange  body,” Badon says. “I hope my colleagues would say, ‘We got to do  something more’. … We have a moral  responsibility to this exploding issue.”     Smith points out, with a laugh, that  she has filed two controversial bills  — the “bully bill” and a sex education  reform bill. Already there’s opposition to both. “If you’re familiar with the  Bible, the Lord looked at individuals  who were very, very different and  took them under His wing,” she says.  “Jesus didn’t discriminate.”      The Bullying Prevention Act has  been referred to the House Education Committee. The committee’s next  meeting is March 28. As of press  time, the measure had not yet been  assigned a hearing date. 


#21 – Gambit – 3/27/12

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

vintage-inspired women's clothing & accessories for work, play, night, day sizes XS–2X

OPEN SEVEN DAYS 11AM-7PM 6010 Magazine Street (near State Street) New Orleans • (504) 891-GIRL (4475)

agirlisagun.com

23 V2_65710.21_4.729x10.833_4c_Ad.indd 1

3/22/12 3:52 PM


just More than just great food...

The stories behind New Orleans’ most memorable Final Four stories.

6

book your DINNERor COCKTAIL private dining

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MARCH 27 > 2012

event now !

areas

corporate parties rehearsal dinners business meetings

Call Our Special Events Planner Gift Certificates Available

mon-fri 9am-5pm

504.581.1103 or

504.525.4790 tommysneworleans.com

welcome basketball fans! Dinner • Classic Cocktails • Entertainment 830 conti st. (in the prince conti hotel) 504.586.0972 • 800.699.7711

www.thebombayclub.com dinner & music nightly • validated parking

24

fun By Brett Michael Dykes

T

his week New Orleans will host its fifth NCAA men’s basketball championship, a grand spectacle of American amateur sport that’s come to be known as the Final Four. Or, as the city’s French founders would have called it back in the day, Le Finale à Quatre,, due to their inexplicable fondness for the metric system, or something. Fittingly, the city’s four previous turns as Final Four host — in 1982, 1987, 1993 and 2003 — have produced some of the more memorable moments in NCAA tournament history: Michael Jordan and Keith Smart hitting thrilling game-winning jumpers in ’82 and ’87, Chris Webber’s ill-fated timeout in the waning moments of the ’93 game and future Linsanity assassin Carmelo Anthony leading Syracuse University to the title as a freshman in ’03. Yes, just like hordes of bright-eyed visitors to the city during its nearly 300-year history, the Final Four always seems to leave town with a story. But like all good yarns, there are stories behind the stories — the secret stories, if you will, the stories the parties involved only share with their closest confidants — and the stories behind the stories are almost always more compelling than the stories themselves. These, my friends, are those stories, all of which, mind you, are based on scurrilous, possibly inaccurate information culled from “anonymous sources” with questionable credibility.

1982

While most people remember the North Carolina-Georgetown game as the one that first established tongue-wagging future sneaker mogul Michael Jordan as arguably the most clutch basketball player in history, it’s also a game in which Georgetown guard Fred Brown established himself as one of the sport’s biggest goats when he inadvertently passed the ball directly to UNC’s James Worthy on Georgetown’s final possession. But Brown’s gaffe may not have been entirely his fault.


Brown was out and about in the Quarter the night before the game with teammate Patrick Ewing, a well-known uber-fan of John Kennedy Toole’s A Confederacy of Dunces. When the two young men ran across a Lucky Dog cart, an exuberant Ewing insisted Brown join him in sampling one of the iconic dogs from the processed meat enterprise that served as the inspiration for Paradise Vendors in Toole’s famed book. A few hours later, Brown found himself stricken with a bout of diarrhea more violent than the average night on the streets of New Orleans. Brown later confessed to teammates that he was hit with a sudden cramping in his stomach and what felt like 50,000 tons of pressure on his anus at the moment he froze up on the court and inexplicably tossed the ball to Worthy. So basically Patrick Ewing’s Dunces fetish deserves a lot of the blame for the Hoyas losing that night. True story.

1987

To get to the Final Four and the eventual national championship game against Providence College in ’87, legendary asshole Bobby Knight’s Indiana

University Hoosiers had to get past Dale Brown’s scrappy Cinderella LSU team in the regional finals, which they did. In his postgame press conference, Knight couldn’t resist taking a shot at Brown, because that’s what surly pricks like him do. “I was worried about losing until I looked down the floor and saw Dale Brown,” Knight said. “Then I knew we had a chance.” Needless to say, Brown, a hopeless Pollyanna but one not immune to venomous resentfulness, was markedly chafed. So on the night before the title game, he called the hotel room of Providence coach Rick Pitino. “Rick, I hate Bobby Knight so goddamn much,” Brown said, “so much so that I’d like to lend you a valuable coaching tip to use in tomorrow night’s game, something straight out of my ‘Freak Defense’ bag of tricks, and it is this: If Indiana has the ball at the end of the game with a chance to win it, triple-team Steve Alford — he’s the only player on their squad who can hit a clutch shot.” Well, as just about any college basketball fan can tell you, Providence indeed prevented Alford from getting the ball in the game’s final seconds, only to see Baton Rouge native Keith

PHOTO COURTESY JEFF DALY

BASkEtBALLS

are round

BAGELS are round it’S a Slam dUnK! 3138 magazine St (Enter on 9th Street) • 504.309.7557 open daily 7am-3pm See full menu at: artzbagelz.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

Georgetown guard Fred Brown is credited with losing the 1982 Final Four game when he gave the ball to a North Carolina player on Georgetown’s last possession. The villain in the story, actually may be Patrick Ewing, who talked Brown into sampling a New Orleans Lucky Dog the night before the game. Brown says the hot dog didn’t sit well with his digestive system.

25


25 %

Best Color Retention • Unsurpassed Durability • Better Paint

ALL PAINT & SUPPLIES THRU 3/31/12

OFF

Your Local Farrell-Calhoun Paint Dealer

504-948-9620 • nolapaintandsupplies.com • farrellcalhoun.com 2900 Elysian Fields Ave • Mon-Fri 7A.M.- 5P.M. | Sat 8A.M.- 12P.M.

WE ARE MOVING BACK TO LAKEVIEW IN SPRING 2012!

Individual Care • Degreed Professionals

LOW TEACHER CHILD RATIOS

PARENTS ALWAYS WELCOME • Open Door Policy

INFANTS THROUGH 4 YEARS Full & Part TIme Programming Available CLASS A LICENSING

Children’s Place

n EducA ationa Alterna l to Chil tive d Care

(FORMERLY OF LAKEVIEW) | 504.281.4182 MONDAY-FRIDAY 7:30AM-6:00PM

Perhaps the most infamous lategame meltdown in college basketball history occurred in 1993 when University of Michigan star Chris Webber was assessed a technical foul for blockheadedly calling a timeout in the closing moments of the game when the team already had churned through its full allotment of timeouts. But according to one of the aforementioned “anonymous sources,” Webber was thrown off that night by a demoralizing practical joke pulled by muckraking teammate Jalen Rose before the game. You see, throughout the course of the ’93 tournament, Webber had a habit of listening to the song “Informer” by Snow — Billboard’s No. 1 song for seven weeks that spring — over and over on his Sony Walkman just prior to taking the court to get his adrenaline flowing at maximum capacity. On this day, however, while Webber was getting his ankles taped by the team trainers, Rose swapped out Webber’s “Informer” cassette for one containing Rick Astley’s “Never Gonna Give You Up.” Webber was livid. “How could you do me like that, man?” Webber screamed at a giggling Rose. “How could you assault my auditory senses with something so revoltingly hideous right before the biggest game of our lives?” The cassette swap was a kick to Webber’s psychological solar plexus, so it’s fair to say that what’s believed to be the first known incident of Rickrolling probably cost Michigan the national championship that night. True story.

2003

The night before the 2003 national title game, a thick fog rolled though

your uptown salon 5300

tc h o u p i to u l a s

suite f4 - in the riverside market

h a i r lo f t n o l a .c o m

N OW CA R RY I N G

kérastase

FREE kérastase TREATMENT WITH COLOR

e

5 0 4 .895 . 2 9 1 1

nc

26

30 years in business

≈ B R OW T H R E A D I N G ≈ ≈ AIRBRUSH MAKEUP ≈ ≈ H A I R E XT E N S I O N S ≈ ≈ B R A Z I L I A N B LOWO U T ≈

1993

bou

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

2804 ATHANIA PKWY

Smart step up to drill what’s been since dubbed “The Shot.” After the game, Dale Brown was seen wandering around the Quarter kicking an empty soup can and mumbling Norman Vincent Peale quotes to himself. True story.

the greater New Orleans area, a fog stubbornly dense enough to make navigation on the Mississippi River especially tedious for the river pilots charged with guiding massive ships up and down the waterway. Throughout the night, crews aboard the passing vessels made liberal use of their foghorns to acquaint other passing watercraft with their presence. Predictably, such a thing posed a nuisance to anyone attempting to get a good night’s rest at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside that night, where the University of Kansas basketball team just so happened to have sought lodging before they played Syracuse for the title the following day. But it was especially troublesome for wiry Kansas guard Kirk Hinrich. You see, when Hinrich was a wee lad growing up in the golden outskirts of Sioux City, Iowa, he had a cocker spaniel named Sissy that was the joy of his life. Well, one day Sissy chased a three-legged rabbit into a cornfield directly in the path of a passing corn plow. The farmer on the tractor blew a horn in an attempt to warn the dog, without success, and young Kirk, who of course was nearby shooting a ball into a peach basket, heard the sound as well. Throughout that night, whenever he heard a ship’s foghorn bellowing in the murky distance, Hinrich was reminded of Sissy’s unfortunate demise. So it shouldn’t come as much of a surprise to anyone that Hinrich threw up an airball when he had a chance to send the title game against Syracuse to overtime at the buzzer. True story. What sort of story behind the story will emerge from the 2012 New Orleans Final Four? Will someone’s game be thrown off because a gameday breakfast buffet wasn’t sufficiently hearty? Probably. These things just tend to happen! True story. — Brett Michael Dykes (aka The Cajun Boy) is the Louisiana-born editor-in-chief of Uproxx.com and a lifelong college basketball fan.


LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD WALTER “WOLFMAN” WASHINGTON

PRESENTED BY

MONDAY, APRIL 23rd

H A R R A H ’ S T H E AT E R Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

7:00 PM - DOORS OPEN | 8:00 PM - SHOW STARTS

30

ENTERTAINER OF THE YEAR REBIRTH BRASS BAND

BUSINESS RECOGNITION AWARD TOBACCO FREE LIVING

HONORARY MUSIC AWARDS CHAIRMAN JOHNNY VIDACOVICH

MUSIC HERITAGE AWARD HENRY GRAY

SPECIAL RECOGNITION AWARD DITHYRAMBALINA, THE MUSIC BOX

AMBASSADORS OF NEW ORLEANS MUSIC PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND

TICKETS

$125

SPONSORED BY

VIP TABLES FOR TEN

$1500

FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 483-3129 MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED P R O D U C E D

B Y

TO B EN EFIT TH E FO U N DATI O N FO R ENTERTAI N M ENT D E VELO P M ENT & ED U CATI O N


10

11 page 29

12

Best Rap/Hip-Hop Big Freedia Curren$y Dee-1

Happy Hour s arita Marg grias n a &S

Best Blues

$

Tab Benoit Alvin Youngblood Hart Johnny Sansone

2.50

WEEKDAYS

3-5PM

DAILY SPECIALS STARTING AT $9.95

Best Hard Rock/Heavy Metal

OPEN MON-SAT 11AM-9PM

Goatwhore Haarp Supagroup

3001 Magazine St. · 891-0997 www.joeyksrestaurant.com

Best Rock GIVERS Anders Osborne The Revivalists

Best Roots Rock Los Po-Boy-Citos Mas Mamones

Best World/Reggae Best Country/Folk Gal Holiday and the Honky Tonk Revue Hurray for the Riff Raff Luke Winslow-King

Best Zydeco Chubby Carrier and the Bayou Swamp Band C.J. Chenier Nathan Williams and the Zydeco Cha-Chas

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

Tom McDermott and Meschiya Lake

Best Mixed Bag

Piano & Vocals join together for this special concert.

Imagination Movers The New Orleans Bingo! Show Voice of the Wetlands All-Stars

MARCH 29

Best Emerging

Best Cajun Feufollet Lost Bayou Ramblers Pine Leaf Boys

Best DJ/Electronica

Julio & Cesar

Garden Concert Series

Debauche Gringo do Choro Luther Gray and Bamboula 2000

Big History Brass-A-Holics The New Orleans Suspects

Best Latin

13

Gypsyphonic Disko Mannie Fresh Quintron

10 Johnny Vidacovich is the 2012 Honorary Music Awards Chairman. 11 Pianist Henry Gray will receive the Music Heritage Award. 12 The Preservation Hall Jazz Band will be honored as Ambassador of New Orleans Music and is nominated for Best Traditional Jazz. PHOTO BY SHANNON BRINKMAN 13 Luke Winslow-King is nominated for Best Country/Folk.

Adults: $10 / Children 5-12: $3 Children 4 & Under = FREE Mint Juleps and other refreshments available for purchase For more information call

(504) 483-9488

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

Happy Talk Band Honey Island Swamp Band Alex McMurray

Thursdays at Twilight

31


WHAT’S

in store

Neighborhood By Kat Stromquist

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

Gott Spot

32

t Uptown restaurant Gott Gourmet (3100 Magazine St., 373-6579; www. gottgourmetcafe.com), steam floats from the open kitchen, a jumble of cafe-style metal tables is scattered across the dining floor, and light from windows facing Magazine Street reflects off warm, melon-colored walls. For owner Christy Parker and her husband, chef David Gotter, location was everything. “We always wanted this spot,” Parker says. “We lived in the neighborhood (and) always thought it was the cutest little spot. We stared at it for years and got the opportunity to take it in October [2008].” Opening the restaurant in the initial stages of the recession, their timing couldn’t have been worse. But after three “very scary” months, the couple successfully transformed their former catering business into Gott Gourmet. The restaurant has blossomed into a casual spot where unique, made-fromscratch cuisine is served in a relaxed neighborhood atmosphere. Thanks to Gotter’s background in fine dining, the menu features flourishes like prosciutto, fried Brie and organic microgreens. Even a simple shrimp po-boy comes adorned with arugula and house-made dill remoulade. Parker describes the outcome as more than just a lunch. “Everything is fresh and homemade,” Parker says. “Even if [a customer] eats a Reuben, it’s going to be the best Reuben they ever had in their life. The locals … depend on us for something good.” As residents of the surrounding neighborhood, the couple takes their commitment to the community seriously. Parker prides herself on the restaurant’s extensive green initiatives: takeaway containers and cups are made from

biodegradable Chef David sugar cane Gotter of Gott and corn, and Gourmet serves the restaurant recently switched made-fromscratch food from glass beer in a laid-back, bottles to more eco-friendly cans. neighborhood setting. “I thought if PhOTO By we were going to ChERyl GERBER start, we’d start right … [putting our] best foot forward,” Parker says. It may be the socially conscious practices, the pair’s combined restaurant experience (both managed several restaurants over the past 20 years), or simply the fresh, expertly prepared food that has led to Gott Gourmet’s many accolades. Gambit readers have named the restaurant as one of the city’s best in several annual Best of New Orleans polls. There’s a notable list of specialty cocktails, including blueberry mimosas and a rum punch. Former Chicagoans often order the restaurant’s Chicago-style hot dog, saying it reminds them of home. Gotter and Parker continue to perfect their project and hope to expand their evening offerings to include more small plates and happy hour specials. “I used to say I wanted four [restaurants]; now I think I’ve lost my mind. One is plenty,” Parker says. “It fulfills both of our interests, both of our needs, for what we want.” That sense of contentment and pride means Gott Gourmet should continue pleasing Magazine Street shoppers and local devotees for years to come. “As the owner, not as the chick cooking all the food, my feeling is that I just want everybody to be happy,” Parker says. “We love to make everybody happy.”

SHoppiNg NEWS ClEarviEW Mall (4436 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-7289; www.-clearviewmall.com) hosts an “Easter Eggstravaganza” from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, March 31 and April 7 in the food court. There will be face painting, balloon art, an egg hunt and photo packages starting at $15.99 for portraits with the Easter Bunny. MyphoNEapp StorE (1821 Magazine St.; 586-0444; www.myphonemd.net), a brick-and-mortar shop where customers can try applications for smart devices before purchasing them, recently celebrated its grand

by Missy Wilkinson

opening. It is located inside MyphoNEMD, a smartphone repair shop. Now through Saturday, March 31, WEDDiNG BEllES (3632 Magazine St., 8911005; www.weddingbellesstationer.com) hosts a sample sale. Debutante dresses are reduced as much as 75 percent. There is also a BlUE by Enzoani trunk show. CC’S CoMMuNity CoffEE houSE (citywide; www.communitycoffee.com) launched a line of specialty whole-leaf hot and iced teas and tea lattes in flavors like Spicy Zydeco Chai, Acadiana Black N Berry and Moroccan Mint.

Get a jump on sizzling summer utility bills. CALL US TODAY FOR... • A 50% LA Tax Rebate on attic insulation

• Plus up to $2,000 from the LA Hero's Program • Plus up to $500 in Federal Tax Credits


EAT drink

+

FOrk + center By IAN MCNuLTy Email Ian McNulty at mcnulty@cox.net

putting everything on the table what

Sal’s Seafood

where

1512 Barataria Blvd.,  Marrero, 341-8112

when

Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat.

how much Inexpensive 

reservations Not accepted 

what works

Crawfish, oysters, cheap  beer and house-made  sausage

what doesn’t

The boil could be spicier 

check, please

A taste of crawfish country  on the West Bank 

Music and meatless meals

    At Chickie Wah Wah (2828 Canal St.,  304-4714; www.chickiewahwah.com),  you’ll find local and touring roots music  acts and the unlikely combination of vegetarian tempeh dishes and meatball calzones. The refreshingly grown-up Mid-City  music venue has for the past few months  been the latest roost for Garage Pizza  (2828 Canal St., 214-5177), an eatery  that specializes as much in light, meatless  dishes as it does in the standard pizza  parlor array of pies, calzones and pastas.      I wrote about Garage Pizza and its chef  Karen Bolds in 2009, after I happily stumbled upon a place that delivered both pepperoni pizza and bowls of soba noodles  in peanut sauce with grilled vegetables.  Garage Pizza was located near the old  Charity Hospital building, at an address  now home to Angeletto’s Pizzeria  (220 S. Robertson St., 581-3500;   www.angelettospizzeria.com).     Last fall, Bolds took over the small tavern  kitchen inside Chickie Wah Wah, where  the taco truck Taceaux Loceaux had  previously set up a stationary spot. Garage  Pizza keeps regular hours independent of  the club’s music calendar, serving from 5  p.m. to 10 p.m. Monday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.  page 35

WinE OF THE week Sal’s Seafood offers a variety of local seafood. PHOTO By CHERyL GERBER

An old-fashioned seafood house revs up for crawfish season. By Ian McNulty

i

t’s hard to say just where the West Bank’s suburbs end and the  Louisiana countryside begins, but I think a case can be made for  the gravel parking lot leading to Sal’s Seafood — at least during  crawfish season.     Sal’s is a small, old-fashioned seafood restaurant in the middle  of Marrero, but on the inside it seems like a place you’d expect to  find closer to Bayou Teche than the Westbank Expressway.      In a paneled room lit by fluorescent tubes, in a setting that’s  about as romantic as a Dollar General store, everyone from nuns  to the guys who parked a bunch of Harley-Davidsons out front  get their elbows on their tables to dispatch enormous amounts of  boiled seafood. The abundance, the quality and the single-minded focus behind the boiling operation here — as well as the diners’ abandon — are all hallmarks Sal’s shares with the so-called  “boiling point” eateries out in crawfish-producing Cajun country.  It makes the short journey over the Harvey Canal to visit Sal’s feel  like a satisfying mini road trip.      Sal’s traces its roots to a bar run by owner and namesake Sal  Penino in the 1970s. He put out boiled seafood for his regular  customers and it proved such a hit that by 1979 he opened  Sal’s Seafood. Today the seafood operation continues, with an  industrial-sized apparatus of conveyor belts and purging tanks  that looks ready to handle a truckload of crawfish at once.  

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2009 Chateau Saint Baulery Saint-Chinian     The boil is not very spicy — I wish it were more so — but the  crawfish size is consistently impressive and there seems to be a  constant supply of baskets full of seafood that is hot and ready  for your order. There’s no waiting around for the next boil batch or  settling for cold crawfish.     Penino also worked in the meat business, which may explain  why this seafood restaurant makes its own hot sausage patties  and serves such a good roast beef po-boy. A deli case by the  entrance is filled with good things to bring home or to order for  your table — from palm-sized crawfish pies and pints of etouffee  to stuffed artichokes and little cups of creamy crab dip to spread  over crackers.      Still, the way to put Sal’s through its paces is to surround a  table with friends and then inundate it with crawfish. At this time  of year, it’s a good idea to get a few rounds of the plump, salty raw  oysters too. Cans of beer, served ice-cold, cost $2.      Before your seafood arrives, you cover your table with newspapers, reams of which are stacked in the corner. A page of  obituaries always seems to end up as part of my place setting, but  maybe looking down at those pages is a healthy reminder to enjoy  what we have while we have it. After all, it’s hard to sit before a  feast of crawfish, oysters and cheap beer at Sal’s without thinking  that you’re really living. 

Languedoc, France $14 retaiL

A Rhone-style red, this bottling was  produced with fruit from vines at least  30 years old planted in the Saint Chinian  commune in southern France’s Languedoc region. Robust and full-bodied, the  wine is a blend of 40 percent Carignan  and 30 percent each Syrah and Grenache. In the glass, it  offers aromas of cassis and black cherry  with herbal and pepper notes followed by  black currants, plum,  dried berries and firm  tannins on the palate.  Decant an hour before  serving. Drink it with  tapenade, muffulettas,  roast duck, wild game, rare beef, veal  dishes and aged cheeses. Buy it at: Swirl  Wines, Stein’s Market & Deli. Drink it at:   Swirl Wines. — BRENDA MAITLAND

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

Boiling Point

33


page 33

interview Tuesday through Thursday and from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. The venue is nonsmoking, and there are tables inside and outside in a small, enclosed patio. There also is a takeout window, and the kitchen delivers.

Boilin’ for bridges

James Beard award nominees

The James Beard Foundation released the list of finalists for its 2012 culinary awards, and plenty of New Orleans names are in the running. Donald Link of Herbsaint, Cochon and Cochon Butcher is up for the Outstanding Chef award, and Sue Zemanick of Gautreau’s is up for a Rising Star Chef of the Year award, marking the fourth consecutive year she has been nominated for this honor. Four of the five nominees for the Best Chef: South award this year work in New Orleans. They include Justin Devillier of La Petit Grocery, John Harris of Lilette, Tory McPhail of Commander’s Palace and Alon Shaya of Domenica. Emeril’s Restaurant made the cut as a semi-finalist for the Outstanding Wine Service award and John Besh’s cookbook My Family Table: A Passionate Plea for Home Cooking is up for an award too.

C o - o w n er , M i D D en D o r F’ S r eS TAu r A n T A n D T H e F o u n D ry

a

native of Germany, Horst Pfeifer earned a master chef’s degree and led kitchens at luxury hotels in Europe before moving to New Orleans. In 1991, he and wife Karen opened Bella Luna, a posh Italian restaurant in the French Market. But after Hurricane Katrina, as repairs to its city-owned building lagged, the Pfeifers made a dramatic change. Five years ago this month, they bought Middendorf’s Restaurant (30160 Hwy. 51, Akers, 985-386-6666; www.middendorfsrestaurant.com), a popular country eatery dating to 1934 and known for its thin-cut catfish. A year later, they rebuilt the restaurant after it was flooded by Hurricane Ike. The couple also runs The Foundry (333 St. Joseph St., 586-1309; www.thefoundryvenue.com), an event space in the Warehouse District. What’s been the biggest difference for you switching from Bella Luna to Middendorf’s? pfeifer: In the beginning, people I knew would come in and say “Oh, this must be so nice and so easy for you now.” I wanted to choke them. This wasn’t easy, it was like trying to jump on a moving freight train. Everyone who walks in the door here knows exactly what they want and expect. They’ve been eating this food longer than I’ve been alive. But I couldn’t be doing anything more enjoyable. We all look for new challenges and we’re very proud of what we’ve accomplished here. You’ve changed some things, and that can be risky for a historic restaurant. What’s been your strategy? p: We never use the word change. People don’t like that word here. So we don’t change anything, but we add to it. The kitchen is high-tech now, we’re recycling our oil for our truck, there’s better air conditioning and insulation, we have a waterfront deck now. So we add. Is there anything you miss about fine dining? p: After Bella Luna, Karen said, “If we get back in the restaurant business. I want to have laminated menus and no tablecloths,” and that’s Middendorf’s. But with the work we do at the Foundry — some of that is more like what we used to do. When we do rehearsal dinners, people will ask for dishes we had at the restaurant. For a party, I just did 30 pounds of fettuccine tossed tableside with truffle oil like we did at Bella Luna. — IAN MCNULTY

Brett Anderson, restaurant writer for The Times-Picayune, sits on the foundation’s Restaurant and Chef Awards Committee. He’s also nominated for a James Beard honor of his own in the foundation’s journalism awards category for a pair of stories documenting a family of oyster fishermen in Lafourche Parish after the BP oil disaster. Award winners will be named on May 4 and 7 at events in New York.

Taste of Lafreniere

It seems like local restaurants are constantly contributing their time and food to fundraisers benefiting an array of community causes. This Friday, some 44 of them will step up for a cause within their own industry. The Louisiana Seafood Taste of the Town always draws a big crowd to Metairie’s Lafreniere Park to sample the offerings of restaurants that this year range from Acme Oyster House to Zea Rotisserie & Grill. The annual event is

hosted by the Louisiana Restaurant Association (LRA) and proceeds benefit both the LRA’s Education Foundation and Lafreniere Park. The event is from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. and tickets cost $90. Visit www.tasteofthetown.info.

Whetting your appetite

Apolline (4729 Magazine St., 8948881; www.apollinerestaurant.com), the Uptown restaurant formerly known as Dominique’s on Magazine, has been running nightly drink specials to help reintroduce itself to the dining public. On Wednesdays you can get any wine offered by the glass for $5 and some bottles for $20. It also now offers happy hours from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, when specialty cocktails are $2 off, well cocktails are $3 and an assortment of appetizers are $6 each.

FIVE spOTs FOr BOudIn BaLLs

Boucherie 8115 Jeannette St., 862-5514 www.boucherie-nola.com An appetizer of boudin balls is served with aioli.

Cochon 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2123 www.cochonrestaurant.com Pickled peppers add spicy heat to Cochon’s classic rendition.

Elizabeth’s Restaurant 601 Gallier St., 944-9272 www.elizabeths-restaurant.com Creole mustard sauce comes with these Bywater examples.

Guillory’s Grocery & Meat Market 3708 Derbigny St., Metairie, 833-1390 Get an order to go at this backstreet deli.

Tracey’s Restaurant & Bar 2604 Magazine St., 897-5413 www.traceysnola.com Boudin balls are sometimes available as a bar snack.

OFF

the

menu

Trends, notes, quirks and quotes from the world of food. “Decades ago cooking in restaurants was considered low, menial labor, and kitchens were often staffed with African-Americans. But now that the restaurant industry feels somewhat like a wing of the entertainment industry — blacks are underrepresented as chefs and cooks.” — From a recent Chicago Tribune story about the scarcity of black chefs in America. The paper reported that about 60 percent of chefs and head cooks in the U.S. are white, 9 percent are black and more than 18 percent are Latino.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

Nice weather always inspires picnics along Bayou St. John, and a lot of those picnics now involve crawfish. This Friday, March 30, a community crawfish boil serves as a fundraiser for a project aimed at fixing some structures on the bayou. The second annual Boilin’ for the Bridges will see large quantities of spicy crawfish and cold beer dispatched as a benefit for Re-Bridge, a nonprofit formed to help rehab a couple of historic bayou bridges. “Tons and tons of crawfish, Abita beer, and a lot of people getting together for a cause,” says Rachel Dangermond, chair of the committee behind the ReBridge effort. The group is out to restore the Magnolia Bridge, an ironwork span dating to the late 19th century that Re-Bridge members believe may be the oldest existing bridge in the city. Closed to traffic since the 1970s, the Magnolia Bridge is used for grassroots gatherings and commemorations and simply as a perch to enjoy views of the bayou. Re-Bridge also is working to restore the Dumaine bridge, a short roadway span built in 1951. Both structures are suffering from neglect, and Re-Bridge is raising local dollars to match federal transportation funds for their repair awarded last year. “This is a very important bridge not just to people in the neighborhood but to people all over the city,” Dangermond says. The boil is at the residence of a ReBridge supporter on Maurepas Street in the Faubourg St. John neighborhood, a few blocks from the bayou. Admission is $30 for adults, $5 for kids under 10. Get tickets and details at www.rebridge.org.

HOrsT pFEIFEr

FIVE in

35


to

EAt

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEaNS.COM

you are where you eat

Out 2 Eat is an index of Gambit contract advertisers. Unless noted, addresses are for New Orleans. Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN CAFE BEIGNET — 311 Bourbon St., 525-2611; 334B Royal St., 524-5530; www. cafebeignet.com — The Western omelet combines ham, bell peppers, red onion and white cheddar, and is served with grits and French bread. The Cajun hash browns are made with andouille sausage, potatoes, bell peppers and red onions and served with a scrambled egg and French bread. No reservations. Bourbon Street: Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Royal Street: Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

SOMETHIN’ ELSE CAFE — 620 Conti St., 373-6439; www.somethingelsecafe.com — Combining Cajun flavors and comfort food, Somthin’ Else offers noshing items including shrimp baskets, boudin balls and alligator corn dogs. There are burgers, po-boys and sandwiches filled with everything from cochon de lait to a trio of melted cheeses on buttered thick toast. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, late-night Thu.Sat. Credit cards. $$ TED’S FROSTOP — 3100 Calhoun St., 861-3615 — The Lotto burger is a 6-oz. patty served with lettuce, tomatoes, onions and Frostop’s secret sauce and cheese is optional. There are waffle fries and house-made root beer. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BAR & GRILL BAYOU BEER GARDEN — 326 N. Jefferson Davis Pwky., 302-9357 — Head to Bayou Beer Garden for a 10-oz. Bayou burger served on a sesame bun. Disco fries are french fries topped with cheese and debris

DMAC’S BAR & GRILL — 542 S. Jefferson Davis Pkwy., 3045757; www.dmacsbarandgrill. com — Stop in for daily lunch specials or regular items such as gumbo, seafood-stuffed po-boys or pulled-pork sliders topped with barbecue sauce. Bar noshing items include seafood beignets with white remoulade. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449 River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $ ZADDIE’S TAVERN — 1200 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson, 8320830 — Zaddie’s serves burgers, alligator sausage, boudin, tamales and meat or crawfish pies. Thursday’s steak night special features a filet mignon, buttergarlic potatoes, salad, grilled French bread and a soft drink for $15. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks St., 202-4741; www.bookoobbq. com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. The Cajun banh mi fills a Vietnamese roll with hogshead cheese, smoked pulled pork, boudin, fresh jalapeno, cilantro, cucumber, carrot, pickled radish and sriracha sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., latenight Fri.-Sat. Cash only. $ SAUCY’S BBQ GRILL — 3244 Severn Ave., Metairie, 322-2544; www.saucysbbqgrill.com — Saucy’s serves slow-smoked St. Louis-style pork ribs, pulled pork, brisket, smoked sausage and grilled or jerk chicken. Side items include smoked beans, mac and cheese, coleslaw and Caribbean rice. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

BURGERS BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL — 4905 Canal St., 4887357; www.beachcornerbarand-

grill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, sauteed mushrooms or house-made hickory sauce. Other options include a grilled chicken sandwich. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-7890; www.cafefreret. com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin. Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100 Magazine St., 373-6579; www.gottgourmetcafe.com — This cafe serves a variety of gourmet salads, sandwiches, wraps, Chicago-style hot dogs, burgers and more. The cochon de lait panini includes slowbraised pork, baked ham, pickles, Swiss, ancho-honey slaw, honey mustard and chili mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.Sun., lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE — 5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK — City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola. com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

Easter April 8

Cruise, Buffet, Bottomless Bubbly & the Swingin’ Sounds of The Yat Pack!

CHINESE FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ page 39

$79 per person, advance tickets required. Boards at 11:30 a.m. from the Riverwalk, cruises noon–1:30 p.m.

Purchase tickets online at creolequeen.com or call 504.529.4567

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

O’HENRY’S FOOD & SPIRITS — 634 S. Carrollton Ave., 8669741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 461-9840; www. ohenrys.com — Complimentary peanuts are the calling card of these casual, family friendly restaurants. The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

gravy. No reservations. Lunch and dinner, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

Like us for special offers and discounts!

37


Hayley Paige Trunk Show

March 30-31 Appointments Required

10% off your wedding gown purchase h

h

h

h

h

h

h h

h

h

COUTURE STYLE, REALISTIC PRICING

38

My Home is your Home

0 te 10 fica 0 ee! y $ rti $2 Fr Bu Ce t a cate ift ge tifi G r & Ce ift G

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

The Market @ Chenier • 1901 Highway 190 • Suite 24 • Mandeville 985.674.6994 • www.oliviercouture.com • info@oliviercouture.com



Est. 1985   

CASUAL YET ELEGANT & AFFORDABLE

Palm Sunday & Easter Sunday

Four Course Menu 11am – 8pm Appetizer · Salad · Entreé Dessert · and much more!

Book your special occasion in one of our five private rooms.

Veal • Beef • Lamb Seafood • Homemade Pasta Homemade Desserts & Pastries SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH 3 Courses $25 Complimentary Champagne 5 Private Dining Rooms for any occasion

2 Appetizers & a Glass of House Wine or Cocktail $25


out to eat

page 37

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

COFFee/DeSSeRt ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — the Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. the Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601 Magazine St., 899-4260; www.pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. there also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONteMPORaRY BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 5254455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www. one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like chargrilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CReOLe ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422; www. antoines.com — the city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ MELANGE — 2106 Chartres St., 309-7335; www.melangenola.com — Dine on French-Creole cuisine in a restaurant and bar themed to resemble a lush 1920s speakeasy. Lapin au vin is a farm raised rabbit cooked served with demi-glace, oven-roasted shallots, tomatoes, potatoes and pancetta. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily, brunch Sunday. Credit cards. $$

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ — Toulouse Street Wharf, 569-1401; www. steamboatnatchez.com — the Natchez serves Creole cuisine while cruising the Mississippi River. At dinner, the Paddlewheel porkloin is blackened pork served with Creole mustard sauce or Caribbean butter spiked with Steen’s cane syrup. Bread pudding is topped with candied pecans and bourbon sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

CUBaN/CaRIBBeaN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437 Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www.mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Aruba scallops are seared and served with white chocolate chipotle sauce with jalapeno grits and seasonal vegetables. Warm walnut goat cheese is served with yuca chips. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sat.-Sun., dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$

DeLI

such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMet tO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez, Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIaN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 9446666; www.schiroscafe.com — the cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308 Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL — 1100 Constance St., 722-3168; www.therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. the Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. the Wild turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and late-night tue.-Sat. Cash only. $

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, 8366859 — the traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, 888-2010; www. koshercajun.com — this New Yorkstyle deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-thu., dinner Mon.-thu. Credit cards. $

ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100 N. 19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www. andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — the wine emporium offers gourmet sandwiches and deli items. the Reuben combines corned beef, melted Swiss, sauerkraut and Russian dressing on rye bread. the Sena salad features chicken, golden raisins, blue cheese, toasted pecans and pepper jelly vinaigrette over field greens. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Fri., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

FReNCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St., 895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffeeand coriander-spiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.Sun. Credit cards. $$ MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www. martiniquebistro.com — this French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. try dishes

ItaLIaN

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ ITALIAN PIE — 3706 Prytania St., 266-2523; www.italianpie.com — In addition to regular Italian pie pizzas, pastas, salads and sandwiches, this location offers a selection of entrees. Seared tuna comes over a spinach salad with thai peanut dressing. Baked tilapia is topped with crabmeat and creamy bordelaise and served over angel hair pasta with glazed baby carrots. No reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ MOSCA’S — 4137 Hwy. 90 W., Westwego, 436-8950; www.moscasrestaurant.com — this family-style eatery has changed little since opening in 1946. Popular dishes include shrimp Mosca, chicken a la grande and baked oysters Mosca, made with breadcrumps and

Italian seasonings. Reservations accepted. Dinner tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$$ RED GRAVY — 125 Camp St., 5618844; www.redgravycafe.com — the cafe serves breakfast items including pancakes, waffles and pastries. At lunch, try meatballs, lasagna and other Italian specialties, panini, wraps, soups and salads. open Sundays before New orleans Saints home games. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411 Chastant St., Metairie, 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — try house specialties like veal- and spinach-stuffed canneloni. Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch tue.-Fri., dinner tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

JaPaNeSe KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 8913644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi. com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. the South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

BREAkFASt, LunCH, DInnER & LAtE-nIgHt

& dinner DAILY lunCh SpeCialS Monday-Friday

Come Try our

BOILED

SHRIMP & CRAWFISH

CRAWFISH PO-BOY’S 504 373 6439 Sunday - WedneSday 7am-10pm

AnD

ThurSday - SaTurday 7am-laTe

620 Conti St. French Quarter

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro. com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ORIGAMI — 5130 Freret St., 8996532 — Nabeyaki udon is a soup brimming with thick noodles, chicken and vegetables. the long list of special rolls includes the Big Easy, which combines tuna, salmon, white fish, snow crab, asparagus and crunchy bits in soy paper with eel sauce on top. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. there’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola. com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. the Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIaNa CONteMPORaRY BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St., 267-7485; www.bouchenola.com —

R E S TA U R A N T & B A R

Outdoor Dining on Esplanade

DAILY SEAFOOD SPECIALS SUNDAY BRUNCH 11 AM - 3 PM FRESH FRUIT

FROZEN MARGARITAS 2 FOR 1

HAPPY HOUR WEEKDAYS 4-6PM

LIVE JAZZ

EVERY THU & SUN 6-9PM

www.santafenola.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485; www.oaknola.com — this wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. the hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and late-night tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747 — this casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. the menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

39


OuT to EAT This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ K-PAUL’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN — 416 Chartres St., 596-2530; www.chefpaul.com — At chef Paul Prudhomme’s restaurant, signature dishes include blackened Louisiana drum, Cajun jambalaya and the blackened stuffed pork chop. Lunch service is deli style and changing options include po-boys and dishes like tropial fruit salad with bronzed shrimp. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

FEATURING AUTHENTIC VIETNAMESE DELICACIES

Gott Gourmet Cafe uses the freshest ingredients available for our homemade dressings, sauces & meats to make all of our signature recipes daily.

LENTEN MENU ITEMS • • • • • • • • • •

"Hot Pot"

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

special inflation fighting price

40

$14.95 good for 2!

featuring cooking table side with the choice of Hot & Sour Soup with shrimp, tomatoes, okra, bean sprouts, celery or Tofu and selected vegetables, in a Vegetarian Soup served with rice noodles or jasmine rice

Grilled Veggie Salad Gott Salad Shrimp/ Oyster Caesar Salad Oyster Spinach Salad Grilled Veggie Wrap Shrimp Club Wrap Catfish Club Fresh Mozzarella Panini Five Cheese Mac & Cheese, plus daily specials

MON-FRI 11AM-9:30PM SAT 12 NOON-9:30PM DINNER MENU ONLY

TUESDAY - FRIDAY 11 AM - 9 PM SATURDAY - SUNDAY 8 AM - 5 PM W E E K E N D B R E A K FA S T S AT. A N D S U N . 8 A M - N O O N

135 N. CARROLLTON

(CORNER OF MAGAZINE & 8TH)

504-309-7286

3100 MAGAZINE ST.

504-373-6579 WWW.GOTTGOURMETCAFE.COM

Large Banquet Room in Metairie

Birthday Parties, Wedding Receptions, Rehearsal Dinners, Sweet 16's FULL CATERING

• BAR • SURROUND SOUND • PARKING

3939 Veterans • (504) 887-8812 (between Cleary & Clearview)

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ TOMAS BISTRO — 755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942 — Tomas serves dishes like semiboneless Louisiana quail stuffed with applewood-smoked bacon dirty popcorn rice, Swiss chard and Madeira sauce. The duck cassoulet combines duck confit and Creole Country andouille in a white bean casserole. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN

Brand New Parran's Catering and Banquet Room

MANNING’S — 519 Fulton St., 593-8118; www.harrahsneworleans.com — Named for former New Orleans Saints quarterback Archie Manning, this restaurant’s game plan sticks to Louisiana flavors. A cast iron skillet-fried filet is served with two-potato hash, fried onions and Southern Comfort pan sauce. The fish and chips feature black drum crusted in Zapp’s Crawtator crumbs served with Crystal beurre blanc. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St., 587-3756; www. attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$ BABYLON CAFE — 7724 Maple St., 314-0010; www. babyloncafe.biz —The Babylon platter includes stuffed grape leaves, hummus, kibbeh, rice and one choice of meat: lamb, chicken or beef kebabs, chicken or beef shawarma, gyro or kufta. Chicken shawarma salad is a salad topped with olives, feta and chicken breast cooked on a rotis-

serie. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and charbroiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S. Carrollton Ave., 4869950; www.juansflyingburrito. com — Mardi Gras Indian tacos are stuffed with roasted corn, pinto beans, grilled summer squash, Jack cheese and spicy slaw. Red chile chicken and goat cheese quesadilla features grilled Creole chicken breast, salsa fresca, chile-lime adobo sauce, and Jack, cheddar and goat cheeses pressed in a flour tortilla. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LUCY’S RETIRED SURFERS’ BAR & RESTAURANT — 701 Tchoupitoulas St., 523-8995; www.lucysretiredsurders.com — This surf shack serves CaliforniaMexican cuisine and the bar has a menu of tropical cocktails. Todo Santos fish tacos feature grilled or fried mahi mahi in corn or flour tortillas topped with shredded cabbage and shrimp sauce, and are served with rice and beans. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily, late night Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguesestyle fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub.com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., 525-8899; www. gazebocafenola.com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www. hob.com/neworleans — Try the

pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur St., 527-5000; www. marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-8855 — This music clubs serves dishes like fish and chips, spicy hot wings, tacos and more. There are weekly specials and vegetarian and vegan options. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

NEIGHBORHOOD ARTZ BAGELZ — 3138 Magzine St., 309-7557; www. artzbagelz.com — Artz bakes its bagels in house and options include onion, garlic, honey whole wheat, cinnamon-raisin, salt and others. Get one with a schmear or as a sandwich. Salads also are available. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636 Franklin St., Gretna, 3013166; www.braxtonsnola.com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, po-boys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Start a meal with oysters Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www. olivebranchcafe.com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Chicken and artichoke pasta is tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the


OUT to EAT Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NEW YORK PIZZA — 4418 Magazine St., 891-2376; www. newyorkpizzanola.com — Choose from pizza by the slice or whole pie, calzones, pasta, sandwiches, salads and more. The Big Apple pie is loaded with pepperoni, Canadian bacon, onions, mushrooms, black olives, green peppers, Italian sausage and minced garlic and anchovies and jalapenos are optional. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA — 4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza. com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 888-4004 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368 Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of poboys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., 8993374; www.mahonyspoboys. com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original poboys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416; www.parranspoboy.com — Parran’s offers a long list of po-boys plus muffulettas, club sandwiches, pizzas, burgers, salads, fried seafood plates and Creole-Italian entrees. The veal supreme po-boy features a cutlet topped with Swiss cheese and brown gravy. No reserva-

SLICE — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800; www.slicepizzeria. com — Slice is known for pizza on thin crusts made from 100 percent wheat flour. Other options include the barbecue shrimp po-boy made with Abita Amber and the shrimp Portofino, a pasta dish with white garlic cream sauce, shrimp and broccoli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THE STORE — 814 Gravier St., 322-2446; www.thestoreneworleans.com — The Store serves sandwiches, salads and hot plates, and there is a taco bar where patrons can choose their own toppings. Red beans and rice comes with grilled andouille and a corn bread muffin. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $$

SEAFOOD GALLEY SEAFOOD RESTAURANT — 2535 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-0955 — Galley serves Creole and Italian dishes. Blackened redfish is served with shrimp and lump crabmeat sauce, vegetables and new potatoes. Galley’s popular soft-shell crab po-boy is the same one served at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575 Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200; www. redfishgrill.com — Seafood favorites include hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Barbecue oysters are flash fried, tossed in Crystal barbecue sauce and served with blue cheese dressing. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy., 737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548; www. bigmommaschickenandwaffles. com — Big Momma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — 322 Magazine St., 522-7902; www.centraarchy. com — This traditional steak-

house serves USDA prime beef, and a selection of super-sized cuts includes a 40-oz. Porterhouse for two. The menu also features seafood options and a la carte side items. Reservations recommended. Diner daily. Credit cards. $$$ CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001 N. Broad St., 821-3271; www.crescentcitysteaks. com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. There are porterhouse steaks large enough for two or three diners to share. Bread pudding with raisins and peaches is topped with brandy sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8362007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Paella de la Vega combines shrimp, mussels, chorizo, calamari, scallops, chicken and vegetables in saffron rice. Pollo en papel features chicken, mushrooms, leeks and feta in phyllo pastry. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

Julie’s Little India Kitchen at NOW SERVING

Weekend

Brunch

sat 9am-noon sun 9am-3pm

CAFE AND BAR | BALCONY GUEST HOUSE GROCERIES | BEER | WINE | LAUNDROMAT TAKE OUT 944-6666

• schiroscafe.com

2483 Royal street • balconyguesthouse.com

900 FRENCHMEN 943-9433 8550 PONCHARTRAIN BLVD. 267-3263

WWW.WASABINOLA.COM

happy hour

TUES-SAT

BRUNCH

3-6PM every sunday

COME TRY OUR BLACKBERRY JALAPENO SMOKED RIBS

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania St., 899-5129; www. moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ DOSON NOODLE HOUSE —135 N. Carrollton Ave., 3097283 — Traditional Vietnamese pho with pork and beef highlight the menu. The vegetarian hot pot comes with mixed vegetables, tofu and vermicelli rice noodles. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$ PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

3701 IBERVILLE STREET • NOLA 70119 504.488.6582 • KATIESINMIDCITY.COM MON.11AM-3PM • TUES-THURS.11AM-9PM FRI-SAT.11AM-10PM • SUN BRUNCH. 9AM-3PM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., 571-7561 — Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. Original topping choices include everything from sprouts to black bean and corn salsa to peanut butter. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

tions. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $

41


42

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012


MuSiC 45 FiLM 49

AE +

ART 53 S TAG E 57

what to know before you go

EvENTS 60

Top Cats The Lion King dazzles at the Mahalia Jackson Theater. By Lauren LaBorde

M

adult Nala. Scenes and characters taken most literally from the film don’t work well. The trio of goofy, dim-witted hyenas (Rashada Dawan, Keith Bennett and Robbie Swift) and Timon and Pumba (Nick Cordileone and Tony Freeman) are facsimiles of their animated counterparts down to the costumes, and they don’t offer many surprises. This is, in many ways, a kid’s show — animal puns and G-rated fart jokes abound. But adults will marvel at the animals and the complex staging that uses creative lighting and set pieces to add depth and create other illusions (the pivotal stampede scene is the best example), as well as dance numbers featuring a highly athletic ensemble and the African-inspired songs that supplement the original score by Elton John and Tim Rice. The Lion King retains enough of its original elements to satisfy nostalgic viewers, but it strays enough from the source material to make it fresh and exciting.

Jelani Remy stars as Simba in The Lion King.

8 p.m. Tue.-Fri.; 2 p.m. 27 & 8 p.m. Sat.; 1 p.m. & ThRu 6:30 p.m. Sun. APRIL Mahalia Jackson 15 Theater, 1419 Basin St., 287-0351; www.mahaliajacksontheater.com Tickets $65-$120 (plus fees) MAR

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

any Broadway musicals are film adaptations, but the transition from movie to stage can be tricky when the source work is animated. Shrek the Musical (the touring production came to New Orleans in June 2011) is an example of how clunky and overly literal a translation can be, resulting in something that looks more like Disney on Ice than a Broadway show. But The Lion King works because it offers an inspired interpretation of the 1994 Disney film’s animal kingdom. Elements that made The Lion King so popular — it’s the sixth longest-running show on Broadway — include costumes, puppetry and other mechanics used to animate the film’s environs and characters for the stage. Audiences get the extent of director Julie Taymor’s original vision (Taymor was the original director of Broadway’s notoriously troubled Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark). The show opener “The Circle of Life” introduces the full array of animals — lions, elephants, zebras and others — which emerges from the stage wings and walks in procession down the theater’s aisles (audiences should take their seats early: latecomers are held in the lobby until after that number). Cast members demonstrate exceptional grace, control and athleticism in operating these animals, especially the giraffes portrayed by actors on stilts, a life-sized cheetah puppet and birds whose operators mimic flight by darting down the aisles and around the stage. Even the cast members whose roles don’t require as much apparatus are captivating. Rafiki (Buyi Zama), who is a monkey in the film but human in the stage version, functions as an enigmatic mystic figure. She commands attention from the beginning with that piercing Zulu verse that begins “Circle of Life.” She’s got a singing voice that can be simultaneously big and restrained, and she’s effective at both humorous and emotional moments. The child actors portraying young Simba (Adante Power) and Nala (Sade Phillip-Demorcy) have refreshingly childlike singing voices that they don’t push to sound more mature. J. Anthony Crane is perfectly diabolical as Scar, who has designs on his brother Mufasa’s (played powerfully by Dionne Randolph) position as king. Syndee Winters embodies the strength and beauty of the

43


MUSIC listings

guys, 5

The Maison — rex gregory, 7; Upstarts, 9 Maple Leaf Bar — eckert gruver o’Day, 10 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — roger ferrera, 9 One Eyed Jacks — tune in & turn on, 9

Complete listings at www.bestofneworleans.Com

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 faX: 504.483.3116

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

TUeSDAY 27 AllWays Lounge — Classic Country Jamboree, 10 Banks Street Bar — riverbent, 9 Big Al’s Deckbar Seafood & Blues — redfish blues band, 7 Blue Nile — Dan oestreicher & marcello benetti, 10 BMC — Carolyn broussard, 5; pocket aces brass band, 8; lagniappe brass band, 11 Chickie Wah Wah — tommy malone, 8 Columns Hotel — John rankin, 8 Crescent City Brewhouse — new orleans streetbeat, 6 d.b.a. — treme brass band, 9

The Famous Door — Darren murphy & big soul, 3 Funky Pirate — blues masters feat. big al Carson, 8:30 The Maison — gregory agid Quartet, 6; magnitude, 9; smoking time Jazz Club, 9:30 Maple Leaf Bar — rebirth brass band, 10 McAlister Auditorium, Tulane University — ben folds, minus the bear, 7:30

WeDneSDAY 28 12 Bar — brass-a-Holics, 9 Banks Street Bar — Kenny triche, 8; major bacon, 10 Big Al’s Deckbar Seafood & Blues — oscar & the blues Cats, 8 Blue Nile — United postal project, 8; gravity a, 11

Preservation Hall — Joints Chief of Jazz feat. frank oxley, 8 Republic New Orleans — glen David andrews, 9 Rock ’N’ Bowl — Johnny angel & the swinging Demons, 8:30 Rusty Nail — Jenn Howard, 7 Siberia — magnetic ear, ratty scurvics trio, 10 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Delfeayo marsalis, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — brett richardson, 4; orleans 6, 6; st. louis slim & the frenchmen st. Jug band, 10 St. Roch Tavern — J.D. Hill & the Jammers, 8

BMC — andre bouvier, 5; blues4sale, 8; Deja Vu brass band, 11

Stage Door Canteen at The National World War II Museum — Victory belles, 12

Cafe Negril — Jamey st. pierre & the Honeycreepers, 9

THURSDAY 29

Chickie Wah Wah — sweet olive string band, 5; meschiya lake & tom mcDermott, 7; marc adams & House of Clements, 9:30 Circle Bar — parenthetical girls, 10 Columns Hotel — riccardo Crespo, 8 Crescent City Brewhouse — new orleans streetbeat, 6 d.b.a. — paul sanchez, alex mcmurray & washboard Chaz, 7 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — bob andrews, 9:30 Fair Grinds Coffeehouse — wolter wierbos, 8 The Famous Door — Darren murphy & big soul, 3 Funky Pirate — blues masters feat. big al Carson, 8:30

Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — the last new beginning, 8; Holly beach, 9; John, 10

Hi-Ho Lounge — walter wierbos, Jeff albert, rick trolsen, mark mcgraine, 10

Preservation Hall — preservation Hall-stars feat. shannon powell, 8

House of Blues — theDream, 9

Ralph’s on the Park — tom worrell, 5

House of Blues (Voodoo Garden) — luke winslowKing, 7

The Sandbar at UNO — edwin santiago, 7

Irvin Mayfield’s I Club — mia borders, 8

Siberia — thomas Johnson, Helen gillet, Julie odell and others, 10

Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Kipori woods, 5; irvin mayfield’s noJo Jam, 8

Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Davell Crawford, 8 & 10

Kerry Irish Pub — Chip wilson, 9

Spotted Cat — brett richardson, 4; aurora nealand & the royal roses, 6; meschiya

Lafayette Square — wednesday at the square feat. big sam’s funky nation, wise

12 Bar — remedy Krewe, tributaries, 9 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery — bomb the music industry, safety, all people, lollies, 6 AllWays Lounge — log ladies, 10 Banks Street Bar — girls Dressed as girls, 8; rx filled, 10 Bayou Beer Garden — walter “wolfman” washington, 8 Blue Nile — micah mcKee & little maker, 7 BMC — soula billy swamp boogie band, 5; andy J. forest, 8; Young pinstripe brass band, 11 Buffa’s Lounge — tom mcDermott & aurora nealand, 8 Cafe Istanbul — michaela Harrison, 8 Circle Bar — sun Hotel, Caddywhompus, boyfrndz, 10 d.b.a. — Jon Cleary, 7; Colin lake, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — seva Venet string band, 9:30 Hi-Ho Lounge — stooges brass band, 10 Kerry Irish Pub — Kelcy mae band, 9 The Maison — John Dobry, 7; team robot, 9; lagniappe brass band, 10 Maple Leaf Bar — the trio, 10 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — old tire swingers,

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — tom Hook, 9:30

lake & the little big Horns, 10

Palm Court Jazz Cafe — lars edegran, topsy Chapman & palm Court Jazz band, 7:30

page 47

45


Introducing the new Carousel Lounge. A whoLe new spIn on LIve musIC.

Tuesday, april 3 6:00pm – 10:00pm: George French Trio featuring Ellen Smith Wednesday, april 4 8:00pm – 12:00am: Luther Kent Quartet Thursday, april 5 8:00pm – 12:00am: Eudora Evans & Band

Come take a spin at this historic bar in The Hotel Monteleone, and catch some amazing local singers and musicians live every Tuesday through Saturday night.

Eudora Evans

George French

saTurday, april 14 9:00pm – 1:00am: Lena Prima & Band

saTurday, april 7 9:00pm – 1:00am: Lena Prima & Band

Tuesday, april 17 6:00pm – 10:00pm: George French Trio featuring Ellen Smith

Tuesday, april 10 6:00pm – 10:00pm: George French Trio featuring Ellen Smith

Wednesday, april 18 8:00pm – 12:00am: Luther Kent Quartet

Thursday, april 26 8:00pm – 12:00am: Eudora Evans & Band

Thursday, april 19 8:00pm – 12:00am: Eudora Evans & Band

Friday, april 27 9:00pm – 12:00am: Luther Kent & Trick Bag (A Special Jazz Fest Treat Featuring Luther’s Big Horn Band!)

Thursday, april 12 8:00pm – 12:00am: Eudora Evans & Band

Friday, april 20 5:00pm – 8:00pm: Luther Kent Quartet 9:00pm – 1:00am: Lena Prima & Band

Friday, april 13 5:00pm – 8:00pm: Luther Kent Quartet 9:00pm – 1:00am: Lena Prima & Band

saTurday, april 21 9:00pm – 1:00am: Lena Prima & Band

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

46

7pm

Tyler’s Revisited feat.

5pm

Playhour Kipori Woods

Germaine Bazzle and Paul Longstreth

8pm

Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam feat. the music of Horace Silver

MONDAY 3/26 8pm

Gerald French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band

TUESDAY 3/27 8pm

WEDNESDAY 3/28

NOJI Presents Master Series feat. Victor Atkins

THURSDAY 3/29 5pm

Playhour Roman Skakun

8pm

Shannon Powell

FRIDAYS 3/23, 3/30 8pm

The Professor Piano Series feat. Tom McDermott

8pm

Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown

12am

www.facebook.com/Thehotelmonteleone

SATURDAYS 3/24 8pm

Jaz Sawyer’s

12am

Brass-A-Holics

Crescent City Allstars

3/31 8pm 12am

Glen David Andrews Regeneration Brass Band

Burlesque Ballroom feat.

Trixie Minx

7 NIGHTS A WEEK 8PM MON-SAT | 7PM SUNDAYS

irvinmayfield.com For schedule updates follow us on:

Tuesday, april 24 6:00pm – 10:00pm: George French Trio featuring Ellen Smith Wednesday, april 25 8:00pm – 12:00am: Luther Kent Quartet

saTurday, april 28 9:00pm – 1:00am: Lena Prima & Band sunday, april 29 9:00pm – 1:00am: Lena Prima & Band

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for the most up-to-date weekly entertainment schedule.

www.twitter.com/hotelmonteleone

214 Royal Street, New Orleans, LA 70130 • 504.523.3341 • http://hotelmonteleone.com/carouselbarentertainment

MARCH 2012

Luther Kent

Friday, april 6 5:00pm – 8:00pm: Luther Kent Quartet 9:00pm – 1:00am: Lena Prima & Band

Wednesday, april 11 8:00pm – 12:00am: Luther Kent Quartet

at the hoTeL monTeLeone

SUNDAY 3/25

Lena Prima

300 BOURBON STREET • NEW ORLEANS 504.553.2299 • WWW.SONESTA.COM


MUSiC LISTINGS PrEViEW

Bare Bones: Trombone Blastoff

Dutch trombonist Wolter Wierbos has a daunting catalog. With 33 years of live and recorded free jazz under his belt, Wierbos’ swerving honk has graced no fewer than 100 albums alongside players as far-flung — continentally, if not creatively — as Amsterdam’s Instant Composers Pool Orchestra and New York City’s Sonic Youth. Despite the voluminous output (and regular visits to New Orleans, a favorite enclave for fellow Pool titans Han Bennink and Peter Brotzmann), to be privy to one of Wierbos’ expressive, extemporaneous performances often means having to be there yourself. An exception is the March 2008 Bare Bones tournament at the Blue Nile, wherein Jeff Albert captured more than an hour of trombone jousts, a series of one-on-ones structured like a hornblowers’ celebrity death match: Wierbos took on Albert, 10 p.m. Wednesday Rick Trolsen, Mark McGrain and Big Sam Mar Hi-Ho Lounge Williams, each of whom faced one another before joining forces in a 15-minute free2239 St. Claude Ave. for-all uprising. The entire animalistic set is 945-4446 online (www.openearsmusic.org/?p=75), and it gives some sense of what you can expect from this residency, in which Wierbos plays solo at Fair Grinds Coffee House (8 p.m. Wednesday), enlists in a Bare Bones rematch at the Hi-Ho Lounge and gets weird with the Fretless Continuum, aka cellist Helen Gillet and guitarist Dave Easley, at Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center (8:30 p.m. Thursday). It’s less call-and-response, more call-and-revolt. Call for ticket information. — NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS

28

page 45

Oak — Cristina Perez, 9 Old Point Bar — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Kim Carson, 9 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Duke Heitger, Crescent City Joymakers & Delfayo Marsalis, 7:30 Preservation Hall — Smittydee’s Brass Band, 8 Rivershack Tavern — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 8 Rock ’N’ Bowl — Leon Chavis & the Zydeco Flames, 8:30 The Saint — Adults, I’m Fine, Dolphin Mouth, 10 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Peter Harris Quintet, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; Smoking Time Jazz Club, 10 St. Roch Tavern — Old Tire Swingers, 8 Tipitina’s — Soul & Blues Revue feat. Clay Otis, Glen David Andrews, Revelations feat. Tre Williams & Jamie McLean, 9 Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary

Friday 30 AllWays Lounge — Honorable South, 10

2012, 10

GARDEN

Howlin’ Wolf — Sheridan Road, Robert Fortune Band, 10

Banks Street Bar — Autotomii, Roarshark, 10 Blue Nile — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 7; Mahayla, Coyotes (upstairs), 10; Bonerama, 11

Kerry Irish Pub — Damien Louviere, 5; Foot & Friends, 5 Le Bon Temps Roule — Bill Malchow, 7

BMC — El DeOrazio & Friends, 3; Jeff Chaz Band, 6; Dana Abbot Band, 9; Lagniappe Brass Band, 12:30 a.m.

The Maison — Those Peaches, 5; Kristina Morales, 7; Dirty Bourbon River Show, 10 Mandeville Trailhead — Mojeaux Band, 6:30

PLENTY OF TVS INDOORS OR OUT

326 N. JEFF DAVIS

SAT:

Karaoke - Starts at 9PM

SUN: Happy Hour ALL DAY

HAPPY HOUR • MON-FRI • 3-7PM

504.302.9357

COME WATCH COLLEGE BASKETBALL BATTLE IT OUT ALL WEEKEND ON THE BIG SCREEN & ENJOY COCKTAILS ON OUR PATIO ON FULTON ST

COMEDY NIGHT 8:30PM

TUE

3/27

W/ JACKIE JENKINS

FRI

DEMO SHOW WITH

SAT

PLUS LAST CHANCE CASANOVA,

3/30

GLEN ST. PATRICK 6PM MUSTACHES FOR MS 9PM

STOP BY AFTER

WEDNESDAYS AT THE SQUARE & ENJOY BOILED CRAWFISH, DRINK SPECIALS & MUSIC BY

WED 3/28

BRASSAHOLICS 9PM

BECOMING A NEW ORLEANS TRADITION

THU 3/29

3RD MEASURE 7PM REMEDY KREWE & THE TRIBUTARIES 9PM

3/31

COLD FORTY THREE 10PM 200 WEST, THE RIFF W/ BASE LINE BUMS

$3 DRINKS / $2 BEERS EVERY NIGHT

608 FULTON STREET • NEW ORLEANS 504-212-6476 • WWW.12BARNOLA.COM

Attiki

bar & grill

Chickie Wah Wah — Gallivan Burwell & the Predatory Drifters, 5; Paul Sanchez, 8; Sugarcane Jane, 10:30 Circle Bar — Nicky Da B, DJ Q, 10

Old Point Bar — Rick Trolsen, 5; Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 9:30

HAPPY HOUR

Old U.S. Mint — Marla Dixon’s Jazz Vixens, 9

FOOD SERVED TIL 1AM

The Cypress — Abide In Me EP release feat. Bearfighter, ManVsMachine, Maps & Makers, Precursor, 7

WED: Blues Jam Night 8-11pm

BASKETBALL FINALS!

Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — Cameron Dupuy, 8; Gina Forsyth, 9; Eric John Kaiser, 10 Oak — Jenn Howard, 9

MON: FREE POOL 6-10pm

PERFECT PATIO WEATHER

Fair Grinds Coffeehouse — Lips & Trips, 8

Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Tom McDermott, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8

Carrollton Station — 61 South, 9:30

BEER

DARTS • POOL • DARTS • POOL

experience the mediterranean

BELLY DANCER

Every Fri & Sat Night

M-F 3-6pm

Daily Martini Specials

d.b.a. — Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 6; Iguanas, 10

One Eyed Jacks — Dax Riggs, Mount Carmel, The Dropout, 10

230 DECATUR

Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Rick Trolsen & Brasil

Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Wendell Brunious & Palm Court

504-587-3756

11AM-4AM DAILY

www.attikineworleans.com

best

trivtia nigh in town!

EvEry y Thursda @ 8PM

1100 Constance St. NOLA

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

7; Poetic Mental Agression, 8; Devil Killing Moth, 9; Bedside Manor, 10

Arts Center — Wolter Wierbos, Dave Easley & Helen Gillet, 8

BAYOU

525-5515 • therustynail.biz

Parking Available • Enter/Exit Calliope

47


MuSic LISTINGS Showcasing Local Music

Papa Grows Funk

Preservation Hall — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8

TUE 3/27

Rebirth Brass Band

The Reserve of Orleans — Naydja CoJoe & the Jazz Experience, 8

WED EGO w/ Jake Eckert, 3/28 CR Gruver & Kevin O’Day THU 3/29

The Trio featuring Johnny V, & Special Guests

FRI 3/30

Davell Crawford

SAT 3/31

Papa Mali & Uptown Double Shotgun

Trio w/ Walter SUN Joe JoeKrown Krown Trio & SUN “Wolfman” Washington 4/1 feat. Russell Batiste & Walter Batiste 3/13 Russell Wolfman Washington

New Orleans Best Every Night! 8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

www.themapleleafbar.com

The

MAR MAR APR

06

SAT

APR CHIP WILSON

9PM

THU 3/29

KELCY MAE BAND

9PM

FRI 3/30

DAMIEN LOUVIERE FOOT & FRIENDS

5PM 9PM

SAT 3/31

SPEED THE MULE RITES OF PASSAGE

5PM 9PM

SUN 4/1

PATRICK COOPER

MON 4/2

BROWN CHICKEN BROWN COW STRING BAND 4PM

331 Decatur St. • www.kerryirishpub.com

8PM

Spotted Cat — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10 Tipitina’s — Steve Gleason benefit concert feat. John Boutte, Benny D & Spyboy, Honey Island Swamp Band, Shamarr Allen, Louisiana Philharmonic Horns, 9 Woldenberg Riverfront Park — Big Dance Concert Series feat. KISS, 4

Saturday 31 12 Bar — Cold Forty Three, Last Chance, Casanova, 200 West, The Riff, Base Line Burns, 10

FRI

14

SAT

15 SUN

w/Lady Madness

BMC — Chris Polacek & the Hubcap Kings, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6; Kipori Woods Band, 9; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, midnight

Say! Don’t Play

Bootleggers Bar and Grille — Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 8

Killahouse

Buffa’s Lounge — Royal Rounders, 8

Bacon

Cafe Istanbul — Ensemble Fatien, 9

Remedy Krewe

Cafe Negril — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7

+ xDefinition

TUE

WED

service karaoke industry night

open mic

THU dj Gene w/$1.00 drinks for ladies

LATE NIGHT FOOD OPEN MONDAY - FRIDAY • 2PM-2AM SATURDAY & SUNDAY • 5PM-2AM 521 East Boston Street • Covington, LA 70433

985-892-2225

Banks Street Bar — Norco Lapalco, Green Demons, House of Surf, 10

Blue Nile — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Zena Moses & the Rue Fiya Allstars (upstairs), 10; Mia Borders & Friends, 11

Dance Party

APR

SAT

APR

WED 3/28

+ Ish + Street Parade 6pm

02 Dax Riggs

APR

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

48

HONKY TONK OPEN MIC W/JASON BISHOP 9PM

Dash Rip Rock

MON

07

TUE 3/27

Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10

The Blue Bengal — Refried Confuzion, 10

31

Zagat Rated

Siberia — Warbeast, The Void, The Devil’s Rain, Chronic Death Slug, 9

FRI

SAT

-No Cover

Rock ’N’ Bowl — Trampled Under Foot, 9:30

GREEN ROOM 30

VOTED

Rivershack Tavern — Ghost Town, 10

Babylon Lounge — Darel Poche CD release, 10

Music Club

Live Music Nightly

Jazz Band, 7

MON 3/26

www.GreenRoomLive.net

Carrollton Station — N’awlins Johnnys, 9:30 Circle Bar — Kay Swiss, Keddz, Sluts, Hot Coke Sex, 10 The Cypress — Awaken the City, The Mothercell, The World Above Us, Define, 7 d.b.a. — John Boutte, 8; Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, 11 Fair Grinds Coffeehouse — Mona Porters, 8 Howlin’ Wolf — Asher Roth, 10

Howlin’ Wolf (The Den) — Gold & the Rush CD release feat. Star & Micey, Mission South Archanimals, 10 Kerry Irish Pub — Speed the Mule, 5; Rites of Passage, 9 The Maison — Ramblin’ Letters, 5; Smoking Time Jazz Club, 7; Brass-A-Holics, 10; Moon Taxi, midnight Maple Leaf Bar — Papa Mali & Uptown Double Shotgun, 10

Howlin’ Wolf (The Den) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 Maple Leaf Bar — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Lucien Barbarin & Sunday Night Swingsters, 7 Preservation Hall — New Orleans Legacy Band feat. Tommy Sancton, 8

Mercedes-Benz Superdome — Blues Traveler, midnight

Siberia — The Energy, Pallbearers, Die Rotzz, 10

Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — Soul Salvage Project, 7; Dan Rivers, 8; Badura, 9

Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Phil Degruy & Cloud Sharp Nine, 8 & 10

Oak — Andrew Duhon, 9 Old Point Bar — Alexander Fly, 9:30 Old U.S. Mint — Ben Polcer’s Girl Jam Jazz Band feat. Miss Sophie Lee, Margie Perez, Sarah Quintana, Meschiya Lake and others, 9 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7:30 Rivershack Tavern — Coldshot, 10 Rock ’N’ Bowl — Royal Southern Brotherhood, Tab Benoit, Bart Walker Band, Lil Red & Big Bad, 9:30 Rusty Nail — Eric John Kaiser, 9; Jenn Howard & Crazy McGee, 10 Siberia — Chef Menteur CD release feat. Microshards, Lonely Lonely Knights, Geisterfahrer, 10 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Germaine Bazzle & Lawrence Sieberth Quartet, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Rick Weston & Colin Lake, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10 Tipitina’s — Suplecs, Supagroup, 10 Woldenberg Riverfront Park — Big Dance Concert Series feat. the Black Keys, 11 a.m.

SuNday 1 Banks Street Bar — Mid-City Pickers, 6; Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 9 BMC — Soula Billy Swamp Boogie Band, 3; Alicia Morton Band, 6; Marc Joseph’s Mojo Combo, 9 Bombay Club — Matt Lemmler Duo feat. Steve Masakowski, 7:30 Circle Bar — Riverwolves, 10 d.b.a. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Chapter: SOUL feat. Calvin Johnson & Kirk Joseph, 10 Finnegan’s Easy — Keiko Komaki, Robin Clabby, Chris Alford & guests, 2 Hi-Ho Lounge — G-String Orchestra, 10

Tipitina’s — Sunday Youth Music Workshop feat. Johnny Vidacovich Trio, 1; Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30 Woldenberg Riverfront Park — Big Dance Concert Series feat. Jimmy Buffett, 3

MoNday 2 Apple Barrel — Sam Cammarata, 8 Banks Street Bar — N’awlins Johnnys, 10 BJ’s Lounge — King James & the Special Men, 10 BMC — Lil Red & Big Bad, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9 Bombay Club — Monty Banks, 7:30 Checkpoint Charlie — Concrete Rivals, 10 Chickie Wah Wah — Jon Cleary Fair Grinds Coffeehouse — Laura Stevenson & the Cans, Dominique LeJeune, 7 Howlin’ Wolf (The Den) — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 10 The Maison — Chicken & Waffles, 5; Aurora Nealand & the Royal Roses, 7; Super Jam, 9:30 Maple Leaf Bar — Papa Grows Funk, 10 Old Point Bar — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 8 Siberia — Underskore Orkestra, Bosques Fragmentados, Broad St. Misdemeanors, 10

claSSical/ coNcertS St. Anna’s Episcopal Church — 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121; www.stannanola.org — Tue: Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7 Trinity Episcopal Church — 1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth Organ Recital feat. Albinas Prizgintas, 6


FILM

listings

Complete listings at www.bestofneworleans.Com

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 faX: 504.483.3116

Now ShowINg 21 JUMP STREET (R) — Channing tatum and Jonah Hill play undercover cops assigned to a high school in the new orleans-shot comedy based on the 1980s tV show. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 ACT OF VALOR (R) — an elite team of navy seals sets out on a global manhunt after discovering a deadly terrorist plot against the U.s. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 THE ARTIST (PG-13) — the black-and-white, silent french romance depicts Hollywood during the time when silent cinema was being replaced by talkies. AMC Palace 20

FRIENDS WITH KIDS (R) — longtime friends (Jennifer westfeldt and adam scott) decide to have a child together in the comedy also featuring Jon Hamm, Kristen wiig, maya rudolph and megan fox. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) — in the film adaptation of suzanne Collins’ popular young adult book, teenagers from the 12 districts of what was once north america must fight to the death in an annual televised event. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 HURRICANE ON THE BAYOU (NR) — the film tells the story of Hurricane Katrina and the impact that louisiana’s disappearing wetlands has on hurricane protection. Entergy IMAX

SAFE HOUSE (R) — a young Cia agent tasked with watching a fugitive at a Cape town safe house finds himself on the run with his charge when mercenaries attack. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 A SEPARATION (PG-13) — in the iranian drama that won the oscar for best foreign language film, a couple faces a difficult decision when trying to improve the life of their child. Chalmette Movies SILENT HOUSE (R) — elizabeth olsen stars as a woman who finds herself trapped inside an old family house she is renovating. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 9 THE VOW (PG-13) — a husband tries to rebuild the bond with his wife, who after a car accident is suffering memory loss and has no recollection of her husband. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN (R) — in the adaptation of lionel shriver’s gripping novel, tilda swinton and John C. reilly play the parents of a teenager whose behavior becomes increasingly vicious. Canal Place

oPENINg FRIDAY MIRROR MIRROR (PG13) — Julia roberts and lily Collins star in the revamp of Snow White.

SPEcIAL ScREENINgS ALL IN: THE POKER MOVIE (NR) — the preservation Hall Jazz band is featured in the score of Douglas tirola’s documentary about the poker boom of the last decade. a Q&a with tirola follows the friday screening. Tickets $7

“LAuGH ALL yOu WANT...IT’S A bLAST.” Peter Travers,

ART IS ...THE PERMANENT REVOLUTION (NR) — manfred Kirchheimer’s film looks at the connection between the artistic process and political art through works by contemporary american artists. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 6:30 p.m. Friday-Monday, then April 2-3 and April 5, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net BATAAN (NR) — the wartime film is about a small unit of americans charged with holding off the Japanese onslaught on bataan in early 1942. Free admission. 6 p.m. Thursday, Stage Door Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944; www.stagedoorcanteen.org BULLHEAD (R) — the belgium film, which was an academy award nominee for best foreign language film, follows a steroids and hormonesaddicted cattle farmer who initiates a dangerous deal with a mafioso meat trader. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 8 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net HIP HOP: BEYOND BEATS AND RHYMES (NR) — byron Hurt, a former college quarterback turned activist, examines representations of gender roles in hip-hop and rap music in his documentary. a Q&a with Hurt follows the screening. Free admission. 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nunemaker Auditorium, Monroe Hall, Loyola University New Orleans, 6363 St. Charles Ave., 865-2011; www.loyno.edu HOTCAKES (NR) — the new orleans-shot film is a 19-minute, black-and-white film noir about three men fresh out of prison with very different ideas about how to spend the night. blues singer olga preforms before the screening. Tickets $8. 8 p.m. Wednesday, Cafe Istanbul, New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave.; www. neworleanshealingcenter.org THE INNKEEPERS (R) — as an inn prepares to close permanently, two employees determined to reveal the inn’s haunted past start experiencing disturbing events. Tickets $6.50 New Orleans Film Society Members, $8.50 general admission. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, 304-9992

“FLAT-OuT HILARIOuS.” Mara Reinstein,

“I’M WILLING TO bET I WON’T SEE A FuNNIER COMEDy THIS yEAR.” Rene Rodriguez,

COLUMBIA PICTURES AND METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURES PRESENT IN ASSOCIATION WITH RELATIVITY MEDIA AN ORIGINAL FILM/CANNELL STUDIOS PRODUCTION “21 JUMP STREET” BRIE LARSON DAVE FRANCO EXECUTIVE TH ICE CUBE MUSICBY MARK MOTHERSBAUGH PRODUCERS ROB BASEDRIGGLEON THEWITELEVISION JONAH HILL CHANNING TATUM EZRASCREENPLAY SWERDLOW TANIA LANDAU STORY SERIES CREATED BY PATRICK HASBURGH & STEPHEN J. CANNELL BY MICHAEL BACALL & JONAH HILL BY MICHAEL BACALL PRODUCED DIRECTED BY NEAL H. MORITZ STEPHEN J. CANNELL BY PHIL LORD & CHRISTOPHER MILLER CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

CASA DE MI PADRE (R) — will ferrell, gael garcia bernal and Diego luna star in the comedy about brothers caught up in a war with a mexican drug lord. AMC Palace 20

JEFF, WHO LIVES AT HOME (R) — a man’s (Jason segel) day takes a strange turn while running an errand for his mother in the Duplass brothers comedy. Canal Place

general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 8 p.m. Friday-Monday, then nightly through April 3, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

49


art

LISTINGS

COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 FAX: 504.483.3116

opening ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Works by Robert Seago and Sarah Griffin Thibodeaux, reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

galleries 1239 CONGRESS. 1239 Congress St. — Photographs by Christian Hardy, Andy Cook, Jordan Cabot, Durado Brooks and Michelle Nicolette Kowalski, through Sunday. A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www. agallery.com — Photogravures by Josephine Sacabo, through Saturday. ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www.angelakinggallery.com — Glass sculpture by Marlene Rose, through April 15.

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 5221999; www.arthurrogergallery. com — “200: Art Inspired by 200 Years of Louisiana Statehood,” paintings by Francis X. Pavy; “Keepsakes,” mixedmedia works by Mary Jane Parker; “Mosquito Muerto,” paintings and prints by Keith Perelli; all through Saturday. ATELIER-MAGASIN. 3954 Magazine St. — Wood and metal sculpture by Kelly Guidry; photographs by Amy James; portraits by Clay Judice Jr.; paintings by George Marks; all ongoing. BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 5252767; www.barristersgallery. com — Prints by Sean Star Wars and Aaron McNamee in conjunction with the Southern Graphics Council International convention, through April 7. THE BEAUTY SHOP. 3828 Dryades St. — Works by Rebecca Rebouche, ongoing. BEE GALLERIES. 319 Chartres St., 587-7117; www.beegalleries.com — Works by 15 local and regional artists including Martin LaBorde, ongoing.

ANTIEAU GALLERY. 927 Royal St., 304-0849; www. antieaugallery.com — “Black White & Blue,” portraits by John Pappas; works by Bryan Cunningham, John Whipple and Chris Roberts-Antieau; all through April 21.

BENEITO’S ART. 3618 Magazine St., 891-9170; www. bernardbeneito.com — Oil paintings, prints and postcards by Bernard E. Beneito, ongoing.

ANTON HAARDT GALLERY. 2858 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart. com — Works by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing.

BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — A group exhibition of artists from the Community Print Shop, through April 10.

AQUARIUM GALLERY AND STUDIOS. 934 Montegut St., 701-0511 — Prints by Frank Lopiccolo, Maureen Iverson and Mark Waguespack in conjunction with the Southern Graphics International conference, through Saturday.

CAFE BABY. 237 Chartres St., 310-4004; www. markbercier.com — Paintings and works on paper by Mark Bercier, ongoing.

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by Anne McLeod, sculpture by Hernan Caro, jewelry by Belle Bijoux, ce-

CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www.carolrobinsongallery.com — “Artists of Faith,” works by Jack Bartlett, Sonia Kouyoumdjian, Nell Tilton, David Goodman and Jean Geraci, through April 14.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www.coleprattgallery.com — “Songs for the Gulf Coast,” paintings by Susan DowningWhite, through Saturday. COLLINS C. DIBOLL ART GALLERY. Loyola University, Monroe Library, 6363 St. Charles Ave., fourth floor, 861-5456 — Southern Graphics Council International juried membership show; “Texted Haiku Broadsides,” works by Dirk Hanger; both through Thursday. COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “Hide and See,” paintings by Judy Burks, through Saturday. COURTYARD GALLERY. 1129 Decatur St., 330-0134; www.woodartandmarketing. com — Hand-carved woodworks by Daniel Garcia, ongoing. D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Macrocosm/ Microcosm,” metal and glass sculpture by Shae Freeman, through April 5. DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Your Planet Has Not Seen its Golden Age,” printmaking by Jesse Shaw and Erin Zona in conjunction with the Southern Graphics Council International convention, through April 8. THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront. org — Prints and installations by Tim Dooley, Aaron Wilson, Derek Whitlock, Craig Branum and Ben Fox-McCord, through April 8. GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www.galerieroyale.com — Mixed media on canvas and metal by Mike Klung, through Saturday. GALLERY VERIDITAS. 3822 Magazine St., 2675991; www.gvnola.com — “Skin and Bone,” works by Joseph Holmes, Tracy McKay and Francisco Magallan, through April. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www. gardendistrictgallery.com — “Twelve,” a group exhibition of 12 artists presenting 12-inch square works, through April 15.

eNi e ! p o iR w ta o e N M iN

Programs Offered: • Administrative Medical Assistant • Computer Information Systems • EKG/Phlebotomy Technician • Physical Therapy Technician • Pharmacy Technician Preparedness • Financial Aid Available For Those Who Qualify

504-526-1478

GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www.goodchildrengallery.com — “Landfill,” a printmaking exhibition, through April 8. GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-

6660 RiveRside dR. suite 101, MetaiRie For student consumer information, visit scan this code with your smartphone for program specific information

www.unitechtrainingacademy.com a branch of unitech training academy - Lafayette Campus

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 298-3161; www.press-street.com — “Object Play,” prints and sculpture by Katie Murken, Christopher Michlig, Tricia Treacy and Ashley John Pigford, through April 8.

ramic crafts by Reenie Esteb, and works by Terri Brasher, through Saturday.

CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www. casellartgallery.com — Works by Joachim Casell, Rene Ragi, Phillip Sage and Jack Miller, ongoing.

53


art LIStINGS Press and works by other printmakers and book artists, through Saturday.

NOUVELLE LUNE. 938 Royal St., 908-1016 — Works using reclaimed, re-purposed or salvaged materials by Linda Berman, Georgette Fortino, David Bergeron, Kelly Guidry and tress turner, ongoing. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — “Reflections in the South,” oil paintings by Edward Bear Miller, through Saturday. PETER O’NEILL STUDIOS. 721 Royal St., 527-0703; www. oneillgallery.com — Works by Peter O’Neill, ongoing. REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 8966369; www.newmanschool. org — “Highlands & Lowlands,” paintings by Campbell Hutchinson and Allison Stewart, through April 5. RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS GALLERY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., second floor, 5237945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Works by Cathy CooperStratton, Margo Manning, Chad Ridgeway and teri Walker and others, ongoing. SCOTT EDWARDS PHOTOGRAPHY GALLERY. 2109 Decatur St., 610-0581 — “Barry Kaiser: A Photographic Restrospective”; “Sex&Death&Rock&Roll,” photographs by Sean Yseult; both through April 7.

ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 8928650; www.sttammanyart.org — “Engagement,” works by Gerald Cannon, Jessica Danby, Laura Gipson and Kathy Rodriguez, through April 7. STAPLE GOODS. 1340 St. Roch Ave., 908-7331; www. postmedium.org/staplegoods — “Symbiosis,” prints and mixed-media drawings by Laura Richens, through April 8. STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 5689050 — Prints and sculpture by Elizabeth Catlett; a group exhibition of works inspired by Romare Bearden; both through Saturday. TAYLOR/BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 5270072 — “Blood Relatives,” works by Fred Stonehouse; “Drips, Drops and Ink Blots,” works by Mark Hosford; both through April.

11, 2001: A Global Moment,” through May 20.

call for artists

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www. noma.org — the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection, through April 8. “Self-taught Artists from NOMA’s Permanent Collection,” an exhibition curated by Alice Yelen, through April 15. “Hard truths: the Art of thornton Dial,” through May 20. “Mass Produced: technology in 19th Century English Design,” through June 24. “Dario Robleto: the Prelives of the Blues,” through Sept. 16. “Forever,” mural by Odili Donald Odita, through Oct. 7.

MICHAEL P. SMITH FUND FOR DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY. the New Orleans Photo Alliance awards a $5,000 grant to a photographer residing in Gulf Coast states. Visit www.neworleansphotoalliance.org for details. Application deadline is Friday.

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane. edu — “tamarind touchstones: Fabulous at Fifty,” a retrospective exhibition of lithographs from the tamarind Institute, through April 15.

ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. the organization seeks entries for its annual National Juried Artists Exhibition, which opens July 14 and is judged by New Orleans Museum of Art modern and contemporary art curator Miranda Lash. Email info@ sttammanyartassociation.org or visit www.sttammanyartassociation.org for details. Submissions deadline is Saturday.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “the Created World of Enrique Alferez,” sculpture and works on paper by the artist, through Monday. “the Past Still Present,” photographs by David Halliday; “the Shape of Louisiana Commenting on the Shape of Louisiana,” assemblages by Jimmy Descant; both through April 8. “thirty Years of LSU Printmaking,” student artwork curated by Kimberly Arp, through April 9.

UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “thINK,” a touring exhibition by the Boston Printmakers in conjunction with the Southern Graphics Council International Conference, through Sunday. UPTOWN POPUP ART GALLERY. 7835 Maple St. — “Preludes,” works by Charles H. trapolin, through April 7.

museums CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org — “NOLA NOW, Part II: Landscape, Seascape, Cityscape (1986 & 2012)”; “Spaces,” works from artist co-ops Antenna, the Front and Good Children Gallery; both through June 10, and more HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc. org — “Goddess Fortuna and Her Dunces in an Effort to Make Sense of it All,” outdoor installation by Dawn Dedeaux, through Friday. “Furnishing Louisiana, 1735–1835,” an exhibition exploring early Louisiana furniture and woodworking, through June 17. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — “the Louisiana Plantation Photos of Robert tebbs,” 60 gelatin silver prints by the architecture photographer, through November, and more. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “September

SOUTHEASTERN ARCHITECTURAL ARCHIVE. Jones Hall, Tulane University, 6801 Freret St., 865-5699; seaa. tulane.edu — “Following Wright,” an exhibit highlighting Frank Lloyd Wright’s influence with drawings by architects Edward Sporl, Albert C. Ledner, Philip Roach Jr. and Leonard Reese Spangenberg, through Dec. 7.

Shopping for Exercise Equipment? FIND THE PIECE THAT WILL FIT YOU BEST! You are more likely to stick with your exercise program if you are comfortable and you see results.

Visit us to find what you will not fifind anywhere else! BEST BRANDS • LARGEST SELECTION • ALL PRICES DELIVERY, INSTALLATION & IN-HOME SERVICE

4124 Veterans Blvd. Metairie, LA • 504-887-0880 2639 N. Causeway Blvd. Mandeville, LA • 985-624-9990

GOOGLE FITNESS EXPO • 0% FINANCING

Slipcover15% off Sale all the

slipcovered

sofa, chair, & sectional

orders

Going on now

SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. southernfood.org — “IlluminEAting,” photographs by Meredith Beau, through June 10. “tanqueray Olive” and “Guinness Pint,” prints by tom Gianfagna, through Jan. 21. “Lena Richard: Pioneer in Food tV,” an exhibit curated by Ashley Young; “then and Now: the Story of Coffee”; both ongoing. TULANE UNIVERSITY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS ROOM. Jones Hall, room 205, Tulane University, 6801 Freret St., 865-5000; www.tulane. edu — “the Art of Proteus,” an exhibition showcasing the krewe’s costume and float designs from 1882-1907, through May 30.

3029 VETERANS BLVD 504.841.3332 SOME RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www.sorengallery. com — Works by Ulises toache; “In Print,” works by Suzanne Carmack, through Saturday.

THREE RIVERS GALLERY. 333 E. Boston St., (985) 8922811; www.threeriversgallery. com — Works by Gail Glassman, through May 10.

55


CONVENIENTLY LOCATED LESS THAN THREE MILES FROM THE FRENCH QUARTER.

FAIR GROUNDS OAKS DAY BENEFITING

FOUR STAKES WORTH $735,000 SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2012 POST TIME 12:10PM $5 GENERAL ADMISSION $10 CLUBHOUSE OR MILLER LITE BEER GARDEN TENT ADMISSION

WEAR YOUR PINK!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

WINNING SEASON

56

FRIDAY, MARCH 30 JOIN US FOR “THE ULTIMATE DAILY DOUBLE.” • 18 Races beginning at 12:40pm • Clubhouse dining room opens at 3:30pm • Miller Lite Beer Garden opens at 5pm

PROUD PRESENTING PARTNER

Located inside

Lakeside

18 RACES! FIRST POST: 12:40PM STARLIGHT RACING COLLEGE SPORTS NIGHT

• First Post: 5pm

• DJ Kemistry – Miller Lite Beer Garden at 5:30pm • Groovy 7 – Clubhouse at 7pm

SEVEN STAKES WORTH MORE THAN $2.1 MILLION POST TIME 12:10PM $5 GENERAL ADMISSION $10 CLUBHOUSE OR MILLER LITE BEER GARDEN TENT ADMISSION

• $5 general admission or $10 admission to the Miller Lite Beer Garden and Clubhouse

garden

PROUD PRESENTING PARTNER

WWW.FGNO.COM


STAGE listings

Complete listings at www.bestofneworleans.Com

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 faX: 504.483.3116

ThEATEr AN APOLOGY FOR THE COURSE AND OUTCOME OF CERTAIN EVENTS DELIVERED BY DOCTOR JOHN FAUSTUS ON THIS HIS FINAL EVENING. The Hatchery’s Garret Theater, 4210 St. Claude Ave., second floor — four Humours theater produces mickle maher’s tragicomedy featuring a rotating list of guest performers. Call 948-4167 or email fourhumourstheater@gmail.com for reservations. admission is “pay what you can.” 7 p.m. sunday, 9 p.m. monday-tuesday through april 23. BAT BOY. NOCCA Riverfront Lupin Hall, 2800 Chartres St., 940-2787; www.nocca.com — noCCa students present the campy off-broadway hit. tickets $15. 7 p.m. wednesdaysaturday, 2 p.m. saturday.

GOOD SPORTS. Pontchartrain Hotel, Caribbean Room, 2031 St. Charles Ave., 524-0581; www.thepontchartrain.com — larry beron, alden Hagardorn and philip melancon present a revue of songs — including originals — about sports. Call 524-0581 for reservations. tickets $15. 6 p.m. sunday. KISS KISS JULIE. Joan Mitchell Center, 2275 Bayou Road — based on the august strindberg play Miss Julie, artspot productions’ interactive performance takes the audience on a sensory romp through a 200-year-old home. the show contains nudity. reservations are required. Call 826-7783 or visit www. artspotproductions.org for details. tickets $20 general

NUNSENSE. Cutting Edge Theater at Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www. cuttingedgeproductions.org — after the cook at the little sisters of Hoboken accidentally poisons and kills some convent members, five sisters put on a talent show to raise funds to bury the deceased nuns in the musical comedy. tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. friday-saturday. ON THE AIR. Stage Door Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944; www. stagedoorcanteen.org — bob edes Jr., troi bechet, gary rucker and others star in the musical that pays tribute to the heyday of radio broadcasts. 8 p.m. friday-saturday, 11 a.m. sunday. A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE. Michalopoulos Studio, 527 Elysian Fields Ave. — southern rep produces the tennessee williams drama at the same block where the play takes place. Visit www.southernrep.com for reservations. a free walking tour starts one hour prior to performances. tickets $29 thursday and sunday, $35 friday-saturday.

VISITING HOURS. Mid-City Theater, 3540 Toulouse St., 488-1460; www.midcitytheatre. com — the theater premieres David Caudle’s play, in which a lesbian couple’s longtime relationship is threatened by the re-appearance of an estranged son with a criminal past. tickets $30. 8 p.m. thursday-friday, 2 p.m. saturday, then 8 p.m. thursday-saturday starting april 5. through april 21.

BurlESquE & CABArET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www.sonesta.com — trixie minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of leon “Kid Chocolate” brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. friday.

Here’s to a Brighter Spring for the Dogs in Your Life! DOGGIE DAYCARE, BOARDING, GROOMING, & MORE DOG FOOD & SUPPLIES NOW AVAILABLE AT OUR DOWNTOWN LOCATION.

4920 TCHOUPITOULAS STREET 218-4098 617 S. CLAIBORNE AVE. 304-3844

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK! Free gifts to all clients using our services the day we get to 1,000 Likes.

WWW.CANINECONNECTIONNOLA.COM JOIN THE LA/SPCA’S PAWS ON PARADE BY GETTING YOUR OWN PIECE OF THE PUZZLE. OUR BEAD DOG WILL BE ON DISPLAY AT OUR BOOTH AT THE LA/SPCA’S DOG DAY AFTERNOON MARCH 25 & AT THE MEGA MATCH-A-THON APRIL 1.

FLEUR DE TEASE. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 5698361; www.oneeyedjacks.net — the burlesque troupe presents “in the opp.” Call 319-8917 or email info@fleurdetease. com for reservations. tickets $15 general admission, $20 reserved seating. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. sunday. KAT HOUSE NOIR. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com — los angelesbased choreographer Jason lewis’ show about women discovering their sensual sides features aerial pole dancing and contortion work, burlesque, music, hip-hop and street jazz dancing. Visit www.abdanceproductions.com for reservations. tickets $15 general admission, $12 students and artists. 9 p.m. monday.

DANCE AN EVENING OF DANCE. Tulane University, Dixon Hall, 865-5105 ext. 2; www.tulane. edu — Choreographer stevan novakovich, faculty from the newcomb dance program, and lusher Charter school present ballet and modern dance. tickets $12 general admission, $9 tulane community, $8 students and seniors. 8 p.m. fridaysaturday, 2 p.m. sunday.

OPErA GOING FOR BAROQUE: OPERA EXCERPTS. Loyola University New Orleans, Louis J. Roussel Performance Hall, 6363 St. Charles Ave., 8652074; www.montage.loyno. edu — twenty-nine students present selections from the baroque period, including arias and ensemble works by Claudio monteverdi, george frideric Handel, Henry purcell and Jeanbaptiste lully, among others. tickets free for loyola community, $8 general admission. 7:30 p.m. thursday.

4920 Tchoupitoulas Street 267-4143

FOR SPRING CLEANING

AND VISIT US FOR DETAILS

SHOPPING

SUNDAY 12-5 • MON-SAT 10-6 • 324-4727 LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

THE BATTLE OF SHALLOWFORD. Rivertown Repertory Theatre, 325 Minor St., Kenner, 468-7221 — in ed simpson’s play, residents of a fictional small town fall for orson welles’ famous “war of the worlds” radio cast and take to the streets to battle the invading martians. tickets $30 general admission, $28 students and seniors, $15 children. 8 p.m. friday-saturday and 2:30 p.m. sunday.

admission, $15 students/seniors. 8 p.m. thursday-sunday through april 15. THE LION KING. Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts, 1419 Basin St., 525-1052; www.mahaliajacksontheater.com — animals are brought to life in the tony award-winning stage production based on the animated Disney film. tickets $40-$153 (plus fees). 8 p.m. tuesdaysaturday, 6:30 p.m. sunday (except april 15), 2 p.m. saturday and 1 p.m. sunday, through april 15. NEW ORLEANS GIANT PUPPET FESTIVAL. The Old Ironworks, 612 Piety St., 908-4741 — the inaugural festival features performances from six puppet troupes. Visit www.marignyoperahouse.org for details. tickets $20 general admission, $10 children and seniors (suggested donations). 7:30 p.m. thursday-sunday.

7:30 p.m. thursday-saturday, 3 p.m. sunday through april 15.

57


StAGE LISTINGS REVIEW

The Light in the Piazza

Don’t be a Basket Case at Easter

The best kept secret in New Orleans

HOP ON IN for help with your EASTER BASKETS.

Plant sales & rentals 5707 Magazine St. 504.269.5707 www.BlueFrogChocolates.com

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MARCH 27 > 2012

BY THE SEA

58

1135 PRESS ST. @ NEW ORLEANS

2900 ST. CLAUDE

(504) 947-7554

“If this isn’t a family show, I don’t know what is!” says Richard Hutton, one of the stars of The Light in the Piazza, recently produced by Jefferson Performing Arts Society. I guess that makes me an orphan. Or more accurately, a curmudgeon. To me, the show seemed like sugar-coated melodrama. To be fair, the staging was top-notch. Under Roland “Butch” Caire’s direction, the cast sang and performed with verve. And maestro Dennis G. Assaf coaxed a pleasing sound from the eccentrically composed orchestra, which was heavy on strings and woodwinds but had no brass. Composer Adam Guettel’s music is noted for straying from the Broadway pop musical mode. In the play, Margaret Johnson (Nancy Ross) takes her daughter Clara (Ariel Assaf) on a tour of Italy. While in a piazza in Florence, a breeze blows Clara’s hat into the hands of Fabrizio Naccarelli (Richard Arnold). Fate has struck. Boy has met girl. Love at first sight. Margaret is an obsessively protective mother and continually places herself between the smitten youngsters. Eventually we learn that as a child Clara was kicked in the head by a pony. Doctors said she would not develop normally, but to our eyes she looks normal. Innocent Clara is awed by Italy’s abundance of “completely naked statues.” She ends up sharing a deep kiss on her hotel bed with the half-naked Fabrizio. So Margaret whisks her off to Rome, but to no avail. The girl is in love and has accepted Fabrizio’s marriage proposal. While making arrangements, Fabrizio’s father, Signor Naccarelli (Richard Hutton), notices something on Clara’s marriage form that infuriates him and calls off the wedding. Now Margaret is determined to save her daughter’s wedding, and she visits Naccarelli. He’s upset that Clara is 26 and his son is only 20. Margaret calms him and the wedding is rescheduled. The rest of the Naccarelli family, Signor’s wife (Celeste Angelle Veillon), Fabrizio’s brother Giuseppe (Scott Sauber) and his temperamental wife Franca (Kate Abreo) offered a likable and spicy pasta of hysterics. And speaking of hysterics, various outbursts are scattered through the drama — as when Clara overhears her mother talking on the phone to her father and describing Clara as handicapped. Despite my reservations about Craig Lucas’ script, Light in the Piazza has won critical awards. And it’s always good to see new works presented locally. — DALT WONK

8119-21 Oak Street • 504-866-9944

Oils + Vinegars = Taste + Health + Wellness

5725 Magazine Street (corner of Nashville)

504.302.1455 • Ample Parking

AUDItIONS

for its June production of the musical. 6:30 p.m. Sunday.

NORDC/NOBA CENTER FOR DANCE. Tulane University, McWilliams Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave., 865-5105 ext. 2; www.neworleansshakespeare. com — The group seeks dancers ages 9-18 for its summer intensive (July 9-Aug. 4) . Call 522-0996 for details. Ages 9-12 audition from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., ages 13-18 from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday.

FAMILY

YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN. Cutting Edge Theater at Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www. cuttingedgeproductions.org — The theater holds auditions

CINDERELLA. Teatro Wego, 177 Sala Ave., Westwego, 885-2000; www.jpas.org — JPAS Theatre Kids! perform in the stage adaptation of the Disney animated film. Tickets $18 general admission, $15 students and seniors, $10 children. 7:30 p.m. FridaySaturday and 2 p.m. SaturdaySunday.

CALL FOR tHEAtER LATINO YOUTH THEATER PROJECT. Performance artist

Jose Torres-Tama, Puentes New Orleans and the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation seek Latino youth to participate in a weeklong free theater workshop (April 9-14), which culminates in a performance. Call 821-7228 or email laura@puentesno.org for details.

COMEDY BLOCK PARTY. The New Movement, 1919 Burgundy St.; www.newmovementtheater.com — The open mic allows participants to take the stage for five minutes to present anything they want. Tickets $5. 9:30 p.m. Thursday.


EVENT LISTINgS

Green Parrot Nursery

PREVIEW

201 NASHVILLE AVE. NASHVILLE & THE RIVAH

(504) 894-1100 www.greenparrotnursery.com

COMPLETE LISTINgS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 FAX: 504.483.3116

EVENTs This Lenten Season come to Andrea's for the freshest Seafood.

3 Course Sunset Dinner Sunday through Friday 3pm-6:15pm $18.00

plus tax & gratuity

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

CASUAL, ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE ... YET AFFORDABLE

60

3100 19TH STREET · 834-8583 AT RIDGELAKE AND N. CAUSEWAY OPEN 7 DAYS FOR LUNCH AND DINNER SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH

OPEN 11AM · AMPLE FREE PARKING

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

89

$

*

(reg. $132)

includes comprehensive exam (#0150), x-rays (#274), cleaning (#1110) or panorex (#330) *NEW PATIENTS ONLY — EXPIRES 04/08/12

DR. GLENN SCHMIDT DR. STEPHEN DELAHOUSSAYE FAMILY DENTISTRY Call For An Appointment

UPTOWN KENNER

Now available at 2 locations!

8025 Maple St. @ Carrollton · 861-9044 www.uptownsmiles.com 1942 Williams Blvd., Suite 8 · 469-9648 www.kennersmiles.com

TUEsDAY 27 FRENCH QUARTER WINE FESTIVAL. Le Meritage, 1001 Toulouse St., 522-8800; www. lemeritagerestaurant.com — The festival pairs food by chef Michael Farrell with wines from a variety of vineyards. Dinners range from $97-$175, plus tax and tip. visit www.frenchquarterwinefestival.com for details. Tuesday-Wednesday through April 25. M-GROUP. LGBT Community Center of New Orleans, 2114 Decatur St., www.lgbtccno.org — The informative and social program for gay and bisexual men ages 18-35 discusses sex and relationship health. Preregistration is required. Call 945-4000 ext. 203 or email brandonb@ noaidstf.org for details. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. MAD HATTER’S LUNCHEON. Hilton New Orleans Riverside, 2 Poydras St., 561-0500; www. hilton.com — The Women’s guild of the New Orleans Opera Association’s Alice in Wonderland-themed luncheon fundraiser features a fashion show, hat contest and auction, raffles and more. Call 4168890 or email madhattersluncheon@gmail.com for details. Tickets $75 general admission, $85 patrons. 11 a.m. NOLA PYRATE WEEK. The 10-day-long event benefits wetlands restoration and preservation. visit www.nolapyrateweek.com for the full schedule and other details. Tuesday-Sunday. PRESS CLUB OF NEW ORLEANS GRIDIRON. Republic New Orleans, 828 S. Peters

St., 528-8282; www. republicnola.com — Press Club members skewer the year’s headline makers at the event featuring Jefferson Parish Sheriff Newell Normand and NOPD Superintendent Ronal Serpas. visit www. pressclubneworleans. org for details. Admission $40. Cocktail reception 6 p.m., show at 7:30 p.m.

WEDNEsDAY 28 FREE STD SCREENING. CAN Project Office, 507 Frenchmen St. — The gay Men’s Wellness Center, NO/AIDS Task Force and N’R Peace provide free STD screenings on a first come, first serve basis for gay and bisexual men for National LgBTQ Health Week. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

THURsDAY 29 FRIENDS OF THE JEFFERSON PUBLIC LIBRARY BIG BOOK SALE. Pontchartrain Center, 4545 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 465-9985; www.pontchartraincenter. com — The sale benefiting the Jefferson Parish library system features more than 60,000 gently used books, puzzles, DvDs, CDs, video tapes, music tapes and records. Call 455-2665 or email friendsjpl@yahoo.com for details. 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. MID-CITY BAYOU BOOGALOO FUNDRAISER. Chickie Wah Wah, 2828 Canal St., 304-4714; www. chickiewahwah.com — The fundraiser features food, auctions, and music. visit www.thebayouboogaloo. com for details. Admission $15 in advance, $20 at the door, $30 patron party. Patron party 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., general admission 7

My Darlin’ New Orleans

Currently filming its third season, HBO’s Treme has incorporated local music into its plotlines about post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans. It has placed a host of local musicians in cameos and licensed their songs for the soundtrack. The cast and crew also is supporting the New Orleans music community with its third My Darlin’ New Orleans (taking its name from the Little Queenie and the Percolators song used in the show). The fundraising gala benefits the Roots of Music, Sweet Home New Orleans and the New Orleans Musicians’ and Assistance Founda7 p.m.-11 p.m. Saturday tion. Wendell Pierce MAR generations Hall (pictured), Melissa Leo and other cast members 310 Andrew Higgins Drive will walk the red carpet 421-4312 and mingle with guests. www.sweethomeneworleans.org Entertainment includes Irma Thomas, Little Freddie King, Meschiya Lake and the Little Big Horns and a performance by the Roots of Music band. There’s a silent auction at the event and food by chefs Susan Spicer, Tory McPhail of Commander’s Palace and Alon Shaya of Domenica. Tickets $150. — WILL COvIELLO

31

p.m. to 10 p.m. A TASTE OF COVINGTON. The inaugural four-day event features cooking demonstrations and wine tastings, a wine dinner, a block party, an art market and more at various locations in Downtown Covington. visit www. atasteofcovington.com for the full schedule and other details. Thursday-Sunday. TWINKLE, TWINKLE FUNDRAISER. Elms Mansion, 3029 St. Charles Ave. — The benefit for the Touro Family Birthing Center features music by Ingrid Lucia and Matt Lemmler, speciality cocktails and a raffle. visit www.touro. com/twinkle for details. Admission $50. 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

FRIDAY 30 BRACKET TOWN. Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, 900 Convention Center

Blvd. — The fan festival in conjunction with the NCAA Final Four features family-friendly activities including meetand-greets with coaches and players, youth clinics, sports competitions, prize giveaways and more. visit www.ncaa.com/finalfour for details. Admission $10 ages 12 and over, $6 ages 3-11, college students, seniors and military. Noon to 8 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, noon to 8 p.m. Sunday, noon to 7 p.m. Monday. FRIDAY NIGHT FIGHTS. Friday Night Fights Gym, 1632 Oreatha Castle Haley Blvd. — The amateur boxing event also features food and a wide range of entertainment, including contests, burlesque acts and more. Tickets $15 in advance, $20 at the door. Call 895-1859 for details. 7 p.m. HICKORY DICKORY ROCK. Carousel Gardens Amusement Park, City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 259-

1509; www.neworleanscitypark.com — The Family Service of greater New Orleans hosts a fundraiser with music by Bag of Donuts. Admission $10 (includes unlimited rides). visit www.fsgno.org for details. 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. LA FETE DU BALLET. Chateau Golf and Country Club, 3600 Chateau Blvd., Kenner, 467-1351; www. chateaugc.com — Bon Operatit and the Joe Simon Trio perform at the auction and gala benefiting Delta Festival Ballet. Call 888-0931 or visit www.deltafestivalballet. com for details. Patron party 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., gala 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. NOLA GIRL JAM. The weekend event celebrates women in music and dance with concerts, parties, classes, films, a fashion show and more. visit www. nolagirljam.com for the full page 62


WE BUY AND SELL

traditional • contemporar y • vintage • MCM

Oversized serpentine Nightstand $199

Double Door Cabinet Bar 42”x45”

Chairs choice of colors! 4 for $99

• • • •

hotel home office restaurant

next to the post office at 501 North Jeff Davis in Mid City 504-482-6850 | 504-482-6851 | Mon-Sat:10am-5pm

e t u min

+

30 i-facial nute min 30 mi sage as -m i n i m

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

$

62

page 60

schedule and other details. Friday-Sunday.

Saturday 31

$99

C/F Liquidators Canal Furniture

Granite top Bar/Island 50” x 42” $199

EVEnt LISTINGS

0 6

AY GH M ROU NT. H T ME OW RS N OINT APP -THU N N A O OR YM ONL LL F . CA 3RD

vd. e Bl n n Argo 2. 2 21 9 ay 2 1 3 6 .4 8 -Saturd 504 y

da om Mon thepark.c ark n e by Op thep yspa Aby .m SP www om/MY ter.c twit

BIG BASS RODEO & FISHTIVAL. City Park, 1 Palm Drive — Anglers of all ages can participate for trophies and prizes. There are more than 25 vendors, wildlife education, raffles and music. Visit www. neworleanscitypark.com/fishrodeo.html for details. Rodeo entry is $10 adults, $5 children under 12; the fishtival is free. 6 a.m. to noon. BOILIN’ FOR THE BRIDGES. Private Residence, visit the website for details — ReBridge, a group that works to restore the the Magnolia and Dumaine street bridges at Bayou St. John, hosts a crawfish boil fundraiser. Visit www.rebridge.org for details. Tickets $30 general admission (includes food and drinks), $5 children 10 and under. 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. COUGAR JAM MUSIC & FOOD FESTIVAL. St. Mary’s Academy and the Sisters of the Holy Family, 6901 Chef Menteur Hwy., 245-0200 — The festival benefits the school’s scholarship endowment fund and features food prizes and music by Chocolate Milk, Dee-1, Captain Charles and others. Admission $30. 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. ENERGY SMART PRESENTATION. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias. org — The program discusses Entergy New Orleans’ energy efficiency program that provides audits and cash rebates to customers who take steps to increase the efficiency of their homes and businesses. Call (866) 721-0249 or email info@energysmartnola.com for details. 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. FETE FRANCAISE. Ecole Bilingue De La Nouvelle Orleans, 821 General Pershing St., 896-4500; www.ebnola. com — Ecole Bilingue’s annual festival celebrates French culture with food, entertainment and more. Free admission. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. GREAT SAINT CHARLES AVENUE ROAD RACE. De La Salle High School, 5300 St. Charles Ave., 895-5717; www.delasallenola.com — De La Salle High School hosts half-mile, 5K and 10K runs down St. Charles Avenue and through Audubon Park, followed by an after-party. Visit www.runnotc.org for details. 7:45 a.m. HARRY TOMPSON CENTER GALA. Jesuit High School, 4133 Banks St., 4833816 — The fundraiser for the

homeless shelter features food from local restaurants, a live auction, and a cash prize giveaway. Call 782-7211 ext. 224 or visit www.harrytompsoncenter. org for details. Admission $75. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. OLD ALGIERS RIVERFEST. Mardi Gras World, 233 Newton St., Algiers, 361-7821 — Irvin Mayfield, Delfeayo Marsalis, Dr. Michael White’s Liberty Jazz Band and others perform at the festival that also features food, arts, activities and more. Free admission. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. SWAN DAY NEW ORLEANS. Byrdie’s Gallery, 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — In celebration of SWAN Day (Support Women Artists Now) the gallery hosts an event including a performance of Diana E.H. Shortes’ solo piece The Baroness Undressed, a panel discussion and an open mic. Free admission. 7 p.m. WESTWEGO CHILI COOKOFF. Westwego Farmers & Fisheries Market, Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The second annual cookoff features food, crafts, children’s activities and live music by Boogie Men and Skeeter and the Swamp Pop Band. Call 341-3424 ext. 209 or email cathyp@cityofwestwego.com for details. Admission $15 (includes all-you-can-eat chili). 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Sunday 1 BUBBLEQ. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — The fundraiser pairs barbecue with premium Champagnes to benefit New Orleans Jazz Institute. Visit www. neworleansjazzinstitute.com for details. Admission $50 per person, $80 for two people. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. PAWS CAUSE. Shamrock Bar, 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938; www.shamrockparty.com — The nonprofit SpayMart Community Kitten Foster and Adoption Program hosts a fundraiser with live music, food and more. Call 343-7000 or email lauree6@ cox.net for details. Admission $10. 3 p.m. to 8 p.m.

SPOrtS BIG EASY ROLLERGIRLS. Human Performance Center, University Of New Orleans, 2000 Lakeshore Drive, 280-6683‎ — The Crescent Wenches face off against the Deadutantes of Montgomery, Ala., and the All Stars battle the Cape Fear Roller Girls of Wilmington, N.C. Visit www.bigeasyrollergirls.com for details. Tickets $12 in advance, $15 at the door; $6

children ages 7-12, free for children 6 and under. 4:30 p.m. Saturday. NCAA FINAL FOUR. Mercedes-Benz Superdome, 1500 Poydras St., 587-3663; www.superdome.com — New Orleans hosts the men’s basketball tournament. Visit www. ncaa.com/finalfour for details. Saturday and Monday.

wOrdS 17 POETS! LITERARY & PERFORMANCE SERIES. Gold Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www.goldminesaloon.net — Moira Crone signs The Not Yet. An open mic follows. Visit www.17poets.com for details. 8 p.m. Thursday. AMY DICKINSON & BRYAN BATT. Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — Dickinson is the author of The Mighty Queens of Freeville, and Batt is an actor and the author of She Ain’t Heavy, She’s My Mother: A Memoir and Big Easy Style: Creating Rooms You Love to Live In. 6 p.m. Tuesday. ANN BENOIT. Maple Street Book Shop, New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave., 304-7115; www.maplestreetbookshop. com — The author signs and discusses Broussard’s Restaurant and Courtyard Cookbook. 3 p.m. Saturday. CHRIS RAKUNAS. New Orleans Public Library, Main Library, 219 Loyola Ave., 596-2602 — The author signs Tears for the Mountain. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. CORY MACLAUCHLIN. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and discusses Butterfly in the Typewriter: The Tragic Life of John Kennedy Toole and the Remarkable Story of A Confederacy of Dunces. 6 p.m. Tuesday. DAVID ARMAND. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 8952266 — The author signs and discusses The Pugilist’s Wife. 1 p.m. Saturday. JOHN KLINGMAN. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author signs and discusses New in New Orleans Architecture. 5:30 p.m. Thursday. STACY ALLBRITTON. Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop. com — The author signs and discusses The Diary of Marie Landry: Acadian Exile. 11:30 a.m. Saturday.


EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

classadv@gambitweekly.com

BEAUTY SALONS/SPAS UPSCALE SALON UPTOWN BOOTH RENTAL Available for stylist. $200/week Appy at 3634 Magazine St, NOLA

DRIVERS/DELIVERY DRIVERS

CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Online: When you place an ad in Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. Note: Ad cancellations and changes for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Please proof your first ad insertion to make sure it is correct. Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

Drivers: Ours have Free Health Ins plus Great Pay & Bonuses! Regional Work! LPG Experience a plus. CDL-A with X-end, 1 yr T/T Exp. Req. Owner Operators Welcome 1-888-380-5516.

MEDICAL Busy Dental Office in the CBD seeking a full time Office Assistant for the Front Desk. This position requires a sunny disposition, an eagerness to work with people and a commitment to excellent customer service. Hours are Monday thru Friday and every other Saturday morning. Parking is paid. Long term employment will include paid holidays and vacations and an opportunity to participate in a retirement program. We do not offer medical insurance at this time. If you are looking to work in an upbeat environment in the heart of the CBD, please email your resume to tracy@cbddentalcare.com

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR BE THE LIFE OF THE PARTY!

Seeking energetic, fun-loving people to work as MC’s @ popular wellestablished Bourbon St. nightclubs. Reply w/ resume, contact info, photo to anthony@marullomgmt.com Is seeking a part-time Hostess for evening & weekends. Please apply in person between 11-2:30pm, 1403 St. Charles Ave.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

64

Only $18,000 with no royalties. Nice profit potential. Call Greg for all the details, (985) 966-7777

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

Call 483-3100

Call (504) 483-3100

MISCELLANEOUS Pinelands Preservations

Seeks independent laborers, landscapers and/or handymen to perform property maintenance. Visit www. pinelandspreservations.com, or call Aaron, 831-222-0044 for more info.

VOLUNTEER

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

Now hiriNg

ChiEF ENgiNEEr 288 rooms

Come join the excitement with a company that promotes from within. We are a team of hospitality professionals that, collectively, comprise the most talented and experienced people in the industry. We are constantly looking for strong people to grow with us. We offer great benefits and a family environment. • Must have a proven ability to manage employees with implementation of a successful Engineering program. • High level of commitment a must with ability to work weekends, holidays and varied shifts as directed by occupancy and need.

Apply in person at 1201 Convention Center Blvd. or email resume to jayt@highpointe.com. EEO/Pre-employment drug screening

Join the excitement and be a part of the Hotel Monteleone’s historic success, with the opening of our new culinary venture, Apply On-Line

Real Estate

WIT’S INN Bar & Pizza Kitchen

Employment

Bartender with restaurant food server experience Apply in person Mon-Fri, 1-4:30 pm 141 N. Carrollton Ave. RETAIL

NOLA

Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, and more for as little as $60

To Advertise in

Criollo Restaurant and Lounge

ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL RATES FOR

MARKETPLACE

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY New Orleans Health Magazine-For Sale

Miyako Hibachi & Sushi Bar

Now Hiring Server/Bar. Apply M-Th, 2-4pm WB location.

Advertise in

Teacher sought for Env Sci, Bio and AP high school courses. Req Bach Biology & 8 months exp, valid teacher cert or 12 credit hrs in Bio and commitment to become certified, adherence to Archdiocese policies. Job in New Orleans. Send resume & cover ltr to Mr. Don Boucree, Principal, St. Augustine High School, 2600 A.P. Tureaud Ave., New Orleans LA 70119.

FT OFFICE ASSISTANT

T.G.I. FRIDAYS

Rentals &

TEACHERS/INSTRUCTORS TEACHER

FT or PT Tailor is needed for ladies clothing store. Experience preferred.

Apply in person @ 1514 St Charles Ave.

504-523-7027

www.hotelmonteleone.com/careers

• Job Fair •

Thursday, April 17th 10am-7pm Servers, Hostess, Food Runners, Buspersons, Stewards, Line Cooks, Prep Cooks, Pantry Cooks, Pastry Cooks


CLASSIFIEDS AUTOMOTIVE IMPORTED AUTOS ‘05 HONDA S2000 Low Miles $16,900 504-368-5640

‘06 BMW 325 Ci Low miles $16,900 504-368-5640

‘09 ACURA TSX $19,995 Call 504-368-5640

‘10 HONDA CIVIC

$13,995 Several to Choose From! 504-368-5640

‘10 VOLVO S40 $15,995 504-368-5640

‘11 HYUNDAI SONATA $16,995 504-368-5640

2004 Volvo V70 Cross Country Wagon Runs Great $10,995 504-368-5640

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES ‘07 VOLVO XC 90 7 Passenger $15,900 504-368-5640

‘08 VW TOURAG V8 $21,995 Call 504-368-5640

‘09 HONDA PILOT EX $19,995 504-368-5640

WANTED TO PURCHASE CASH FOR CARS

Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

CHIROPRACTORS ARCHER CHIROPRACTIC

ARCHER CHIROPRACTIC CENTER We focus on relief care, to get you out of pain as quickly as possible. 3301 Canal St. 504 - 252 - 9182 WALKS-INS WELCOME

HEALING ARTS

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

QUIET WESTBANK LOC

Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123.

STRESS? PAIN?

Relax with a massage. Amazing Hands by Patrick. LMT Lic 4005. 504-717-2577 www.amazinghands.us

Special Needs Cat

9 yr old , spayed, gentle, quiet and litter trained. She is de-wormed and has gotten all of her shots including rabies vaccine. No fleas. She MUST be an inside house as she has FIV. The perfect home would be with no children or other pets and in a stable environment. Non-smoking home only. 619-309-7354 or email mwall1000@gmail.com

BOGIE – DSH CAT

White w/ blk spots, M, 7 yrs old, fully vetted. Baby Girl’s brother. Easy going. Sweet with Baby Girl, but could go alone. Would love one on one attention and to replace the home he lost. Call 454-8200

BREES - BLACK LAB

YOGA/MEDITATION/PILATES

perfect family, take me with yu BLACK LAB. Happy-go-lucky little boy, great with kids & other dogs & strangers! Neutered & up to date on all shots. Contact 504-975-5971

AUDUBON YOGA STUDIO

CARMEN-Steel grey/wh, DSH

Ivengar Yoga, Level 1 - 3 Winter classes now in session 511 Octavia St. 504-821-9885 www.audubonyoga.com

Free Pilates Reformer Class With paid class $20. 10 years teaching experience. 504-220-5589. www.pilateswithconstance.com

MERCHANDISE

F, 5 yrs old, fully vetted. Carmen has been sheltered almost all of her life. She is sweet and loving. Gets along with other cats and dogs but would prefer to be an only cat. Call 504-454-8200

COOKIE-DSH CAT

Blk/wt, F,7 yrs old, fully vetted. Cookie has been sheltered for almost 6 years. She has a sweet, friendly nature and has been overlooked too long. She is ready for a home of her own. She has never been around dogs, but would probably be OK. Call 454-8200

JUNEBUG - DSH CAT BLDG - “Big Used Shed”

Torti, F, 2yrs old, fully vetted. Owner relinquish due to family problems. This little girl is friendly, outgoing, and full of spirit. Better without dogs. Loves to play. Contact 504-454-8200

EXERCISE/SPORTS EQUIPMENT

KITTEN - LIBERTY

BLDG. MATERIALS Free Local Delivery. (504) 888-6152

SPA

‘Used Hot Tub” In from Trade. Call (504) 888-6152

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $225. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $250. (504) 846-5122

Sweet Tortoiseshell little kitten ready to enter into a good home. 504-975-5971.

ROUX

Little over 1 yr petite side of medium. Female, great with other dogs. LOVES PEOPLE - snuggler. 504-975-5971

FREE TO GOOD HOME

Male lab pt mix. 6 years old. All shots. 944-7733

BODY & FOOT MASSAGE

14 x 40 Bunk House. Great for cabin of office. (504) 888-1652

Open 7 days - 10am-10pm Jasmine Health Spa 614 Causeway, Metairie 504-273-7676 Chnese Health Spa 2424 Williams Blvd Suite S Kenner - 504-305-5177

LICENSED MASSAGE NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

RELAX RELAX RELAX

Swedish massage by strong hands. Call Jack at 453-9161 La lic #0076.

PETS

LOST/FOUND PETS REWARD- LOST

PETUNIA Kennel #A15495453

PET ADOPTIONS BABY GIRL - DMH

Siamese mix, F, 7 yrs old, fully vetted. Owner could no longer keep. Sweet and loving. This little girl would to replace the home she lost. Good with children and other cats. Call 504454-8200

Buddy boy Catahoula mix

m all med. done & house broken sweet & good w/ other dogs Loves to play w/ toys. Best in home w/no small kids. contact cindy foxcfox@cox.net

IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY, TENNESSEE

ERIC DUANE DENNIS CASE NO: 09-0251DR PETITIONER, VS. SALLY A. DENNIS RESPONDENT. TO: SALLY A. DENNIS Order of Publication It appearing from the bill in this cause, which is sworn to that the residence and current address of the above listed defendant, SALLY A. DENNIS, unknown and cannot be served with process, It is therefore ordered publication be made for four consecutive weeks in THE GAMBIT WEEKLY, a newspaper published in NEW ORLEANS, ORLEANS PARISH, LOUISIANA, requiring the above listed defendant, SALLY A. DENNIS, appear before the clerk of said court on or before thirty days after the last publication hereof and make defense to the bill filed in the above cause, which seeks DIVORCE or otherwise said bill be taken for confesses and cause proceeded with exparte. This the 22nd day of FEBRUARY, 2012 John A.W. Bratcher, Clerk of said Court, By: Lori Finch, Deputy Clerk. Solicitors for Plaintiff: APRIL WATKINS TO BE RUN; 3/6, 3/13, 3/20 & 3/27/2012

OSIRIS Kennel #A15424697

AIR COND/HEATING

THE CRACKED POT GARDEN CENTER

SUPERIOR AIRE

Trane 3 Ton Replacement System $3990 Installed Expires 3/31/12 504-465-0688 Air Conditioning Heating

FLOORS/CARPET/TILE GROUT WORKS, LLC

Tile Grout Cleaning, Color Sealing, Grout repair, Shower Restoration, Natural Stone Care, Tile Replacement, Recaulking. Commercial & Residential. Free Estimates. Jay Broadwell, 504-309-2509. www.grout-works.com

GENERAL CONTRACTORS MIKE’S REMODELING

Small & Big Jobs - We Do It All Custom cabinets, carpentry, painting, sheetrock, ceramic, roofs, kitchen & baths. Call (504) 324-9585

HANDYMAN HARRY’S HOUSE HELPERS

* Small Jobs *Repairs *Carpentry *Painting *Install AND MORE! Insured & Priced-Right Harry’s Helpful Ace Hardware Uptown * 504-896-1500 Metairie * 504-896-1550

Osiris is a 2-year-old, neutered, Snowshoe Siamese with ice blue eyes. He’s quite the stunner and such a mellow, laid-back, guy. To meet Osiris or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

TERMINIX

Home of the $650 Termite Damage Repair Guarantee! WE DO IT ALL... Termites, Roaches, Rats & Ants Too. New Orleans Metro - 504-834-7330 2329 Edenborn, Metairie www.terminixno.com

PLUMBING Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. KennerJefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-6520084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

POOL SERVICES

DELTA SOD

JEFFERSON FEED

Cocker Spaniel whose a bit shy around new friends. She’s housetrained, enjoys belly rubs and treats and knows how to sit and walk nicely on a leash. To meet Petunia or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

With Harris Bed Bug Killer & Harris Roach Killer. Odorless, non-staining formulas. Will rid your home of bed bugs & kill roaches for up to 1 year. Guaranteed. Makes 2 gallons. Available at: Johnny’s True Value, 2001 Mirabeau Ave & United Hardware, 735 Elysian Fields.

MAGNOLIA POOLS

HOME SERVICES Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

PEST CONTROL Kills Bedbugs & Roaches

LAWN/LANDSCAPE

SERVICES

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

FREE LANDSCAPE ESTIMATES 2 mi west of Airport on Airline Hwy Mon - Sat, 9-5 504-466-8813

ROOTER MAN

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

Petunia is a 3-year-old, spayed,

MISC. FOR SALE OFFICE

(Mid City but could be anywhere by now),Ozzie, male, brown/black stripe (brindle), pit mix, sweet, call him & he will come, hold him & call me asap, Traci 504-975-5971.

LEGAL NOTICES

Weekly Tails

At Crossroads In Life?

Feeling blocked? Seeking destiny? Problems? Sacred African Divination may be the solution. Obtain success in life, business, relationships, health & more. Oracle readings available. Call Olorisa M.S. Akinlana 504-905-6347. www.ileekoasa.com. Se habla Espanol

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Pet & Garden Center GREEN GRASS - REAL FAST The Only Certified Grade A St. Augustine Sod For New Orleans Conditions. Save with our Do-It-Yourself Lawn Maintenance Program. 733-8572.

Specializing in Saltwater Systerms Service, Maintenance, Repair 504-270-7307 www.magnoliapools.org

LEGAL SERVICES Need Something Notarized?

24hrs/7days Traveling Notaries Melissa Culotta - (504) 473-1215 Isabelle Montelepre (504) 220-2503

Warren Raymond Lawn Care Uptown Specialist www.warrenraymond.com 504-831-7411

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

TAX SERVICES

baby momma TAX SERVICE !

ED ANTE

GUAR

IF YOU HAVE KIDS WE GUARANTEE YOU WILL GET A REFUND W-2 SELF-EMPLOYED BUSINESS ETC ...

Tel: 888-644-2467

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

65


817 BURGUNDY

reaL esTaTe

1 Br, 1 BA, HIGH CEILINGS, GRANITE KITCHEN 1ST FL OFF PATIO $279,000 DORIAN BENNETT SOTHEBYS 9443695 CALL PAT KAHN 450-4506 LICENSED IN LA & MS

SHOWCaSe

520 St. Phillip #3 399K

FRENCH QUARTER

FQ Townhouse Building. Fully renovated 1830’s. Spacious 2BR w/private patio. Slate flrs, granite, ss, brick & beams. Elevator access to rooftop terrace.E.J. Maysonave (504) 554-6210

822 TOURO ST UNIT 8

922-24 Dauphine St. $875K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

938 Royal St. A $215K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

835 Royal St. $349.5K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

617 Duphine St. $268K Spacious light filled condo. Great floor plan. Fabulous pool and courtyard. Being sold furnished. In the heart of the quarter.

Paula Bowler, Agent • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

ALGIERS

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY

3060 HUDSON PL.

3BR 2BA redone, all new, must see! $188,500 obo Great Algiers nbrhood Call Betsy Birdsong 504-376-7650 Value Plus Realty 504-780-9422

ALGIERS POINT

NOTICE:

113 Lavergne

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act and the Louisiana Open Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. For more information, call the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-273-5718

Beautifully Restored! 2 Master Suites, 2.5 story shotgun Double interconnecting double parlors, $299K. Paul Shows - 504.944.3605. Dorian Bennett Sotheby’s International Realty 504.944.3605. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN WALK TO CITY PARK - $39K

Vacant lot 50 x100, Castine St great neighborhood Re/Max Partners 888-9900. Each office independently owned and operated. Phyllis Seely 236-6464

1009 DAUPHINE

“Shot Gun Style” 2/2 King Size Travertine Baths Gourmet Kitchen. $349,000 Property New Orleans Susan Morrow, 504-231-2445

1201 Canal St - PH 653

One of a Kind Penthouse! Open House April 1, 1-3pm. Shrimp & Grits by Mia’s Balcony. $995,000. Lauren Maginnis 504220-4044. Dorian Bennett Sotheby’s international Realty, 504.944.3605. Each office Independently owned & operated.

214 Chartres #1 $849K

New Listing. Hidden Gem! Lg (2300sf) 2br/2ba, wet bar, spacious living & INTERIOR COURTYARD. E.J. Maysonave (504) 554-6210

Cozy 1 bdrm condo in heart of Marigny Triangle. Offst pkg. Short walk to French Qtr. Balcony, ctyd. Only $159K. Carol, 504-908-3605. Dorian Bennett Sotheby’s International Realty, 504.944.3605. Ea office Independently owned & operated.

824 BURGUNDY UNIT 2

Magnificent 2 br, 2 ba. hi ceil, hdwd flrs, covered balc, patio & pool. $499,000. Brigitte Fredy, 504-6164044, Latter & Blum, ERA powered is independently owned and operated. 948-3011 X110. www.brigittefredy.com

Best Value in French Qtr

333 JULIA

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT #208: New renov, beautiful hdwd flrs, granite cntrs & top of the lineapp. Lg 1br/1ba 720 sq ft on atrium! Rooftop pool & cabana. $229,000 #504: Beaut renv 5th fl corner. Chef’s kitc & open bar into lg liv & din w/ wall of windows. 1 pkng in int garage. $395,000. E.J. Maysonave (504) 554-6210

732 Gov. Nicholls - $890,000

Classic Greek Revival Townhome has lovely historic details: marble mantles, Zubar wallpaper, lush private ctyd & 2 story rear guesthouse w kitchen. Offst parking for two cars, balcony overlooking he Quarter. Dorian M. Bennett 504.236.7688 Dorian Bennett Sotheby’s international Realty, 504.944.3605. Each office Independently owned & operated.

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

1020 ESPLANADE #103. Lovely 2 br, 2 ba condo, high ceil in den, sparkling pool, courtyd, fenced pkg. Private attached alley could be dog run. $339K. Lana Sackett, Gardner Realtors, 504352-4934. www.lanasackett.com

Exq. Irish Channel Dbl

Exquisite Irish Channel double. Gutted to the studs & wonderfully renovated. CA&H, granite cntrtps, inside laundry, wood flrs in mint move-in condition. Great tenant on one side pays $995 per month. 538-40 Philip Street. $269,000. Michael L. Baker, Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 Cell 504-606-6226. Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission with offices in the historic Lower Garden District of New Orleans

JAX BREWERY French Quarter’s Finest

N * 1/1 Riverviews $495,000 J * Rare 3/3 1750 sq. ft $695,000 H * Jackson Square 2/2 $795,000 All easy access to River Terrace E.J. Maysonave (504) 554-6210

Courtyard Studio

514 DUMAINE, Unit 6. Charming 2nd flr studio perfectly located, 1BR , French doors open to balcony. Parking avail. Asking $104,000. Judy Fisher, Inc, 504-388-3023. www.JudyFisher.net

Esplanade Condo - 115K

Two-story renovated townhouse condo with all the amenities. Tasteful kitchen with maple cabinets and stainless appliances, central A/H, pool and dedicated off-street parking spot, & 1 block to the French Quarter. Agents protected. Call 525-3067 O/A

GRETNA / HARVEY 830 Fifth St, Harvey

3BR, 2BA, right off WB Expressway. Only 13 years old. Covered carport & patio. Cathedral ceiling in kitchen & breakfast area. $126,100 Kim Catalano 504462-0734, GARDNER, REALTORS, 504-861-7575

Timberlane Golf Course

$150,000 Soaring ceilings, open entertaining area, beautiful view Pool, Needs Renovation. Gardner Realtors 891-6400 GailRuddock.com, 897-6000

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1302 JACKSON AVENUE

Historic Garden District luxury renov. 3 BR, 2.5 BA. Premium finishes & fixtures. Sophisticated & tasteful. $960,000. Ricky Lemann, 504-4606340. Keller Williams Realty N.O. 504-862-0100. Each office Independently owned & operated.

1310 Eagle St

3BR, 2 BA, cute cottage near Oak St. $96K. Also avail - Unique property w/ 2 buildings at 1300 Eagle St and Vacant lot at 1304 Eagle St. Judy Fisher REALTORS 504-388-3023. www.JudyFisher.net

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

BROKER

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

Historic House and Luxury Home Specialist

66

455 Phillip Street $ 239,000

Motivated Sellers: Want to know the value of your property? Call today ... No obligation.

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

farmeran@gmail.com

Was gutted to the studs in 2004/05 and underwent a high quality renovation. 3 independent bedrooms, 2 full baths, master with whirlpool plus nice walk-in closet, off street parking in a great close to town location.

www.demontluzinrealtors.com

Building on a real estate heritage since 1905

THE FERNANDEZ HOUSE

927 DAUPHINE STREET $1,895,000 An excellent example of an early creole cottage set in a serene compound. Beautiful courtyard with mature plantings in a classic partere garden. Property consists of the main house, 4 income producing apartments and a large bonus space-- office, workshop, gym, etc. Parking for multiple cars. Great location.

Paula Bowler, Owner/Agent • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 www.frenchquarterrealty.com

817 Amelia Street $ 239,900 Rustic charm on this unique home fashioned from joining two separate cottages. Great flowing floor plan and with a second front door that’s great for working from home. Off street parking.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226 Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130


CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE 2227 CHESTNUT ST.

Beautifully appointed 3/2, double parlor in Garden District. . Courtyard, cocktail pool. $525,000. Ricky Lemann, 504-460-6340. Keller Williams Realty N.O. 504-862-0100. Each office Independently owned & operated.

3000 St. Charles #102

2/2 condo. 1st floor. All the bells & whistles. One of a kind! $650K. Lauren Maginnis 504-220-4044. Dorian Bennett Sotheby’s international Realty, 504-944-3605. Each office Independently owned & operated.

3437 ST. CHARLES #C

Parades & streetcar at your doorstep! Unique 2bd condo. Dramatic open flr plan w/cathedral ceilings & period stained glass windows Gated off street pkng. $249,900. Josee Francher Kantak, (504) 427-3333. Gardner Realtors, (504) 891-6400. Licensed Realtor in Louisiana, Francher Perrin Group

3821 LAUREL ST. #5

1 BR, 1 BA, 2 blks to Magazine St. . - Chic Condo Conversion. Offst pkg, ss appl, marble bath, intercom, w/d. $119K. Patrick Tucker, 504-908-6364. Property New Orleans LLC 231-2445. www.propertyneworleans.com

Lakeview Appraisal Service LLC WHAT’S YOUR HOME WORTH? PROPERTY TAXES TOO HIGH? Residential Appraisals $300 Kevin T. LaGraize www.lakeview-appraisal.com 504-284-3445

WESTBANK 118 LAVENDER COURT

COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES 12.73 ACRES - Harvey

High visibility. Previously used as a golf driving range. Peters Road and Lapalco Blvd. Zoned M3. $2,000,000. Angela Dennis, cell 504-784-2833. Mazier Realty, 504-309-1700 ext 247. www. AngelaDennis.com

1929 Hickory Ave., Harahan.

Two-story office building approx. 2,160sf. REDUCED price of $249,000. Can also be for lease $1,900/mo., triple net. Emily Kramer, Corporate Realty 581-5005

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

SPECIAL EVENT RENTALS Final 4 & Jazz Fest Condos

N.O. Algiers Point River front Upscale 2 bedroom, 2.5 baths. Nicely furnished. Secured parking. $375 night. 3 night minimum. 781-608-6115

CORPORATE RENTALS LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT

3 BR, 3 BA Greek Revival. Totally renovated. Completely furnished incl linens. $250/day (10 day minimum) or $3000/mo. 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

New Orleans Area (Metairie) 10 Min to Downtown N.O. 1 & 2 Br Apts, 1 Ba, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras From $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2200 Pasadena, Met. 781608-6115..

Belle Chasse , $475,000.00 Custom built home w/4BDR,/3.5BA, approx. 3044 sq. ft living & 3921 sq. ft. total. Very open layout,. Bonnie Buras COLDWELL BANKER TEC REALTORS 504909-3020 Each office independently owned & operated.

NEW ORLEANS RIVERFRONT

3205 Pansy Court - $81K

1014 HARMONY

4100 Barataria

Spectacular Mediterranean-Style Villa on over 2 acres. Approx. 6,383 sf living; 9,100 sf total. 4 BR, 5 Full & 2 half BA, Saltwater pool, sauna, steam Room. Minutes from New Orleans. Game room, intercom system, hurricane shutters, central vac system, 45kw nat/gas generator. $1,975,000. Dorian Bennett Sotheby’s International Realty 504.944.3605. Dorian M. Bennett, 504.236.7688. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

817 Matador Dr. Gretna

$140,000.00 1,972 SF 3 BR/2 BA. Large den off back, separate dining room and formal living. Katherine Eley 985-373-2823, Beau Box Residential Real Estate 504-525-5354

WOODMERE - 4BDRM

Great 4 Bdrm only $83,000. 3004 Keith Way Dr. Luis Ramos 504-400.9899 Luis Ernesto Ramos Jr. Office: 504-4567890 GULF SOUTH INTERNATIONAL REALTORS, Licensed in La.

COMMERCIAL RENTALS OFF MAGAZINE. COMMERCIAL. $1850 PER MONTH. Call (504) 895-6394 or (504) 289-9977.

Kenner Warehouse & Office

6420 sq ft warehouse with office 20 x 60 ft fenced yd 625 Maria. Nr airport. 1 yr lease. $1850/mo. 504-421-3135, jaymclellan@cox.net.

MARRERO - WESTBANK

2273 Barataria Blvd. 900 sq ft office + half bath. 2 rms, prof’l mgmt. Easy free parking. Desks avail. $800/month. 781-608-6115

RETAIL, OFFICE & FLEX SPACE

MULTI-USE FACILITY LOCATED 1995 GENTILLY BLVD. AT DESAIX CIRLCE CAN ACCOMMODATE A RETAIL USER & 1 OR MORE OFFICE TENANTS W/ WHSE SPACE ADJACENT. TOTAL OF 8,625 SQ. FT. CALL 504-583-5969

GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2, 3 & 4 ROOM OFFICES STARTING AT $495 INCLUDING UTILITIES

MISSISSIPPI HIDE-AWAY-LAKE

Move-in ready. On the Water. 3 BR, 2 BA, split level, boat launch, great backyard deck. $199,000. Call 504-887-4191

HOUSE & 1 ACRE

2 or 3 BRMS/1BA. House liveable but needs work. More acreage availe. 3 miles east of Magnolia & 100 miles from NO. $17,000. (601) 248-0888

CALL 899-RENT KENNER 3BR/2.5BA TOWNHOUSE

O/S prkng, wtr paid, all kit appls, priv yard, conv. location, cable ready, Pets ok. $950/mo. 504-913-4803.

Modern 1 BR Apt. $775/mo incl free wifi & assigned pkg. 1 yr lease. $400 sec dep & rental application. 2325 Pasadena Ave. (nr Clearview & I-10). 504-366-7374 or 781-608-6115.

212 SEVERN

1 bdrm - $585 OR 315 S. Rocheblave, Studio Apt(Mid City) $535/month. Both include water. No pets. 504-887-1814

4509 Lefkoe St.

1 BR near Clearview & W. Esplanade. NO PETS / NO SMKS. $650/mo, $650 dep. 1 yr lse. Quiet triplex unit. Washer/dryer negot. Tenant pays water & elec. (504) 583-9813.

A HIDDEN GEM

Near heart of Metairie, dead end street. 1 bdrm $625, wtr pd., Rsvd pkg, 1 car. No smoking/pet 504-7801706 orrislaneapts.com

FOR RENT OR SALE

2511 Metairie Lawn. 2BR/2BA, w/d, pool, security. No pets. Rent $950/ mo. Sale $149,000. Call 427-1087

OLD METAIRIE 1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

UPR DPLX OFF MET RD

Lrg 3 br, 2 ba, furn kit, din rm, wd flrs, c-fans, w/d, c-a/h, off st pkg. 261 B Elmeer. $1250 • 504/554-3844

WEST BANK 5029 Eighty Arpent Rd

3Bd/2.5Ba.,Country living, yet 15 min to CBD & another 15 to the fishing hole! B brick, new A/C, Lg fenced yard. Dbl Carport. Never flooded, $1500/mo. & deposit. Call Brent 458-1205.

ESPLANADE RIDGE 1 BEDROOM

Living room, kit & bath, private balcony, gated. Water included & laundry facilities on property. Gated. $850/mo + dep. Call (504) 615-1716.

1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, no pets. $1050 mo. 432-7955.

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY 941 ROYAL

2 BR, 1 BA, $1450/Mo. ALSO 1 br loft , 1ba, $1200/mo. All fully furn, pool, w/d onsite, shared balc, elevator, no pets. 504-236-5757, 236-7060. FQRental.com

Beautiful French Qtr Leases!

934 St Ann - 1 bd, Private Courtyard, W/D, Renovated - $1,600 1114 Royal - 2 bd, New Renovation! W/D, Granite, Hrdwd, Courtyard, $1,950 1116 Royal - 1 bd, New Renovation! W/D, Granite, Hrdwd, Courtyard, $1,850 All 1 Yr Lse, , Pets OK. Call Steve Richards at 504-258-1800. Latter & Blum, ERA powered is independently owned and operated.

CORPORATE FURN APTS

Plan Now: Jazzfest, Spring Fiesta, etc. Residential edge Fr Qtr . Historic, new renov. Courts 10 blks. Security Gate. No Pets. 1) Handsome eff: cypress wdwk- firepl Exposed brick, lovely patio. $850. 2) Elegant 2 Bdrm: 3 marble mantles, hi ceil, chandeliers, 30’ liv rm, frt & rear balconies. $1490. 504-861-3141

METROWIDE APTS

1, 2 & 3 BDRM apt homes $530 $3000+. Free wifi incl. Free I Pad w/any rental! (504) 304-HOUSe (4687) www.BrunoInc.com

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE 6233 CATINA

3/2, furn kit, w/d hkps, ca/h, carport w/storage in back alley. All renov’t. No pets, no smoking. $1200 + $1200 sec. dep. 1 yr lease, refs. 455-2674

LAKEFRONT Beautiful Marina Living

In a boathouse $1800/mo One bed 1350 sq ft 40 ft slip Jennifer LaNasa Evans HGI Realty 504 207-7575

Lakefront Condo - 1 BR

Stove, Microwave, Dishwasher, Refrig, Pool, Gym, Secure Covered Parking. $975.00/mo $950.00/deposit 504-251-4667 Leave contact info. References

MID CITY SMALL OFFICE SPACE

MID CITY - Offstreet parking for one vehicle. Separate entrance. Available Now. Contact Jane, (504) 482-5292

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1 BR, NEAR MAGAZINE ST

Renov, furnished kitchen, new appliances, hardwood floors, cen a/h, w/d. $750 • 930 Jackson Ave. No Pets. Call 504-250-9010

1205 ST CHARLES/$1075

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. Avail NOW. 985-871-4324, 504-442-0573.

512 Lowerline St

Furn, short-term rental. 3/3, cable, security, wetbar, all appl incl w/d, ctyd, fence. $3500. Jean Hunn, 504-2323570. www.HunnProperties.com. RE/ MAX N O Properties 504-864-2329. Ea Ofc Ind Owned & Oper.

2 BEDROOM APT

2511 S Carrollton Ave. 2/1 Furn kit, cen a/h, off st pkg. $825/mo, wtr pd. Background ck required. 504-450-7450.

FURN CORP. APT

Beautifully furn 1 BR/1.5 BA apt. w/ hdwd flrs, nice kit, lg patio, pool, pkng & laundry. Avail now! Maselli Properties, (504) 891-2420.

Lower Garden Dist

2 bedroom, 1 large bath Wood flrs, full kit, w/d Full balcony owner/agent Jennifer HGI Realty 504 207 7575

1508 CARONDELET ST- 2 APTS Studio, newly remodeled kit & ba, hdwd flrs. $750 mo. Huge 2 BR Apt. Bright, spacious,, high ceilings, hdwd flrs, $1095. Both have Cent a/h, laundry facility avail 24 hrs. Walk 1 blk to St. Charles St Car, easy access to I-10, CBD & FQ. No pets/No smokers. 1-888-2396566. mballier@yahoo.com

3222 NAPOLEON ROOMS FOR RENT

Spacious house, 6 large private bedrooms. Large equipped kitchen, 3 baths, dining room, front porch. Central heat & air. $625 each includes all utilities & internet, cable & laundry facilities. No Pets + Deposit 504-376-4676. Grad students welcome.

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

9500 River Road

Beautiful 5 BR, 3.5 BA. 3800 sft, Fr. Country Estate w/ equestrian facilities. 1.5 mi. past Eng. Turn 1.5 mi from the CBD. $3800/mo. Des Crain, 504-2320221. Dorian Bennett Sotheby’s International Realty 504.944.3605. Each Office Independently Owned & Operated.

METROWIDE APARTMENTS

NOLA * Gretna * Metairie * Kenner. Affordable Luxury Living, 1, 2, 3 BDs, $545 & up! Gtd. Pkng, Lndry, Courtyards, FREE WI FI. 504-304-4687 www.BrunoInc.com

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

CARROLLTON 1028 SO. CARROLLTON

Grt for prof/med student, 2BR/1.5 BA, LR, DR, furn kit, central air, off st prkg, Univ. area. No smkrs/pets. $1250/mo + 1 yr lse. 504-522-7218

60 NERON PLACE

Grt for prof/med student, 1 BR/1 BA LR, DR, Sitting Rm, furn kit, c-heat/air units, c-fans, wd flrs, w/d avil, off st prkg, balcony, univ area. No smkrs/pets. $1200/ mo+1yr lse. 504-460-2852

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN 3324 DESOTO

Living room, large bedroom, tile bath, furnished kitchen. Private fenced backyard. No pets. $800/month + deposit. 504-494-0970

Bayou St John

2 bed 1 bth full kit w/d hkups Central a/h $1500/mo Jennifer LaNasa-Evans HGI Realty 504 207 7575

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

Lrg 4 bdrm/2 ba home, @2K sq. ft., w/open floor plan. Lrg bkyd w/rear yd access, driveway pkng. Subject to short sale lender approval. Major price reduction. Call Todd Taylor, (504) 232- 362, RE/MAX Real Estate Partners, (504) 888-9900. Each office independently owned and operated.

2 BR, 2.5 BA. Furn, healthclub, pool, parking. All util incl, wifi. Minimum 1 month. $3000/mo. Also 3 BR Penthouse $3800/mo. 781-608-6115.

METAIRIE 1 MONTH FREE RENT!

67


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS MAGAZINE ST. CONDO NEW PrICE

John Schaff CRS

MORE THAN JUST A REALTOR!

(c) 504.343.6683 (O) 504.895.4663

ERA Powered, Independently Owned & Operated

231 Friedrichs 4941 St. Charles 2721 St. Charles 1750 St. Charles 1544 Camp 1544 Camp 1224 St. Charles 2721 St. Charles 3222 Coliseum 5528 Hurst 1750 St. Charles 3915 St. Charles 1544 Camp

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > march 27 > 2012

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 2

70

(5BDRM/3.5BA) ..................... $1,439,000 Grand Mansion.......................$2,100,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) ............$1,559,000 Commercial ............................. $349,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg).................. $229,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) ............................ $139,000 (Only 3 Left!) ............starting at $149,000 TOO LATE! ................................ $169,000 TOO LATE! ..............................$2,495,000 TOO LATE!.............................. $1,300,000 TOO LATE! ................................ $429,000 TOO LATE! ................................ $315,000 TOO LATE! ................................ $159,000

LAKEVIEW UNDEr CONTrACT

4850 MAGAZINE

6901 GENErAL hAIG

Newly renovated 1bedroom, 1 bath, open floor plan. Beautiful original hardwood floors, 12ft ceilings, updated kitchen - everything new! Hardwood floors. On a quiet block of Magazine, close to everything. EASY TO PARK. $135,000

Complete this 3 bdrms 2 ba home on corner lot. Roof, siding & foundation complete. Plumbing, electrical & HVAC partially complete. Raised in ‘09 w/new piers. All work professionally done. Add personal touches to this fabulous home in a highly sought after location. Huge master suite. Large kit & baths. Most important part of renovation complete. Don’t miss the chance to buy! $195,000

(504) 895-4663 Latter & Blum, ERA powered is independently owned and operated.



Gambit New Orleans: March 27, 2012