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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

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JANUARY 3, 2011 · VOLUME 33 · NUMBER 1

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C’est What?

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PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

Saluting Scott Cowen and Leslie Jacobs for their commitment to local education Be it resolved ....

The New Orleans know-it-all In the culinary capital of America, what does the average school lunch tray hold?

17

This week’s heroes and zeroes Gambit’s Web poll

Scuttlebutt

From their lips to your ears

The BCS Buzz

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Best bets for your busy week

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com p l i me ntary 1 d e s i gn con s u ltat i on 1





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Review: Regla Store 5 in Five: Five spots for sliders Wine of the Week Scuttlebites: Food news in brief

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commercial & residential 1 custom design services

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A&E

PREVIEW: Hurray for the Riff Raff

FILM LISTINGS

REVIEW: War Horse REVIEW: Knuckle

ART LISTINGS

REVIEW: New art on St. Claude Avenue

STAGE LISTINGS

Celebrating over 100 years of Serving New Orleans the Best!

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12 Great Reasons to Celebrate 2012

IN SEASON LOUISIANA SATSUMA ICE, SICILIAN CHESTNUT, PEPPERMINT, & EGGNOG GELATO

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GAMBITGUIDE MUSIC LISTINGS

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

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Be It Resolved ...

E

governor — or any other statewide office. Now it’s time to rebuild. Local Democratic lawmakers work together to get things done; the state party should copy that. The Louisiana Republican Party — The GOP made a generational change by moving Louisiana solidly into the “red” column. Now the party has to decide if the Tea Party is going to drive the Republican bus or ride along. The yo-yo poll numbers for this year’s GOP presidential candidates offer a clue as to what most voters think. Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews — We’ve watched him grow from a little kid with a big trombone to a leading figure in contemporary jazz, and it only took two albums. Jazz alone probably isn’t big enough to contain his talent. The sky is the limit for him now. All we ask is that he not forget his hometown.

clothes + accessories

Remember those rings you got for us in early 2010? Not to be greedy, but we’d like another set. The New Orleans Hornets — Despite some ham-fisted machinations by the NBA in the off-again, off-again, on-again trade of Chris Paul, the Bees showed a lot of class in the run-up to their Dec. 26 opening game — which they won by a score of 85-84 against the Phoenix Suns (a fact overshadowed by the Saints-Falcons matchup). General manager Dell Demps and coach Monty Williams should stay the course and rebuild the team this year. We’re still in. The New Orleans Saints — Remember those rings you got for us in early 2010? Not to be greedy, but we’d like another set. Thanks, guys, for all you do on and off the field. And to all our readers in print and online: Happy New Year!

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

ach year we offer a list of suggested New Year’s resolutions for prominent New Orleanians and public figures and entities. While we recognize it would be naive to expect many of these suggestions to be followed, we remain ever optimistic as we look ahead to 2012. Here goes: Mayor Mitch Landrieu — If he succeeds as mayor, Hizzoner’s legacy will not be economic and cultural development, though both are important, but rather a long-term, significant reduction in New Orleans’ murder rate. His plans for 2012 sound impressive, but our city’s murder rate for 2011 was nonetheless higher than that of 2010. His poll numbers remain high, but his extended honeymoon is over. There is nothing more important that he and NOPD Chief Ronal Serpas could do this year than bring the murder trend down. Nothing. NOPD Chief Ronal Serpas — See Mayor Landrieu’s resolution, to which we’ll add: fewer sound bites and more sound policing practices. The chief’s rant after the shooting of 24-month-old Keira Holmes days before her second birthday was a classic case of grabbing headlines while dodging responsibility. Accountability and trust were among the things the chief promised upon his arrival. He needs to work harder to restore both. Also this year, we expect to see him fully implement the federal consent decree that City Hall is negotiating with the U.S. Department of Justice. We’re all tired of having to explain that the majority of our cops are good when a significant minority of them are clearly corrupt and unfit for the jobs they hold. Gov. Bobby Jindal — Hey, Governor, remember us here in New Orleans? Economic engine for the state? We’d like to see more of Jindal in 2012. He managed to make it to town last June when national GOP stars (and political media) came for the Republican Leadership Conference, and he came back in October when Mercedes-Benz bought naming rights to the Superdome. But last April, when ground was broken for the LSU-VA hospital complex — the economic engine for New Orleans in the 21st century — he was nowhere to be found. Note to the governor: Your book tour is over. You’re not going to be president. Or vice president. Get to know more of Louisiana. You might like it. U.S. Attorney Jim Letten — Don’t stop swinging. Never stop swinging. Sen. David Vitter — When he couldn’t run as a family-values politician any more, he pivoted and became the anti-Barack Obama. Enough playing to the Tea Party. He represents all of Louisiana, and he should start acting like it. The Louisiana Democratic Party — Democrats bottomed out in 2011 when they couldn’t even field a viable candidate for

07


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

11AM-TIL

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3449 River Road (at Shrewsbury in Jefferson Parish) • 834-4938

DEAR ERIC, Yes, it does. The Pedesclaux-Lemonnier House is at 640 Royal St. on the corner of Royal and St. Peter streets. In fact, it’s pretty hard to miss because at four stories high, it’s the second tallest building in the old “Colonial” section of the French Quarter — St. Louis Cathedral is taller — and has been dubbed “The Skyscraper.” The house was not built all at once, and the fourth story wasn’t added until 1876, when Bertrand Saloy turned the building into a tenement. Today it would require a stretch of the imagination to call the structure a mansion because there is a souvenir store on the first floor and apartments on the others. A plaque on the wall next to the door provides the following information: Pierre Pedesclaux, a prominent notary, purchased the site in 1795 and began construction of the house. Its design is attributed to Barthelemy Lafon, who had an office in the building in 1805. Dr. Yves Rene Lemonnier and pharmacist Francois Grandchamps bought the property in 1811. The house was then completed by architects LaCarrier Latour and Hyacinthe Laclotte and was owned by the Lemonnier family until 1860. The house became famous as the setting of writer George Washington Cable’s 1873 story “Sieur George.” More important than the owners of the property, however, are the people associated with it. Lafon, born in France in 1769, came to New Orleans about 1789 and became successful as an architect, engineer, geographer, surveyor, cartographer, scholar and politician. Lafon subdivided the Faubourg Marigny and the five plantations of Annunciation, Soulet, LaCourse, Nuns and Panis, as well as designing plans for Donaldsonville. It also was Lafon who gave us the Greek street names in the Lower Garden District. After the Battle of New Orleans in 1815, Lafon gave up the architecture business to take up piracy and smuggling with people

like Jean and Pierre Lafitte. Lafon was very rich when he died of yellow fever in 1820. Cable, born in New Orleans in 1844, has been called the most important Southern writer of the 19th century, as well as the first modern Southern writer. Cable grew up in the Crescent City and, after serving as a Confederate soldier in the Civil War, he lived in the city until 1885, when he moved to Massachusetts. After the Civil War, Cable turned his talents to journalism and wrote columns for

The Pedesclaux-Lemonnier mansion in the French Quarter now houses a souvenir shop on the ground floor. PHOTO BY KANDACE POWER GRAVES

the Picayune. He gained attention in 1873 with the publication of “Sieur George” in Scribner’s Monthly. In the opening lines of that story, Cable describes the building: “In the heart of New Orleans stands a large four-story brick building that has so stood for about three-quarters of a century. Its rooms are rented to a class of persons occupying them simply for lack of activity to find better and cheaper quarters elsewhere. With its grey stucco peeling off in broad patches, it has a solemn look of gentility in rags and stands, or, as it were, hangs, about the corner of two ancient streets, like a faded fop who pretends to be looking for employment.” Cable gained a national reputation as a local color realist. In his early novels and stories he depicted multicultural Louisiana in the 19th century, especially Creole life. He despised slavery and racism and wrote essays dealing with civil rights.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> MORE SCUTTLEBUTT CLANCY DUBOS < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 13 14 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK: RICKY BOBBY EDITION

“Davenport, Iowa — It was a nice crowd that gathered at the marvelous Figge Art Museum here for a Rick Perry town hall. But by the time it was over, it felt more like a [Bobby] Jindal in 2016 rally. … You could tell the crowd was with Jindal during the Q-and-A when one of the first questions to Perry was whether he would invite Jindal to join his Cabinet. My guess is that Jindal has bigger things in mind than a place in a notional Perry Cabinet.” — Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne Jr., on the GOP presidential campaign trail.

Tray Tragique IN AMERICA’S CULINARY CAPITAL, ALL THE TALK OF EDUCATION REFORM STILL DOESN’T EXTEND TO SCHOOL CAFETERIAS.

“Jindal not only heaped praise on the Texas governor, but he also threw Perry a lifeline when the Texas governor stumbled in explaining a portion of his tax plan. A voter asked Perry if the standard deduction would still exist if someone opts to use his proposed 20 percent flat tax, and after Perry mistakenly responded no, Jindal chimed in, reminding the Texas governor the standard deduction would still be in place.” — ABC News’ Arlette Saenz, on the road with Perry and Jindal.

BY ALLISON GOOD

I

BoUQuets The Marching Crusaders,

Rosie Jackson, the certified Lunch at SciHigh: nutritionist who has headed a sausage sandChild Nutrition for years, is wich, fries and a especially proud of her postside salad. Katrina accomplishments. “I think we’ve put more concentration on offering whole grain products and fresh fruits and vegetables, and our goal is to serve them daily,” she says. “We’ve increased our healthy options, we cook from scratch, and we try to use limited pre-prepared products. We do not deep-fry, and the kids love our oven-baked chicken, shepherd’s pie, and red beans and brown rice with ‘turkey ham.’” A look at the Child Nutrition menu, however, reveals that the baked chicken, shepherd’s pie, and beans and rice with “turkey ham” will only be served once each this month. More commonplace, on the other hand, are items like Mexican chili mac, sweet-and-sour pork with brown rice and a tuna noodle bake. Jackson’s belief that Child Nutrition successfully provides a variety of nutritious and tasty breakfast, lunch and snack options for low-income students reveals a disconnect between the Orleans Parish administration and those who are actually eating the food. Barbara MacPhee, the veteran principal of SciHigh, agrees with her students. PAGE 11

“Every barrel of oil that comes out of those sands in Canada is a barrel of oil that we don’t have to buy from a foreign source.” — Perry, on the Iowa campaign trail.

SHEARER & THE HACKERS

A group identifying itself as Antisec, which is associated with the Anonymous collective/movement, hacked computers at security think tank Stratfor Global Intelligence over Christmas weekend, then posted thousands of Stratfor PAGE 13

c'est what? DO YOU AGREE WITH STATE REP. AUSTIN BADON JR. THAT THE NATIONAL GUARD SHOULD BE CALLED IN TO HELP QUELL VIOLENT CRIME IN NEW ORLEANS?

35% yes

42% no

23%

whatever works

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

How will you primarily get your Mardi Gras parade information this year?

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

the Roots of Music’s marching band, was picked to perform in the Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, Calif., on New Year’s Day. The Crusaders is the city’s only tuition-free citywide marching band, created by Roots of Music founders Derrick Tabb and Allison Reinhardt in 2007. The group is dedicated to supporting and teaching at-risk youth through after-school musical activities.

Young Judaea,

a group of Jewish high school students from around the country, came to New Orleans for “Alternative Winter Break.” While here, they helped with public service projects at Battle Ground Baptist Church in the 9th Ward and helped elderly homeowners weed and clean up their yards. The group worked in partnership with Green Light New Orleans and the St. Bernard Project. It was Young Judaea’s third trip to New Orleans.

The Jefferson Parish Library

opened its new Lakeshore Library Dec. 27, more than six years after the floodwall breaks of Hurricane Katrina destroyed the old library. The new building, which replaces a temporary facility, holds nearly 30,000 books, CDs, DVDs and reference materials. It’s located at 1100 W. Esplanade Ave. in Metairie and will be open seven days a week.

Pete Prisco

of CBS Sports wrote a column complaining about Drew Brees and how he continued to throw passes in the New Orleans Saints’ Dec. 26 game against the Atlanta Falcons in a successful attempt to break Dan Marino’s season passing record long after the Dirty Birds had been roasted. Prisco called the late-game passing “classless,” then tweeted, “I’d tell my players to hit Brees in the mouth.” Now that’s class, Prisco.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

t’s lunch period at Uptown’s New Orleans Charter Math and Science High School, or SciHigh. Hundreds of students crowd the cafeteria line, some waiting for whole-wheat spaghetti and turnip greens, others choosing hot sausage on a whole-wheat bun with french fries and a salad, and many opting for the salad bar. I take the second option, but the fries are cold, the sausage is tasteless and rubbery, and the salad fits only the most elastic definition of a serving of vegetables. Hannah Stoor, a junior, looks disdainfully at the contents of my styrofoam tray. “I don’t like the food,” she says. “I can never tell what the meat is because it’s never labeled, and it tastes like it was made out of paste.” Kalie Indesc, also a junior, is similarly dissatisfied. “I’m a vegetarian, so I don’t get to eat lunch that often, and when I do, it’s a bunch of unsubstantial side items,” she explains, gesturing to her fries and side salad. Prior to Hurricane Katrina, school districts were legally restricted only to providing traditional in-house food service, but once the Recovery School District (RSD) absorbed more schools and evolved into a full-fledged machine, it turned to outside corporate food service contractors like Aramark and Sodexo. Sodexo had the contract to serve RSD direct-run schools until July 2010, when the RSD switched to Aramark. RSD charters, on the other hand, have more autonomy over school food; they can choose to use either the RSD direct provider or a different outside contractor. Before Katrina, all New Orleans schools used Child Nutrition, the in-house service provided by the Orleans Parish School Board (OPSB). All OPSB direct-run schools still use Child Nutrition, as do a number of OPSB charters (including SciHigh) and RSD charters, for a grand total of 11,500 students.

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tently  available  at  breakfast  and  lunch.  Of the nine schools included in the report,  only SciHigh uses Child Nutrition.     Even  though  a  lot  of  the  schools  have  made  significant  improvements  in  food  quality  since  last  year’s  report  card,  Rethink  communications  director  Mallory Falk says some problems are still  very common.     “I’ve heard a lot that the food isn’t identifiable,  that  they  can’t  tell  what  they’re  eating, and that it’s not properly cooked,”  she says.     While  the  RSD  has  been  publicly  supportive  of  the  Rethinkers’  initiative,  Jackson remains unresponsive.     “Rethink  has  reached  out  to  OPSB  on  multiple occasions, and we’ve invited Rosie  Jackson to all of our summer press conferences,  but  she  has  not  attended,”  says  Grow  Dat  youth  farm  director  Johanna  Gilligan, who also serves as a food educator for Rethink. School food reform is further hindered by  the  federal  budget.  Though  the  National  School  Lunch  Program  Fact  Sheet  states  that “school lunches must meet the applicable  recommendations  of  the  Dietary  Guidelines  for  Americans,”  which  require  school lunches to provide “one-third of the  Recommended Dietary Allowances of protein,  vitamin  A,  vitamin  C,  iron,  calcium,  and  calories,”  current  federal  reimbursement rates are only $2.79 for lunch, $1.80  for breakfast, and 77 cents per snack.     “Reimbursement  rates  never  decrease,  they  always  go  up  because  the  price  of  food  goes  up,  but  the  rates  do  not  even  come close to covering food and operating  costs,”  says  Chris  Van  Vliet,  the  food  services director for all five FirstLine RSD charter  schools.  “We  use  Sodexo,  so  we  pay  them  pretty  much  all  of  our  reimbursement, leaving maybe eight cents per every  meal served to come back into our offices  to  offset  my  salary  and  my  assistant’s  salary.  Out  of  that  $2.79  on  every  lunch  meal  I  also  have  to  put  enough  money  aside to help maintain my kitchen, and I’ve  even trained myself to do basic equipment  repairs because it’s so expensive.”     According  to  Van  Vliet,  student  input  is  essential  to  running  an  economically  efficient program.     “Meal  participation  is  your  main  goal,  because  the  more  meals  consumed,  the  higher your monthly reimbursement from  the  federal  government,  and  the  better  your overall production average,” he adds.  “You’re better making 400 cheeseburgers  and  having  395  consumed  than  just  100  consumed,  so  you  want  to  have  a  lot  of  input in the menu as far as giving students  choices.  I’ll  make  adjustments  according  to how well an item was received the last  time it was served.”     Making  changes  to  the  menu  at  Child  Nutrition,  which  serves  21  schools,  is  a 

different  story.  Schools  that  choose  to  opt  out  of  their  district’s  provider,  such  as  FirstLine’s,  also  face  the  daunting  process  of  becoming  their  own  School  Food  Authority.  The  Louisiana  Department  of  Education,  which  monitors  the  process,  requires  that  a  school  applying  for  SFA  status  hire  someone  like  Van  Vliet,  a  staff  member  responsible  for  developing menus, overseeing staff, and ensuring  compliancy with regulations.     “Most  schools  don’t  have  the  budget  for  it,  and  it’s  much  harder  for  schools  that  go  out  on  their  own,”  Van  Vliet  notes.  “I  know  that  the  International  School of Louisiana runs its own kitchen  without  any  contract  management,  but  they’re operating in the red.” New  Orleans  College  Prep,  on  the  other  hand, has been more successful. Liberty’s  Kitchen,  a  program  that  trains  at-risk  youth  to  become  independent  in  a  culinary  setting,  began  serving  College  Prep  students  fresh  food  made  from  scratch  in-house in the fall of 2010, thanks in part  to  a  $50,000  planning  and  development  grant from the Emeril Lagasse Foundation.     The  paperwork,  Lozada  recalls,  was  an  enormous hassle.     “I found that there was no clear process  or  set  of  documentation  to  let  me  know  what was required, so it was very unorganized, but most of these papers, which are  things like permits to operate and the fire  marshal’s report, are things schools should  have on file anyway,” she says.     Once  the  paperwork  is  completed,  a  school  must  send  administrators  who  will  be  a  part  of  the  program  to  Baton  Rouge  for  a  three-day  training  course  focusing  on  procedural  aspects,  and  the  third and final step is opening a public bid  for a vendor contract.      “It  was  very  competitive,  and  I  found  during the individual meetings with each  vendor  that  it  was  really  up  to  me  to  push  what  was  important  to  our  organizations,”  she  explains.  “A  lot  of  them  did  change their menus and prove to us that  they could change what they do in other  schools, and other vendors didn’t and still  showed us corndogs and other items that  were not in line with our vision.”      Though  both  Aramark  and  Sodexo  bid  on  the  contract,  Liberty’s  Kitchen  came  out on top.     “Liberty’s  Kitchen  has  been  an  incredible  provider  of  both  service  and  quality,  and they have exposed our kids to a whole  new  horizon  of  food,”  says  College  Prep  founder and director Ben Kleban.     For  now,  Jackson  remains  confident  that she will continue to win over her the  students, which she calls her “customers.”     “We’re only going to win our customers  over  if  we  keep  it  exciting  and  fun,”  she  says.  “If  kids  don’t  enjoy  it,  they’re  not  going to come back for it.”

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    “I knew the food wasn’t good because I  would occasionally eat it because I wanted  to  see  what  the  kids  were  eating,”  she  explains.  “And  when  I  say  ‘not  good,’  I  mean  that  last  week  one  day  we  had  hard  corn  tacos  with  a  little  bit  of  meat,  only  two  of  them  per  person,  and  that  came  with  a  sweet  roll  with  raisins  and  white sugar, and the vegetable was corn.  Another day we had something called ribs,  but I think it was some product in which  pork  is  ground  up  and  put  into  strips  to  look  like  ribs,  and  then  a  very  sweet  barbecue sauce is poured over it.”     MacPhee  is  concerned  about  her  students’ health. According to the Louisiana  Department  of  Education,  in  2010  more  than  84  percent  of  students  in  New  Orleans  public  schools,  or  more  than  32,000  students,  qualified  for  free  and  reduced  price  meals  through  the  National  School  Lunch  Program  and  the  School  Breakfast  Program.  More  than  one-third  of  those  students  are  either  overweight or obese.     “Obesity is an epidemic, and I know we  have kids who are hypertensive and high  blood pressure and we have kids who are  diabetic,” MacPhee says. “Child Nutrition’s  response  to  my  concerns  is  that  this  is  the only thing kids will eat — stuff that’s  heavy in sodium and sugar.”     The salad bar does not seem a fresh and  healthy  alternative,  either.  “The  budget  only allows for bagged lettuce, and oftentimes  the  carrot  has  been  shredded  days  ago  and  is  very  dry,”  MacPhee  explains.  “They also offer ham cubes and shredded  cheese,  olives,  which  are  high  in  sodium,  and the kids really pile on the dressing.”     Kristen  Lozada,  the  chief  operating  officer  for  RSD  charter  New  Orleans  College  Prep,  says  she  does  not  have  fond  memories  of  the  school’s  relationship with Child Nutrition.     “We contracted with them for the 2009  to  2010  academic  year,  but  I  wasn’t  particularly impressed with either the quality  of the food or with their flexibility in terms  of putting students first,” she remembers.  “Everything  was  very  compliance-driven,  which  is  extremely  important,  but  there  are  ways  to  do  that  while  also  meeting  student needs.”     Companies like Aramark and Sodexo, on  the other hand, do not necessarily provide  a better product.      According  to  the  second  annual  school  food  report  card  presented  at  a  press  conference  in  May  by  Kids  Rethink  New  Orleans Schools, a student think tank that  works to improve the city’s public schools,  SciHigh  received  a  D,  but  RSD-operated  Fannie C. Williams Elementary, which uses  Aramark, was given a D-minus — in part  because the food was a mix of pre-cooked  and  freshly  cooked,  the  majority  of  students said they do not like eating the food,  and  vegetarian  options  were  not  consis-

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Harry Shearer was among the people whose personal information was put on the Internet by Anonymous in the Stratfor hacking incident.

tigating whether BP properly reported pressure measurements during its deepwater drilling. Last week, The Wall Street Journal and NPR reported prosecutors may be close to pursuing criminal charges against several Houston-based engineers and at least one BP supervisor for giving false information about drilling risks (including pressure readings) which led to the explosion at the Deepwater Horizon rig that killed 11 men and flooded the Gulf of Mexico and its coasts with a months-long gusher. A DOJ prosecution task force led by Brooklyn prosecutor John Buretta is leading the investigation, and, according to NPR, the engineers are already lawyering up. No charges have been filed yet, however. BP will enter trials in February, anyway, as the feds determine liability for the disaster. Meanwhile, the company faces stacks of lawsuits for compensation not addressed by its claims process. — Alex Woodward

MOnitOring the nOPd

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New Orleans Independent Police Monitor (IPM) Susan Hutson has told Gambit that by the end of 2011, her office will have investigated between 250 and 275 misconduct complaints against the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD). However, a recent influx of complaints from protesters associated with Occupy New Orleans could push that tally over the projected mark. According to IPM spokeswoman Ursula Price, two incidents — the police eviction of Occupy New Orleans and the unpermitted Krewe of Eris second-line parade last March 6, in which 12 people were arrested amid allegations of police violence — will account for more than 200 such complaints. “We had at least 150 from Eris in March, and I’m looking at about another 50 here,” Price said. Price, along with Hutson and Deputy Police Monitor Simone Levine, had not finished a review of every affidavit from Occupy New Orleans protesters. Lawyers for the group, however, estimated they turned over more than 100. “The primary complaint is just damage to property” from the early morning eviction of the group’s Duncan Plaza encampment on Dec. 6, Price said. That morning, an estimated 150 people were told to leave the park and given 30 minutes to do so. Anything left behind after that time was destroyed. In spite of protesters’ claims of losses totaling thousands of dollars, Price said she is yet to see any details “about the value of the items so far in the complaints I’ve read.” Price said that after IPM reads and records the details of the complaints, they will be turned over to the NOPD’s Public Integrity Bureau for an internal investigation. — Maldonado

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

clients’ credit card numbers and other personal information on file-sharing websites. Among the victims, Gambit found, was local actor-filmmaker Harry Shearer. “I subscribed to Stratfor for one year, at the recommendation, as it happens, of a New Orleans friend of mine,” Shearer wrote in an email to Gambit. His New Orleans address, along with an out-ofstate phone number, personal email address and a credit card number were disclosed in the leak. Shearer wrote that the firm informed him of the hack and he canceled the compromised credit card. The scope of the Stratfor breach isn’t clear. Stratfor denies claims that hackers were able to steal its most important files, which according to a report in PC World magazine, may include “sensitive information about Stratfor’s high-profile clients, such as Apple, the U.S. Air Force and the Miami Police Department.” The firm, however, doesn’t deny that Antisec managed to snag personal information on subscribers to its published intelligence and news reports, which are often cited by major national news outlets. Shearer wasn’t the only local on the list. Others whose information appeared to be compromised include Jefferson Parish chief administrative assistant for public safety Heather Hilliard; author James P. Farwell; Jeffrey Winn, a former New Orleans Police Department captain (and witness in the Henry Glover trial); and philanthropist Louis M. Freeman. — Charles Maldonado

on the Metairie Parade Route

13


clancy DUBOS

POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

Looking Forward aving just finished recapping 2011, what else to do but handicap 2012? Herewith a look ahead at the headlines we’re likely to be discussing in the next 12 months. Federal Corruption Investigations — This should be the year that somebody connected to the River Birch landfill is indicted … or not. By that I mean if there’s going to be an indictment at all, it should come before the end of 2012. As a run-up to that, look for some action in the Aaron Broussard case — most likely a plea deal for the former Jefferson Parish president’s ex-wife. Maybe one for former parish attorney Tom Wilkinson as well. I hear rumblings about a possible investigation into St. Bernard Parish big shots — alleged funny dealings with BP and possibly the Meraux Foundation. Also begging for attention are the Jefferson Parish Performing Arts Center and NOPD. Speaking of NOPD — If the federal consent decree to reform the department is going to get done via negotiations, it should happen in the first half of 2012. It will be interesting to see what Mayor Mitch

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

H

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Landrieu can negotiate in terms of maintaining some measure of control (he likes control) over the cop shop. Mayor Mitch Landrieu, Year 3 — This is the year the mayor needs to make a dent in the murder rate, or else he will be looking at potential challengers for re-election in early 2014. Next year (2013) will see a slow but steady build-up to the February 2014 citywide elections, so the time to establish his political invincibility (to the extent he can do it) will be this year and the first half of 2013. Elections — First up will be the contest for Arnie Fielkow’s old at-large seat on the New Orleans City Council, along with a judicial race for Civil District Court. In the fall, look for a nasty congressional showdown between Republican U.S. Reps. Charles Boustany and Jeff Landry in the 3rd District. Meanwhile, the presidential race won’t mean much here. Fill in the name of the GOP nominee and that’s who’ll carry Louisiana on Nov. 6, probably with 60 percent or more of the vote. Bobby Watch — Gov. Talking Points has lots of public support for his education

reforms; now all he has to do is figure out which reforms he wants to implement. He has been meeting with lawmakers to gauge support for what promises to be the biggest fight of the annual legislative session.

This is the year the mayor needs to make a dent in the murder rate, or else he will be looking at potential challengers.

Meanwhile, his name continues to be tossed around as a rising star in national GOP circles, which tells us two things: (1) He still can’t wait to get outta here; and (2) the GOP has a really, really weak bench. Suburban Politics — There’s been a changing of the guard in the ’burbs. John Young continues to put his stamp on Jefferson Parish government, although he will continue to get pushback (some of it public, most of it private) from his old foes on the council. In St. Bernard, new Sheriff Jimmy Pohlmann is closely tied to former Sheriff Jack Stephens, but other new faces in parish government represent significant breaks from the past. It will be interesting to see who emerges as the dominant player in St. Bernard, particularly if the feds swoop in. Meanwhile, Plaquemines has a new sheriff (Lonnie Greco) and St. Tammany has a new parish president (Pat Brister) who could reshape the politics of their respective parishes. At a minimum, we’ll see some big changes in political style. A s always, this should b e a year to remember.

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Neighborhood Charm im Rivas, chef and owner of Braxton’s Restaurant & Lounge (636 Franklin Ave, Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola.com) knew he wanted to work on the West Bank as soon as he saw the light gray building with its wraparound porch that now houses his restaurant. “I fell in love with this building,” Rivas says. “Some people have tables on sidewalks. We’re sitting on a porch … it’s romantic.” Rivas renovated the building and opened his restaurant last April, offering a sophisticated dining and bar experience at an affordable price. Braxton’s has a formal dining room, stage and bar. Rivas says he wants the feel of the French Quarter, but with prices more suited to a neighborhood restaurant. “I wanted to give the restaurant a French/Italian feel that incorporates live music,” Rivas says. “I look at this space as a music venue. People can rent it for office parties or birthday parties or come here with their families.” Featuring pale green walls and linen tablecloths, the dining room provides a fast lunch for those on the go or a more leisurely dining experience at night. The bar’s granite tops, leather stools and wood paneling create a laid-back atmosphere for enjoying a glass of wine, beer or a cocktail. The light from lamps hanging over the bar morphs Karen Bolar, director of special into different colors, providing a jazzy ambience. Drink prices begin at $2 for domestic beers, events and sales, and Jim Rivas, $4 for well drinks and $7 for premium liquor. owner, relax on Braxton’s wrapThe menu offers staples like gumbo, fried seafood platters, pasta, po-boys, T-bone steaks, around porch. and daily specials like red beans and rice. Every menu item is under $20. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER “(We’re) not going for gourmet food. We’re not going for pretentious, but for comfort,” Rivas says. “My goal is for Braxton’s to feel like a neighborhood joint.” Starting this month, Rivas hopes to have live entertainment featuring blues, R&B, jazz and gospel every night with a gospel/jazz brunch on Sundays. A Chicago native, Rivas began working in French Quarter restaurants when he moved to New Orleans 20 years ago, and formerly worked as chef and general manager of The Original Pierre Maspero’s. “My first love is always cooking,” Rivas says.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

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“In the past year, we’ve opened four new stores, added 800 new team members, and welcomed another future grocer to our family. We believe our passion for great food and all things local is what has helped us grow from one small store in 1960 to the nearly 40 our family operates today. Cheers to 2012! We can’t wait to see what – DONNY ROUSE this year brings.”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

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TRANSFORMERS OUR 2011 NEW ORLEANIANS OF THE YEAR DEDICATED THEMSELVES TO MAKING FUNDAMENTAL CHANGES IN PUBLIC EDUCATION— AND IN THE COMMUNITY AT LARGE — AFTER HURRICANE KATRINA. THEIR EFFORTS PAID BIG DIVIDENDS IN 2011.

I

n the long slog toward reversing decades of decline in local public schools, 2011 ranks as a breakout year. Student test scores climbed higher than ever. More schools got off the “failing” list. And voters wholeheartedly backed a statewide effort to elect reform-minded candidates to the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE). In and out of the educational arena, 2011 was a year that taught the value of focusing on the three R’s — recovery, rebuilding and renaissance. Our New Orleanians of the year for 2011 brought a one-two punch to those efforts — Tulane University President Scott Cowen from his namesake education reform institute and venture philanthropist Leslie Jacobs from the political and civic trenches. “Scott Cowen and Leslie Jacobs have very different styles but share a deep commitment and passion for improving our community,” says Jay Lapeyre, president of the Business Council of New Orleans. He has worked with both our honorees — as a member of Tulane’s board of trustees and as a member of the advisory board of Jacobs’ Educate Now! nonprofit. “They have each brought clear, principled decision making and extraordinary perseverance and leadership to many of the recovery and reform initiatives critical to the future of our city and region.” We agree.

TULANE UNIVERSITY’S PRESIDENT HELPED HIS SCHOOL AND HIS ADOPTED CITY AFTER HURRICANE KATRINA. BOTH ARE NOW STRONGER THAN EVER.

S

cott Cowen was confused when he first moved to New Orleans. Having grown up in New Jersey and having spent most of his adult life in Cleveland, New Orleans was, as he puts it, “quite different.” “It was the little things,” he says. “Like the condition of the roads and the sidewalks. It was quite different than what I was used to seeing.” He soon learned how to adapt to the local culture, however. Thirteen years later, Cowen is every bit a New PAGE 18

LESLIE JACOBS

THE INSURANCE EXECUTIVETURNED-PUBLIC EDUCATION REFORMER PROVED THAT VENTURE PHILANTHROPY — WITH A LARGE DOSE OF GRIT AND DETERMINATION — CAN BE AN IRRESISTIBLE FORCE.

U

.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan called New Orleans the most improved school district in the country last April. With close to 80 percent of its students in charter schools, 2011 was a banner year for Orleans Parish public schools. The district could not have reached that mark, though, without the efforts of education reform advocate and venture philanthropist Leslie Jacobs. A native of New Orleans, Jacobs became involved in public PAGE 21

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

SCOTT COWEN

BY ALLISON GOOD

PHOTOS BY CHERYL GERBER

BY DAVID THIER

ILLUSTRATION BY THATCHER HILLEGAS

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

SCOTT COWEN

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Orleanian. Engaging, gregarious and still built like a linebacker at 71, he has the kind of cannonball personality that can only be contained by the city he now calls home. His local chops were hard-earned, too. Through the crucible of Hurricane Katrina, Cowen rebuilt Tulane into an institution with an even more enviable national reputation than before the storm and a renewed focus on public service by students. He also founded The Cowen Institute and became an integral part of the revitalization of public schools in New Orleans. The key, for him, was the city itself. “I was born and raised in the Garden State, but now the Bayou State is my home,” he says. When Cowen arrived at Tulane in 1998, it was a very different place. Over the years, Tulane had developed a national and international stature, but in some ways its success distanced the institution from the strange and particular city of its birth. Despite being the largest private employer in the city, by the time Cowen arrived in 1998, Tulane had stopped feeling like part of New Orleans. That all changed in the autumn of 2005. On Aug. 27 of that year, just two days before Hurricane Katrina made landfall in southeast Louisiana, Cowen took the stage at the convocation for the newly arrived class of 2009 wearing Bermuda shorts and a T-shirt. The incoming freshmen had arrived just a few days before, but he told them to leave because of the hurricane. Cowen then girded himself for one of the greatest challenges faced by any university president. He stayed in the city for five days as his campus flooded, then evacuated to Houston where he assembled a skeleton crew to chart the university’s future. In addition to the daunting task of rebuilding Tulane in the face of $650 million worth of storm damages, Cowen also found he had a new and much broader civic role to play in the city’s recovery. He was charged with leading a committee that focused on public education as part of Mayor Ray Nagin’s Bring New Orleans Back commission. Initially, Cowen’s task appeared to be an ad-hoc assignment that consisted mostly of reopening a patchwork system of public schools, wherever possible in light of the flood waters, and getting as many students back in the classroom as they could. But he and other commission members quickly recognized that bringing back a failed public school system wasn’t good enough. They started looking for ways to reinvent public education in New Orleans, and their work helped lay the foundation for the wave of public education reform that followed the storm. Meanwhile, Tulane experienced a similar renaissance. Immediately after the storm, university students pitched in like everyone else in the battered city. In those days, public service was a necessity — a foregone conclusion even. But afterwards, Tulane students and faculty members found themselves woven into the fabric of the city in a new way. As it became clear that Tulane was a different university as a result of Hurricane Katrina, Cowen made sure the university would always keep its relationship with the city central to its mission by folding public service into the core curriculum for undergraduates. Tulane is the first university in the country to make public service an undergraduate requirement. “If it is not in your DNA to rebuild Tulane and New Orleans, don’t come back,” he said to a group of students and parents in the months following the storm.

PaST

NEW OrlEaNiaNS Of ThE YEar

1983 — Joe Canizaro 1984 — Darryl Berger 1985 — Gary Groesch 1986 — Oliver Houck 1987 — Tom Benson 1988 — Dr. Mervin Trail 1989 — Pat and Phyllis Taylor 1990 — Lindy Boggs 1991 — Jim Bob Moffett 1992 — Ian Arnof He believes that commitment to public service is the driving force behind a historic surge in applications. This year Tulane received 44,000 applications — more than any other private institution in the country and twice what it received in 2005. Tulane also enjoys the highest undergraduate retention rate of its 177-year history. Along the way, Cowen’s work with public education went from being a post-storm necessity to a passion — and a transformational part of New Orleans. In 2007, as the Recovery School District and local charter schools were making national headlines, the college president launched the Cowen Institute for Public Education Initiatives, a think tank based at Tulane and designed to sustain the momentum behind K-12 education reform in New Orleans. In 2011, Cowen signed a first-of-its-kind agreement with the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP) New Orleans charter schools and the KIPP Foundation to enroll more KIPP graduates in Tulane — and to place more Tulane teacher certification program students in KIPP schools. He also cemented a partnership between the Cowen Institute and Teach for America to increase the number of Tulane graduates who will teach in New Orleans public schools. While helping to rebuild and renew public schools in New Orleans, Cowen in 2011 also laid the groundwork for bringing Tulane football back to the Uptown campus with the announcement that a new on-campus stadium would be built. And his civic engagement stretched beyond education to include service on Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s new Public Belt Railroad board after a scandal rocked the city-owned rail spur. Cowen tends to be modest in his descriptions of both the university’s and his role in New Orleans’ postKatrina recovery, citing the huge number of people involved in volunteer efforts, public education and Tulane. Those around him are much quicker to sing his praises. page 25

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education while working at the Rosenthal Agency, a small familyowned insurance brokerage firm she built with her brother Steve. In the late 1980s, Jacobs started as a business partner to an elementary school across from the St. Thomas housing development, providing needing supplies and services. From there, she chaired a partnership program that connected business leaders to public education, and in 1992 she was recruited to run for the Orleans Parish School Board as part of the Excellence in Education reform movement. Jacobs brought a determination and grit to the task of dismantling old, broken paradigms and replacing them with new ones. It has made her a formidable champion of education reform. Jacobs won her school board race and took office in January 1993. After serving more than three years on the local board — including a stint as vice president — she was appointed to the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE) by then-Gov. Mike Foster. Jacobs remained on BESE under Foster and his successor, Gov. Kathleen Blanco. As a member of the state education board, she played a leading role in reshaping public education statewide, including the establishment of Louisiana’s school district accountability system, which includes LEAP tests and performance scores. “In school, the accountability analogy is getting a report card, and it was incumbent upon schools to figure out how to improve themselves, to force school boards and communities to

focus on their schools,” Jacobs explains. “The first school report cards came out in 1999, and it was clear New Orleans had the majority of failing schools in the state.” In 2000, Jacobs and her brother sold Rosenthal Agency to Hibernia National Bank, now Capital One, and she forged ahead with school reform advocacy. The state had given New Orleans’ failing schools extra money and resources as a result of the initial report cards, but local schools weren’t turning around. In early 2003, Jacobs approached Foster with the proposal for the Recovery School District (RSD). He bought in, and later that year Louisiana voters approved a constitutional amendment creating the entity that is putting Jacobs’ reform ideas into practice. “I felt incompetence was harder to fix than corruption, and in Orleans Parish there was both,” Jacobs says. “Everyone was trapped in a failed system incapable of righting itself, and the only model in the country for intervening in failed urban school districts was a takeover. … The thought process behind the RSD was that we needed something different, so it was modeled after Chapter 11 bankruptcy in business. We would put a failing school in the RSD, which had the power to make sweeping changes to that school to allow it to go on its way and succeed.” The RSD received its first school in 2004, and when the federal levees failed during Hurricane Katrina in August 2005, five New Orleans schools were already in the district. In the aftermath of Katrina, Blanco summoned lawmakers into a special session to pass Act 35, which ultimately took more than 100 failed public schools away from the scandalplagued Orleans Parish School Board. When local public schools reopened in 2006, all but 16 were under the jurisdiction of the RSD. As the RSD took the reins at dozens of schools in New Orleans, Jacobs shifted her focus slightly — to get behind the local charter school movement. One of her first successes came shortly before the storm, when she flew to Houston to recruit charter school operator KIPP (the Knowledge is Power Program) to open its first New Orleans school in July 2005.

HOW SWEET IT IS ON AND OFF THE GRIDIRON

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VERY HONORABLE MENTION SHARON L. CLARK

SOPHIE B. WRIGHT CHARTER SCHOOL

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

“I came here because I wanted to work in a failing school,” says Sophie B. Wright Charter School principal Sharon L. Clark. When she came to New Orleans from Arizona in 2001 to work as principal of what was then Sophie B. Wright Middle School, Clark got her wish. Back then, the Uptown school was among the lowest performing in the city. Its performance score — calculated using standardized test scores, graduation rate and other factors — was 27.7, a solid “F” by state Department of Education grading standards. The school’s dropout rate was twice the state average; it was labeled an “academically unacceptable school” and was at risk of closure. Rather than shuttering, Sophie B. Wright became a charter school in 2005, before Hurricane Katrina led most public schools in Orleans Parish to go in the same direction. It expanded its mission to include high school, and last May, the first-ever senior class graduated. The class of only six students had a 100 percent graduation rate, and Clarks says all of them went to college. Last year’s school performance score was up to 86.1. “Hopefully, with our graduation rate … we’ll be a B or A minus, from an F when I started here,” Clark says. “What has made the difference is that we have a consistent educational program. We have a shared vision.” That vision is shared by the whole community, she says. “Our parents trust us, so our parents don’t have to micromanage us,” Clark says. “The kids go home and tell them, ‘They really care for us. They’re really trying to get us to excel.’” — Maldonado

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DR. DORIS ROCHE HICKS

DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING CHARTER SCHOOL FOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Dr. Doris Roche Hicks says she and her staff at Dr. Martin Luther King Charter School for Science and Technology in the Lower 9th Ward were “very reluctant” at first to join the charter school movement. “We felt it was just the demise of public education,” says Hicks, principal at the school. “We were loving what we were doing [as a traditional district-run school] and not worrying.” King, which opened in 1995 as Dr. Martin Luther King Elementary School for Science and Technology, was not a failing school by state standards. It had been meeting or coming close to its target growth rates every year when, after Hurricane Katrina temporarily closed the campus, Hicks found out her school was being pushed to join the state-run Recovery School District. Ultimately, Hicks says, the change — and the removal of bureaucratic obstacles faced by traditional schools — worked out better than she could have imagined. “We were always being called into meetings,” Hicks says. “Those things were getting in the way of going about educating our kids.” Within two years, the school, which was operating out of Edgar P. Harney Elementary in Central City after the storm, reopened in the Lower 9th Ward. It also expanded into high school and this year will graduate its first class of seniors, 30 students, most of whom have been there since ninth grade. The class has seen no dropouts or withdrawals, Hicks says, and she expects most or all will attend college next year. “That’s our goal, and we think we’re achieving this goal,” she says. — Maldonado

FOUR NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC SCHOOL PRINCIPALS HELPED TURN AROUND THEIR FAILING SCHOOLS. BY CHARLES MALDONADO AND ALEX WOODWARD

MARY LAURIE

O. PERRY WALKER COLLEGE & CAREER PREP HIGH SCHOOL O. Perry Walker College & Career Prep High School was one of only two public high schools to reopen in New Orleans in December 2005 following Hurricane Katrina. The Algiers Charter Schools Association took over Walker, which first opened its doors in 1970, and veteran educator Mary Laurie was hired as principal. She gradually is turning the historically under-performing high school into an academically diverse school that “embraces the arts,” Laurie says. “Every child on the planet is born with a strength,” and it’s Walker’s job to nurture it, she says. “We have to get children in the school to educate them,” Laurie says. “What brings them to school — if it’s band, it’s band, if it’s choir, let it be choir.” The principal often walks with Walker’s marching band at parades. “It’s a great honor,” she says. “I want them to know there’s someone there.” Walker now offers college courses through dual enrollment at Tulane University, SUNO and other local universities. The school’s performance score jumped 20 points from its 2005-2006 mark, though Laurie says there’s “still a long way to go.” “We’re far from OK,” she says. “There still is so much work to do. We don’t want to lose sight of our kids.” — Woodward

RENE LEWIS-CARTER

MARTIN BEHRMAN CHARTER ACADEMY FOR CREATIVE ARTS & SCIENCES Martin Behrman Charter Academy for Creative Arts & Sciences, which operates under the Algiers Charter Schools Association, opened its doors in December 2005. The school was among five new charters that opened that month, and Rene Lewis-Carter was hired as principal just two weeks before classes started. “I wanted nothing more than to be in New Orleans and improve it and teach,” she says, adding that Behrman’s students were as eager to return as their parents. “They wanted to be back in these antiquated buildings with people who understand them, people who know them.” Before Katrina, the school suffered from low test scores, but in its 20062007 school year, scores were among the city’s best — and they continue to improve. But more important than those scores, Lewis-Carter says, is her hope to “eliminate the climate and culture (of failure)” within the school system and “make Behrman a place where children want to be.” Despite the school’s drastic improvements, Lewis-Carter says her work isn’t done. “Not until every child is successful,” she says. “We’re on our way … we’re just not there yet.” Lewis-Carter hired veteran educators from across the country to reboot the school and places a “relentless emphasis” on her students’ success. She also has high expectations for her staff. “I want for these children what I want for my child,” she says. “Every adult in this building is expected to model that. … There’s nothing I won’t do for the children at Behrman.” — Woodward


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LESLIE JACOBS Today, KIPP operates eight elementary and middle schools and a high school that covers ninth and 10th grades only.

SCOTT COWEN “What Scott Cowen did for Tulane University after the storm is nothing short of miraculous,” says Bill Goldring, a 25-year member of Tulane’s board of trustees and Gambit’s 2004 New Orleanian of the Year. He now is a trustee emeritus. “A large portion of the campus was underwater, and he had to send all of his students around the country to other schools. He had no revenue. He could have quit and no one would have faulted him. Tulane could have closed its doors. Yet, in just one semester, Scott got Tulane back on its feet and then proceeded to use that inflection point to transform the university.” Cowen’s efforts have earned him notice outside New Orleans as well. President Barack Obama appointed him to the White House Council for Community Solutions, which advises the president on mobilizing citizens, nonprofits, businesses and government to address community needs. He also was elected vice chair of the Association of American Universities, a select group of 61 North American universities with pre-eminent programs of graduate and professional education and scholarly research. Today, more than six years after the storm, Tulane University enjoys an unprecedented level of prominence. New Orleans has changed in ways nobody could have expected, and Cowen believes the city now has the commitment — and the political culture — to finally deal with the complex problems that have dogged it for decades. And he believes education — public, private, K-12 and higher education — will play a crucial role in charting the future of New Orleans. Cowen’s recent efforts also will bear fruit in 2012, as Tulane will serve as the host institution for the 2012 Men’s Final Four, which will be a huge economic boost for New Orleans. On campus, Cowen launched “Tulane Empowers,” a university-wide effort to use the knowledge, expertise and energy of Tulane to empower others to build a better world. “There’s a culture of social innovation and entrepreneurship that’s leading to younger people coming to New Orleans and wanting to be part of the rebuilding,” he says. “I have a lot of comfort that there’s a new will and determination to deal headlong with these issues.” Tulane now is inextricably bound up in that culture and in the life of the city, as is Cowen himself. He came here for a job, he says, but now he’ll stay until he retires — and live out his days as a New Orleanian.

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Though her tenure on BESE ended three years ago, Jacobs continues to influence the city’s recovery — and educational reform efforts — through philanthropy. “When I sold my business, I said I was going to do some venture philanthropy because you aren’t just giving money, you are personally involved in that effort,” she explains. In 2008 Jacobs founded two organizations that reflected her commitment to venture philanthopy: 504ward, an group dedicated to retaining talented young 20- and 30-somethings in New Orleans; and Educate Now!, a nonprofit committed to reforming New Orleans public schools. Jacobs’ optimism and passion for her hometown is reflected in 504ward. According to Educate Now!’s website, the organization strives to engage the thousands of young movers and shakers who came to town with what she calls the “dual aspirations of sparking social change and advancing their careers.” Jacobs recruited local partners from the business community to address issues pertinent to these young professionals — career opportunities, social engagement and opportunity for community impact. Since its inception, 504ward has connected thousands of new New Orleanians to their adopted city and each other. “Leslie has this intutition and real business knowledge that produce results,” says 504ward executive director Jessica Shahien. “504ward could have easily been just something talked about at cocktail parties, but Leslie actually did something. I think what distinguishes her is that when she puts her mind to something, it’s going to happen.” On a similar track, Educate Now! became an integral component of public school reform, working on the facilities master plan and framing issues for long-term governance. (The RSD was never envisioned as a permanent solution to failing schools. The lingering questions are when — and how — to transfer the improved schools back to local governance.) Educate Now! also is the source for comparative data about how public schools are doing locally and statewide.

Jacobs’ education reform efforts produced outstanding results this year. The District Performance Score for Orleans Parish, which was 56.9 in 2005, reached 83.2 in 2011, according to information provided by Jacobs. In 2005, before her efforts took hold in Orleans Parish, only 35 percent of local students scored at basic or above the proficiency goal on standardized tests, compared to 58 percent for the state — but in 2011 the rates were an unprecedented 56 percent for New Orleans and 66 percent for Louisiana. This year, the percentage of African-American students at basic or above the proficiency goal in Orleans Parish was 2 points ahead of the statewide percentage for African-American students, which represents a 114 percent local improvement rate in just four years. “The gains we’ve made are really transformational and inspiring to people outside New Orleans,” Jacobs says. “You have Teach For America and KIPP and foundations across the United States coming back to New Orleans as something really special. They can see the energy and synergy firsthand. People are willing to come back to the city because they’re excited about the education space, which is appreciating and empowering talent.” In addition to her work with 504ward and Educate Now!, Jacobs also serves as acting CEO of the New Orleans Startup Fund, chair of GNO Inc., vice chair of New Orleans Business Alliance, vice chair of the New Orleans Business Council, and chairwoman of the Southeast Regional Business Council Coalition. That breadth of involvement has earned her the admiration of a large coterie of local business and civic leaders. “It is impossible to fully capture the breadth of Leslie’s impact in our community, to understand what Leslie has contributed to the lives changed by our improving public education system, to understand the hope and effectiveness Leslie has given so many initiatives, and to appreciate the ripple effect of her work,” says New Orleans Business Council president Jay Lapeyre. Jacobs says her main focus is for New Orleans to have the state’s best school district in the next few years. “I think when we hit the 10-year anniversary of Katrina, the improvement will be there for all to see, and it’s going to be irrefutable,” she says. “I just feel New Orleans and the region have such tremendous opportunity right now, and we have to seize it.”

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BCS REMATCH THE LSU TIGERS AND ALABAMA CRIMSON TIDE BATTLE FOR THE CHAMPIONSHIP. BY A L E JA N D R O D E LO S R I O S hen the Louisiana State University Tigers and the University of Alabama Crimson Tide faced off in early November, it was billed as the “Game of the Century” — the first time a No. 1-ranked team went up against a No. 2-ranked team during the regular season. Everyone expected fireworks and a knock-down, drag-out kind of game they would be talking about for years. In reality, the game was a letdown. Football purists and fans of defense can point out plenty of highlights from LSU’s 9-6 overtime win over Alabama in Tuscaloosa — four interceptions, four missed field goals, no touchdowns — but it wasn’t the Game of the Century. Now, in a Bowl Championship Series (BCS) first — and much to the chagrin of critics of college football’s current structure — LSU and Alabama will once again face off, this time on Jan. 9 in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome for the BCS National

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

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Championship game. The matchup gives Alabama a second shot at LSU for the national title, and the Crimson Tide may be the only team in the country that can give LSU a run for its money. The list of accolades for both teams is long. LSU and Alabama combined have 11 players named All-Americans this year, and LSU coach Les Miles received his first AP Coach of the Year Award. The two teams also combined for seven post-season NCAA awards, and each team had a player named as a finalist for the Heisman Trophy. All of this is a long way of saying there will be an abundance of talent on the field with some of the best college coaching on the sidelines. With all that in mind, we’ve compiled a list of what you should look out for in the biggest game of the year. Tyrann Mathieu taking what he wants — If you haven’t heard of Mathieu by now, you need to get to a computer immediately. The LSU cornerback has become a cult sensation among LSU and college football fans for his explosive playmaking ability and his nickname, “the Honey Badger,” which was inspired by a viral video of the same name (choice quote: “Honey Badger don’t give a shit, it just takes what it wants.”) and has, in turn, inspired a slew of bootleg LSU merchandise featuring the aggressive animal. Mathieu, a New Orleans native who graduated from St. Augustine High School, was a Heisman Trophy finalist and won the Chuck Bednarik Award for being the nation’s top defensive player, but it’s his ability to return punts for touchdowns seem-

Crimson Tide running back Trent Richardson ranks first in the SEC for rushing yards and rushing touchdowns. PHOTO COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA ATHLETICS

LSU cornerback Tyrann Mathieu returns a punt for a touchdown during a regularseason game against Arkansas. PHOTO BY STEVE FRANZ/LSU

ingly at will that has made him a sensation among Purple and Gold faithful. After all, it was Mathieu’s punt returns for touchdowns that effectively won games for LSU against Arkansas and Georgia. In LSU’s first meeting against Alabama, Mathieu wasn’t able to stand out on special teams like he had in past games, but that shouldn’t be an indication of what’s to come. Alabama will try its best to kick away from the Honey Badger, but if any punt comes near him, expect Mathieu to take what he wants — which usually is a touchdown. Trent Richardson running like a battering ram — As mentioned earlier, the first matchup between LSU and Alabama was anything but an offensive shootout, but Alabama’s Richardson was still able to make his mark on an otherwise sloppy performance by the offense from both teams. Richardson, who rushed for 89 yards on 23 carries in the team’s first game, will have to run the ball much more effectively to give the Crimson Tide a shot at winning. He increased his rushing total in each of his last three games after the loss to the Tigers, topping out with a 203-yard performance against Auburn.


LSU’s defense is second only to Alabama’s in Division I-A football, allowing an average of just 252 yards per game; the Crimson Tide had to fight for every yard against the Tigers in their first matchup. At 5-feet, 11-inches and 224 pounds, Richardson gives Alabama a powerful force running the ball and, with interior lineman-of-theyear Barrett Jones opening holes ahead of him, the LSU defense will have its hands full trying to shut down the Tides’ running game. Les Miles eating grass — No, don’t expect Miles to pull up artificial turf from the Superdome field and eat that during the game — he’s smarter than that. As Miles revealed earlier this year, he carries a bit of the real stuff pulled from Tiger Field in his pocket for just such an occasion. What else can we expect from the irreverent “Mad Hatter”? If the past is any indication, it will be something seriously unexpected. Miles won his first AP Coach of the Year award after a season that seemed, by his standards, positively normal. Unlike that crazy 2007 season in which Miles had not one but two memorable fake field goals against Florida and South Carolina, LSU hasn’t had its fortunes turned by a memorable trick play this year. More than anything, this is a testament to LSU’s dominance this season. It also speaks to Miles’ staff’s coaching abilities. It’s no coincidence that, as Miles was honored as the country’s top college coach, defensive coordinator John Chavis was honored as the nation’s top assistant coach. For Miles’ eccentricities, the reason the Tigers have been so successful this season is they’ve been well-prepared and well-coached. Trickery may be exciting and, as Miles proved, can lead to a championship season. This year, though, sound fundamentals have led LSU to being one win away from the national championship title. The fate of the game changing on a turnover — In the two

Alabama defensive back Mark Barron leads the Crimson Tide’s secondary and ranks eighth in Alabama history for career interceptions with 12. PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA ATHLETICS

Running back Michael Ford (42) leads the LSU Tigers in rushing with 755 yards — and he’s only a sophomore. PHOTO BY STEVE FRANZ/LSU

Whose fans will be the loudest? With both schools within driving distance of New Orleans, LSU will not have the luxury of playing in an ad hoc home field like they did when they beat Ohio State University in the Superdome for the 2007 title. That being said, it will be interesting to see how many Alabama fans show up, as a recent article in the Tuscaloosa Times said the demand for travel packages was higher in 2009 when Alabama won the national title in Pasadena, Calif. — thousands of miles away. All things considered, you can expect to see a fair number of people dressed in crimson and white, but the real question is whether it will be visible in what is sure to be a sea of purple and gold. After all, LSU is just an hour away and it’s a commute many students, teachers, coaches and alumni already make frequently. Add to that the considerable number of LSU fans who live in New Orleans year round and there’s a good chance New Orleans will become Tiger Town 2.0. In a game that could be decided by one play, whichever team has the advantage in crowd noise could very well ride their fans’ support to victory.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

teams’ first matchup in Tuscaloosa, four interceptions were thrown, two of which changed the course of the game. The first game-changer was thrown by Jarrett Lee in the third quarter with the game tied 3-3. Alabama converted that into a crucial field goal in a game starved for points. The second game-changing interception occurred when LSU safety Eric Reid wrestled a pass away from Alabama’s Michael Williams on the goal line, securing an interception for LSU and preventing what could have been a gamewinning touchdown. Of course, there’s no guarantee the defenses will be able to nab another pair of interceptions each, but in a game between two rival teams boasting the top two defenses in the country, you can bet a turnover from either team will be a deciding factor. Look for Mathieu, Reid and Jim Thorpe Award winner Morris Claiborne to get their hands on a pick for LSU. Alabama, which relies less on star players and more on coach Nick Saban’s defensive schemes, will try to counter by forcing mistakes from LSU’s Lee and Jordan Jefferson, who finished a combined 9-of-17 for 91 yards and two interceptions.

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Fridays at Midnight FEATURING

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JASON MARSALIS

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JASON MARSALIS

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Tuesdays at 8PM

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DON VAPPIE QUARTET GLEN DAVID ANDREWS JOE KROWN SWING BAND GLEN DAVID ANDREWS

BRASS BAND JAM

Saturdays at Midnight 1/7 & 1/28 BRASS-A-HOLICS 1/14 DéJà VU BRASS BAND 1/21 LAGNIAPPE BRASS BAND

Wednesdays at 8PM GRAMMY AWARD-WINNING

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GIRL,

KATHY GRIFFIN AT THE MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER • PAGE 31

UNINTERRUPTED FILM: WAR HORSE AND KNUCKLE PAGE 39

STAGE: TRAILER-PARK HOLIDAYS PAGE 47

CUISINE: A CUBAN CONNECTION PAGE 53


>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE EVENTS CUISINE >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 35 39 42 47 49 53 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > JAN << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Readings of new works by Ruby Prize finalists highlight Southern Rep’s New Play Bacchanal. Merit (6 p.m. Saturday) is by Ruby Prize-winner Lenelle Moise (pictured). Other events include works by local writers, appearances KATHY GRIFFIN DISHES ON by Treme’s Clarke Peters and Yolonda Ross, and a play FELLOW CELEBRITIES. slam featuring alternate endings to classic dramas. BY L AUREN L ABORDE See the website for schedule and details. Tickets for most events are $5. Southern Rep, nyone who watches Bravo likely The Shops at Canal Place, has caught one of comedian 365 Canal St., third floor, 5226545; www.southernrep.com Kathy Griffin’s many stand-up

New Play Bacchanal

4-7

Gossip Girl

A

Phunny Phorty Phellows The Phunny Phorty Phellows usher in the Carnival season on Twelfth Night with a costumed procession on a streetcar. The party begins at 6:30 p.m. at the Carrollton Station (8140 Willow St.). Revelers and the Storyville Stompers brass band depart at 7 p.m., making the full loop to Canal Street and back. Free admission. Visit www. phunnyphortyphellows. com for details.

Tony Kishman and the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra

My Life on the D-List, which still airs in reruns on Bravo, stands in stark contrast to the type of histrionicscentric programming populating the network today. “It was a little bit of a different era over there — (Bravo) had just finished showing gritty, black-andwhite independent movies. So they kind of let me do my show, which was a comedic-driven reality show as opposed to the Housewives franchise, which is more of a meltdown moments reality show. My mother never threw a table at somebody,” Griffin says. “My show was me going to a million gigs, and going to Iraq (to entertain troops), me marching in a pro-gay marriage rally, me getting a Pap smear (in public, to raise awareness for women’s health issues). It was a different type of thing — It wasn’t like ‘my life is falling apart.’ It was really more of a sitcom masked as a reality show.” While the show propelled her to the kind of recognition associated with the celebrities she skewers, Griffin hasn’t abandoned her no-holds-barred style of comedy just because she might end up sitting next to Kim Kardashian at an awards banquet (as happened at the Hollywood Reporter’s Women in Entertainment PAGE 33

JAN

6

JAN

6

Looking like he leapt barefoot and besuited off the cover of Abbey Road, Broadway performer and Paul McCartney doppelganger Tony Kishman leads the LPO through a symphonic tribute to the Walrus’ Fab Four and Wings greatest hits. Tickets $20$95. 8 p.m. Friday. Mahalia Jackson Theater, 1419 Basin St., 525-1052; www.mahaliajacksontheater.com or www.lpomusic.com

Max Levine Ensemble

JAN

6

A smirking punk trio from Washington, D.C. — none of whom are Max Levine — the Max Levine Ensemble issues 5-Hour Energyfueled power-pop opinions on everything from political figures to pizza guys. The Rooks, Small Bones, Atlas the Atom Smasher and Les Doux open. Tickets $6. 7 p.m. Friday. The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 5692700; www.3rcp.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

specials in between seemingly endless re-runs of The Real Housewives. Her most recent special — called Tired Hooker, in keeping with the absurd names of previous stand-up specials, such as Strong Black Woman — is a series of profanity-laced rants, during which she refers to Kim Kardashian’s ex-husband as her “special needs boyfriend” and describes the heterosexual Hugh Jackman’s oneman Broadway show as “gayer than a glory hole in (figure skater) Johnny Weir’s bathhouse.” But even if you’ve seen her perform on TV or live, the show Griffin brings to New Orleans Thursday will probably be rife with new material. That’s partially because much of Griffin’s acerbic act pulls from the constantly updating Hollywood gossip world, of which Griffin is both an observer and an enthusiastic participant. “Everything from the Lindsay Lohan Playboy cover, which was leaked — the irony of the word ‘leaked’ is not lost on me,” Griffin says, discussing some of the topics she’s been hitting on her current stand-up tour, “… the Kardashian fairy-tale 72-day wedding, as well as all the stuff going on with the Housewives, and just my various celebrity run-ins, which seem to happen a lot.” While the type of comedy she specializes in necessitates attention to new material, it seems Griffin is always working. Bravo’s Kathy Griffin: My Life on the D-List, the reality show starring Griffin and her constellation of family, publicists and celebrity friends, debuted in 2005 and recharged her career, which had been relatively quiet after her breakout role alongside Brooke Shields in the 1990s NBC sitcom Suddenly Susan. My Life on the D-List lead to numerous hosting gigs and TV appearances, a book and Broadway special (titled Official Book Club Selection and Kathy Griffin Wants a Tony, respectively), multiple Grammy nominations for her comedy albums and Emmy awards (she famously accepted by one by exclaiming “Suck it, Jesus!”). The fame from the Bravo series, which ended in 2010, is ironic, considering much of the show depicted Griffin and her team scrambling for publicity and suffering through comically low-end gigs in order for her to ascend in Hollywood entertainment circles.

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page 31

LUNCH TUE-SUN 11:30-2:30

DINNER TUE-SUN 5:30-10:30

NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION: EAT LESS MEAT

VOTED ONE OF THE BEST VEGETARIAN MENUS IN NEW ORLEANS 4 3 0 8 M AG A Z I N E S T • 8 9 4 - 9 7 9 7

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1125 D e ca tur S t . . 524-1122 9 40 D e ca tur S t . . 528-8559 3109 Ma gazine S t . . 895-4102 other newspapers — as in, US Weekly and In Touch Weekly. The Kathy Griffin research and development department never sleeps.” And even though she appears on the red carpet and posts pictures with celebrities like the Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl and Gossip Girl heartthrob Chace Crawford on her Twitter, Griffin hasn’t lost the ability to relate to her fans. My Life on the D-List may have made her more famous, but Griffin doesn’t think of herself as an A-lister. “I’ll always feel like an outsider looking in, but the nice thing is it gives me a unique perspective in that I’m kind of halfway in. I will always relate more to the audience than the subjects of my act. I always liken it to I’m allowed in the party, but I’m not in the supersecret celebrity VIP room — which, by the way, always seems to have a glass wall that I can see through,” she says. “I do have a unique access to that world — I can go to the Grammys and the Emmys and everyone knows I’m going to be naming names and telling tales out of school. I’m kind of part of that world, but no, I’m never going to relate to Gwyneth Paltrow.”

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

breakfast in December. She described Kardashian to Jimmy Kimmel as “super stupid”). Her change in status has instead given her some firsthand celebrity anecdotes to include in her act, even if that gets her in trouble from time to time. “As far as getting in trouble with celebrities, of course I do. But … I just don’t give a shit anymore,” she says. “If it’s something that’s funny it’s going to go in the act. That’s the barometer — if it’s true and it’s funny it’s going in. Celebrities try to avoid me as much as they can, and they should.” She may be known for barbs lobbed at famous people, but first and foremost Griffin is a tireless pop culture savant, providing her signature perspective on the latest endeavors of celebrities from Oprah Winfrey to Ryan Seacrest — two of her favorite targets — and the tabloid fodder du jour. The ardently liberal Griffin, who is an advocate for LGBT causes, also tends to include some politics in her acts. “My (writing) process is I am constantly on the clock. I’m constantly living life and attending anything that will put me in the mix, or something that could be comedic,” she says. “I’m a 24-hour news cycle junkie. I’m constantly reading the

33


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

34

Introducing the new Carousel Lounge. A WHOLE NEW SPIN ON LIVE MUSIC. Starting January 1st, The Carousel Bar will host a variety of great, local musicians. Come take a spin at this historic bar in The Hotel Monteleone, and catch some amazing singers and musicians live in 2012. Happy New Year!

at the HOTEL MONTELEONE

Eudora Evans

Ingrid Lucia

SUNDAY, JANUARY 1 9:00pm – 1:00am: Robin Barnes & Band Noon: New Orleans vs. Carolina (Live TV Broadcast in Carousel Bar) MONDAY, JANUARY 2 9:00pm – 1:00am: George French Quartet TUESDAY, JANUARY 3 7:00pm: Allstate Sugar Bowl Game (Live TV Broadcast in Carousel Bar)

George French

Luther Kent

Lena Prima

SATURDAY, JANUARY 7 5:00pm – 8:00pm: Robin Barnes & Band 9:00pm – 1:00am: Lena Prima & Band Time TBA: NFL Wildcard Playoff Games (Live TV Broadcast in Carousel Bar) SUNDAY, JANUARY 8 9:00pm – 1:00am: George French Quartet Time TBA: NFL Wildcard Playoff Games (Live TV Broadcast in Carousel Bar)

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5 9:00pm – 1:00am: Eudora Evans & Band

MONDAY, JANUARY 9 7:00pm: BCS National Championship Game (Live TV Broadcast in Carousel Bar)

FRIDAY, JANUARY 6 5:00pm – 8:00pm: Luther Kent Quartet 9:00pm – 1:00am: Lena Prima & Band

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11 9:00pm – 1:00am: Luther Kent Quartet

Robin Barnes

THURSDAY, JANUARY 12 9:00pm – 1:00am: Eudora Evans & Band FRIDAY, JANUARY 13 5:00pm – 8:00pm: Robin Barnes & Band 9:00pm – 1:00am: Lena Prima & Band SATURDAY, JANUARY 14 5:00pm – 8:00pm: Robin Barnes & Band 9:00pm – 1:00am: Lena Prima & Band Time TBA: NFL Divisional Playoff Games (Live TV Broadcast in Carousel Bar) SUNDAY, JANUARY 15 Time TBA: NFL Divisional Playoff Games (Live TV Broadcast in Carousel Bar)

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for the most up-to-date weekly entertainment schedule.

www.facebook.com/TheHotelMonteleone

www.twitter.com/HotelMonteleone

214 Royal Street, New Orleans, LA 70130 • 504.523.3341 • www.hotelmonteleone.com • reservations@hotelmonteleone.com


STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 3 BANKS STREET BAR — Denton Hatcher & the Soapbox Blues, Elephant Skeletan, 8 BMC — Mikey B3 Organ Combo, 5; Young Pinstripe Brass Band, 8; Lagniappe Brass Band, 11

D.B.A. — Treme Brass Band, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Jason Marsalis, 8

THE MAISON — Gregory Agid Quartet, 6; Magnitude, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Funkin’ the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 6; Ted Hefko & the Thousandaires, 9:30 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Cameron Dupuy, 7; Gina Forsyth, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Mia Borders, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Kipori Woods, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8 THE MAISON — Upstarts, 9; Mario Abney Quartet (upstairs), 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Dirty Dozen Brass Band, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Blues Frenzy, 6; Marcelo Benetti, 9:30 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Johnny J. & the Hitmen feat. Derek Huston, 8:30

SIBERIA — Joystick!, J E Double F, MC Duck, Brasky, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 ST. ROCH TAVERN — JD Hill & the Jammers, 7:30

BANKS STREET BAR — Sam & Boone, Dave Jordan, Mikie B3, RxFilled, 10

BAYOU BEER GARDEN — Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 8

12 BAR — Brass-A-Holics, 9

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Hurray for the Riff Raff, Shovels & Rope, 10 BANKS STREET BAR — Major Bacon, 10

BMC — Mumbles, 5; Blues4sale, 8; De Ja Vu Brass Band, 11

CAFE NEGRIL — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 9 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Meschiya Lake & Tom McDermott, 8

D.B.A. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Tom McDermott & Aurora Nealand, 8

D.B.A. — Jon Cleary, 7; Johnny Sansone, Baby Bee, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; James Andrews, 8 KERRY IRISH PUB — Ashmen feat. Damien Louviere, 9

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; The Session, 7; Magnetic Ear, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Big Al, 6; Andre Bouvier, 9:30 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Cooper Jummonville, 9 OAK — Cristina Perez, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Mumbles, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Duke Heitger & Crescent City Joymakers, 7:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Tornado Brass Band feat. Darryl Adams, 8

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Two Man Rubber Band, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Horace

us! Join an. 6th y, J Frida

’s s i v El day h t ! r h i s B Ba - t i l h

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Rooks, Small Bones, Max Levine Ensemble & others, 6:30 ALLWAYS LOUNGE — The Kirk Nasty, 10 BANKS STREET BAR — Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, Lushingtons, 10

435, 600, 610, 721, 727 Bourbon St.

New Orleans’ Most Powerful Drink!

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VOLUNTEER TRAINING

BMC — El DeOrazio & Friends, 3; Soul Project, 6; Dana Abbot Band, 9; Lagniappe Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Al “Carnival Time” Johnson, 8

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Creole String Beans, 8

Join our team of volunteer ushers and experience

New Orleans’ Biggest Shows

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Vivaz, 10 GREEN ROOM — Dash Rip Rock, 10

HERMES BAR — Ingrid Lucia, 9:30 & 11

up close and personal!

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 8

LEGENDS BAR & GRILL — LA Lightning, 10

-Sold Only At-

MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER

BLUE NILE — Honey Island Swamp Band, 10:30

KERRY IRISH PUB — Damien Louviere, 5; Crescent City Celtic Band, 9

HOME OF THE Hand Grenade®

8 p mKrewelvi

Friday 6

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — David Reis, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8

tropical isle®

FEBRUARY 12, 2012 - 11AM

MARCH 3, 2012 - 12PM

No need to register. Open door training at the theater will begin promptly at the times above.

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Some Like it Hot!, 7; Mainline, 10; Kings of the Fauborg, midnight

For more information, please call 504-525-1052

MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Queens’ Ball feat. Johnny Sketch, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Lil Red & Big Bad, 7; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10:30 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Agent 86, 8; Ryan Tennis, 9; Round Pegs, 10 OAK — Jenn Howard, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Rick Trolsen, 5; Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Wendell Brunious & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7:30

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Top Shelf, 9:30

DARTS • POOL • DARTS • POOL MON: FREE POOL 6-10pm WED: Blues Jam Night 8-11pm THURS: Steak Night 6pm-till FRI:

Fish Fry Night • 4-8PM

SAT:

Karaoke - Starts at 9PM

SUN: Happy Hour ALL DAY

HAPPY HOUR • MON-FRI • 3-7PM

3 full bars • 10:30-til 738 Toulouse St. • 523-5530

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

Wednesday 4

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Roland Guerin Quintet feat. Olivia Trummer, 8 & 10

Thursday 5

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Electric Yat String Quartet, 5:30

YUKI IZAKAYA — Sombras Brilhantes, 8

SIBERIA — Acropolions, Neur, Captive, 10

D.B.A. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 5; Special Men, 9

SIBERIA — Microshards, Selma Oxor, DJ Pineapple, DJ Alison F., 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smoking Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

SATURN BAR — Alex McMurray, 10

VICTORY — Sombras Brilhantes, 7:30

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Phillip Degruy, 8 & 10

Trahan & Ossun Express, 8:30

CARROLLTON STATION — Acadias CD release feat. Kelcy Mae String Trio, Craig Paddock, 9:30

BMC — Soula Billy Swamp Boogie Band, 5; Andy J. Forest, 8; Young Fellaz Brass Band, 11

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Redfish Blues Band, midnight

MUSIC

11 0 th 0 C er on u 52 sty stan 5- na ce 55 il. S 15 biz t.

LISTINGS

VISIT OUR WEBSITE

www.originaldungeon.com

35


MUSIC

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Rolling Stones Tribute, 9:30

Showcasing Local Music

VOTED

TUES 1/3 WED 1/4 THUR 1/5 FRI 1/6 FRI 1/6 SAT 1/7 SAT 1/7 SUN 1/8 MON 1/9

SHAMROCK BAR — Yeah You Right, 9

MON 1/2

Papa Grows Funk

-No Cover

TUE 1/3

Rebirth Brass Band

Zagat Rated

WED 1/4

Dirty Dozen Brass Band

Live Music Nightly

JASON BISHOP (AFTER BOWL GAME) 9PM CHIP WILSON 9PM THE ASHMEN w/ DAMIEN LOUVIERE 9PM DAMIEN LOUIVIERE 5PM CRESCENT CITY CELTIC BAND 9PM SPEED THE MULE 5PM RITES OF PASSAGE 9PM PATRICK COOPER 8PM PAUL TOBIN & KENNY KLEIN (AFTER LSU-BAMA GAME) 8PM

THU The Trio featuring 1/5 Johnny V, George Porter Jr & Special Guests FRI 1/6

The Queen’s Ball

SAT 1/7

Andrew Duhon & The Lonesome Crows

featuring Johnny Sketch

Trio featuring SUN Joe JoeKrown Krown SUN Russell batiste Trio & Walter 1/8 feat. Russell Batiste & Walter Washington 3/13 “Wolfman” Wolfman Washington

COME WATCH THE GAMES ON THE BIG SCREEN!!

New Orleans Best Every Night!

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8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

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GREEN ROOM Music Club

36

JAN

First Fracture

JAN

07 13

JAN

+ Trevelyan + DJ Scrim

SAT

Battle of the Bands

JAN

14

FRI

Bruiser’s House of Surf

JAN

20

+ The Unnaturals

SAT

Battle of the Bands

21

W E E K LY S C H E D U L E

MON todd lemoine

TUE

service industry free red beans night

WED

THU

open mic

ladies night with dj trix

LATE NIGHT FOOD

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Saturday 7 ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Hazy Hayes, 10 BANKS STREET BAR — J. Monque’D, 10

BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7

BMC — Andre Bouvier, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Jazz Band, 6; Revealers, 9; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, midnight BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Royal Rounders, 8

CAFE NEGRIL — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7 CARROLLTON STATION — Jim McCormick & Alex McMurray, 9

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Cedric Watson et Bijou Creole, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Los Tres Amigos, 10 GREEN ROOM — First Fracture, Nod, 10 HERMES BAR — Johnny Sansone, 9:30 & 11

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Los Hombres Calientes feat. Irvin Mayfield & Bill Summers, Javier Gutierrez & Vivaz, 8

Jayroc

FRI

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Wayne Mills Band, 10

+ Nod

www.GreenRoomLive.net

Hurray For the Riff Raff with the Tumbleweeds

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10

HOUSE OF BLUES — Honey Island Swamp Band, Dash Rip Rock, 9

06 Dash Rip Rock

JAN

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

FRI

preview

SIBERIA — Testeverde, I, Octopus, Opposable Thumbs, 10

D.B.A. — John Boutte, 7; Mike Dillon, 1 a.m.

The

SAT

LISTINGS

Alynda Lee Segarra’s New Year’s resolution appears to be wasting no time. The Hurray For the Riff Raff bandleader debuted in 2008 with It Don’t Mean I Don’t Love You, a firstperson soft bulletin of banjo-busking, boxcarjumping Americana; two years later, she put out Young Blood Blues, whose cargo included more orchestrated arrangements and a country/rock backing band that could have sat in with the first Grand Ole Opry (in 1925), the last (the Saturday night past), or any in between. Befitting their unhurried pacing, those self-released albums trickled into the local consciousness through positive word-of-mouth and what evolved to be an alternately blazing and razing live set, augmented by consummate-gent singer/guitarist Sam Doores and his 10-gallon Tumbleweeds. But with a sparkling new LP in the can (the Nashvillecaptured Lookout Mama, due on Loose Records in the spring) and two shows in the first two weeks of 2012 (headlining here and opening for the breakout Alabama Shakes at One Eyed Jacks Jan. 19), the 24-year-old Segarra seems to be seizing the controls. Lookout standouts “Born to Win Pt. 1” and “Ode to John and Yoko” drop the banjos and accordions, surrounding Segarra’s cane-syrup drawl with a different cast of characters: warped organs and warbling guitars, a harmonica’s whinny out in front and a barbershop of swooning harmonizers bringing up the caboose. The Tumbleweeds and Shovels and Rope open. Call for ticket information. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

JAN

04

Hurray For the Riff Raff with the Tumbleweeds 10 p.m. Wednesday AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com

Destiny, 8; Beth Trepagnier, 9; Terrina & Jon, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Don Vappie Quartet, 8; Brass-A-Holics, midnight

OAK — Kristin Diable, 9

KINGPIN — Clockwork Elvis, 10

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7:30

KERRY IRISH PUB — Speed the Mule, 5; Rites of Passage, 9 LEGENDS BAR & GRILL — LA Lightning, 10

THE MAISON — Mary Flynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues Band, 5; Smoking Time Jazz Club, 7; Essentials, 10; DJ Jubilee (upstairs), 10; Lagniappe Brass Band, midnight MAPLE LEAF BAR — Andrew Duhon & the Lonesome Crows, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Mumbles, 1; The Deluxe, 4; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 7:30; Soula Billy Swamp Boogie Band, 11 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Igor, 7;

OLD POINT BAR — Thomas Johnson & the People, 9:30

PRESERVATION HALL — Gregg Stafford’s Jazz Hounds, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Austin Reed Alleman CD release, 7 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Refugeze, 10

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Rockin’ Dopsie Jr. & the Zydeco Twisters, 9:30

SIBERIA — Choke, The Void, The Devil’s Rain, Dead to a Dying World, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Leah Chase, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Rick Wetson & Colin Lake, 3; Panorama

Jazz Band, 6; Davis Rogan Band, 10

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10 WALK-ON’S BISTREAUX & BAR — Category 6, 9

Sunday 8 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Choi Wolf, Surf Nazis, 7 BANKS STREET BAR — Sebastian & the Funky Groove, 9

BMC — Soula Billy Swamp Boogie Band, 3; Megan Stewart Band, 6; Chapter: SOUL, 9

D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Jaimoe’s Jasssz Band, 10 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ


bestofneworleans.com

MUSIC

PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7

KERRY IRISH PUB — Patrick Cooper, 8

THE MAISON — Erin Demastes, 7; Eric Gordon & the Lazy Boys, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Tom McDermott & Kevin Clark, 11 a.m.; Ricardo Crespo, 3:30; Roberto Tammeta y su Grupo, 7 OLD POINT BAR — Craig Paddock, 3:30

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Sunday Night Swingsters, 7:30

PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street AllStars feat. Lars Edegran, 8 SIBERIA — Scammers, El Esqueleto, Blind Texas Marlin, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Jason Marsalis Original Vibes Quartet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Ben Polcer & the Grinders, 6; Pat Casey, 10; In & Out, 2 a.m. TIPITINA’S — Saturday Youth Music Workshop feat. Johnny Vidacovich, Chris Severin & Cliff Hines, 1 WALK-ON’S BISTREAUX & BAR — Chee Weez, 9

Monday 9 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Norco Lapalco, Green Demons, Wonton Lust, 8:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Drew Landry, 10 BMC — Lil Red & Big Bad, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Jon Cleary, 8 GREEN ROOM — Todd Lemoine, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Rebirth Brass Band, Benjy Davis, Jason Martin, 2

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Meghan Stewart & the Reboppers, 6; Young Pinstripe Brass Band, 9:30

OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Jazz Trio feat. Romy Kaye, 7 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Players feat. Mark Braud, 8 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Dave Jordan, 7

SIBERIA — Mayday, SS Boombox, James Hayes, 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominick Grillo & the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

13-0 AND 1 TO

THREE MUSES — Kristin Diable’s Songwriters Series, 7 WALK-ON’S BISTREAUX & BAR — David St. Romain, 3

classical/concerts

GEAUX!

MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS — 1419 Basin St., 525-

1052; www.mahaliajacksontheater.com — Fri: Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra presents “Live and Let Die: A Symphonic Tribute to the Music of Paul McCartney,” 8 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH — 1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth Organ Recital feat. Albinas Prizgintas, 6

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Gerald French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8

37


JANUARY AT THE JOY THEATER SATURDAY, JANUARY 7 AT 9PM

GLITZ: THE ART OF FEMALE IMPERSONATION

FRIDAY, JANUARY 13 AT 8PM

JOINT’S JUMPIN’ PLUS JODI BORRELLO

SATURDAY, JANUARY 14 AT 8PM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

COWBOY MOUTH

38

THURSDAY, JANUARY 26 AT 8PM

LITTLE RIVER BAND

SATURDAY, JANUARY 28 AT 8PM

PERCY SLEDGE

TICKETS AVAILABLE THROUGH AT 1-800-745-3000 OR AT THE BOX OFFICE. 1200 Canal Street • New Orleans, LA 70112 504.528.9569 • www.TheJoyTheater.com


FILM

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING ADVENTURES OF TINTIN (PG) — Steven Spielberg’s adapta-

tion of the classic comic book series is a vivid animated adventure. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS: CHIPWRECKED (G) — The trio

finds itself marooned in a tropical paradise. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

ARTHUR CHRISTMAS (PG) —

The 3-D computer animated film follows Santa Claus’ son Arthur, who must deliver an important present before Christmas morning. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

young people at a Moscow nightclub change when an alien attack devastates the city. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

THE DESCENDANTS (R) — In

Alexander Payne’s (Sideways) movie, a recently widowed father (George Clooney) tries to reconnect with his daughters while in Hawaii. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (R) — David Fincher

(The Social Network) directs the English-language adaptation of the wildly successful film and book series about a troubled computer hacker. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 HAPPY FEET 2 (PG) — The dancing CGI penguins are back for a sequel. AMC Palace 20, Entergy IMAX, Hollywood 9 HUGO (PG) — Martin

Scorsese’s family-friendly film is a fantasy/adventure about an orphan who lives inside the walls of a magical train station in 1930s Paris. AMC Palace 20 PAGE 40

War Horse It’s easy to get cynical about a new Steven Spielberg movie at Christmas, especially one about a boy and his beloved horse. The studio marketing campaign inevitably pushes all the right buttons, promising a heartwarming tale of courage during a time of great personal sacrifice. But at the end of a holiday movie season noted by even casual observers as underwhelming, War Horse arrives as something of a thoroughbred. Earnest and openly emotional to a fault, it nevertheless fulfills Spielberg’s obvious desire to achieve the kind of modest, un-ironic storytelling that once gave Hollywood its Golden Age. Of course, War Horse’s production values are anything but modest. From the gorgeous opening shots of the English countryside to a final scene of almost otherworldly physical beauty, the director spares no expense and doesn’t care who knows it. Spielberg opted to shoot thousands of extras and hundreds of real horses when he could have done it all digitally. But early on, that epic scale results in a first act that’s dangerously ponderous and slow, and too long by almost half. Eventually it’s boy meets horse, boy loses horse to the war effort, boy vows to find horse (both will be conscripted) and bring him home safely. The rest of this long movie sprints ahead pleasurably as the horse, named Joey, suffers the vagaries of World War I — the last major military conflict to rely heavily on horses for battle, and for manual labor like pulling artillery up steep hills. Spielberg changes hands repeatedly to develop the story and introduce new characters. As Joey’s adventures evolve, War Horse turns episodic, but it works as the world’s first equine road movie. The constant shifts give War Horse some firepower and allow for a number of small, standout performances that benefit from the forced brevity. David Thewlis is especially memorable as the evil landlord who sets the story in motion, and Emily Watson establishes the right tone early with an understated turn as the boy’s long-suffering mother. Newcomer Jeremy Irvine plays the lad with the almost unhealthy attachment to his horse, and he emotes a bit too much for the good of the film. Thankfully, he’s reined in before he can ride War Horse into Lassie Come Home territory. Despite its title, War Horse never really feels like a war movie. Based on a children’s book written from the horse’s perspective and inspired by the still-running puppet-based Broadway show that first sprang from the book, the film avoids flag-waving and never glorifies the conflict. One remarkably intense battle sequence does recall the invasion of Normandy recreated by Spielberg at the beginning of Saving Private Ryan. But War Horse is a simple story about people, and one very large animal, as they struggle with man-made circumstances far beyond their control. And it’s not so easy to get cynical about that. — Ken Korman

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

THE DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) — The lives of a group of

review

Ursulines Ave.

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

St. Phillip

LISTINGS

39


oF THE YEAR ‘‘‘ THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO’ IS A

BEAUTIFULLY TAUT AND TERRIFYING THRILLER.

LISBETH SALANDER IS

of Hurricane Katrina and the impact that Louisiana’s disappearing wetlands has on hurricane protection. Entergy IMAX

J. EDGAR (PG) — Clint Eastwood directs Leonardo DiCaprio in a candid look at the life of the FBI director, who harbored many of his own secrets. AMC Palace 20 THE LAST RITES OF JOE MAY (NR) — The film chronicles the

ONE OF THE GREAT HEROINES

‘ THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE,’ PLEASE!’’

MISSION IMPOSSIBLE: GHOST PROTOCOL (PG-13) — Tom

STEVEn reλ

‘‘ SPONTANEOUS AND SENSATIONAL. CRAIG AND MARA LEAVE YOU WISHING THE DIRECTOR WOULD

HURRY UP AND SHOOT

THE NEXT MOVIE. A FABULOUSLY SINISTER ENTERTAINMENT. ’’

RENE RODRIGEZ

‘‘ LISBETH

IS A MARVELOUS POP-CULTURE CHARACTEr, STRANGER AND MORE COMPLEX THAN THE AVERAGE SUPERHERO and

MORE INTRIGUING

THAN THE USUAL BOY WIZARDS AND VAMPIRE BRIDES.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

PAGE 39 HURRICANE ON THE BAYOU (NR) — The film tells the story

finals days of an aging con artist who is presented with one last shot at greatness. Chalmette Movies

OF DETECTIVE FICTION. ON TO

40

FILM

oNE oF t�E bESt FILMS

LISTINGS

SHE IS AN OUTLAW FEMINIST

FANTASY-HEROINE’’. λ.o. scoTT

‘‘ UNAPOLOGETICALLY GROWN-UP AND

UTTERLY ENTERTAINING.’’ L O  I S E

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A DAVID FINCHER FILM

COLUMBIA PICTURES AND METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURES PRESENT A SCOTT RUDIN/YELLOW BIRD PRODUCTION DANIEL CRAIG ROONEY MARA “THEMUSICGIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO” CHRISEXECUTIVE TOPHER PLUMMER STELLAN SKARSGÅRD STEVEN BERKOFF ROBIN WRIBASED GHT ONYORITHECK VAN WAGENINGENORIGINALLY JOELY RICHARDSON BOOK BY STIEG LARSSON PUBLISHED BY NORSTEDTS BY TRENT REZNOR & ATTICUS ROSS PRODUCERS STEVEN ZAILLIAN MIKAEL WALLEN ANNI FAURBYE FERNANDEZ SCREENPLAY PRODUCED BY STEVEN ZAILLIAN BY SCOTT RUDIN OLE SØNDBERG SØREN STÆRMOSE CEÁN CHAFFIN DIRECTED BY DAVID FINCHER CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

Cruise returns — and stars alongside Jeremy Renner — in the latest installment of the thriller series, in which the IMF is implicated in the bombing of the Kremlin. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

THE MUPPETS (PG) — Some fans (Amy Adams and Jason Segel) team up with the Muppets to save their old theater from a greedy oil tycoon (Chris Cooper). AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 MY WEEK WITH MARILYN (R) — A portrait of Marilyn

Monroe (Michelle Williams) at the peak of her fame is framed through the account of a 23-year-old’s weeklong romance with the star. AMC Palace 20

NEW YEAR’S EVE (PG-13) — The romantic comedy’s star-studded cast includes Michelle Pfeiffer, Sarah Jessica Parker, Hilary Swank, Ashton Kutcher, Lea Michele and many others. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS (PG-13) — Robert

Downey Jr. reprises the title role in the sequel, where the detective must try and stop a cunning criminal mastermind. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

THE SITTER (R) — Jonah Hill is a reluctant babysitter who doesn’t know what he’s getting into when he takes on three challenging charges. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN, PART 1 (PG-13) — The

mythical creature romance series nears its end with the first part of the conclusion. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

review Knuckle

Ian Palmer started filming Knuckle likely for the same reason one would want to see it: the primal spectacle of men fighting — without gloves, rounds or weight classes, until one man is knocked out or concedes. He was hired to film a wedding and met someone at the event who invited him to shoot a bare-knuckle fight between members of rival Irish Traveller families. That account opens the film, and it’s a riveting and brutally short affair in which James Quinn McDonagh repeatedly bashes and bloodies the face of Patrick Joyce in a fight held on a secluded muddy road. With the victory comes some money, pride, some trash talking and inevitably more challengers. Travellers is a term for a group of itinerant laborers. They’ve traditionally stuck to certain professions, most recently construction, as they move through the U.K., maintaining tight family networks and heated rivalries. Much of Knuckle focuses on a long-term feud between the Quinn McDonaghs and Joyces, and fights between numerous members from several generations of each clan are spread over a dozen years (as well as fights with other familes). But for all the talk of vengeance and settling matters, no single bout resolves much of anything, and each event is followed by some taunt or slight by someone in the winning family to someone in the losing family, if not calling the entire family “dirt” (one of the kinder insults). Palmer and many of the fighters (almost always the winners) say they have grown tired of the violence and want it to end. But as is amply clear, the men distinguish themselves by fierce senses of family honor and by personal refusals ever to back down from a challenge. Even if everyone wants peace, no one wants to be perceived as a coward. So the fights continue, and so does the thrill/repulsion dynamic that drives the film. James Quinn McDonagh is sort of the hero. He’s one of the best fighters and also one of the most reasonable men Palmer follows. He may have the courage to stop fighting, but it would take something else to stop the feud. — Will Coviello

JAN

312

Knuckle 8 p.m. daily Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

UNDER THE SEA 3-D (G) — Jim Carrey narrates the documentary exploring the Great Barrier Reef. Entergy IMAX WAR HORSE (PG-13) — Steven

Spielberg adapts the Tony Award-winning stage play that follows a boy looking for his horse during World War I. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 14

WE BOUGHT A ZOO (PG) —

Cameron Crowe directs Matt Damon and Scarlett

Johansson in the true story of a family that purchases and moves into a dilapidated zoo and works to get it reopened. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 YOUNG ADULT (R) — Diablo Cody and Jason Reitman — the duo behind Juno — return for the comedy starring Charlize Theron as a divorced fiction writer who hopes to rekindle a romance with a married ex. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place


FILM

bestofneworleans.com

OPENING FRIDAY THE DEVIL INSIDE (R) — The daughter of a muderer travels to the Italian insane asylum where her mother is locked up to discover the truth of her crime.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BRIT WIT — The Big Top screens British

comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

DEADGIRL (R) — The 2008 horror follows

two high schoolers who, while ditching school to hang out in an abandoned mental asylum, discover a woman who cannot die. Tickets $8. Midnight Friday-Saturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

KNUCKLE (R) — The documentary follows the bloody feud among three rival Irish Traveler clans over the course of 12 years. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 8 p.m. TuesdayMonday, then nightly through Jan. 12, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net MARY POPPINS (NR)— Julie Andrews plays

a magical nanny who comes to work for a banker’s unhappy family. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania. com

THE WHALE (G) — Ryan Reynolds and Scarlett Johansson produced the documentary about an orca who got separated from his family and turned up in Vancouver’s Nootka Sound, where a community embraced him. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 6 p.m. Tuesday-Monday, then nightly through Jan. 11, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

allows him inside a strange and wonderful candy factory. Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and Jan. 11, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com

AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 2624386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 262-4386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

Scan for movie times.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

WILLY WONKA & THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY (G) — A poor boy wins a contest that

41


ART

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

review New works and a new gallery in the St. Claude Avenue arts district

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

ART EVENTS 3246 Severn Avenue · 454-1170 Open Tuesday - Saturday • est. 1966 ANTIQUE · ESTATE JEWELRY · DIAMONDS · FINE SILVER GIFT ITEMS

PROSPECT.2. Dan Cameron’s art biennial features works by 27 local, national and international artists on display in traditional and alternative venues. Visit www.prospectneworleans.org for details. Through Jan. 29.

OPENING 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 5692700; www.3rcp.com — “Taint

Modern,” a mixed-media exhibition by Critique Group, through Jan. 28. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — “True Blue,”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

photographs by Gary Perez; jewelry by Bonnie Miller; works by Pamela Marquis; all through Jan. 30. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

42

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — “Aspects of a New Kind of Realism,” a group exhibition curated by Michael Klein; “Shifting States,” paintings and drawings by Luis Cruz Azaceta; both through Feb. 18. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — “Body,

Remember,” oil paintings by Denyce Celentano, through Jan. 28. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday.

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE. 527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com —

WALK IN 7 DAYS A WEEK • NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

Don’t wait for an appointment or waste your time in the Emergency Room!

Need to see a Doctor? ExPERIENCE ThE DIFFERENCE OF DOCTOR’S ExPRESS.

Works by Martin Welch, Hannah Cohen, Jane Brewster, Berhane Habtezion, Brian Bush and Shaun Aleman, through January. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday. HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www. heriardcimino.com — “Elemental,” paintings by Regina Scully; “Minor Keys,” wall sculptures by Martin Payton; both through Feb. 19. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — Paintings by Adam Hall,

through January. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

Mon-Fri: 8AM-8PM Sat & Sun: 8AM-5PM www.DoctorsExpressMetairie.com

3348 W. Esplanade Ave., Suite A, Metairie, LA 70002

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LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Mann’s Mind,”

In a recent interview, Prospect New Orleans founder Dan Cameron opined that New Orleans doesn’t do enough “to support its local visual artists, yet ... the St. Claude district now constitutes the critical mass of artist-run spaces for the entire country.” While his opinions are open to debate, his comment about St. Claude being a national epicenter for artist-run co-op galleries is hard to dispute; no other city has so many in such concentration. The newest is Staple Goods, a former corner grocery on St. Roch Avenue at Villere Street. Its current show features work by its member artists, and it’s surprisingly cohesive despite the diversity. Cynthia Scott’s Chandeleur (pictured) series of sculptures transform everyday manufactured items into airy, chandelier-like mobiles with a Zen-like delicacy that belies their prosaic origins while complementing Daniel Kelly’s grid drawings, in which loosely rendered lines and marks suggest a ghostly sort of architectural space, as if modernism had evolved directly from stone age cave paintings. A notable exception to the prevailing abstraction is Thomasine Bartlett’s Hot Mamas photo series of women in archaic Storyville attire lounging languidly in steamy summer torpor in a visual meditation on “the brutality of fashion and style” in a tropical environment. More Storyville-based imagery turns up in a series of tintype photographic portraits by Bruce Schultz at Homespace Gallery, another co-op down the street. In fact, the entire gallery is given over to the archaic 19th-century tintype process with additional portraits as well as abstract compositions by Euphus Ruth, Jenny Sampson and S. Gayle Stevens. Beyond novelty, these works take us to a parallel universe where technique becomes a ritual and the expressions of the sitters, extended over long exposure times, become windows into their souls. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU JAN

08

Fresh Produce: Works by Thomasine Bartlett, Aaron Collier, Robyn Denny, William DePauw, Daniel Kelly, Anne C. Nelson, Laura Richens and Cynthia Scott Saturday-Sunday Staple Goods, 1340 St. Roch Ave., 9087331; www.postmedium.org/staplegoods Tintype: Photographs by Euphus Ruth, Jenny Sampson, S. Gayle Stevens and Bruce Schultz Saturday-Sunday Homespace Gallery, 1128 St. Roch Ave., (917) 584-9867

PAGE 44


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Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

Ellipse,” projectable works by Francoise Gamma and Rollin Leonard; all through Sunday. GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — “Moving in

Colors,” sculpture by Key-Sook Geum, through Jan. 26. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery. com — A group exhibition fea-

turing Kim Bernadas, Jacques Soulas, Jean Cassels and others, through Jan. 29.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — Photo-based abstractions by Rodolfo Choperena for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 15. ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Delgado Community College, Isaac Delgado Hall, third floor, 615 City Park Ave., 361-6620 — “Below Sea Level,”

a panoramic video installation by Pawel Wojtasik for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg. com — “The Painter on An

Extended Voyage,” paintings by Bernard Beneito, through Jan. 29.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www.jonathanferraragallery. com — “P.2 Projects,” a group

exhibition curated in conjunction with Prospect.2, through Jan. 21.

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — “Sun-

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. martinechaissongallery.com — “Stamina in the Dream

House,” oil paintings and sculpture by Elizabeth Fox, through Jan. 28.

NEW ORLEANS HEALING CENTER. 2372 St. Claude Ave., 9489961; www.neworleanshealingcenter.org — Works by

Keith Duncan for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

NEW ORLEANS PHOTO ALLIANCE. 1111 St. Mary St., 610-4899; www.neworleansphotoalliance.blogspot.com — “Silenced Suffering: The

Comfort Women Project,” photographs by Jungeun Lee for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 29.

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane. edu — Works by Nick Cave and Joyce J. Scott for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.

PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER. 923 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-7032; www.prcno.org —

“Penn Station: A Distant View,” large-scale photographs by Becca Fitzpatrick for Prospect.2 satellites, through January. STAPLE GOODS. 1340 St. Roch Ave., 908-7331; www.postmedium.org/staplegoods — “Fresh

Produce,” works by Thomasine Bartlett, Aaron Collier, Robyn Denny, William DePauw, Daniel Kelly, Anne Nelson, Laura Richens and Cynthia Scott, through Sunday. “Fresh Produce,” works by gallery members in conjunction with Prospect.2 St. Claude Satellites, through Sunday.

STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Maha-

lia: Queen of Gospel Music,” a group exhibition of works inspired by Mahalia Jackson, through Friday.

T-LOT. 1940 St. Claude Ave., (865) 567-9766; www.t-lot.tumblr. com — “Parallel Play,” a group

exhibition featuring works on paper, architectural installations, sculpture and performance, through January.

UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — Works by Ivan Navarro for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

CALL FOR ARTISTS STAPLE GOODS FEBRUARY GROUP SHOW. Staple Goods, 1340 St. Roch Ave., 908-7331; www.postmedium.org/staplegoods — Artists can submit

work in any medium for Brother, Can You Spare a Day?, a leap year-themed exhibition. Visit www.postmedium.org/ staplegoods for details. Submissions deadline is Sunday.

MUSEUMS 1850 HOUSE. 523 St. Ann St., 568-6968 — Works by Sophie Calle for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “NOLA Now Part

I: Swagger for a Lost Magnificence,” through Jan. 29. Prospect.2 show featuring Jonas Dahlberg, George Dunbar, Karl Haendel and others, through Jan. 29, and more.

GEORGE & LEAH MCKENNA MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ART. 2003 Carondelet St., 5867432; www.themckennamuseum.com — “African Wisdom

in Image and Proverb,” photographs by Betty Press; “Becoming Home,” photographs by Mariana Sheppard and Nakeya Brown for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 21.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The 18th

Star: Treasures From 200 Years of Louisiana Statehood,” through Jan. 29. “Goddess Fortuna and Her Dunces in an Effort to Make Sense of it All,” outdoor installation by Dawn Dedeaux for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

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LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — “Audubon’s Absence,” eco-

logical artworks by Brandon Ballengee, through January.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “The Louisiana Planta-

tion Photos of Robert Tebbs,” 60 gelatin silver prints by the architecture photographer, through Nov. 30, 2012, and more.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “Infamy:

December 1941,” oral histories, artifacts and images focusing on the attack on Pearl Harbor, through Feb. 19.

experience it

NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www. noaam.com — Works by Lor-

raine O’Grady for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “NOMA 100: Gifts

for the Second Century,” an exhibition with works by Anish Kapoor, Keith Sonnier, Matthew Barney, Jasper Johns, Sol LeWitt, Kathe Kollwitz and Gabrielle Munter, through Jan. 22, and more. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “Ersy: Architect of Dreams;”

“Oyeme Con Los Ojos,” photographs by Josephine Sacabo, through Sunday. Works by Ashton Ramsay for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

823 FULTON STREET NEW ORLEANS, LA 70130 P 504/581 SAKE

ROCKNSAKE.COM

OLD U.S. MINT. 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state. la.us/site/mintex.htm — Works by William Eggleston, An-My Le and Ragnar Kjartansson for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “The Boudin Trail,” a

NEXT TO SHOE-NAMI

3112 MAGAZINE ST. 504.301.9864

travelling exhibit from the Southern Foodways Alliance, through Monday, and more.

WILLIAMS RESEARCH CENTER. Historic New Orleans Collection, 410 Chartres St., 523-4662; www. hnoc.org — “In Katrina’s Wake: Restoring a Sense of Place,” photographs by Stephen Wilkes for PhotoNOLA, through March 3.

3319 SEVERN AVE.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

flowers,” hand-painted silk wall hangings by Ray Cole; watercolors by Sean Friloux; “A 30-Year Retrospective of Photography,” photographs by Eliot Kamenitz; “Delta Dogs,” clay sculpture by Larone Hudson; all through Wednesday.

octaviaartgallery.com — “For the Love of Flowers,” photographs by Elizabeth Kleinveld for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 14.

ART

504.885.0805

45


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LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

STAGE

Oils and Vinegars Wines, Spirits and Liqueurs

review

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

5725 Magazine Street (corner of Nashville)

504.302.1455

THEATER

AMPLE PARKING ON THE CORNER & IN REAR OF STORE

BIG BOSOM BUDDIES. Mid-City Arts Theater, 3540 Toulouse St., 4881460; www.midcitytheatre.com — Ricky Graham and Varla Jean Merman perform duets, cabaret favorites and pay tribute to Joan Crawford and Bette Davis in the original comedy revue. Tickets $25. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday. NEW PLAY BACCHANAL. Southern

Rep Theater, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www.southernrep.com — Southern Rep’s festival of new works features play readings, panel discussions, the alterna-ending play slam, and a finale toga party. Visit the website for the full schedule and other details. A bacchanal pass is $15, admission for individual events is $5. Wednesday-Saturday.

NUNSET BOULEVARD. Teatro Wego, 177 Sala Ave., Westwego, 885-2000; www.jpas.org — The sisters from Dan Goggin’s Nunsense series are invited to perform at the Hollywood Bowl, where they try to impress a famous movie producer. Tickets $30 general admission, $27 seniors and military, $20 students, $15 children. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through Jan. 22. RAT PACK NOW. Stage Door Canteen

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www.sonesta. com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

FLEUR DE TEASE. One Eyed Jacks,

615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www. oneeyedjacks.net — The burlesque troupe performs an Alice in Wonderland-themed show. Call 319-8917 or email info@fleurdetease.com for reservations. Tickets $15 general admission, $20 reserved seating. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Sunday. FREAKSHEAUX TO GEAUX. AllWays

Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge. com — The troupe of vaudevilleand circus-style artists performs with Ford Theatre Reunion. 10 p.m. Tuesday.

After a two-year hiatus, Running With Scissors revived its serialized holiday show Grenadine McGunkle’s Double-Wide Christmas at One Eyed Jacks. All the regulars were back in fine form: bighaired chanteuses Crystal (Lisa Picone) and China (Ashley Ricord) had new tales of what they had actually done instead of headlining in Branson, Mo., this past year; mailman Johnny Shoemake (Bob Edes Jr.) was tired of holiday fruitcakes and got closer to realizing his dream of having gender reassignment surgery; Helen Highwater (Jack Long) tried to steal everyone’s gifts; Grenadine (Dorian Rush) filled her Crock-Pot with cocktail wieners, and Madge (Elizabeth Pearce) used some Icy-Hot to remedy her carpal tunnel syndrome long enough to hit the keys on her Casio. Gladys Finkelstein (Brian Peterson) had a more exotic tale, having been conscripted into compulsory Israeli military service while attending Purim celebrations (“It’s like Mardi Gras, only louder,” she told the crew at the Everlasting Arms Motor Park). It provided an opportunity to turn Pat Benatar’s “Love is a Battlefield” into “Jews on the Battlefield” in a rock video-imitating ensemble dance number with gratuitously sacrilegious references to battle stress inducing desires for ham and other pork products. But most of the variety-style show’s songs were reworked Christmas carols, and the outrageous parodying was highlighted in Shoemake’s homage to a planned sex change in what should have been titled “Carol of the Balls.” As an alternative to trimming a traditional tree, the show offered a barrage of guilty holiday pleasures. — Will Coviello

GLITZ. Joy Theater, 1200 Canal St., 528-9569; www.thejoytheater.com — Bianca Del Rio stars in the drag revue featuring tributes to Liza Minnelli, Judy Garland, Lady Gaga, Amy Winehouse and more. Tickets start at $35. 9 p.m. Saturday.

COMEDY COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 944-0099; www.lostlovelounge. com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. 8 p.m. Thursday.

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St.; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts the long-form improv comedy show. Tickets $10. 8:30 p.m. Friday. GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The

Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 371-5543; www.maisonfrenchmen.com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m.; show is 8 p.m. Friday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail,

1100 Constance St., 525-5515; www. therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar

and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday.

Theater, 5039 Freret St.; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a safe-for-all-ages team comedy competition. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. Saturday.

NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY. Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The audience interactive comedy show features live local music. Call 523-7469 or visit www. nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $8 online, $15 at the door. 10 p.m. Saturday.

GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit

OPEN MIC STAND-UP. La Nuit

COMEDY SPORTZ. La Nuit Comedy

6047 MAGAZINE ST. 899-4223

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St.; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts the free open mic. 11 p.m. Friday. PERMANENT DAMAGE STAND-UP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar, 2441

A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC. Sid-

ney’s, 1674 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts 9 p.m. Thursday.

SITTING ROOM ONLY COMEDY SHOW. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

5039 Freret St.; www.nolacomedy. com — Stand-up comedians Joseph Patrick Larkin, Mark Normand and Joseph Tolpi perform. Free admission. 8 p.m. Tuesday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton

Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts 9 p.m. Wednesday.

PHYLLIS WALLO, M.D. PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRY EVALUATION . MEDICATION . THERAPY

Adults and Adolescents

504.444.5640 7611 MAPLE STREET NEW ORLEANS

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944; www.stagedoorcanteen.org — The tribute show seeks to recapture the music, style and comedy of Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Sammy Davis Jr. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m. Sunday.

Grenadine McGunkle's Double-Wide Christmas

47


48

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012


LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 3 TODDLER TIME. Louisiana Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm. org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 5 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m

Saturday 7 ROCK CANDY LAB. Southern

EVENTS Tuesday 3 CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University

Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE. Tulane-

Lakeside Hospital, 4700 South I-10 Service Road West, Metairie — The peer support group meets the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Visit www.dbsaneworleans.org for details. 7:30 p.m.

“DOWNTON ABBEY” PBS PREMEIRE. East Bank Regional

Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The library and WYES host a premiere for season two of the British television series. Free admission. 7 p.m.

DOWNTOWN LUNCHTIME SPIRITUALITY SERIES.

Immaculate Conception Jesuit Church, 130 Baronne St., 529-1477; www.jesuitchurch. net — Ghazala Khan, a physics teacher at Mt. Carmel Academy, discusses “Islam: A Woman’s and Mother’s Perspective.” Visit www. loyno.edu/lplc/downtown for details. Free admission. 12:30 p.m.

Wednesday 4 COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City

Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

EXERCISING TO CURE DISEASE.

East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — Darren Colletti, a partner in a local chain of gyms, discusses strategies in choosing a gym, how exercise can prevent ailments, choosing a personal trainer and other topics. Free admission. 7 p.m. FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market,

French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket. org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for people who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

LUNCHBOX LECTURE. National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. Noon.

RED WINE AROMAS CLASS.

Windsor Court Hotel, 300 Gravier St., 522-1922; www. windsorcourthotel.com — Space is limited for the class. Call 522-1994 for reservations. Admission $25 (plus tax and tip). 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

Thank You

Thursday 5 FIRST THURSDAYS WARGAMES.

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum hosts WWII board and miniatures gaming for players at all levels. Pre-registration is required; a minimum number of gamers must register for the meeting to be held. Call 528-1944 ext. 333 for details. 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

We wish to thank all of our customers for their continued patronage and for another great holiday season!

- The Fisher Family

“WHERE THE UNUSUAL IS COMMONPLACE.” 5101 W. ESPLANADE AVE., METAIRIE, LA 70006 504-885-4956 • 800-222-4956

More than just great food...

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

geaux tigers !

WORLD WAR II DISCUSSION GROUP. East Bank Regional

Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — Walt Burgoyne, education programs coordinator at the National World War II Museum, discusses Operation Chariot, a successful British amphibious attack in Germanoccupied France. 7 p.m.

event now !

Friday 6

EASTSIDE ART MARKET.

HAPPY HOUR

TUES-SAT 3-6PM

areas

COME TRY OUR BLACKBERRY JALAPENO SMOKED RIBS

corporate parties rehearsal dinners business meetings

BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS ANNIVERSARY. Chalmette

Battlefield of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, 8606 W. St. Bernard Hwy., Chalmette, 589-3882; www.nps.gov/jela — The anniversary celebration features living history presentations, crafts, cooking demonstrations and more. There is a reenactment of the Dec. 23, 1814 night battle at 7 p.m. Friday. All other activities 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

6

book your DINNERor COCKTAIL private dining

OPEN AT 9AM FOR BRUNCH

on gamedays

Call Our Special Events Planner Gift Certificates Available

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Eastside Studios, 107 S. Orange St., Hammond, (985) 542-7113 or (985) 543-0403 — Eastside Studios holds a juried art market for professional artists on the first Friday of each month. Artists pay a $15 application fee and, if accepted, a $20 booth fee. 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. KREWE DE JEANNE D’ARC PARADE. The krewe celebrat-

ing Joan of Arc’s birthday has its annual parade that encourages medieval attire. The parade starts at the Bienville statue at Conti and Decatur streets. Visit www.joanofarcparade.com for details. 6 p.m.

KUNG FU SEMINAR . Tulane University, Lavin-Bernick Center, Kendall Cram Lecture

Call 522-9897

www.theoriginalleakspecialist.com Good thru 6/1/12

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JANUARY 03 > 2012

Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 5690405; www.southernfood. org — Kids can make a batch of rock candy to learn about the intersection of food and science. Admission free for museum members, $5 nonmembers. 11 a.m. to noon.

EVENTS

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Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

Hall — Wu Bin, the renowned kung fu instructor known for being the mentor to action movie star Jet Li, conducts a seminar along with other kung fu and tai chi practitioners. Email noliuinstitute@gmail. com or visit www.shaolin-world. net for details. Admission $20 students, $25 general admission. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

tulap@tulane.edu for details. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK . Armstrong Park, N. Rampart

corner of Freret Street and Napoleon Avenue, 638-2589; www.freretmarket.org — The market offers food, arts, live music and crafts from local exhibitors on the first Saturday of each month. Noon to 5 p.m.

and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays.

SCOTCH TASTING . Deutsches Haus,

1023 Ridgewood St., 522-8014; www.deutscheshaus.org — In celebration of Scottish New Year’s and Twelfth Night, the Daughters of the British Empire in Louisiana hosts a tasting of five single malt Scotch whiskies paired with food. The event also features live Scottish music. Call 737-4309 for details. Admission $45. 7:15 p.m. to 10 p.m.

WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www. noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays.

Saturday 7 ART AT THE MARKET. Griffith Park,

333 Erlanger St., Slidell — The Slidell Art League hosts a monthly art market at the Camellia City Farmers Market. Visit www.slidellartleague.info for details. 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Joan of Arc Catholic Church, 919 Cambronne St.,, 715-3209 — The church hosts its annual fundraiser. Admission $15. 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. E-WASTE AND PAINT DROP-OFF.

Whole Foods Market Arabella Station, 5600 Magazine St., 8999119 — Whole Foods and the Green Project offer a monthly electronic waste and paint drop-off event. Visit www.greenproject.org for details. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING .

Christ Church Cathedral, 2919 St. Charles Ave., 895-6602 — ERACE meets in the church’s Westfeldt Room for its weekly discussion group. Call 866-1163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

FEMA COLLECTIONS SEMINAR .

Tulane University, Lavin-Bernick University Center, McAlister Drive, 247-1507 — Tulane University Law School and Southeast Louisiana Legal Services provide free legal assistance to recipients of letters from FEMA demanding repayment of Hurricane Katrina emergency assistance funds. Email

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 6773668 — The session discusses the history of the park, as well as the life of Bernard de Marigny and his influence on Louisiana’s history. 11 a.m.

FRERET MARKET. Freret Market,

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation, 13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET. Gretna

Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

JAZZMEN RICE DEMONSTRATION . Southern Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — Chef Glen Hogh from Vega Tapas Cafe presents a cooking demonstration using Jazzmen rice. Free with museum admission. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. KREWE OF ORPHEUS 13TH NIGHT PARTY. Generations Hall, 310

Andrew Higgins Drive, 581-4367; www.generationshall.net — The Carnival kickoff party features an open bar, food from local restaurants, music by Gashouse Gorillaz, an appearance by the 610 Stompers and an auction benefiting the George Rodrigue Foundation of the Arts. Email renee@kreweoforpheus.com or visit www.kreweoforpheus.com/13thnight for details. Admission $55 per person, $100 per couple. 8 p.m. to midnight. LAKESHORE BRANCH LIBRARY GRAND OPENING . Lakeshore

Library, 1000 W. Esplanade Ave., 838-1100; www.jefferson.lib.la.us — The library that was shuttered after 2005’s floods hosts a grand opening celebration featuring a ribbon-cutting ceremony, book signings and readings, cooking and dancing demonstrations, and more. Free admission. 9 a.m.

SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET. Holy Angels Complex, 3500 St. Claude Ave., 875-4268; www.sankofafarmersmarket.org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. ST. BERNARD SEAFOOD & FARMERS MARKET. Aycock Barn,

409 Aycock St., Arabi — The market showcases fresh seafood, local produce, jams and preserves, baked goods, crafts, live entertainment, children’s activities and more. Call 3554442 or visit www.visitstber-

The children’s book author reads from Dinosaur Mardi Gras. 2 p.m. Saturday.

Sunday 8

FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT. Fair

INTRODUCTION TO JUDAISM .

Temple Sinai, 6227 St. Charles Ave., 861-3693; www.templesinaino.org — Rabbi Edward Cohn leads a free class for those seeking information about Judaism or considering conversion. Reservations are recommended. 9 a.m. Sundays. Through Feb. 26.

LSU PEP RALLY. Grand Isle

Restaurant, 575 Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — The restaurant hosts a rally on Fulton Street for the BCS game with live music by Category 6, outdoor bars and grills, giveaways and more. 1 p.m.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 6773668 — The program discusses woodworking techniques used to split wood and make various objects. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Monday 9 BOUDIN & BARBECUE BCS TAILGATE .

Piazza d’Italia, 200 Poydras St., behind Loews Hotel — Cafe Adelaide executive chef Chris Barbato and Alabama restaurant Jim ‘N Nick’s executive chef Drew Robinson stage a culinary competition in honor of the Alabama/LSU BCS match-up. Call 595-3305 or visit www.cafeadelaide.com for details. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. CASA NEW ORLEANS VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION. CASA New Orleans,

1340 Poydras St., Suite 2120, 5221962; www.casaneworleans.org — The organization hosts an orientation for those interested in volunteering as court appointed special advocates. 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS SCHOOL LEADERSHIP CENTER FELLOWS PROGRAM. The group seeks

area principals and assistant school leaders for its intensive professional and leadership development program. Visit www.slc-gno.org or email jbrown@slc-gno.org for details. Application deadline is Jan. 31.

WORDS THE BLACK WIDOW SALON. Crescent City Books, 230 Chartres St., 5244997 — Playwright Andrew Vaught from Cripple Creek Theatre Co. leads the salon. Reservations are requested. Email books@crescentcitybooks.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday. CORNELL LANDRY. Maple Street

Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 8664916; www.maplestreetbookshop. com — The children’s book author signs and reads from Happy Mardi Gras. 11:30 a.m. Saturday. DIANNE DE LAS CASAS. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 —

WITH BEAUTIFUL FRESH FLOWERS ARRANGEMENTS STARTING @ $40

Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www. fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae hosts poets and spoken-word readers on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES. Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. PASS IT ON . George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturdays. SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday.

815 FOCIS STREET [OFF VETERANS ]

837-6400

MEXICAN & CUBAN FOOD

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PUERCO FRITO - $10.50 ROPA VIEJA - $8.15 Come Have Lunch With Me!

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620 IBERVILLE STREET • 522.1138 OPEN EVERYDAY ‘TIL 8:30PM

THE WELL: A WOMEN’S POETRY CIRCLE . St. Anna’s Episcopal Church,

1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121; www. stannanola.org — The group meets at 2 p.m. Mondays. Call 289-9142 or email poetryprocess@ gmail.com for details.

CALL FOR WRITERS BOB KAUFMAN BOOK PRIZE IN POETRY. Trembling Pillow Press

presents the contest. The winner will be published in 2012. Visit www.tremblingpillowpress.com/ bobkaufmanbookprize.html for details. Submissions deadline is Jan. 31. LETTERS ABOUT LITERATURE. For

the national contest, the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress seeks letters from 4th to 12th grade students to authors — living or dead, from any genre — explaining how those authors’ work changed the student’s way of thinking. Visit www.lettersaboutliterature.org for details. Submission deadline is Friday. SWAMP LILY REVIEW. Editors seek

fiction, poetry, nonfiction and creative nonfiction for the spring 2012 issue of the online publication. Editors are also open to some book reviews, interviews, photographs and artwork. Email swamplilyreview@gmail.com or visit www. swamplily.com for details.

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

l unch

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

BLESSED SACRAMENT ST. JOAN OF ARC TWELFTH NIGHT BALL. St.

FONTAINEBLEAU HISTORY TOUR.

nard.com for details. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

welcome

51


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

This is what 100 looks like.

52

adMission oPen houses & tours Pre-K – 4 tours

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>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <MUSSELS ON MAGAZINE > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >Chef Sebastien Baudin, a native of France, opened the French bistro C’est La Vie (4206 Magazine St., 304-6497) in late < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <December, taking over a former boutique on a block housing several restaurants. His menu includes bistro standards like steak frites, escargot, mussels and onion soup. With its liquor license pending, C’est La Vie currently is BYOB and charges no corkage fee. The restaurant serves dinner nightly, and Baudin plans to add lunch soon. WHAT Regla Store

am

B

WHERE

4200 D’Hemecourt St., 485-6494 WHEN

Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. RESERVATIONS

Not accepted

HOW MUCH

Inexpensive

WHAT WORKS

SWEET MEMORIES REVIVED

The menu at Johnny’s Po-Boys is extensive, but the variety of sandwiches pales in comparison to the roster of candies found at the shop’s recent upstairs addition. Johnny’s Sweets & Treats (511 St. Louis St., 524-8129; www.johnnyspoboys.com) serves Blue Bell ice cream and stocks a memory lane of candy, from Pop Rocks and Fun Dip to Charleston Chew and Bazooka bubble gum. The shop sells both boxed candy bars (Sky Bar, anyone?) and sweets by the pound (wax bottles, gummy worms, Jordan almonds).

five 5 IN

FIVE PLACES FOR SLIDERS

Pressed sandwiches, plate lunches and tropical shakes

AMERICAN SECTOR

WHAT DOESN'T

Order mini burgers anytime and get bargain barbecue sliders from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

It’s takeout only

CHECK, PLEASE

The former Garces Restaurant is reborn as a Cuban deli

945 MAGAZINE ST., 528-1940 www.american-sector.com

NOSH

219 DAUPHINE ST., 581-6674 www.nolanosh.com

This diner’s slider menu includes fish, turkey and buffalo patties.

STANLEY

Pork Legacy CUBAN TRADITION AT A MID-CITY DELI. B Y I A N M C N U LT Y

T

547 ST. ANN ST., 587-0093 www.stanleyrestaurant.com

Try slider versions of fried oyster, Korean beef and club po-boys.

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

Garces and her son decided a grocery would fare better in their flood-ravaged neighborhood. This tucked-away pocket of Mid-City still looks like it’s in recovery mode, and from the crumbling street, Regla does not seem too inviting. Inside, however, you find a perfectly friendly New Orleans neighborhood hybrid, a deli offering po-boys and Monday red beans along with the Cuban standards for which Garces was known. The kitchen is open and guiltless, equipped like that of a family home with the addition of a fryer and the all-important foil-lined sandwich press. Here, mother and son make tropical fruit shakes and cook marinated Cuban steaks in small skillets for plate lunches or their Uruguay sandwich, a beef- and ham-filled relative to the Cuban. If you order black beans and Garces decides they need more seasoning, she might snatch some onions and peppers from the grocery’s tiny produce rack and slice them into the simmering pot. The basic po-boy menu is undistinguished, but there are many Cuban options, from tamales and guavafilled empanadas to flan for dessert. Order any of the $8 daily plates, especially Wednesday’s ropa vieja, and you get so much food you’ll want to run out and find someone to share it. The store is tiny, and there’s not much room to maneuver. But at least there’s plenty to look over as you wait for your order — from the deli case crammed with pork legs to the walls sporting maps of pre-revolution Cuba beside posters of Drew Brees.

THREE MUSES

536 FRENCHMEN ST., 252-4801 www.thethreemuses.com

Goat cheese and tomato chutney top lamb burgers.

TWELVE MILE LIMIT

500 S. TELEMACHUS ST., 488-8114

Get barbecue sliders with coleslaw at this backstreet bar.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2008 Nipozzano Riserva Chianti Rufina TUSCANY, ITALY / $20-$25 Retail

Marchesi de Frescobaldi makes this blend of Sangiovese with small amounts of Malvasia Nera, Colorino, Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon at an 11th-century estate. Buy it at: Vieux Carre Wine & Spirits, Elio’s Wine Warehouse, Matassa’s Market, Dorignac’s, Langenstein’s in Metairie, Acquistapace’s Covington Supermarket, Saia’s Super Meat Market and Cost Plus World Markets. Drink it at: Tony Angello’s, Venezia, The Rib Room, Broussard’s, Vincent’s Italian Cuisine in Uptown, Cafe Giovanni, Eleven79, Andrea’s, Salvatore Ristorante, Hyatt Regency New Orleans, Adolfo’s, Cafe DiBlasi, Sal and Judy’s, Nuvolari’s and Ristorante Carmelo. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

urkeys were prepared in countless New Orleans kitchens this holiday season, but in the Cuban kitchen at the back of the Mid-City corner grocery Regla Store, attention turned to roasted pork legs. With the shape and size of bagpipes, weighing more than 20 pounds on the bone, these pork legs are the traditional centerpieces for some local Cuban families at Thanksgiving, Christmas and parties for football games so momentous they call for feasts. The store prepares these on special order, though these same legs — thoroughly steeped in the classic Cuban marinade mojo — power the store’s Saturday plate-lunch special of roast pork, as well as its everyday specialty of Cuban and medianoche sandwiches. Order a sandwich and pork is sliced from the bone, layered on French bread (or on sweet, yellow rolls for the medianoche) and pressed until the mojo’s garlic and sour orange flavors seep over the ham, Swiss and pickles. The pork leg, a holiday custom and daily staple, is the pride of Carmen Garces, who runs Regla Store with her son David Gutierrez and his wife Lisa. Garces’ name should be familiar to local aficionados of Cuban cooking, because before Hurricane Katrina she operated Garces Restaurant at the same address. It opened in the 1970s, and until Katrina was a quiet, backstreet joint with trim curtains, modest furnishings and such a homey feel you expected Garces to join your table as soon as she finished serving supper. After Katrina, her ex-husband opened a Garces Restaurant in Kenner (which has since closed), but

David Gutierrez, Carmen Garces and Lisa Gutierrez prepare Cuban dishes at Regla Store.

53


CUISINE

Scuttlebites ALL THE NEWS THAT’S FIT TO EAT. B Y I A N M CN U LT Y

TED’S FROSTOP GETS MUGGED

LATIN FARE AT FARMERS MARKETS

Going to farmers markets is a great way to keep up with which local foods are in season. These days, though, such visits also are helpful for keeping up with what’s new in the local food truck scene. For instance, the truck la Cocinita visits two markets this week. On Tuesday, it will be at Hollygrove Market & Farm (8301 Olive St., 483-7037; www.holly-

grovemarket.com) from noon to 2 p.m. Thursday it will begin what is expected to be a weekly appearance at the Mid-City edition of the Crescent City Farmers Market (3700 Orleans Ave.; www.crescentcityfarmersmarket.org), serving food from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. La Cocinita is run by Benoit Angulo and Rachel Billow, who both work at Commander’s Palace. Angulo trained at a culinary school in Venezuela, and many of his specialties for la Cocinita are based on South American savories. Look for arepas (cornmeal cakes stuffed with meat and cheese) and patacones (fried cakes of mashed green plantains made into sandwiches). The selection of sauces is unique and impressive. La Cocinita serves food at other events and outside various bars, including Thursdays starting at 9 p.m. at Le Bon Temps Roule (4801 Magazine St., 895-8117), and Saturdays starting at 10 p.m. at Rendezvous Tavern (3101 Magazine St., 891-1777).

RIP IN 2011

As one year ends and another begins, we recount the changes and trends in the food world over the past 12 months. It’s also when we remember the people from the New Orleans restaurant world we lost during the year. Each passing was a reminder of how much our distinctive local restaurants rely on the personalities, family histories, traditions and passions of the people who run them. This list is by no means complete, but some of the people who died in 2011 included: Natalie Brown, 45, co-owner of Kosher Cajun New York Deli and Grocery (3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com). James Leeming, 50, chef/owner of Coulis (3625 Prytania St., 304-4265). Angel Miranda, 57, founder of Lola’s (3312 Esplanade Ave., 488-6946; www.lolasneworleans.com). John Mosca, 86, of Mosca’s Restaurant (4137 Hwy. 90 West, Avondale, 436-9942; www.moscasrestaurant.com). Antoinette Riccobono Uddo Bossier, 64, an owner of Riccobono’s Peppermill (3524 Severn Ave., 455-2266; www.riccobonos.com). We extend condolences to their families and share our gratitude for the contributions each made to our community. All of the restaurants mentioned above remain open.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

People who might have spotted the giant mug sign from Ted’s Frostop (3100 Calhoun St., 861-3615) being loaded onto a flatbed truck and driven away last fall can be excused for thinking they’d witnessed the end of an era. In fact, it was part of a new chapter for a long-running legacy. That mug is a 14-foot-tall, sheetmetal relic from the glory days of the American burger stand, and it’s been a kitschy landmark on South Claiborne Avenue since it first was installed in the 1950s. More recently, it became a defiant symbol of Hurricane Katrina recovery. Originally mounted on a high pedestal, the mug was knocked down by Katrina’s storm winds, landing upside down in the parking lot. Rather than right it, the Ted’s crew had it repaired as it stood, with frosted top to the pavement. When Ted’s reopened in 2006, the logo on its menus and T-shirts was changed to show the mug upside down. But the mug’s move in September 2011 signaled a new start for Ted’s Frostop, which now has a new owner, a revamped menu and, as of last week, a newly restored mug sign returned to its original, frosted-side-up stature. Finishing touches include illuminating the sign with neon lettering and making it spin. “I’m sure a lot of people will be upset that we don’t have it upside down anymore, but we want to signal there’s a renaissance going on,” says Peter Moss, who bought Ted’s last year. Moss is a Royal Street antiques dealer who also owns Cafe Beignet coffee shops in the French Quarter and is a partner in the Steamboat Natchez. He’s out to revitalize Ted’s, and repairing the mug was one step. He’s replaced the pre-formed patties used in hamburgers with fresh-ground chuck, and the restaurant’s namesake root beer is again made using the original Frostop recipe and is served in frosted mugs.

55


>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

>>>> specialty at chef Shane Pritchett’s < < < < < < <casual < cafe with an upscale deli Order barbecued pulled> > > > > > > >menu. > pork, Texas-style brisket or St. <<< Louis ribs. There also are burg>> ers, entrees, creative sides, and is available all day. No <breakfast < reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< SAUCY’S BBQ GRILL — 3244 Severn > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. > > > > > > > Ave., > > Metairie, 322-2544; www. Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN O’HENRY’S FOOD & SPIRITS — 634

S. Carrollton Ave., 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 461-9840; www.ohenrys.com — Complimentary peanuts are the calling card of these casual, family friendly restaurants. The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL BAYOU BEER GARDEN — 326 N.

Jefferson Davis Pwky., 302-9357 — Head to Bayou Beer Garden for a 10-oz. Bayou burger served on a sesame bun. Disco fries are french fries topped with cheese and debris gravy. No reservations. Lunch and dinner, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $ THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

ZADDIE’S TAVERN — 1200 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson, 832-0830 — Zaddie’s serves burgers, alligator sausage, boudin, tamales and meat or crawfish pies. Thursday’s steak night special features a filet mignon, butter-garlic potatoes, salad, grilled French bread and a soft drink for $15. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks St.,

202-4741; www.bookoobbq.com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat. Cash only. $

FAT HEN GROCERY — 7457 St.

Charles Ave., 266-2921; www.fathengrill.com — Barbecue is the

saucysbbqgrill.com — Saucy’s serves slow-smoked St. Louisstyle pork ribs, pulled pork, brisket, smoked sausage and grilled or jerk chicken. Side items include smoked beans, mac and cheese, coleslaw and Caribbean rice. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

sauteed mushrooms or housemade hickory sauce. Other options include a grilled chicken sandwich. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www.

budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and 24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish po-boys. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE —

527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Crabmeat-stuffed jumbo shrimp, grilled baby back ribs, overstuffed po-boys and seafood gumbo are popular dishes. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS

BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL — 4905

Canal St., 488-7357; www.beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese,

7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast items like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ CANAL STREET BISTRO & ECO CAFE — 3903 Canal St., 561-6585; www.

ecocafeno.com — This cafe serves sandwiches like the veggie club, layered with Swiss cheese, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, spinach and baby pickles. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100 Mag-

azine St., 373-6579; www.gottgourmetcafe.com — This cafe serves a variety of gourmet salads, sand-

««2012»»

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

The best kept secret in New Orleans

gourmet pizzas

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus specialty sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton

Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchid-

HAPPY NEW YEAR

A Sweet, Healthy, Chocolate-filled Year

Hand Made Freshly Prepared Dough With Our Own Sauce

Create your own 10” Pizza with our favorite toppings or try our specialty pizzas. Mediterranean • Blackened Shrimp Grilled Chicken Alfredo • Margarita Pizza We also have lactose free soy mozzarella cheese

Plant sales & rentals

3939 Veterans • 885-3416

(between Cleary Ave & Clearview)

1135 PRESS ST. @ NEW ORLEANS

2900 ST. CLAUDE

(504) 947-7554

Mon-Tues 11-3 • Wed-Thurs 11-7:30 Fri 11-8:30 • Sat 11-8:00 www.parranspoboys.com

deckomeals.com

5707 Magazine St. 504.269.5707 www.BlueFrogChocolates.com

Attiki

bar & grill experience the mediterranean

make your

BELLY DANCER

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to become a

New Orleans Musician 504.220.4803

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56

Year of the Gator

wiches, wraps, Chicago-style hot dogs, burgers and more. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

Every Fri & Sat Night

M-F 3-6pm

FOOD SERVED TIL 1AM

Daily Martini Specials

230 DECATUR 11AM-4AM DAILY

504-587-3756 www.attikineworleans.com

SPRAY-FOAM & BLOW-IN INSULATION

COLD HOME? FREE ESTIMATES

$4,000 Incentives

504-255-5165

A New Orleans, LA Co. *credit cards accepted


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

neworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA —

600 N. Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen.com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations ac-

cepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St.,

581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metairie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 464-8884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 267-3328; www.thekupcakefactory.com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes. The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501 Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers

frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638; www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-

4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485; www.

oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.Sat. Credit cards. $$ ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www. one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St.,

525-1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ MELANGE — 2106 Chartres St., 309-7335; www.melangenola. com — Dine on French-Creole cuisine in a restaurant and bar themed to resemble a lush 1920s speakeasy. Lapin au vin is a farm raised rabbit cooked served with demi-glace, oven-roasted shallots, tomatoes, potatoes and pancetta. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily, brunch Sunday. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CUBAN/ CARIBBEAN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437

Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www. mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Aruba scallops are seared and served with white chocolate chipotle sauce with jalapeno grits and seasonal vegetables. Warm walnut goat cheese is served with yuca chips. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sat.Sun., dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL —

1100 Constance St., 722-3168; www. therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches such as The Piggly Wiggly, with pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with GraNo reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $ KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI &

GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun. com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — The wine emporium offers gourmet sandwiches and deli items. The Reuben combines corned beef, melted Swiss, sauerkraut and Russian dressing on rye bread. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Fri., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St.,

895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola. com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and coriander-spiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations

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JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE —

58

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RES-

TAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italianstyle eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411

INDIAN

MONDAY $1 LONGNECKS TUESDAY $1 DRAFTS WEDNESDAY $10 BOTTLES OF WINE MID-CITY

MAGAZINE

4024 CANAL ST. • 302-1133

4218 MAGAZINE • 894-8554

T H E O S P I Z Z A . C O M

923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100

N. 19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni. com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tassomushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

MOSCA’S — 4137 Hwy. 90 W.,

Lunch Buffet Daily LUNCH

11:30AM - 2:30PM

DINNER

5:30PM - 10:30PM

9 2 3 M E TA I R I E R D . 8 3 6 - 6 8 5 9

lasagna and other Italian specialties, panini, wraps, soups and salads. Open Sundays before New Orleans Saints home games. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast and lunch Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $

CLOSED TUES.

Westwego, 436-8950; www. moscasrestaurant.com — This family-style eatery has changed little since opening in 1946. Popular dishes include shrimp Mosca, chicken a la grande and baked oysters Mosca, made with breadcrumps and Italian seasonings. Reservations accepted. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$$

RED GRAVY — 125 Camp St., 561-

8844; www.redgravycafe.com — The cafe serves breakfast items including pancakes, waffles and pastries. At lunch, try meatballs,

Chastant St., Metairie, 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Try house specialties like vealand spinach-stuffed canneloni. Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 8913644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola. com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub.

com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St.,

267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TOMAS BISTRO — 755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942 — Tomas serves dishes like semi-boneless Louisiana quail stuffed with applewood-smoked bacon dirty popcorn rice, Swiss chard and Madeira sauce. The duck cassoulet combines duck confit and Creole Country andouille in a white bean casserole. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR —

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$ BABYLON CAFE — 7724 Maple St., 314-0010; www.babyloncafe.biz —The Babylon platter includes stuffed grape leaves, hummus, kibbeh, rice and one choice of meat: lamb, chicken or beef kebabs, chicken or beef shawarma, gyro or kufta. Chicken shawarma salad is a salad topped with olives, feta and chicken breast cooked on a rotisserie. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun

St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No res-


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ervations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville

St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LUCY’S RETIRED SURFERS’ BAR & RESTAURANT — 701 Tchoupitoulas

Jack Dempsey’s offers an array of broiled or fried seafood dishes (738 Poland Ave., 943-9914; www. jackdempseysllc.com). PhOTO By CheRyL GeRBeR

vations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur

St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Deca-

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031;

265-8855 — This music clubs serves dishes like fish and chips, spicy hot wings, tacos and more. There are weekly specials and vegetarian and vegan options. No reservations. Dinner and latenight Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reser-

tur St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on poboy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave.,

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD ARTZ BAGELZ — 3138 Magzine St.,

309-7557; www.artzbagelz.com — Artz bakes its bagels in house and options include onion, garlic, honey whole wheat, cinnamonraisin, salt and others. Get one with a schmear or as a sandwich. Salads also are available. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636

Franklin St., Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola.com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, poboys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Start a meal with oysters

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iber-

ville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Bara-

taria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe.com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Chicken and artichoke pasta is tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie,

832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NEW YORK PIZZA — 4418 Magazine St., 891-2376; www.newyorkpizzanola.com — Choose from pizza by the slice or whole pie, calzones, pasta, sandwiches, salads and more. The Big Apple pie is loaded with pepperoni, Canadian bacon, onions, mushrooms, black olives, green peppers, Ital-

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St., 523-8995; www.lucysretiredsurders.com — This surf shack serves California-Mexican cuisine and the bar has a menu of tropical cocktails. Todo Santos fish tacos feature grilled or fried mahi mahi in corn or flour tortillas topped with shredded cabbage and shrimp sauce, and are served with rice and beans. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily, late night Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

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59


OUT2EAT ian sausage and minced garlic and anchovies and jalapenos are optional. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717

— Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-

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DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., 571-

7561 — Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order with topping choices that include everything from sprouts to black bean and corn salsa.Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

d e dressings, sauces and meats to

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

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WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 888-4004 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS

G ott Gour met Cafe uses the fre s h

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4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

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Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Vet-

erans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416; www.parranspoboy. com — Parran’s offers a long list of po-boys plus muffulettas, club sandwiches, pizzas, burgers, salads, fried seafood plates and Creole-Italian entrees. The veal supreme po-boy features a cutlet

topped with Swiss cheese and brown gravy. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $

THE STORE — 814 Gravier St., 322-

2446; www.thestoreneworleans. com — The Store serves sandwiches, salads and hot plates, and there is a taco bar where patrons can choose their own toppings. Red beans and rice comes with grilled andouille and a corn bread muffin. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $$

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St.,

899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEAFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

Convention Center Blvd., 5208530; www.grandislerestaurant. com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried softshell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy., 737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, poboys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd.,

241-2548; www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun.,

Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — 322

Magazine St., 522-7902; www.centraarchy.com — This traditional steakhouse serves USDA prime beef, and a selection of supersized cuts includes a 40-oz. Porterhouse for two. The menu also features seafood options and a la carte side items. Reservations recommended. Diner daily. Credit cards. $$$

CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001

N. Broad St., 821-3271; www. crescentcitysteaks.com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. There are porterhouse steaks large enough for two or three diners to share. Bread pudding with raisins and peaches is topped with brandy sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH BARCELONA TAPAS — 720 Dub-

lin St., 861-9696 — This Spanish restaurant serves paella and more than 50 tapas dishes with selections including patatas bravas, garlic shrimp, tomato with mozzarella and avocado shrimp tropical. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY —

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles

Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $


NOLA

MARKETPLACE

YOUR GUIDE TO: MERCHANDISE • SERVICES • EVENTS • ANNOUNCEMENTS AND MORE

CRISTINA’S

Study French in New Orleans CLASSES BEGIN JAN 9 - END MAY 28

CLEANING SERVICE cleaning needs including

After Construction Cleaning Residential & Commercial

L'UNION FRANCAISE 504-899-4477 • 985-373-5151

Licensed & Bonded

232-5554 or 831-0606

Visit us @ lunionfrancaise.org

HARRY'S

Lakeview

HOUSE HELPERS • Small JobS • RepaiRS • inStall

CLEANING SERVICE

• CaRpentRy • painting

And More!

Susana Palma

Insured & Priced-Right

Harry's Helpful Ace Hardware

...for Romance!

CERTAIN CONDITIONS & RESTRICTIONS APPLY

1499 5 YEAR WARRANTY

3 ton unit 13 Seer R22 Dry Ship. Additional charges for added for Freon. EXP 1/10/2012

DUCT G IN CLEAN BLE AVAILA

Service Calls $ 50

59

GULF STATES AIR 504-304-0443

To place your ad in

Nola Market Place Call your Classifed Rep today or call 504-483-3100

3 TON REPLACEMENT SYSTEM

LINGERIE, CORSETS, FASHIONS & MUCH MORE! SEXY TOYS • LINGERIE PARTY OUTFITS • SHOES & BOOTS Women Owned & Operated www.suzettes.com 4636 W. Esplanade Metairie • (504) 888-7722 Mon - Fri - 11am-8pm Sat 11am-6pm

3890 Expires: 1/31/12

FOR SALE Pilothouse Ketch “Angel Runner” Good Live Aboard Good Neighbors Robert Perry Design World Cruiser • Slip Avail.

69K ORO

classadv@gambitweekly.com

Call (504) 208-7661

ANything in the store* * EXCLUDES TOBACCO

2101 MAGAZINE STREET 11am to 7pm daily

504-899-0005

tobacco • pipes Hookahs • Vaporizers

New Year... New You!

or

email

504-250-0884 504-913-6615

15% Off

3 TON CONDENSOR SALE

GO ! LSU

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL AFTER CONSTRUCTION CLEANING LIGHT/GENERAL HOUSEKEEPING HEAVY DUTY CLEANING SUMMER/HOLIDAY CLEANING

lakeviewcleaningllc@yahoo.com

HOLIDAY SALE $

Locally Owned & Serving the New Orleans Area for 21 Years

www.upinsmokeneworleans.com

Bonus Image Aesthetics

Personalized Professional Aesthetic Care

MICRODERMABRASION PEELS BOTOX • FILLERS SKIN CARE PRODUCTS 6042 Magazine St., Suite B 504-909-1490 bonusimageaesthetics.com

Massage Available

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

Fully Insured & Bonded

Uptown• 504-896-1500 Metairie • 504-896-1550

13 SEER

EVENING: All Levels $200/Semester + Book (Meets Twice Weekly)

DAY: All Levels $100/Semester + Book (Meets Weekly)

Let me help you with your

61


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

Loving New Orleans in 2012!

62

Contact deMontluzin Investments to Own or Lease a Place in Our Charming City SALES

4834 St. Charles Ave. ................... $1,250,000 1019 St. Ann St. ............................... $875,000 Ann de Montluzin 1100 Royal St. #8 ............................... $588,000 Farmer 1218 St. Mary St. ............................... $415,000 Historic House and Luxury 1016 Napoleon Ave. ........................ $340,000 Home Specialist 80 Fontainbleau Dr. ............................. $270,000 708 Marengo St. .................................... $200,000

LEASES Residential / Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737 farmeran@gmail.com

4911 St. Charles Ave. .......................... $4000 2100 Jefferson Ave. ............................. $3,750 1100 Royal St. #6 ...................................... $3,000 1402 Jefferson Ave. ............................... $1,950 7 Spinnaker Ln. ..................................... $1,700 1000 Bourbon - Commercial ................ $12,000

Building on a real estate heritage since 1905

www.demontluzinrealtors.com


LoVe LIFe WHere YoU LIVe New Waterfront Homes. Deep Water Access

WAterfroNt Lots from $90’s LAKeSHore MArInA TWO & THREE BEDROOMS FROM $899 PER MONTH

• New full Service Marina • Wet Slips & Dry Storage • Opening Spring 2012

LAKeSHore VILLAGeS • New Waterfront Homes • $200,000 • Spring-fed lakes • Levee Protected

Now Leasing

Live Green

Live Healthy

LAKeSHore MoTorCoACH reSorT WATerFronT

Live Inspired

• 100 unit Luxury Class A • Home Port Resort Community

LIVE IN THE CENTER OF IT ALL Restaurants, Bars, Live Music, Quiet Cafes, Vintage Shops, Modern Boutiques

For More InFo

One & Two Bedrooms from $880 per month

Nancy Collier 985-641-0089

C O M E V I S I T U S T O D AY A N D RESERVE YOUR NEW HOME

I-10 exit 261 At oak Harbor - Lakeshore

1740 BARONNE STREET, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70113 | PHONE: 504-522-2888 WWW.THEMUSESAPARTMENTS.COM

Joy North Gardner realtors

Breathtaking view of the River & Bridge. Wall of windows allows natural light to flow through. 2BR/2BA condo. Amazing floorplan! 1918 sq ft w/elegant designer details.

K

cell: 504-400-0274 office: 504-889-7777 cocohocke@aol.com Million Dollar Club Gold Award Winner

K

Cecelia S. Buras Realtor GRIM, ABR, SRS, SRES

burasc@bellsouth.net

GEAUX BOYS!

One of a kind European country estate on the Bogue Falaya River. Custom built & appointed with fine finishes including antique heart pine, cypress, and Old Chicago brick giving this property an old world charm. Featuring a floor plan and outdoor spaces ideal for entertaining, the Main House has 3500 sq ft of living area (3 bedrooms/3.5 baths) and the separate guest house has 1000 sq. ft (2 bedrooms/1 bath). Nestled on 4.66 private acres, this idyllic setting affords complete peace and privacy yet still close to the Causeway Bridge and I-12.

Offered at $1,050,000 - CovingtonRiverEstate.com By Appt. Only - (985) 502-2882

Jamie Amdal Hughes Multi-Million Dollar Producer Specializing in Historic New Orleans Neighborhoods

504-913-0597 cell

504-862-0100 office jamie@historicneworleansrealtor.com www.historicneworleansrealtor.com 8601 Leake Ave. New Orleans, LA 70118 Each office is independently owned and operated.

Margarita Bergen Call 495-9181 for all your Real Estate Needs

Hablo Español margaritabergen@hotmail.com

Large comfortable homes – 4 bd – Convenient Harahan

3725 MacArthur Blvd.

New Orleans, LA 70114-6825

Office: 504.366.4511 • Cell: 504.583.2902 An independently owned and operated member of the Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.

8601 Leake Ave • New Orleans, La 70118 Each Office Independently Owned & Operated

4726 Veterans Blvd. Metairie, LA 70006

Each office independently owned and operated

Karen Breaux Mosca 504-455-0100 kmosca@kw.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

1 RIVER PLACE $1,149,000

Elegant Country Living minutes from Downtown Covington!

985-641-0089

www.LakeshoreLouisiana.com

63


New Year, New Home 3827 BAUDIN New Orleans • Mid-City 2 bed | 2 full bath 1033 sqft | Side Hall Cottage

Your Guide to Real Estate in New Orleans and Beyond

Mat Berenson NEW ORLEANS TOP PRODUCER

Total renovation includes new roof, elect, plumbing, granite, ss appliances, tankless water heater, alarm. Fabulous master suite with huge walk in closet. Not a shotgun!!! Independent bedrooms. Peaceful and secluded backyard has new fence & sod. Off-street parking for 2 cars. Owner/Agent. $154,900.

Buying or Selling? Mat knows real estate! Uptown, Downtown, Old Metairie and Lakefront

LESLEY POCHÉ

CELL 504-232-1352 OFFICE 504-866-2785

mobile: 504-259-2561

CRS

Mat Berenson, CRS

matberenson@yahoo.com

EACH OFFICE INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

Todd Taylor, Realtor, (504) 232-0362 • RE/MAX Real Estate Partners, (504) 888-9900 Each office individually owned and operated

toddtaylorrealtor@yahoo.com • www.toddtaylorrealestate.com RE/MAX & NOMAR Award Winning Agent

738 Orion Avenue - $225K 3 BR/2 BA w/huge tree-cvrd bkyd in Met. - below Causeway. Mins from Lakeside Mall/CBD in NOLA. Oak flrs, tons of closet space, chef's kit. w/pro grade Viking stove/range hd, 2 drvwys.

939 Jefferson Avenue - $540K Steps from Mag./St. Charles Ave., 3-4 bd/3.5 ba, & @2800 sf. w/stately Oak flrs., open flr plan kit./den. Mstr. bdrm on the 1st flr., all brdms are suites. Quiet bckyd patio w/hot tub. Walk to Whole Foods/Audubon/JCC.

For Sale 4707 Baccich Street - $140K U/C 1 Belleville Court - $75K 2956 A/B Camellia Drive, Slidell - $119K 5946 Jamison Street - $40K U/C

2524 - 6 Jena Street - $185K SOLD 2682 Law Street - $40K 3205 Pansy Ct. - $96.1K 5600 Red Maple Drive - $140K 6640 Rue Louis Phillippe - $97K

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

Jay Realtor® Susslin

64

2600 Belle Chasse Hwy, Suite G Gretna, Louisiana 70056 Office: 504-207-2007 Direct: 504-723-5403 Fax: 504-324-0301

Call (504) 483-3100

7721 LaFourche Street - $80K A 2 bd/1 ba main home w/a 1/1 mother in law in rear. Main house has lots of original charm, gorgeous wood flooring, & generous rooms. Includes a large lot (75'x157') with fruit trees, a boat cover, and a garage. 528 Tupelo Street - $99K 2253 Urquhart Street - $49K 107 West Park Court - $50K For Rent

2956A Camellia Dr., Slidell - $875/mo.

For Jay Susslin, keeping it simple is the key to success. By applying this philosophy to his real estate career, Jay has earned a solid reputation as one of the Westbank's leading real estate professionals. Using his business expertise, lifelong knowledge of the area and no-pressure approach, Jay makes your next move the best - and easiest - one yet. If you're thinking about buying or selling a home, call on Jay Susslin because he's KEEPING IT SIMPLE. Contact him today.

Direct: 504-723-5403 Email:

Jay@JaySusslin.com Website:

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT

www.JaySusslin.com

GARDEN DISTRICT OFFICES Starting at just $495 Including Utilities

CALL 899-RENT Properties For Lease and For Sale

Full Service Property Management Over 30 years of selling properties & filling vacancies!

504-736-0544

www . mauriceguillot . com


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe FRENCH QUARTER

922-24 Dauphine St. $875K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

938 Royal St. A $215K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

835 Royal St. $349.5K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

617 Duphine St. $268K Spacious light filled condo. Great floor plan. Fabulous pool and courtyard. Being sold furnished. In the heart of the quarter.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

EAST NEW ORLEANS LARGE LOT (85X75)

4805 RHODES, $12,000 Robert Armstrong, French Quarter Realty, (504) 616-3615

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY Best Value in French Qtr

1020 ESPLANADE #103. Lovely 2 br, 2 ba condo, high ceil in den, sparkling pool, courtyd, fenced pkg. Private attached alley could be dog run. $339K. Lana Sackett, Gardner Realtors, 504352-4934. www.lanasackett.com

HISTORIC VICTORIAN

Renovated, 2 blocks from the Fr. Quarter. 4 bedrooms/4baths, 2 story with courtyard - FANTASTIC! Call Aimee with DEMAND REALTY at 319-0443 or 837-3000.

MID-CITY 3924 B CLEVELAND $160K

Restored 2 unit Creole cottage in Lwr Gard Dist. Walk to Magazine St. Nr CBD. 6BR/2BA, all elec, cen a/h, 2900 sf liv area, porch. 30x158 lot. John, 508-5799.

WESTBANK BUYING OR SELLING - CALL ME Barataria Waterfront Property Vacant Lot in English Turn Westbank Dwellings Call Cecelia, 583-2902, Gardner Realtors

ST. BERNARD PARISH 523 Angela, Old Arabi

3 blocks from Marigny. 10 Min from The Quarter. 110 year old home, fully restored, 1200 sq ft, 12’ ceil, orig hdwd flrs, 2 firepl, 2 BR, 2 BA, granite in kit $145K. 504-554-4800

R/E SERVICES HISTORIC HOME RECYCLERS

Find historic homes & facilitate purchase. Move historic homes whole or in pieces. Renovate historic homes, Demolish historic homes & resell lumber. www.hhrno.com Home Recyclers or New Orleans, LLC. Robert (504) 236-8069

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT PRICED TO SELL NOW

427 ARABELLA Unique sgl. architectually designed interior, 2-3 BR, 2 BA, 2000+ sq ft. Only $385K. 917 RACE Historical 1850’s gem. Beautiful stairway, orig pocket doors, L shaped yd, much more. Call for info. $350K 3655-57 TCHOUPITOULAS Ready to rent, nice dble, lg yd, new roof. $110K. Lois Landry Realty, 504-586-1019

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

CORPORATE RENTALS New Orleans Area (Metairie) 10 Min to Downtown N.O.

1 & 2 Br Apts, 1 Ba, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras From $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2200 Pasadena, Met. 504491-1591.

NEW ORLEANS RIVERFRONT

2 BR, 2.5 BA. Furn, healthclub, pool, parking. All util incl, wifi. Minimum 1 month. $3000/mo. Also 3 BR Penthouse $3800/mo. 781-608-6115.

GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2, 3 & 4 ROOM OFFICES STARTING AT $495 INCLUDING UTILITIES

CALL 899-RENT

JEFFERSON

OLD METAIRIE

NEAR OCHSNER

Beautiful 2 BR, 2 BA, large jacuzzi in master bath, high end appliances incl washer & dryer, pool. $1200/mo. 504-835-1577

METAIRIE ALL NEW - HIDDEN GEM

Renov’t - all new! - near Heart of Metairie. 1 bdrm + bonus room, from $795. Wtr pd., Rsvd pkg,1 car. No smoking/ pets 504-780-1706 orrislaneapts.com

FOR RENT OR SALE

2511 Metairie Lawn. 2BR/2BA, w/d, pool, security. Rent $950/mo. Sale $149,000. Call 427-1087

FURNISHED 1 BRDM CONDO Great location, w/d, gated, nr Causeway & Veterans. $900/mo incls utils. Call 504-957-6456 or 504-838-9253

DOWNTOWN

METAIRIE TOWERS

1BR, 1-1/2 BA, pool. Elec & cable included, parking. 24 hr Concierge Service, Reduced to $880/mo 914882-1212.

Real nice 2 bdrms, carport, w/d hkkups, Sect. 8 OK. $800/month. Utilities pd. Nice patio. Call Eddie, (504) 481-1204

ESPLANADE RIDGE

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN 3324 DESOTO

1930 PAINTERS

Living room, large bedroom, tile bath, furnished kitchen. No pets. $850/ month + deposit. 504-494-0970

1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, no pets. $1050 mo. 432-7955.

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY 929A ST. PETER

1BR, 1BA, Furn Kit, Heat/Cool Unit, Ceiling Fan. Shared Ctyd. Non-Smoking. Lse. $875/mo; $875 dep. Owner Occupied Bldg. Seek neat, resp, long term tenant. (504) 296-7126 for appt

COMMERCIAL RENTALS LOW PRICED OFFICE

Central Met 2909 Division St. Approx 1385sf. $9/sf per yr + electric. Emily Kramer, Corporate Realty, 504-5815005. ekramer@corp-realty.com

MARRERO - WESTBANK

2273 Barataria Blvd. 900 sq ft office + half bath. 2 rms, prof’l mgmt. Easy free parking. Desks avail. $800/month. 781-608-6115

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE ELMWOOD CONDO

2/2, Appl inc. w&d, walk-in closets, pkng, priv. patio, pool, tennis crts. Earhart - 1 mile. No smokers. $1050, Glenn, 504-450-5634

FABULOUS RENOV 4BR/2BA

Quiet cul-de-sac, walk to levee, new hdwd/ceramic floors, surround snd, recess lighting, sec sys, great backyd & deck for entertaining. Pets OK. Lse. $1600/mo Sylvia 504-415-6501

THE FERNANDEZ HOUSE

927 DAUPHINE STREET $1,895,000 An excellent example of an early creole cottage set in a serene compound. Beautiful courtyard with mature plantings in a classic partere garden. Property consists of the main house, 4 income producing apartments and a large bonus space-- office, workshop, gym, etc. Parking for multiple cars. Great location.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 www.frenchquarterrealty.com 8309 Sycamore Street & 2214 Dante Street

Large executive sized home (5000 sq. ft.) on double lot with gourmet kitchen, chic master bath, huge den, 4 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, sutdio/game room/2nd den and an office plus a six (6) car garage and 3 bedroom/2 bath rental (great tenant at $1575 per month) on an adjacent property. Package Price $ 699,000 Sycamore house may be sold separately for $ 529,000

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226

Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

Off Canal & Carrollton. 2br/1ba, CA&H, hdwd flrs, crown molding, ss appliances. Washer/Dryer/Fridge included. (504) 559-1993

2123-25 LAUREL ST $270K

65


CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE OFF STREET PARKING

1713 BURGUNDY, 1 bd/1 ba, furn kit, all elec, ac, carpet, wtr pd. 1 yr lse. No pets. $750 + dep. 949-5518

GENTILLY Beautiful New Renovation

3838 Havana Place. 2 BR, quiet neighborhood, cent air & heat, alarm. granite counters in kit, fenced yd. $1025/mo. Call 504-430-1164

LAKEFRONT LARGE ATTRACTIVE APT

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beautiful courtyard setting w/swimming pool, quiet neighborhood. $850/mo. 504-495-6044 or 504-756-7347

MID CITY

1508 CARONDELET ST- 2 APTS

Studio, newly remodeled kit & ba, hdwd flrs. $750 mo. Huge 2 BR Apt. Bright, spacious,, high ceilings, hdwd flrs, $1100 Both have Cent a/h, laundry facility avail 24 hrs. Walk 1 blk to St. Charles St Car, easy access to I-10, CBD & FQ. No pets/No smokers. 1-888-239-6566. mballier@yahoo.com

SMALL OFFICE SPACE

MID CITY - Offstreet parking for one vehicle. Separate entrance. Available Now. Contact Jane, (504) 482-5292

UNIVERSITY AREA 4 BLKS FROM TULANE

5512 Cucullu. Newly renov 2 br 1 ba, lr, din rm, kit w appl w\/d hkups, cent a/h, offst pking, hdwd flors. $1000/ mo. 504-874-4330

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1205 ST CHARLES/$1075

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. Avail 2/1. 985-871-4324, 504-442-0573.

3222 Napoleon Rooms For Rent

Spacious house, 4 large private bedrooms. Large equipped kitchen, 3 baths, dining room, front porch. Central heat & air $625 each includes all utilities & internet, cable & laundry facilities. No Pets + Deposit 504-376-4676. Grad students welcome.

4130 PRYTANIA

1 BR, 2nd flr apt, walk-in closet, hi ceil, a/c, ceil fans, w/d, hdwd flrs. $800/ mo. No pets. MUST SEE! 908-9350, Remax RE Partners 504-888-9900

8309-11 BELFAST

ST. CHARLES AVE & 6TH

Remodeled, on street car line in Garden District. 1 br, 1 ba, liv rm, kit w/ appl, offst pkg, coin operated w/d. $675/mo. 504-874-4330

Cool Carrollton Double Only $69,000

OLD NEW ORLEANS CHARM

1 BR 1 BA Condo. Completely renovated, High ceil, hardwood flrs. 754 Louisiana, Close to Magazine & shopping. 700 sq ft, $1400/mo. Lease. 504-214-7215

GOOD LOCATION CLOSE TO STREETCAR, 2 BR/side, off st.pkng,NEW ROOF, PARTIALLY RENOVATED! Should rent for $1800/mo. Great for investor or owner occupant. GARDNER REALTORS. CALL LOUIS@ 874-3195

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

66

gambit EMPLOYMENT SECTION

Call 483-3100 or fax at 483-3153

‘96 CHEVROLET CORSICA

Great Cond! 44k mi. $3,000 OBO 504-885-5290

‘03 BUICK CENTURY

Beautiful! 38k mi. $6,900 OBO 504-885-5290

‘04 CHEVY MONTE CARLO With Sunroof $6995 504-368-5640

‘10 CHEVY COBALT LT $10,995 Several To Choose From! 504-368-5640

2002 CROWN VICTORIA

Car has roomy leather interior, powerful engine, showroom quality paint job & keyless entry. For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

2003 CHEVY IMPALA

Sleek black paint job! Comfortable, clean interior, fantastic sound system. For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

2007 PT CRUISER

Low miles, flawless exterior, roomy interior with cd payer. For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

‘06 BMW 325 Ci Low miles $17,900 504-368-5640

Furnished Condo in Warehouse District. Secure building, top floor, end unit. Rent includes utilities, pool, gym, cable, internet. Apt has W/D, stainless steel appliances, central heat/air. Central to to French Quarter, West Bank, Uptown, parade route, streetcar. Loft with desk. Available 11/1. Call Bonnie at Soniat Realty, 504-488-8988. $1600, negotiable.

$14,995 Several to Choose From! 504-368-5640

PENTHOUSE LOFT

‘10 KIA OPTIMA

Gorgeous penthouse condo on top floor, unbeateable spot in the Arts and Warehouse dist. 2b-2b, Exquisitely furnished, located in a luxurious building, with amenities including : Gym, inground pool, events room, covered garage and 24 security/surveillance. Walk to world class shops,restaurants, night life. Breathtaking views of New Orleans from huge outdoor terrace... a must live in! $4500.00/month Corporative leases are welcome. manageronellc@gmail.com 504-275-7772

Consider the alternative ...

DOMESTIC AUTOS

IMPORTED AUTOS Furnished 1 Bedroom—1 Bath

NEED HELP?

AUTOMOTIVE

‘09 ACURA TSX $20,995 Call 504-368-5640

‘10 HONDA CIVIC

$11,995 504-368-5640

‘10 VOLVO S40 $17,995 504-368-5640

2000 ACURA 3.2 TL

Comfortable leather interior, cd player with amazing sound system, auto transmission & a great low price! For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

2001 TOYOTA CAMRY

Reliable vehicle with new wheels & tires, interior & interior in great condition, clean engine. For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

®

‘94 LEXUS

Features showroom paint job, leather interior & custom rims. Perfect condiition For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

TRUCKS 1991 NAVSTAR INTERNATIONAL

Strong flatbed truck, international commercial vehicle. Showroom paint job on front cab. For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

2001 F-150

Stick shift trans, V8 engine, sturdy XL cab, leather interior. For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

‘08 VW TOURAG V8 $22,995 Call 504-368-5640

‘09 HONDA PILOT EX $19,995 504-368-5640

MISCELLANEOUS 1996 FREIGHTLINER SEMI

Low miles for commercial vehicle, chromed stacks on cab, double bedded interior cab, new front tires, 500hp motor, 10 speed Detroit engine. For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT COUNSELING/THERAPY ALTERNATE CHOICES

Suffering from Alcohol/Substance Abuse, Anxiety or Depression that may be related to the upcoming holidays? Contact us about our programs/ services that may begin a New path for you & your family. 504-888-8600 www.newfreedom.info

HEALING ARTS BODY & FOOT MASSAGE Open 7 days - 10am-10pm Jasmine Health Spa 614 Causeway, Metairie 504-273-7676 Chnese Health Spa 2424 Williams Blvd Suite S Kenner - 504-305-5177

HEALTH/FITNESS $49/MO BOOTCAMPS

& Weight Management Program Enroll now for January Classes Bonnebal Boat Launch & Park 994-3822 - www.trainertogonola.com

LICENSED MASSAGE A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown) Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Thanks to my past, present & future clients for your patronage and for using massage as part of your health regimen. Call Matteo. LA 0022, for your next appt. Metairie area. 504832-0945.

QUIET WESTBANK LOC

Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123.

STRESS? PAIN?

Relax with a massage. Amazing Hands by Patrick. LMT Lic 4005. 504-717-2577 www.amazinghands.us

YOGA/MEDITATION/PILATES AUDUBON YOGA STUDIO Ivengar Yoga, Level 1 - 3 Free classes for new students Jan 7-13 - 511 Octavia St. 504-821-9885 www.audubonyoga.com

MERCHANDISE

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES ‘07 VOLVO XC 90 7 Passenger $18,900 504-368-5640

Size 8. Great Looking! Paid over $600. Sell for $100. Call 504-833-2478

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

SPA EQUIPMENT END OF YEAR CLEARANCE!

HOT TUB, WAS $7200, NOW $2996. 1 ONLY! Call (504) 888-6152.

SPORTS EQUIPMENT SKI JUMPSUIT - NLS

Size 8. Great Looking! Paid over $600. Sell for $100. Call 504-833-2478

BYWATER BODYWORKS

2006 SILVERADO

New 20” wheels, new tires, wonderful interior & low miles. For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

CLOTHING SKI JUMPSUIT, NILS

PETS

LOST/FOUND PETS Looking for Benji

My neighbors found this dog in Luling Wednesday night (11/2) & brought him to Old Metairie because they thought he was lost. My neighbor put him in their shed, but he apparently got out overnight (on Aris between Canal Street & Metairie Road). The rightful owner in Luling was located Thursday morning. The dog is 16 years old! Tan & white; red collar & cataracts in each eye. Please call (504) 256-6553 if you have seen him. This is so heartbreaking!!! Thank you.

Calico Cat - REWARD

Missing since 12/24/2011 Mylee Adams - I’m very loved and missed by my family. Mylee is a multi colored calico cat with a white neck and belly. Her front paws have been declawed. There is a $500 reward for her safe return. Any information please call 504-473- 4254, 504-231-9566 or 504-919-4264. She went missing from the Westgate Subdivision. The circumference is between West Napolean, Veterans, Roosevelt, and David Dr.

REWARD!

LOST TEACUP CHIHUAHUA from Stall Dr in Harvey, Sat, Dec, 17. She is mostly black, with brown & white patches. She is very small (2-3 lbs) but chubby. VERY friendly. Answers to “Etta”. Call Ray 504-261-0364

BLDG. MATERIALS MORGAN BLDG

1 only! $995 Won’t last! Call 504-888-6152

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100


EMPLOYMENT

CLASSIFIEDS PET ADOPTIONS

REWARD- LOST

(Mid City but could be anywhere by now),Ozzie, male, brown/black stripe (brindle), pit mix, sweet, call him & he will come, hold him &call me asap, Traci 504-975-5971.

Nikolai- short hair Tabby

sweet cat, deserves better than w/ he was given. thrown out of a car- all recovered now SUPER sweet Tracitbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

LEGAL NOTICES ORDER OF PUBLICATION No. CH-11-2000-1 IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF SHELBY COUNTY, TENNESSEE IN THE MATTER OF: JALIYAA JADYN DECAY (DOB: July 24, 2011), A Minor, LIFE CHOICES OF MEMPHIS, INC., Petitioner,

CHARLES PARKER and ANY UNKNOWN FATHER, Respondents. It appearing from the sworn petition for termination of parental rights filed in this cause, that the whereabouts of the Respondents, Charles Parker and Any Unknown Father, are unknown and cannot be ascertained upon diligent inquiry. It further appearing that Respondent Charles Parker is a 36-year-old African American man with black hair and brown eyes. It further appearing that conception occurred in New Orleans, Louisiana. It is therefore ordered that Respondents, Charles Parker and Any Unknown Father, make their appearance herein at the Chancery Court of Shelby County, Tennessee, 140 Adams Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee on Friday, the 17th day of February, 2012, at 9:00 a.m. and answer petitioner’s petition for termination of parental rights or the same will be taken for confessed as to Respondents and this cause proceeded with ex parte, and that a copy of this order be published once a week for four consecutive weeks in the Gambit of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana.

This 8th day of December, 2011. CHANCERY COURT OF SHELBY COUNTY s/ Amy Mitchell

Kevin W. Weaver WEAVER & CRAIG, P.C. Attorneys for Petitioner 51 Germantown Court, Suite 112 Cordova, Tennessee 38018 Publish: 12/13/11, 12/20/11, 12/27/11, and 1/3/12. (901) 757-1700

TAX SERVICES

TAX SERVICE A GUAR

Very sweet Stafford, home or foster. Very, very sweet boy, help asap to get him out of small confinement. tbkestler@cox.net

Terrier mx needs a loving & caring home

Jojo- shots current, sweet as can be, snuggler, great w/ kids/cats/chickens contact Traci- tbkestler@cox.net 504975-5971

IF YOU HAVE KIDS WE GUARANTEE YOU WILL GET A REFUND

HOME SERVICES Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

D-Bar Ranch, Katy, TX has 2 positions for seed & rice production; 3 mos. experience required for job duties listed: must able to obtain clean U.S. driver license in 3 mo. following hire; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $10.00/hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 2/01/12 - 12/01/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX6175656.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Honls Bees, Lovelady, TX has 4 positions for bees & honey; 3 mos. experience required as a beekeeper with references, may not have bee, pollen or honey related allergies; must able to obtain clean U.S. driver’s license in 30 days following hire; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $10.57 - $10.62/hr depending on location; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 01/20/12 - 11/20/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX6174443.

VOLUNTEER

in Riverwalk looking for someone who is personable and enjoys workilng with the public! This job requires you to make samples of our recipe and interact with customers in front of store. Must work weekends. We will pay for parking. Email us if yio are interested in an application or for further detils: crescentcitycooks@att.net

WE ARE GROWING!

Culinary Store/Cooking School in the Riverwalk looking for enthusiastic retail sales person who has basic knowledge about New Orleans cooking. Must be able to work Saturday and Sunday. We will pay for parking. Email us if you are interested in an application or for further details: crescentcitycooks@att.net

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR

GULF STATES AIR

Service & Sales 3 TON A/C Condenser & Installed $1499 5 Year Warranty Service Calls only $79.50 Gulf States Air (504) 304-0443

WIT’S INN

SUPERIOR AIRE

Bar & Pizza Kitchen

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE

Apply in person Mon-Fri,1-5pm 141 N. Carrollton Ave.

Trane 3 Ton Replacement System $3890 Installed Expires 1/31/12 504-465-0688 Air Conditioning Heating

Pizza Maker & Bartender w/ food experience

DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

The Cracked Pot Garden Center

Upscale Wine Bar & Restaurant Now Hiring:

2 mi west of Airport on Airline Hwy 504-466-8813 Fall Landscaping Clean Up Special Free Estimates

All FOH Positions

PEST CONTROL

Exp. Servers & Bartenders

DELUXE PEST CONTROL

Commercial & Residential Celebrating 50 yrs in New Orleans Great Rates & Service. 504-837-5800 www.deluxepestcontrol.com

Please send inquiries & resume to: chefjason@bouchenola.com

PLUMBING ROOTER MAN

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. KennerJefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-6520084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

EDITING WORLD’S BEST WRITING HELP

RESEARCH PAPERS - FICTION ESSAYS 452-3697 or ROBERBRIDE@LIVE.COM

LEGAL SERVICES NEED A NOTARY NOW?

Tel: 888-644-2467

RETAIL CULINARY STORE/ COOKING SCHOOL

AIR COND/HEATING

PROFESSIONAL

W-2 SELF-EMPLOYED BUSINESS ETC ...

FARM LABOR TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

SCHOENFELD LAW CORPORATION 24-hr mobile notary services. Successions, Wills, Power of Attorney, etc, We’ll come to you! 504-416-2489

NEW YEAR — NEW TALENT!!!

OMNI ROYAL ORLEANS & THE RIB ROOM ARE LOOKING FOR HOSPITALITY PROFESSIONALS!

SERVERS • SERVER ATTENDANTS BARTENDERS • COOKS HOSTS/HOSTESSES FRONT DESK – ASST. MANAGER & GUEST SERV. AGENTS LEAD COORDINATOR IN SALES Apply online at www.omnihotels.com Or in person Mon. or Tuesday from 9am to 12pm Corner of Charters and St. Louis Fax resumes to 504-529-7029 EOE DRUG FREE WORKPLACE

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

baby momma D! NTEE

SOCO - URGENT!

SERVICES

vs.

By:

Buddy boy Catahoula mix

m all med. done & house broken sweet & good w/ other dogs Loves to play w/ toys. Best in home w/no small kids. contact cindy foxcfox@cox.net 504-451-9335

67


CLASSIFIEDS PUZZLE PAGE COOL, CONVENIENT CONDO

JOHN SCHAFF CRS

(c) 504.343.6683 (O) 504.895.4663

3222 Coliseum 4941 St. Charles 2721 St. Charles 5528 Hurst 1750 St. Charles 1750 St. Charles 20 Anjou 1544 Camp 3915 St. Charles 1544 Camp 1544 Camp 1224 St. Charles 2721 St. Charles

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > january 03 > 2012

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 66

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TOO LATE! ..............................$2,495,000 Grand Mansion.......................$2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) ............$1,579,000 TOO LATE! ..............................$1,300,000 TOO LATE! ................................ $429,000 Commercial ............................. $349,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) ................ $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) ................. $239,000 TOO LATE!................................. $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) ............................ $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) ............................ $149,000 (Only 6 Left!)...............starting at $79,000 (efficiency condo)..................... $169,000

BUY AND BUILD

4850 MAGAZINE

2105 VALENCE

Newly renovated 1bdrm, 1 ba, open floor plan. Beautiful original hardwood floors, 12 ft ceilings, updated kitchen - everything new! Hardwood floors. On a quiet block of Magazine, close to everything. EASY TO PARK. $145,000

UPTOWN LOT ZONED FOR DOUBLE. Residential block, build a single or double, for owner occupied or investment piece. Close to St Charles & Napoleon. Walk to parades. Close to Freret St which has many new renovations and businesses. $42,000

(504) 895-4663



Gambit: Jan. 3, 2012