Issuu on Google+

INSIDE: THE FIGHT OVER “PERSONHOOD” PAGE 15 | NEW ORLEANS FRINGE FEST PAGE 41

BEST

OF NEW ORLEANS

G A M B I T > V O L U M E 3 2 > N U M B E R 4 6 > N O V E M B E R 15 > 2 011

.COM

FILES UNACCOUNTED FOR. CONTRACTS NOT ONLINE. LACK OF TRANSPARENCY.

CITY HALL’S CONTRACT MESS. BY CHARLES MALDONADO

>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>> > <<<<<<<<< >>>>>>> > <<<<<<<

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>

contents <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>

CHECK IT OUT

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 3923 BIENVILLE ST., NEW ORLEANS, L A 70119 < < < < <(504) < < <486-5900 <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > >OPERATING > > > > > HOURS > > > >: 8:30 > > A.M. > > >TO>5>:30> P.M. > MON.-FRI. PUBLISHER

MARGO DUBOS

Sweet NOLA Cupcakes Cupcakes, Birthday Cakes,

NOVEMBER 15, 2011 · VOLUME 32 · NUMBER 46

> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >ADMINISTRATIVE > > > > > > > > DIRECTOR > > > > > >MARK > > >KARCHER > < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < NEWS&VIEWS <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >EDITORIAL > > > > > > > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3116 | response@gambitweekly.com Cover Story 21 <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< While the City Council works to finalize a 2012 > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > municipal > > > > > > budget, > > > > >New > > >Orleans > > > > >still > > doesn’t > > > > > > > > > > > >EDITOR > > > > KEVIN > > > >ALLMAN >>> MANAGING EDITOR KANDACE POWER GRAVES seem to have a centralized list of municipal POLITICAL EDITOR CLANCY DUBOS contracts — despite all the city’s talk of ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR WILL COVIELLO transparency SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR MISSY WILKINSON

8

News

• A new 10-year study aims to track the health 9 of Gulf Coast residents exposed to oil • The people for — and against — 15 Mississippi’s “Personhood Initiative”

15

Bouquets & Brickbats

This week’s heroes and zeroes

9

Scuttlebutt

9

From their lips to your ears

Clancy DuBos / Politics Ideology over reality

Gifts For Him

29

Shoptalk

37

How to make your fellow happy

Attiki Bar & Grill

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

FALL FLAVORS

A&E News

41

Gambit Picks

41

The New Orleans Fringe Fest arrives

39

Best bets for your busy week

Cuisine

Review: Fat Hen Grocery 5 in Five: Five great lamb dishes Wine of the Week Scuttlebites

The Puzzle Page

5725 Magazine Street

67 67 67 69 86

MUSIC LISTINGS

PREVIEW: Lykke Li

504.302.1455

FILM LISTINGS

AMPLE PARKING ON THE CORNER & IN REAR OF STORE

REVIEW: Hausu

ART LISTINGS

PREVIEW: ARTDOCS benefit art auction REVIEW: Nick Cave and Joyce Scott

STAGE LISTINGS

67

REVIEW: Red

EVENTS LISTINGS

PREVIEW: Remembering Eric “Cashus” Clay PREVIEW: Angola to Zydeco booksigning

45

47

51 51 53 55 56 59 59

61 61 62

CLASSIFIEDS

Oxford Heels

FRENCH QUARTER 526 ROYAL ST. 569-0005

Mon-Sat 10-6 | Thurs 10-7 | Sun 12:30-5 F EE TF IR S T S TO R E S. COM

Market Place Employment Mind / Body / Spirit Weekly Tails Real Estate / Rentals Home and Garden COVER DESIGN BY BRITT BENOIT

STAFF WRITERS ALEX WOODWARD, CHARLES MALDONADO EDITORIAL ASSISTANT LAUREN LABORDE listingsedit@gambitweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JEREMY ALFORD, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, RED COTTON, ALEJANDRO DE LOS RIOS, MEG FARRIS, BRENDA MAITLAND, IAN McNULTY, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS, DALT WONK CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER CHERYL GERBER INTERN ALEXANDRA PENCE

PRODUCTION >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

DORA SISON

SPECIAL PROJECTS DESIGNER SHERIE DELACROIX-ALFARO

WEB & CLASSIFIEDS DESIGNER MARIA BOUÉ GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LINDSAY WEISS, LYN BRANTLEY, BRITT BENOIT, MARK WAGUESPACK PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR GEORGIA DODGE DISPLAY ADVERTISING >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3159 | displayadv@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SANDY STEIN BRONDUM 483-3150 ········sandys@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING ADMINISTRATOR MICHELE SLONSKI 483-3140········micheles@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING COORDINATOR CHRISTIN JOHNSON 483-3138 ········christinj@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE JILL GIEGER 483-3131 ·········jillg@gambitweekly.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES JEFFREY PIZZO 483-3145 ········jeffp@gambitweekly.com LINDA LACHIN 483-3142 ········lindal@gambitweekly.com ABBY SHEFFIELD 483-3141·········abbys@gambitweekly.com AMY WENDEL 483-3146········amyw@gambitweekly.com MEGAN MICALE 483-3144········meganm@gambitweekly.com STACY GAUTREAU 483-3143 ········stacyg@gambitweekly.com INTERN JOSHUA DAVIS

GAMBITGUIDE

(corner of Nashville)

UPTOWN 4119 MAGAZINE ST. 899-6800

19

STYLE&SHOPPING

7901 Earhart Blvd. 504.309.7109

SHOE LUST HANDBAG ENVY

9

C’est What?

Gambit’s Web poll

Community Coffee Served Daily

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > NOVEMBER 15 > 2011

Blake Pontchartrain

The New Orleans know-it-all

Red Velvet · German Chocolate · Carrot · and more.

04

7

Our endorsements

and other sweet treats!

Pumpkin Seed Oil & Apple Orange Extra Virgin Oil & Star Date and more!

Commentary

78

79

80

80 81

87

MARKETING>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> MARKETING DIRECTOR

JEANNE EXNICIOS FOSTER

CLASSIFIEDS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 483-3100 FAX: 483-3153 | classadv@gambitweekly.com CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SHERRY SNYDER 483-3122 ········sherrys@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE CARRIE MICKEY 483-3121 ·········carriem@gambitweekly.com BUSINESS >>>>> billing inquiries: (504) 483-3135 CONTROLLER GARY DIGIOVANNI ASSISTANT CONTROLLER MAUREEN TREGRE CREDIT OFFICER MJ AVILES OPERATIONS & EVENTS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> OPERATIONS & EVENTS DIRECTOR LAURA CARROLL

OPERATIONS & EVENTS ASSISTANT RACHEL BARRIOS

Gambit Communications, Inc.

CHAIRMAN CLANCY DUBOS PRESIDENT & CEO MARGO DUBOS Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2011 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.

Meet Christina...

Christina attended St. Martin’s from Pre-Kindergarten until she graduated in 2011. Christina excelled in both visual and performing arts. Christina’s curriculum included Art I, Painting and Fibers Honors, Art III Honors and AP Studio Art. After submitting her transcripts along with her Three Dimensional Design portfolio, Christina was accepted at art schools around the country. Christina is studying Fashion Design at Parsons The New School for Design in New York City. Christina is St. Martin’s Episcopal School.

November Open House for Grades 6-12 Thursday, November 17th at 6:00pm

EDU CATI NG FOR LI FE 225 Green Acres Road Metairie, LA 70003-2484 (504) 733-0353 www.stmsaints.com

N AT 10A PE

M

O

St. Martin’s Episcopal School, a coed, early childhood through grade 12 independent school, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, disability, religion, national or ethnic origin.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

R FO

BLA GOLCK & HOM D E GA MES

COME SEE US SUN. NOV. 20TH

4 X PO-BOY WINNER! WE’RE MAKING HAPPY HOUR GRAND

4-6pm Monday - Friday · 2 for 1 Wells & Drafts at the Bar 575 Convention Center Blvd. | Fulton St. at Lafayette | Open 11am-til

06

504.520.8530 | grandislerestaurant.com | $3 Validated Parking in Harrah’s Self Parking Garage

commenTary

thinking out loud

Unfinished Business he vast majority of issues and elections on the ballot this year were resolved in the Oct. 22 primary. All statewide incumbents were reelected, as were most legislators. Voters approved three state constitutional amendments and rejected two others. But some unfinished business remains. A handful of local and regional elections require runoffs, and several new propositions are on the ballot this Saturday, Nov. 19. We urge all our readers to go to the polls this Saturday, and we make the following recommendations:

T

Jefferson Parish Council District 3: Mark Spears District 3 is the minority district on the Jefferson Parish Council, and this year it is an open seat thanks to term limits. In Saturday’s runoff, newcomer Mark Spears faces School Board member Cedric Floyd. Although only 31 years old, Spears, an attor-

Constitutional Amendment 1: Against Only one statewide issue is on the ballot this Saturday, a proposed amendment to the state Constitution to bar local and state governments from imposing any new tax or fee on immovable property. While wellintentioned, this amendment is unnecessary — and virtually without effect, because an existing property transfer fee in New Orleans is “grandfathered” in. The truth is, local and state governments already face extremely high political and legal barriers to imposing the kind of tax or fee to be

floor sweeper black maxi $68

clothes + accessories

We urge all our readers to go to the polls this Saturday.

7732 maple 865 . mon - sat 10-6

9625

REGISTER AT THE NOAC FOR THE 104TH ANNUAL

outlawed by this amendment. As a practical matter, the bar is already in place for new levies. We do not support higher real estate taxes or fees, but we also believe the constitution does not need to be further cluttered with feel-good placebos. New Orleans Charter Amendment: For Voters in New Orleans are asked to amend the City Charter to revise the makeup of the Public Belt Railroad Commission, which oversees the city-owned rail loop that services the port. At present, the commission consists of the mayor and 16 appointed members who serve 16-year terms. The proposed amendment would reduce the commission’s size to 10 members serving four-year terms and would allow non-New Orleans residents to serve on the commission. The amendment, which is tied to recently passed state legislation, is City Hall’s response to scandals that came to light last year along with a critical report by the legislative auditor. The amendment is a reasonable proposal for reining in a commission that needs to remain “unattached” while also becoming more accountable to the public.

TAD GORMLEY STADIUM, CITY PARK, NEW ORLEANS A Historic Race Benefiting Local Charities: Spina Bifida Association of Greater New Orleans and New Orleans City Park

Everything you want and more at the NOAC. For more on what we offer, call 525-2375 or visit us at 222 N. Rampart today. Free Parking.

www.neworleansathleticclub.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

BESE District 2: Kira Orange Jones This year’s races for the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE) have generated record levels of interest, which is always a good thing. The reason for the heightened interest is the fact that reforms that began almost 20 years ago are now starting to show real results — and people with vested interests in the Old Order are making a fervent bid to take back the system they broke. In BESE District 2, Kira Orange Jones is challenging the eight-year incumbent. She has won endorsements from across the political spectrum, including state Sens. Karen Carter Peterson, J.P. Morrell and Joel Chaisson, as well as U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu, Jefferson Parish President John Young and Mayor Mitch Landrieu. Jones, a former remedial student who went on to receive a master’s degree in education from Harvard, taught in Baton Rouge and later became Teach For America’s vice-president of New Site Development, partnering with community leaders to raise funds. While an advocate for charter schools, Jones is concerned about the rate at which special-education students and others with disciplinary problems have been expelled from or otherwise kept out of some local charters — a concern we share. Louella Givens, the incumbent, has criticized Jones for taking out-of-town donations from big contributors (including New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg), but at candidate forums, Givens has not presented a forward-thinking vision or new ideas for BESE — nor has she addressed a drunk-driving arrest earlier this year or an IRS lien filed against her for unpaid taxes. We believe Jones is the clear choice for this important position, which will help shape the future for many thousands of young people in southeast Louisiana.

ney, has impressed many with his varied resume and his familiarity with the issues, particularly code enforcement — which is a priority in a district plagued by blight. We join the Alliance for Good Government and many others in recommending Spears for this seat.

07

blake

Antiques & Interiors

wholesale to the public.

PONTCHARTRAIN™

NEW ORLEANS KNOW-IT-ALL

Questions for Blake: askblake@gambitweekly.com

over 12,000 square feet of european antiques.

& decorators alike 300 Jefferson Highway(A cr oss fr om Lowe’s) New Orleans 504.231.3397 www.dopantiques.com

HEY BLAKE, WHEN I VISITED NEW ORLEANS I STUMBLED UPON THE PIAZZA D’ITALIA DOWNTOWN. IT REALLY SURPRISED ME TO FIND SUCH A LOVELY ARCHITECTUR AL ODDITY ALMOST HIDDEN IN THE BUSINESS DISTRICT. WHAT IS/WAS THE PIAZZA D’ITALIA, AND IS IT EVER USED FOR ANYTHING? DANNITA HAWTHORNE Salt Lake City

FALL FLAVORS

Peach Streusel Pineapple Inside Out

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

Pecan Sweet Potato

08

Pumpkin Spice

3 LOCATIONS:

819 W. Esplanade Ave, Kenner 6233 S. Claiborne Ave, Uptown 800 Metairie Rd, Metairie

www.thekupcakefactory.com (504)464-8884

DEAR DANNITA, You say you were surprised upon finding the Piazza d’Italia and recognized it as a hidden treasure. That fulfills part of the architectural design team’s intention of mimicking Mediterranean “surprise plazas” that pop up along pedestrian paths like gems hidden within urban landscapes. (The plazas in the Mediterranean are usually filled with cafes and shops.) The plaza was completed in 1978 to commemorate the c o n tr ib u ti o ns Italian immigrants made to the city’s history and culture. It was designed by post-modernist architect Charles Moore and New Orleans architects Allen Eskew, Ronald Filson and Malcolm Heard, who were working for Perez Architects at the time. Moore’s concept included a public fountain shaped like the Italian peninsula, surrounded by colonnades, a clock tower and abstract representations of a campanile and Roman temple. In keeping with the surprise plaza concept, Moore placed the fountain in the center of a city block and designed access through a keyholeshaped opening toward Poydras Street or an arch in the clock tower at the corner of Commerce and Lafayette streets. The plaza incorporates vibrant colors in a bow to Italy. In the early 1970s the downtown area of New Orleans was falling on hard times. Then-mayor Moon Landrieu (Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s father) supported construction of the plaza as a way to encourage investment in the area, which was populated with abandoned buildings, port infrastructure, mid-19th century commercial row houses and industrial properties. Part

of the architectural plan for the area surrounding the plaza was to have a row of rehabilitated 19th century buildings facing Tchoupitoulas Street, mixed with new construction. The expected boon in development didn’t materialize (there was no public or private funding in place to move the plan forward) and the plaza soon fell into disrepair. Although the Piazza d’Italia opened to national acclaim and remains one of Moore’s most influential works, it quickly fell out of the public consciousness. Over time, a lack of maintenance earned it the description of “postmodern ruin.” The plaza sat decaying for years, until the Loews Hotel opened in 2003 and the hotel’s developers wanted to restore the Piazza d’Italia. They funded a million-dollar renovation, which was completed in

The Piazza d’Italia is a whimsical plaza constructed to commemorate Italian immigrants. Now it is a temporary home to a gold statue of Sophia Loren as part of Prospect.2. PHOTO BY KANDACE POWER GRAVES

2004. The city still owns the Piazza d’Italia and the public park is open to visitors during the day (although there is a metal fence around it), but the city leases the plaza to Loews, and the hotel takes care of maintenance and lighting at the park. The hotel’s lease allows it to use the plaza for private parties about 30 nights a year. The American Italian Renaissance Foundation Museum and Library is adjacent to the plaza. The foundation also is allowed to use the plaza for its events on designated dates. The plaza also is the site of public St. Joseph’s Day and Columbus Day celebrations and, through Jan. 29, 2012, a Prospect.2 art installation.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >MORE >> MORE NEWS SCUTTLEBUTT CLANCY DUBOS < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 15 13 19 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“Oops.” — Texas Gov. Rick Perry at the Nov. 10 GOP presidential debate, after he said he would cut three federal agencies, but couldn’t come up with the name of the third one. The clip was replayed endlessly on cable news shows. Perry has been endorsed by Gov. Bobby Jindal, who has stuck by his Lone Star counterpart even as Perry’s numbers have cratered after a series of disastrous debate performances.

Gulf Aid? A FEDERAL 10-YEAR STUDY WILL FOLLOW 55,000 GULF COAST RESIDENTS AND CLEANUP WORKERS FOLLOWING THE BP OIL DISASTER. HERE’S WHAT IT’S LOOKING FOR, AND HOW YOU CAN GET INVOLVED.

“Satan wins.” — Mississippi Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant, describing how the state would fall apart if voters rejected Initiative 26, which would confer the rights of personhood on human eggs at the moment of fertilization. The measure lost 58 percent to 42 percent on Nov. 8. That same night, Bryant was elected governor, succeeding fellow Republican Haley Barbour, who was term-limited.

BY ALE X WOODWARD

I

PERSONHOOD OF INTEREST

Contractors with the Deepwater Horizon response clean oil from a vessel of opportunity at a decontamination facility in Lafitte in October 2010. A new study aims to track the health of 55,000 people who worked on cleanup after the BP oil disaster.

The “Personhood Initiative” — which would have declared a fertilized egg to have all the rights of a human being (see story, p. 15) — may have been rejected by Mississippi voters on Nov. 8, but bestowing full human rights on ova is hardly a dead issue. The organization Personhood USA, the main force behind the ballot initiative, has outposts in all 50 states, including Louisiana. The group is circulating petitions addressed to “Louisiana lawmakers,” stressing “federal and judicial tyranny is at its apex,” and asserting, “By stripping personhood from the unborn, their right to life was revoked. … African slaves PAGE 13

PHOTO BY U.S. COAST GUARD PETTY OFFICER 3RD CLASS ANTHONY L. SOTO

are staying in touch with people.” That’s the goal now: recruiting. The team has trekked the four Gulf states (Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana) to meet with communities and their leaders to register participants. Those who take part likely be in for a years-long study with home visits, phone interviews and possibly other tests, like blood sampling. Agree to the home visits and you get a $50 gift card. Oil disaster-related health complaints aren’t anything new. Most recently they were the subject of a documentary (The Big Fix), and are a recurring nightmare illustrated in hundreds of lawsuits targeting BP and its claims administrators for denying coverage. Former

c'est what? DO YOU THINK BOBBY JINDAL WILL SERVE OUT HIS FULL SECOND TERM AS GOVERNOR?

49%

51%

yes

no

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

How much will you spend on the holidays this year?

PAGE 10

BoUQuets Jonathan Vilma

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

held his second annual “Saints Celebrity Server” event Nov. 7 at Morton’s the Steakhouse. Dinner guests had their meals served by one of the New Orleans Saints, and proceeds went to the Jonathan Vilma Foundation, which continues to provide aid to Haiti after the January 2010 earthquake. The quake killed 230,000 people and destroyed much of the country. Vilma’s family is from Haiti. This year’s event raised $201,077.

Happy Johnson,

the Hurricane Katrina first responder, AmeriCorps volunteer and founder of the charities Blanket New Orleans and Blanket Haiti, was invited to speak to 450 doctoral students at Virginia’s Walden University Nov. 12. Johnson has written a children’s book about disaster preparedness and soon will publish his second book, Ready to Rebuild: Leadership from a New Generation of Innovators.

Tony Perkins,

the head of the Family Research Council (FRC) and former Louisiana state representative, awarded Rep. Joe Walsh (R-Ill.) the FRC’s “True Blue” award, applauding Walsh’s “commitment to uphold the institutions of marriage and family.” Perkins surely knew — and overlooked — a July report showing Walsh owed $117,000 to his ex-wife and three children. Walsh’s ex-wife has sued him for the money.

Glenn Gross,

a former New Orleans police officer in the department’s information technology division, pleaded guilty Nov. 7 to four felony counts of malfeasance in office. While on the force, Gross wrote more than 200 phony tickets for seat belt violations while being paid with a federal grant for traffic safety. Gross was sentenced to five years’ probation. He left the force in early November.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

n case you missed last week’s announcement: BP and the Coast Guard are wrapping up their cleanup business on the Gulf Coast. “Shoreline cleanup” is more or less completed. Despite the oil disaster that wrought (and continues to wreak) havoc up and down the coast, authorities declared the Gulf is ready for the next phase: “restoration.” Fittingly, another phase of cleanup is underway, though not one directly linked to BP and its network of Gulf Coast operatives: A potentially decade-plus-long study of coastal residents’ and cleanup workers’ health began earlier this year, and last week, its chief researchers met with Louisiana coastal communities to get people on board. It’s aiming for 55,000 participants; so far study staff have conducted 5,000 phone interviews and completed 600 home exams. The Gulf Long-Term Follow-Up (GuLF) Study is a project under the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services — a federally backed, long-term project studying health implications of handling (and exposure to) oil, dispersants and other chemicals in the cleanup operations that began last year following the disaster at the Deepwater Horizon rig. “We hope to go more than 10 years,” says Dr. Dale Sandler, the lead investigator and chief of the NIEHS Epidemiology Branch. Ideally we would do this for 20 years. If we are interested in (finding) really long-term implications for cancer, or other chronic diseases that occur later in life, we do need to go there. What will determine whether we can do that is how successful we

09

NOW ON SALE!

4 easy Ways to Purchase Tickets! CLICK:

CALL:

Ticketmaster.com

800-982-ARTS

IN PERSON:

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

Mahalia Jackson Theater Box Office & all Ticketmaster Outlets GROUPS (15+): 504-287-0372

MARCH 14 – APRIL 15 MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER lionking.com Tickets subject to applicable service charges. Performance prices, dates, times and cast are subject to change without notice. Single-ticket purchases limited to 8 tickets per person. Other restrictions may apply. ©DISNEY

NEW ORLEANS / C M Y K WEEK ON 7.166"” XLAST 8.083”

ESTATE TREASURES

ADAMS STREET LOCATION! Come shop the SALE or help us pack up.

CONSIGNMENT FURNISHINGS

ING

fall into fromage!

CLOTHING

See ya next week at 4223 Magazine! 714 ADAMS STREET [504] 872-9230

10

88714 / JR. PAGE / THE GAMBIT RUN DATE: TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15

Open | Monday-Saturday 10-6 | Sunday 11-4

Time to entertain & artisan cheese is what your guests want. Order your platter ahead or come in to taste & create a custom selection. 5004 prytania st • 899-4737 www.stjamescheese.com

CCEPT Now AIG NMENTS CONS

VISIT OUR NEW STORE! ESTATE TREASURES, ETC 1320 VETERANS, METAIRIE 504.835.2299 2014 MAGAZINE ST 504.679.6600

news

views

page 9

cleanup workers point to rashes, respiratory problems, sores, headaches, nausea, seizures, blindness, bloody stools, bloody noses and a host of other symptoms related to chemical exposure. In April, Sandler told Gambit her study had only just begun recruiting. It was still a long way from getting 55,000 participants from its target pool of oil cleanup workers and coastal residents impacted (or not) by the disaster. Planning for the study began in February, and interviews began in the following months. The group held several community meetings last week in Lafourche, Terrebonne and Chauvin, as well as in Biloxi, Miss. In September, researchers met with Alabama cleanup workers in Orange Beach, Foley and Irvington. “The point is to spread the word about the study, encourage workers themselves to join the study, answer their questions,” Sandler says. “We’ve also been using it as an opportunity to hear what people care about. If there’s a way to make sure our study addresses what they’re interested in, we’ve added questions to our questionnaire. We’ve thought about additional groups of people who might be included in the study because they were working on the oil spill in some way we might not have known about.” In April, Sandler told Gambit the scope of the project could include “looking at respiratory effects and nonspecific complaints — dizziness and headaches,” but it’s also interested in the longer term, linking issues to chronic diseases and cancer. The problem, Sandler says, is sorting through the stories — who’s sick and who’s not. The results need to include the full scope of coastal workers, including both people with and without health issues. “It’s hard to know what to make of that and how to deal with it because we need the larger picture. How many other people walked into the Gulf and didn’t get a rash or get sick. These are things we have to pay attention to,” she says. “We are asking people in our study about their experience: Did they walk into the Gulf, what were they doing, were they standing in water, did they get rashes, did they get chemicals on their skin? If we get 55,000 people, we’ll have the power of numbers — a lot of people. And we’ll be able to make some sense of it.” Here’s how it works: People call a toll free number (800644-4853) and take part in a phone interview. Each caller is asked what he or she was doing at the time of the disaster, whether he or she had health problems attributed to the disaster, and how he or she is feeling now.

BOOK SIGNING

SPRAY-FOAM & BLOW-IN INSULATION

How to ParticiPate     The Gulf Long-Term Follow Up Study will follow oil disaster cleanup workers  for  a  decade,  measuring  health  issues  potentially  linked  to  the  disaster  and exposure to related chemicals.      “We’re interested in the everyday people who were out there cleaning up  the beaches, out on the water lending their boats and having their boats out  there,” says Dr. Dale Sandler, who leads the study.     To  participate  in  the  GuLF  Study,  call  (855)  644-4853  or  visit  the  website:  www.nihgulfstudy.org.

Sandler says a study of this size (and scope)  is  unprecedented.  Similar  impact  studies,  like  those  with  responders  to  the  World  Trade  Center  bombings  and  oil  cleanup  workers from spills in Spain, started years  following the event itself. The GuLF Study  began  in  early  2011.  Ideally,  she  says,  a  study  like  this  would  be  in  the  disaster  response  planning,  ready  to  go  immediately in the event of a disaster. “If there is a  standard response and protocol that says,  ‘Before you put someone on the field and  work, ask these five questions about their  health  and  get  a  urine  sample  or  blood  sample.’ Because it will be useful,” Sandler  says. “Researchers don’t want to get in the  way.  There  are  more important things  to  do than research at that time,” like getting  responders  out  of  immediate  harm  and  plugging a leaking well.      The  explosion  in  the  Gulf  happened  April 20, 2010 — the study has its legs in  Louisiana only now, more than a year after  the event. Can this process happen faster?     “Normally  it  takes  a  year  to  get  all  the  clearances you need, then design a study, 

get  it  scientifically  peer-reviewed,  go  to  an  institutional  review  board  to  review  the  ethics  of  what  you  want  to  do,  and  the safety — before you can even do the  first  call  telling  people  to  join  the  study,”  Sandler says.     So,  no  it  can’t  go  faster,  not  yet.  There  still is no standing group or agency to help  design  studies  and  implement  them  in  the event of a large disaster. “None of that  really exists,” Sandler says. “It takes effort  and money to sustain it. And we only have  limited dollars. You tend to deal with the  problem at hand.”     Sandler  admits  there  is  pressure  to  release data as it comes in. The group will  begin regularly publishing some information on its website next month, keeping  participants’  personal  information  confidential.  But  it  won’t  link  to  exposures  and health.      The study also includes help from organizations  working  with  impacted  residents and responders; community groups  and nonprofits forward information and  act  as  “people  on  the  ground,”  Sandler  says. Cynthia Klein, community outreach  coordinator for the study, says her group  is partnering with 70 organizations along  the  coast,  which  are  involved  with  planning and getting the word out to potential  study  candidates.  The  study  group  itself  includes  telephone  interviewers  working at a call center in North Carolina,  while teams of 40 to 50 home examiners  are  hired  from  the  communities  where  they’re working. “We’re trying to do this  confidentially  and  unbiased,  but  sometimes they may get a neighbor,” Sandler  says.  “We  work carefully  so that  doesn’t  happen.  …  We’ve  employed  people  right  out  of  this  community  who  are  trained  medical  assistants;  they’re  licensed  to  draw blood. They’re well-trained in what  to do when they get to someone’s home.  But they’re not doctors. They’re not there  to provide care.”     Advertisements  and  billboards  will  target  affected  communities.  “We  can  be  there  next  to  the  lawyer  billboards,”  Sandler  says,  referencing  the  billboards  along  Highway  90  and  elsewhere  featuring  bold-lettered  ads  for  legal  services  targeting cleanup workers. “Ours start the  same way.”

FREE ESTIMATES

$4,000 Incentives

504-255-5165

A New Orleans, LA Co. *credit cards accepted

WALTER ISSACSON

Discusses & Signs Steve Jobs

THURSDAY NOV 17 • 12-2PM Books must be purchased from Garden District Book Shop

2520 HARVARD AVE., SUITE 2B METAIRIE, LA 70001 • 504-454-3004 watkinsfootcenter.com

Weekend Appointments & House Calls Available

2727 PRYTANIA ST NEW ORLEANS 504-895-2266 WWW.GARDENDISTRICTBOOKSHOP.COM

811 Conti Street

504-523-8619

Mon-Sun 10am-6am www.erinrosebar.com

SIDEWALK SALE SAT. NOV. 19 • 11AM-5PM - MAGAZINE STREET ONLY -

Ford 300 Sat., Nov. 19 - 3pm Ford 400 Sun., Nov. 20 - 2pm

SERVICE INDUSTRY HI-LIFE SPECIALS Monday-Thursday • Midnight-4am

NEW ORLEANS

3115 MAGAZINE · 899-9555 9 24 ROYAL · 52 5-6211

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

    “A  general  illness  checklist,”  Sandler  says. “We collect information about their  other  jobs,  other  exposures  they  might  have.  (If  they’re  a)  smoker,  drinker,  they  have  another  job  cleaning  up  after  some  other disaster — we need to know so we  can interpret our results.”     A  home  exam  with  a  licensed  medical  care  professional  (not  a  doctor)  follows,  and  that  person  will  collect  additional  health information through mental health  and  diabetes  screenings,  blood  pressure  and  lung  health  checks  and  recommend  or help them find medical care or resources.  Every  six  months,  participants  will  be  called  to  update  health  information.  Smaller pockets of communities (especially in Louisiana) will undergo more extensive medical screenings and more detailed  respiratory and neurologic health studies,  led  by  a  doctor.  Home  visit  participants  also receive a $50 gift card.     Chemical  screenings  won’t  happen  immediately.  Instead,  Sandler  wants  to  know  “What  happens  when  you’re  exposed  for  a  month,  or  two  weeks,  or  some random amount when things blow  your way? … We think it’s worth asking.”

COLD HOME?

BATON ROUGE

711 JEFFERSON HW Y

11

scuttlebutt

page 9

life begins with fertilization, cloning or its functional equivalent, at which time every human has all legal and constitutional attributes and privileges of personhood.” Broun’s 2011 bill has 63 House co-sponsors, including three Louisiana representatives: Rodney Alexander, John Fleming and Steve Scalise. Broun did not respond to Gambit’s request for a statement on the failure of the Mississippi initiative, but he has said he will continue to introduce the “Sanctity of Human Life Act” as his first bill each Congressional session. — Kevin Allman

RAFApAloozA

State Rep. John LaBruzzo introduced a Louisiana version of the Personhood act last spring, but the measure never made it out of the House.

BywAteR ARt Venue Closes undeR peRmit pRessuRe

Trouser House executive director Emily Morrison announced Nov. 6 that the art venue would close at the end of the month. Her announcement came via the group’s website and in an email to the art space’s supporters. Trouser House, located at 4105 St. Claude Ave., opened in 2009 as a gallery and art space with an urban farm, and last week it hosted its final show, Salon des Refuses, which, Morrison notes with irony, is named after the rejected pieces of Parisian salons. Trouser House, among other Bywater and Marigny spaces, received an email from Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s Office of Cultural Economy in the wake of permitting problems at Bacchanal, the wine store that served food and hosted live music without city approval. The email

them in business,” said Scott Hutcheson, Landrieu’s adviser for cultural economy. “We will continue to work with Trouser House to assist in their efforts to find a suitable location.” — Alex Woodward

moRe BAd news FoR ARts: leH Hit witH Budget Cuts

In addition to zoning issues that impinge on art venues in rebounding neighborhoods, state budget cuts are hitting traditional arts powerhouses like the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities (LEH). Michael Sartisky, who serves as LEH’s executive director, recently noted that state support for the organization was “slashed by $1.5 million from its level in 2007-08.” The consequences were immediate: LEH has suspended its 2011-12 grant cycle. That means no money — as of Nov. 1 — for LEH programs such as Outreach, Public Humanities, Teacher Institutes for Advance Study, Documentary Film and Radio, and the Louisiana Publishing Initiative. “We remain fully committed to a sustained fight to reinstate an appropriate level of support from the state that will allow us to resume the funding of crucial programs to benefit communities and institutions across Louisiana,” Sartisky wrote in an email blast. “But without appropriate levels of state funding, this simply is not possible.” Sartisky noted that the cuts will hit LEH’s partner institutions hardest. “No films will be funded this year,” he wrote. “Funding for American Routes (a public radio program), which the LEH supported for more than a decade, is eliminated.” State support for LEH reached $2 million under former Govs. Mike Foster an Kathleen Blanco. Sartisky said that level of funding created an economic impact of $14 million a year and allowed LEH to serve needy communities that lacked the infrastructure to support high-end cultural programs in libraries, museums, schools and other institutions. — Clancy DuBos

corrections

In “You Know the Drill,” (Scuttlebutt, Nov. 1), we misidentified the president of the Louisiana Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association. Chris John is the president of that group. In “Forty Under Forty” (Nov. 1) we stated that Ryan Gootee helped Jesuit High School become the first school to reopen in Orleans Parish after Hurricane Katrina, opening the Monday after Thanksgiving. De La Salle High School says it was the first to open, in October 2005. Gambit regrets the errors.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

were denied their personhood and were therefore treated as property, bought, sold and bred as animals. Jews were not considered full persons, so their property could be confiscated and their people eliminated.” Louisiana personhood advocates lost one of their champions when state Rep. John LaBruzzo was defeated in last month’s primary. Last spring, LaBruzzo introduced the Louisiana Personhood Bill, which would have banned abortion outright in the state and almost certainly would have triggered a Supreme Court fight. In an appearance before the state House Health & Welfare Committee, LaBruzzo said, “It doesn’t matter if you’ve voted for every pro-life bill that’s come to this committee. This is the pro-life bill. … I think you’d be in a difficult situation if you voted against this bill and tried to convince everybody that you are ardently pro-life. And I would not want to be in that situation.” The committee approved LaBruzzo’s bill by a 10-2 vote, but the full House voted 65-30 to send it to the Appropriations Committee, effectively killing it for the session. Bills to confer the full rights of personhood on zygotes have been introduced on and off for nearly 20 years in the U.S. House of Representatives. The Sanctity of Life Act of 2005 was introduced by current presidential candidate and Texas GOP Congressman Ron Paul, but it didn’t make it out of committee. Paul also filed similar bills in 2007 and 2009. This year, the Congressional standardbearer for the personhood movement has been Congressman Paul Broun, R-Ga., a physician whose 2011 “Sanctity of Human Life Act” states: “Each human

When Rafael Delgadillo was shot last September in an attempted carjacking, the injuries suffered by the local peace activist spawned an anti-crime march in Mid-City near the site of the shooting. Now a new group called Responding Against Fear and Violence (RAFA-V) is holding a “RAFApalooza” fundraiser Nov. 17 at Bayou Beer Garden (326 N. Jefferson Davis Pkwy.). Fifty percent of the proceeds will go toward Delgadillo’s ongoing medical expenses and the other half to “an organization doing anti-violence work in New Orleans” (Delgadillo is set to announce which one that evening). The evening will feature food, a silent auction and art activities. NOPD Superintendent Ronal Serpas and Criminal Justice Commissioner James Carter will attend the fundraiser. Other supporters include New Orleans City Councilwomen Kristin Gisleson Palmer, Susan Guidry and Cynthia Hedge-Morrell along with dozens of partner groups, including evacuteer.org and Puentes New Orleans, two groups Delgadillo ardently supported. Tickets to the event are $20 and can be purchased at rafapalooza. eventbrite.com. — Allman

prompted area gallery owners to rush to City Hall to apply for appropriate permits, and “some got them,” Morrison said. But prior to that, in August, Morrison sent an email to city officials inviting them to a salon opening. He said they replied, asking to meet. City code enforcement officials have told Morrison that the building, which dates from 1840, needs to be brought up to current code standards, including Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accessibility and fire safety provisions. Morrison was given a checklist: level the building’s foundation, widen doorways several inches, install bathrooms and ramps, add exits through a neighbor’s parking lot, widen alleyways, install a gateway — a complete overhaul, Morrison says. The extensive makeover would require hiring an architect to perform a feasibility study, a licensed contractor to make the changes, and thousands of dollars. “‘Then maybe we’ll give you a permit,’” Morrison said, pretending to quote city officials. “How can something built 100 years ago get compliant up to this year?” Identity issues in Bywater and Marigny properties aren’t helping: There currently are no permits to cover what Trouser House does; Bacchanal’s offerings changed as it grew; the Esplanade Avenue art treehouse “moved” to St. Claude Avenue; and Plan B will move later this year after its relatively smooth eviction from the A.R.K., which is being renovated into luxury apartments. Bywater and Faubourg Marigny neighborhood associations voice support for the arts in their respective neighborhoods, but the city’s recent code enforcement campaigns are the rule. Morrison worries, “Is it possible in the Bywater anymore?” Trouser House’s mission statement defines the space as “a model of sustainability defined by community involvement and public education. As a catalyst for social change, Trouser House advocates food activism and contemporary art as vehicles for improving public health and personal well-being.” Exhibits were planned through May 2012 but now will have to find new exhibition spaces. The city, Morrison said, isn’t kicking out Trouser House tenants or closing its doors, but it can’t run as is without proper permits. City officials were “receptive,” Morrison said, and “to an extent encouraging.” She added that folks in the Landrieu administration are working for the arts and are willing to help as long as Trouser House moves. “We continue to work with cultural workers and businesses to help get the permits and licenses they need to keep

13

news

views

Planned Personhood The fighT To defeaT Mississippi’s “personhood iniTiaTive.” by valerie Wells, Jackson free press

EDITOR’S NOTE: On Nov. 8, Mississippi voters defeated the proposed “Personhood Initiative,” which would have declared that a fertilized egg has all the rights of a human being. Several days before, when polling declared no certain outcome to the vote, the Jackson Free Press ran this story about the people for and against “personhood” for fertilized ova.

A

Dr. Randall Hines, a fertilization specialist who practices in Flowood, Miss., treated

Atlee Breland’s infertility. He also spoke at the JSU town hall meeting. “In America and in most democratic countries, we train people in health care,” he said. “Those people invest time, money and energy in their training.” That’s exactly why people seek out trained health care providers, he said, so all the best options are on the table. Hines said Initiative 26 would interfere. “We will bring the government into the clinic and into the bedroom. When was the last time anybody here went to the Capitol for medical advice?” he asked the crowd. State legislators and attorneys — not trained doctors — would interpret what the proposed amendment means, Hines said. He gave the example of a fertilized egg that gets stuck in the fallopian tube instead of implanting itself in the wall of womb. That type of ectopic pregnancy would be called a “person” if this measure passes, even though that “person” would never be born, he said. “It can rupture and kill the woman,” Hines said, but under Initiative 26, if a woman comes to an emergency room suffering an ectopic pregnancy, doctors might not legally be able to help her. “When I go to an operating room and operate to save that woman, I’m committing homicide,” Hines said. “Approximately 20 percent of fertilized eggs result in children,” Hines added. “Most fertilized eggs do not become children. All fertilized eggs are not equal.” The proposed amendment would damage the sanctity of the doctor-patient relationship. “It’s a radical departure [from] the way we have become accustomed to practicing medicine,” Hines said. “We want to make decisions based on science, based on experience, based on published studies.”

Under Mississippi’s recently defeated Personhood amendment, this ovum would be only moments away from having all the legal rights of a human being. Hines said the amendment could affect the legality and accessibility of birth control, with things like Plan B, a morningafter emergency contraceptive, and intrauterine devices, which prevent a fertilized egg from implanting in the wall of the uterus, being declared illegal. Even some birth-control pills might be considered a threat to a fertilized egg. “So many medicines have so many mechanisms. It’s really complicated,” Hines said. “Birth control can affect implantation. It’s difficult science. I don’t think law is the place to sort that out.” Several health-profession organizations are opposed to Initiative 26, including the Mississippi State Medical Association, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Society of Reproductive Medicine. Bear Atwood, a lawyer with ACLU Mississippi, says a personhood amendment would force doctors to practice law. “Could miscarriage be investigated as homicide?” Atwood asked the crowd at the JSU town hall meeting. “Maybe.” That is the answer to almost every question the vague Initiative 26 brings to mind, she said. The trend is to charge women who have miscarriages with homicide, she said, citing a Florida example. Redefining the word “person” to include a fertilized egg would encourage prosecutors and politicians who already want to criminalize some miscarriages. “There is a drive to unfund Planned

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

tlee Breland picked up her three young children from preschool and drove home to Brandon, Miss. A self-employed computer programmer, Breland is able to adjust her day around her children. After she bathed the youngsters and put them to bed, Breland read yet another comment online about the Mississippi Supreme Court’s decision to allow the Personhood Initiative (MS 26) on the Nov. 8 ballot. It angered her. As a woman who became a mother because of in-vitro therapy, she was frustrated that people didn’t understand the initiative, which would legally redefine the word “person” to include fertilized eggs. “I’m going to stop it,” she told her husband. At 9 p.m. on a Friday just a little more than a month ago, she started the website parentsagainstms26.com. She started a political action committee and gave speeches, sometimes spending six hours a day in her car. She picks up and distributes yard signs and drives to Oxford and Biloxi to address rallies and brainstorm with other activists. Breland calls herself an unlikely activist. An attractive, thin blond with a sweet voice and pleasant smile, she isn’t poor or disadvantaged, but in-vitro fertilization (IVF) therapy is expensive. Part of her message is to erase the stigma attached to infertility. “I was an infertility patient,” Breland says. “It doesn’t go away; it doesn’t end. Infertility is more common than breast cancer. Everyone wears pink ribbons for breast cancer. Infertility is not shameful. It’s a disease, and I got medical treatment.” She tells anyone who will listen that the Yes on 26 supporters pushing the measure are not telling the whole story. The 21 words in the ballot initiative leave too much room for judges and legislators to make choices about what happens in women’s wombs, Breland says, and she doesn’t trust them. “Mississippi can’t draw up voting districts without federal government oversight,” she says. “How are we going to trust it to oversee medical treatment?”

The Personhood Initiative is short: “Should the term ‘person’ be defined to include every human being from the moment of fertilization, cloning, or the equivalent thereof?” That is how voters read it on the ballot. The secretary of state’s website says that if passed, the initiative would amend the Mississippi Constitution. “There are so many things we don’t know about this initiative,” Olga Osby told a packed amphitheater at Jackson State University (JSU) during a town-hall meeting Oct. 12. Osby, a professor of social work, went through a long list of things the initiative leaves unclear. • It makes no exceptions in cases of rape or incest, or for the life of the mother. • It could potentially outlaw in-vitro fertilization and birth control. • It could create criminal investigations into miscarriages. • It could affect congressional districts for voting or other population equations. Osby spoke about the unintended consequences of the simple wording, a common theme of Initiative 26 opponents. “Mississippi is the only state with a personhood measure on the ballot this year,” Osby said. “Similar propositions are planned in Florida, Montana and Ohio. Colorado faced it twice; both times, it died.” Osby, who is black, showed the crowd a picture of a billboard depicting a young, African-American girl. The billboard read, “The most dangerous place for an African American is the womb.” “The pro-life movement has started linking race to the issue of abortion,” Osby said. “I take it personally. We need to be careful. Race should not come into this. It’s dangerous living in Mississippi.” She gave the crowd some statistics why: Mississippi is 50th in infant mortality. In Mississippi, a child is abused or neglected every 60 minutes, a child dies before her first birthday every 19 hours, and a child dies from gunfire once a week. One in five Mississippi children lives in poverty. “Mississippi leads the nation in every negative health indication. We are 50th in quality of life for women,” Osby said. “We are all pro-life. Mississippi has a great deal to do to care for children.” Osby suggested that improving life for all Mississippi residents will lower the number of women forced to face difficult decisions about pregnancy. “26 does nothing to improve lives of children,” she said.

15

news

views

page 15

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

Parenthood and make birth control difficult to obtain,” she said. “Do we really want to ask young men and women to sneak across the border to get birth control?”

16

The Rev. Mark Anthony Williamson, pastor of New Hope Missionary Baptist Church, spoke briefly at the JSU town hall meeting. He said he was pro-life and opposes the Personhood amendment. He’s not the only spiritual leader against Initiative 26. Others include the Rev. Hope Morgan Ward, bishop of the Mississippi Conference of the United Methodist Church, and the Rev. Duncan M. Gray III, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Mississippi. Attendees at the JSU town-hall meeting wrote questions on index cards for the panel to answer. Most of the questions were practical economic concerns. Would a Personhood amendment mean that a father would have to start paying child support sooner? “Maybe,” Bear Atwood said. The farreaching implications could affect inheritance laws also. Atwood said even donating sperm would have ramifications. Citizenship would also require redefining. The questions kept coming. Would you have to get a Social Security number for your fertilized egg? Could you count your egg as a deduction on your tax return? “Now we get the IRS involved,” Atwood said. “You guys want to bring the IRS in your bedroom?” Atwood said there’s a reason why church and state for centuries have used one simple moment in time to define personhood. “Birth is a concrete moment,” she said. “They can put a time on it. They can put a place on it.” Dr. Paul Seago finds it absurd that under Initiative 26, a carcinoma could have the same rights as his teenage daughter. Seago, who practices gynecologic oncology in Jackson, spoke at a news conference Oct. 7 at the Capitol. He and Hines, the infertility physician who treated Atlee Breland, represented the group Mississippi Doctors Against 26. They called Initiative 26 a law of unintended consequences. “We as doctors will have to deal with these consequences,” Seago said. “This initiative is bad for the practice of medicine, bad for women’s health and bad for Mississippi families.” Seago said the measure could eliminate common birth control options. Supporters of the measure have said otherwise, suggesting an emotional overreaction from their political opponents. The doctors said identifying the moment of fertilization is not so simple. “We have no test to know exactly when this happens,” Seago said. “We also know that more than 40 percent

of the time, the fertilized egg will fail to develop past this early stage, even in optimal circumstances.” In-vitro options for infertile couples could be illegal under the amendment, Hines said. “Mississippians face some of the worst health outcomes in the nation,” he said. “Health care teams with best practices should decide what is best, not politicians and lawyers.” If Personhood became law, malpractice premiums would rise for Mississippi doctors because they could face criminal charges for providing the best care for individual patients, Hines argued. He also pointed out that the measure doesn’t allow pregnancy termination even in cases of rape and incest. Jonathan Will, an assistant professor and head of MC’s Bioethics and Health Law Center, moderated the symposium, “Exploring the Implications of Mississippi’s Personhood Initiative.” An embryologist explained the basic physiology of fertilization. Dr. Michael Tucker, who is an in-vitro fertilization pioneer and top expert, showed pictures of an incubator, a cell freezer and cryo tanks. He said 450 infertility clinics now operate in the United States. “Our business is to bring two gametes together,” he said. Of the 100 to 200 million sperm released, only 1 to 100 wind up in the fallopian tube. In-vitro fertilization doctors select the best quality sperm for the oocyte, or egg cell. He showed a short video clip of a glass micro needle poking an egg to place a single sperm in its cytoplasm. He called this the beginning of the initialization affect. The first day, the zygote forms. The second day, it becomes a four-cell entity. On the third day, it grows to eight cells and is only about 120 microns wide. That’s one-tenth of a millimeter, just less than the width of a strand of hair. Day four and five, the eight-cell entity becomes a morula. Then, sometime between the fifth and seventh day, the morula becomes the blastocyst. “We treat these microscopic entities with respect,” Tucker said. “For the first three days, the egg is running on its own maternal quest.” He said the sperm doesn’t do much except be there during these early stages. “The fertilization event is extremely extensive. It’s not a simple discrete moment in time,” he said. It takes 38 hours for the four-cell entity to emerge. It’s 50 hours of development before the sperm has any involvement. At 70 hours of development, the entity blossoms into segments like a soccer ball. On the fifth, sixth and seventh days, the inner cell mass starts to form. “Everything before this is pre-embryo,” Tucker said.

“It’s difficult to conceive of that entity as an individual.” Stephen Crampton, vice president of legal affairs and general counsel for Liberty Counsel, a national nonprofit policy group that opposes abortion rights, told the symposium that the use of terms is significant. “Definitions set the stage and set the tone,” he said. As an example he said others had coined the term “pre-embryo” to reduce the status of an unborn child, and he called the term “reproductive rights” a “loaded euphemism.” But to him, “personhood” is simple. “Personhood is nothing more than to return to a principle foundation stone,” he said. “There is a moment male and female chromosomes come together.” The principle of personhood “would not automatically outlaw abortion,” he said. Glenn Cohen, assistant professor of law at Harvard Law School, jumped in via Skype on a large screen near the panel of experts. “I’m going to call a spade a spade here,” Cohen interjected. “You really think it will have nothing to do with abortion?” Rebecca Kiessling, a Michigan attorney who identifies herself as “conceived in rape,” addressed the legal implications. She suggested all parties would have to wait out the courts as the Personhood Initiative went through the legal system. Caitlin Borgmann, a professor at City University of New York School of Law, challenged Kiessling and Crampton on their defense of Personhood. “I agree words are important,” she said. “If you support this ... wouldn’t you have to oppose all abortions?” She talked about the many kinds of birth control and in-vitro fertilization methods that, if Crampton and Kiessling took wording seriously, should also be outlawed. Kiessling argued that the proposed amendment is framework only. Borgmann and Cohen countered that the language is too ambiguous even for that. Fertilization, as Tucker explained it, is a week-long process that doesn’t happen in a single moment as an egg grows from zygote to blastocyst. “Which of the six things is it?” Cohen asked. “These are scientific definitions.” The moderator turned the panel to the observation that if passed, the personhood amendment would not be self-executing — it does not mandate any action. “A principle is non-self-executing,” he said. Mississippi has an existing statutory framework. The state Supreme Court could read the new amendment as applying to the entire code, and if that happened, Will said, it could possibly lead to the state closing in-vitro fertilization clinics. Kiessling accused him of “fearmongering.”

Borgmann returned to the initiative’s wording, positing that if you think fertilized eggs are persons, and you don’t want a woman to abuse a child, then it would follow you would want to prevent a pregnant woman from drinking and should promote the prosecution of pregnant women who act irresponsibly. You would also believe fertilization clinics should be closed since they can discard embryos, she added. Renee Whitley, a volunteer co-chairwoman of the national advocacy committee for RESOLVE: the National Infertility Association, a nonprofit organization, is a mother because of IVF therapy. “IVF patients, they are you and me, your neighbor, your daughter. It’s one in seven couples,” Whitley said. “It’s been 30 years since the first IVF cycle in Mississippi.” She reiterated what others had already said: The proposed amendment is not self-executing and will need regulating legislation. Crampton said a personhood amendment is not inherently inconsistent with legal IVF therapy. Mississippi law already protects the unborn child from intentional injuries, he said, citing statute 97-3-37 (Homicide; killing of an unborn child). “That statute wouldn’t apply any more” because the amendment would view a fertilized egg with the same rights of a person, said Amelia McGowan of ACLU Mississippi. Doctors in the state could face liability in numerous situations involving the presence of a potential fertilized egg, she warned. “Do we want to interfere in doctorpatient relationships?” McGowan asked. Other issues also could arise. Under the proposed amendment, a one-cell zygote is a person, when it could become one or two or three entities, Tucker, the fertility specialist said, explaining twins and triplets. “It shows a lack of appreciation for the continuum of growth. Splitting is a physical, mechanical act that has nothing do with genetics. The idea that genetics is destiny is horrific.” Cohen said there could be legal implications: “If an embryo becomes two persons, who was it? Sue or Sally? Who was the person?” He said legal complications would follow. “When you look at the scientific side of reproduction, you realize there is nothing simple about it,” Whitley said. “Is freezing allowed? What about embryos that develop (abnormally) in a dish?” She wondered if police would investigate doctors for manslaughter in such cases. “Do you need passports for embryos?” Tucker asked. Personhood is clearly a wedge issue that will tie up the Legislature and cost a lot of resources, he said. “Is this state prepared?”

DON’T OVERLOOK YOUR VISION BENEFITS. It’s tIme to use your annual eye care benefIts or rIsk losIng them at the end of the year. If you pay for vision insurance every month, it’s time to use your annual eye care benefits or risk losing them at the end of the year. So it’s a great time to stop by St. Charles Vision for your annual eye exam, discover new, unique eyewear, or get fitted with the most technologically advanced contact lenses available.

Call today to schedule an appointment.

UPTOWN 504.866.6311

METAIRIE 504. 887.2020

MANDEVILLE 985.626.8103

ELMWOOD 504.733.0406

CHATEAU 504.712.3551

WESTBANK 504.328.9733

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

www.stcharlesvision.com

18

clancy DUBOS

POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

When Ideology Trumps Reality ov. Bobby Jindal has once again sacrificed the well-being of Lou-isiana citizens on his ideological altar, this time ignoring the needs of at least 100,000 Louisiana residents. But it’s OK — they’re poor and don’t vote for him anyway. At issue is $80 million in federal grant money to bring some 900 miles of fiberoptic cable — and with it, broadband Internet service — to 21 rural, poor communities that private Internet providers refuse to serve because it’s not profitable. The same grant would also tie together schools, libraries, health care centers and homes in those underserved communities — along with colleges and universities in Louisiana and Mississippi. The tie-in to higher education is why the state Board of Regents, which oversees colleges and universities in Louisiana, initially applied for the grant from the U.S. Commerce Department. The grant was awarded early last year. The Jindal Administration took over the grant this year and essentially killed it,

G

although Commissioner of Administration Paul Rainwater claims that was not Team Jindal’s intent. That’s an open question. Rainwater recently told the state Public Service Commission that the Regents should not have applied for the grant because the government-run program would compete with private industry — the same private industry that refuses to serve the economically depressed areas that the program was designed to serve. What Team Jindal did was hijack the grant and insert private providers at the very end of the deal — the cheap end, in terms of cost outlay, and therefore the profitable end — and the Commerce Department balked. Under the guise of “public/private partnerships,” the administration’s plan involved leasing broadband use rights from local Internet providers instead of building new ones. There’s nothing at all wrong with public/private partnerships, mind you. Some of them work very well, in fact. And some have even been approved under the stimulus plan that produced the grant.

The trouble with Jindal’s plan is that it didn’t provide enough specifics to assure the feds that the network would be completed on time — and that it would actually accomplish what the grant was designed to accomplish. That’s not my conclusion; that’s what Commerce Department Assistant Secretary Lawrence Strickling said. “The Louisiana project, as originally submitted, promised great benefits to unserved and underserved areas of the state,” Strickling noted when the grant was rescinded. “However, after the state determined it was unable to implement the original project plan and fell significantly behind schedule, it proposed major modifications to its original proposal without adequate technical and financial details and a viable schedule for completing the project.” Rainwater and Commissioner of Higher Education Jim Purcell blame lawmakers and the private contractor hired for the project. They say lawmakers took too long to approve the grant work and the contractor caused repeated delays; the

contractor, GEC Inc., denies causing any delays and says it would have completed the job on schedule. Nonetheless, GEC was fired by Team Jindal, and now the whole project is dead. Rainwater also said that private companies complained about the initial approach taken by the Regents (under Purcell’s predecessor). When pressed on that point by Public Service Commissioner Foster Campbell, who represents some of the communities the grant would have served, Rainwater got to the heart of the matter: “We do not believe in state-run enterprise competing with private companies.” Campbell noted that most of the state’s largest providers signed letters in support of the grant. He then asked, “I represent one-half of north Louisiana, many of whom can’t get high-speed Internet, and you’re telling me we’re not getting it because you had a problem with it philosophically?” Yep. That’s what happens when ideology trumps reality.

WHAT IS THE DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING SERVICES ADVANTAGE? PROVIDING LOWER FEES THAN SOUTHSHORE (AND NORTHSHORE) HOSPITAL-OWNED IMAGING CENTERS!

Also save on: PET/CT | NUCLEAR MEDICINE | BREAST MRI | ULTRASOUND GUIDED BREAST BIOPSY | MAMMOGRAPHY | DEXA | ULTRASOUND | X-RAY & more

Saving patients money while providing high quality images for your doctor Call & Compare Prices – See for Yourself – It’s YOUR decision – It’s YOUR money Patient Financial Services: 504-459-3220 | Appointment Scheduling: 504-883-5999

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

RISE UP AGAINST EXCESSIVE HEALTH CARE IMAGING BILLS REDUCE YOUR OUT-OF-POCKET EXPENSES ON A MRI BENEFIT FROM VAST SAVINGS IF REQUIRING A CT SCAN

19

N E K O R B G N I P E E K D R O C RE CEN T HAVE A ’T N S E O STILL D . LE A N S R O ACCESS W E E E T, N ONLIN G G D IN U B IR W R EQ U 012 CIT Y 20 0 8 L A LIZE A 2 A A E IN F IT P O T S NADO W OR K S T S — DE C IL ALDO A C R M N T U N S O E C CO HARL HE CIT Y OF CIT Y BY C WHILE T

PAGE 22

D LIST

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

O

pen government has been one of Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s overarching themes since he took office in May 2010, and the mayor has said repeatedly that his tenure will signal a break from the city’s often-opaque past, which was marked by poor record-keeping and a lack of ready access to public records. In many areas, the current administration has indeed made city government less impervious to public inspection. In the area of city contracts, however, a lot more work remains to be done. Even some City Council members have griped recently that they cannot find information online about current city contracts. Earlier this year the Landrieu administration founded the Office of Performance and Accountability (OPA), headed by Oliver Wise and overseen by Deputy Mayor Andy Kopplin. Kopplin’s office has hired 10 new employees this year — and seen its budget increase by more than $3 million over last year — even as many other offices in city government saw hiring freezes. One quarter of OPA’s stated mission is “Foster[ing] transparency in how City government is performing.” Central to any transparent government is the timely, accurate and public accounting of how tax dollars are spent. City departments now report personnel and internal operating expenditures throughout the year — and in greater detail during city budget hearings. What don’t appear in those tallies, however, are details of city contracts: how much money is spent on services and materials, who vendors are, where the money comes from, or even the terms of the contracts themselves. The state Constitution and Louisiana Public Records Act require such information to be made available. Moreover, a 2008 city ordinance requires that all professional services contracts be posted on the city’s website. And a 2011 Kopplin policy memorandum requires that copies of all contracts — as well as all supporting documents — be kept in a centralized record-keeping system. Those laws and directives portend an intention to be transparent and open. In the area of contracts, the city has pledged to make them not only available upon request, but also easily viewable at all times via the website. A monthlong investigation by Gambit, however, found that hasn’t always been the case.

R ALIZE

21

COVER STORY ECRS (EGOV.CITYOFNO.COM/ECRS_CONVIEW), THE CITY’S OLD SYSTEM FOR POSTING CONTRACTS, WAS DEVELOPED UNDER THE NAGIN ADMINISTRATION AND NEVER WORKED PROPERLY.

THE CITY HAS BEEN POSTING NEWLY SIGNED CONTRACTS TO ITS NEW SYSTEM, BUYSPEED (WWW.PURCHASING.CITYOFNO.COM/BSO), SINCE SEPTEMBER.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

PAGE 21

22

Among our findings: • The city has been unable to produce a comprehensive list of all currently active contracts, including values, dates and descriptions. • The City Attorney’s Office, in theory the central record-keeper for city contracts, was unable to deliver any list, instead turning to the office of the mayor. • Though Gambit could identify only one missing contract that was initiated by Landrieu, we found many cases where the city’s two contracting websites are missing information on currently active and recently expired contracts, including professional service contracts signed before Landrieu took office. • Despite promises of more openness and transparency, the Landrieu Administration has no plans to fill in the gaps we found. Less than a week before Oct. 17, when Landrieu presented his proposed city budget for 2012, Gambit asked acting City Attorney Richard Cortizas for a list of all currently active contracts. We wanted to compare that list to what is posted on the city’s two contract sites: the Ray Nagin-era electronic contract routing system (ECRS) and the newer BuySpeed portal, which the city has licensed from a vendor, Periscope Holdings. Gambit sent a public records request Oct. 11 asking for a list of active contracts, including the date each was executed, the duration or term of each contract, names of vendors, names of purchasers, the name of each city department or component unit for which each contract was prepared, the dollar value of each contract and a description of the services or materials the city would receive from the contract. We received an initial response two days later, which technically complies with state law — and stands in stark contrast to the Nagin administration’s record on requests for public documents. However, City Hall’s first response merely acknowledged our request. We received a substantive response about a week later — but it still didn’t include all the information we sought. In particular, we were given a 56-page list of all contracts signed by the mayor since his term began in May 2010. That list did not contain dates, dollar amounts, or in most cases descriptions of the services or materi-

als provided. It also did not contain any information about contracts signed by Nagin that are still in effect. Included in that response was a comment by Assistant City Attorney Anita Curran, stating, “City contracts from approximately 2008 to present are available on the City’s website. … Please be advised, however, that the mayor’s office has provided us with additional records responsive to your request.” Landrieu’s press secretary Ryan Berni initially assured us that the list represented all active contracts. We later learned — and Berni subsequently admitted — that the list included only those agreements signed by Landrieu since May 2010, some of which had already expired. The involvement of the mayor’s office in responding to our public records request was somewhat unusual in that the City Attorney’s Office typically handles all public records requests. The City Attorney’s Office was budgeted $13 million and has 70 full-time employees this year. It’s also the official repository of all city contracts. Gambit’s requests for comment from Cortizas’ office were unanswered by press time. However, Berni says centralizing procurement record-keeping in the City Attorney’s Office is “certainly a goal” of the administration. The 56-page list provided by the city makes it difficult to crossreference online records because it contains few details about most contracts. For vendors that appear more than once on the printed list, or for vendors who only appear once on that list but more than once on either of the websites, it’s difficult if not impossible to tell which hard-copy item corresponds to which online item. Without a centralized, up-to-date list of all its current contracts, the city may be unable to accurately, in Landrieu’s words, “budget for outcomes.” “Most everything we do in City Hall is by department,” Berni explains. “The departments themselves manage their active contracts. But there’s various checks and balances, checks internally, between finance and purchasing and law and other places, to ensure that people who are getting paid are getting paid on an active contract or valid procurement.” A city audit for 2010, released in September, noted that the city PAGE 24

#5 - Gambit - 11/15/11

ADD SOME FUN TO YOUR SCHEDULE! THANKSGIVING BUFFET

BUFFET $35 Hours: 11 am - 6 pm Kids Buffet $15 Kid Craft Area Ample FREE Parking 111 Veterans Boulevard heritagegrillmetairie.com

Smoked Duck Gumbo • Boston Bibb Wedge Cavatappi Pasta with wild mushrooms & tasso cream Bourbon Glazed Berkshire Ham Crab Crusted Bronzed Snapper Free Range Herb Roasted Turkey Satsuma Cranberry Compote Neola’s Oyster Dressing • Praline Sweet Potatoes Fennel Roasted Acorn Squash Chorizo Brussels Sprouts • Broccoli with Garlic Pumpkin Tarts • Chocolate Hazelnut Cordials AND MORE!

Reservations

LONi LOvE

with JODi BORRELLO

934-4900

Friday, November 18 • 8pm

1st Course

Deviled Shrimp & Truffles • Creole Crap Dip Apple Cranberry Salad • Chilled Wedge Salad Oyster Artichoke Soup • Butternut Squash Soup

2nd Course

3 COURSE MENU Starting at $26

2700 Metairie Road www.cafeb.com

3rd Course

Lemon Ice Box Pie • Praline Bread Pudding Chocolate Bliss • Pumpkin Pie • Ice Cream & Sorbet

Reservations

934-4700

MiDNigHT STAR

Saturday, November 26 • 8pm

BETTER THAN EZRA Friday, December 30 • 8pm

THANKSGIVING BUFFET

BUFFET $47 Hours: 10:30 am - 9 pm Kids Mini-Buffet 12 & under $15 / 6 & under - FREE

Kids Craft Area Complimentary Gift!

115 Bourbon St. www.redfishgrill.com

Free Range Tanglewood Farms Turkey Honey Mustard Glazed Chisesi Ham Roasted Prime Rib & Garlic Pan Jus Fresh P&J Oysters • Shrimp Cocktail Luge Pepper Seared Tuna • Hot Smoked Salmon Roasted Duck & Andouille Gumbo Acorn Squash Soup & Caramel Chestnuts Blackened Redfish satsuma butter & crabmeat Shrimp & Corn Macque Choux Hot Sausage Stuffing • Oyster Stuffing Hickory Veggies • Artichoke Casserole Sweet Potato Casserole • Cauliflower Purée Chocolate Pecan Pie • Sweet Potato Pie Fruit Cobbler AND MUCH MORE!

Reservations

598-1200

Purchase tickets online at harrahs.com or call Ticketmaster at 1-800-745-3000.

Harrah’s reserves the right to change, cancel or amend entertainment at any time. Facebook is a registered trademark of Facebook, Inc. Twitter is a registered trademark of Twitter, Inc. Must be 21 or older to enter casino and to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® ©2011, Caesars License Company, LLC.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

Hours: 11 am - 6 pm Kids Menu Available FREE Valet Parking

Traditional Turkey Dinner Grilled Redfish & Wild Mushroom Confit Black Angus Filet Mignon Gulf Shrimp & Main Lobster Ravioli Slow Roasted Confit Duck Pot Pie Harris Ranch Hanger Steak & Garlic Frites

23

COVER STORY

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

PAGE 22

24

contract record-keeping system wasn’t centralized. It also found that city departments were not employing adequate procedures to make sure invoices were paid on time and recorded properly. The annual audit, which is required by state law, was done by the Baton Rouge accounting firm of Postlethwaite & Netterville (P&N) for the fiscal year 2010. The firm’s report represents an independent evaluation of the city’s financial reporting and accounting mechanisms. The report is due each year on June 30, but the city needed an extension this year, as it had for its 2009 report (due June 30, 2010). Along with the audit report, P&N filed two additional reports. One, the internal control in financial reporting letter, listed 13 formal findings. Those findings list the auditor’s concerns about the city’s bookkeeping procedures that constituted either actual noncompliance with uniform auditing standards or potentially serious weaknesses in the city’s ability to maintain accurate financial records. Major problem areas included concerns about City Hall’s ability to accurately report its accounts payable — which includes amounts due to vendors under current contracts. The firm also submitted a list of other observations — a list of problems that didn’t quite rise to the level of an actual “finding,” said P&N accountant Joey Richard at an Oct. 4 meeting of the City Council Budget Committee. (Richard did not respond to Gambit’s request for an interview for this story.) The first of those observations noted that, despite the CAO’s policy memorandum, the city doesn’t actually have a “centralized repository” for contracts. City auditors were unable to easily track down city contracts, Richard explained to the committee. “I know that you show CAO policy memorandum 122(R), that the city has a centralized recordkeeping system, or allegedly does, and the Law Department is responsible for bringing in every single contract and having them available in the Law Department,” District B City Councilwoman Stacy Head told the accountant. “No. 1, you’re saying that’s not accurate, that they actually don’t have every single contract, easy access. Is that fair to say?” “They do not,” Richard said. “There’s really no excuse in this day and age for not having them available electronically,” Head said. “I was trying to find a contract the other day, and I couldn’t find it. So I understand the frustration that the average constituent feels.” Taken together, is it possible that the concerns expressed by P&N mean City Hall’s checks and balances, as referenced by Berni, are inadequate? “I think that’s a stretch,” Berni says. Council President Jackie Clarkson, who chairs the Council Budget Committee, agreed with Head, recommending that Kopplin appear before the committee to address Head’s observation “because it could affect where we’re going with the budget.”

Kopplin agreed to appear, but the next Budget Committee meeting was later canceled. Budget hearings are now underway, and the council by law must adopt the 2012 city budget by Dec. 1. There is no deadline, however, for putting all current city contracts online, as promised. “Simpler is better for sure,” says Aaron Schneider, a professor of political science at Tulane University. “I would love all of the information that you or I could ask for on a spreadsheet or some kind of an interactive database like the one we’re building here.” Schneider and Tulane law professor David Marcello have spent the past 18 months learning precisely how shrouded New Orleans’ public finances can be. Their solution is the website New Orleans Satellite Government (nolasatellitegovernment.tulane.edu), which was designed as an easy-to-use repository of information about government and quasi-governmental entities. An example: The Audubon Area Security District had $81,000 in net assets as of its last audit, which it is required to report to the legislative auditor annually. The district generates its revenue from parcel fees not to exceed $500 a year. To qualify as a “satellite,” an entity must have been created by local or state law, have access to public funds, require a government agent or board appointee to operate or be regulated by public operations rules. Meeting any of those requirements ought to have meant that information about the entity is easy to find, but simply identifying the 150 on Schneider’s list took months, he says. Then Schneider and research assistant Adrienne Wheeler had to track down each satellite entity, contact them and file public information requests to gain access to their bylaws, board membership rosters and financial information. Many responded willingly. Some didn’t. Some did but couldn’t or wouldn’t provide basic information on their finances, he says. Others responded only after being contacted by Mike Sherman, a colleague of Schneider’s at Tulane and Landrieu’s recently appointed executive counsel. Schneider was happy to have Sherman’s help, but the idea of having to get a high-powered city official to shepherd his request disturbed him. “It shouldn’t require someone having personal contact with someone in the administration,” Schneider says. Even with that connection, some information is still missing. “I can tell you what I think,” Schneider says. “I don’t know that I can tell you what the city knows. I can tell you that I don’t know how much is going in or out. That was one of the curiosities I’ve had as far as building this database.” In 2008, the Nagin Administration built its own online electronic contract routing system, dubbed ECRS. ECRS had two components, the secure “back end,” where departments could draft and administer the entire contracting process from bid to mayoral signature, and the publicly accessible “front end,” where citizens could view signed contracts posted online. According to Landrieu PAGE 26

ACTING CITY ATTORNEY RICHARD CORTIZAS’ OFFICE IS THE OFFICIAL REPOSITORY OF ALL CITY CONTRACTS, BUT THE OFFICE WAS UNABLE TO PRODUCE A LIST OF ACTIVE CONTRACTS REQUESTED BY GAMBIT. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

#26 - Gambit - 11/15/11

THURSDAYS JAZZ R&B HAPPY HOUR 6pm – 9pm

11/17: Michael Baptiste 11/24: Tonia Powell 12/1: Naydja Cojoe 12/8: BRW 12/15: Angela Bell 12/22: Michael Baptiste 12/29: Real Love

MICHAEL BAPTISTE

FRIDAYS TOP 40 FRIDAYS 9pm – 11pm

11/18: Flow Tribe 11/25: Real Love 12/2: No Idea 12/9: The Wiseguys 12/16: Vieux Carré 12/23: Bucktown All-Stars 12/30: Four Unplugged

THE WISEGUYS

FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS 11PM

10PM

Mixing It Up with House Spin Masters

DJ ROB NICE

DJ HEKTIK

DJ SPIN

Plus The Ladies of Masquerade ®

SUNDAYS SUNDAY NIGHT DANCE PARTY 7pm – 11pm

DJ CAPTAIN CHARLES

NO COVER CHARGE • Half off bottle service Thursdays and Fridays in Ultra Lounge. • Free self parking with bottle service. • To reserve bottle service in Ultra Lounge, call 504.533.6139.

TAKE THE HASSLE OUT OF THE HOLIDAYS Book the entire restaurant for a Monday or Tuesday party or ask about catering available for pick-up. *minimum capacity required

PRESENTED BY

Harrah’s reserves the right to change, cancel, or amend entertainment at any time. Drinks specials are subject to availability and valid at Harrah’s New Orleans only. Facebook is a registered trademark of Facebook, Inc. Twitter is a registered trademark of Twitter, Inc. Must have valid ID and Total Rewards® card. Subject to availability. Harrah’s reserves the right to change, cancel, or amend this promotion at any time. Additional restrictions may apply. Valid at Harrah’s New Orleans only. Must be 21 or older to enter casino and to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2011, Caesars License Company, LLC.

wednesday–sunday > lunch + dinner • saturday > dinner only closed monday + tuesday • dine in + carry out

488.7991 · 134 N. CARROLLTON

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

jasmine collection

27 V1_60854.26_4.729x10.833_4c_Ad.indd 1

11/10/11 4:49 PM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

The Bombay Club’s

SPECIAL 4-COURSE THANKSGIVING MENU

Reservations Required

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24 • 1-8PM { prices start at $54 & include starter through dessert }

starters

entrees

CHICKEN & ANDOUILLE GUMBO

FARM FRESH ROASTED TURKEY

CRAWFISH & MIRLITON CHOWDER

BROILED POMPANO

FRIED OYSTERS ROCKEFELLER

TOMATO BRAISED PORK SHANK

SHRIMP REMOULADE & MARINATED CRAB CLAWS

GROUND FILET MIGNON

salads

desserts

BABY SPINACH & CHRISTMAS SPICED PECANS

PUMPKIN PIE CREME BRULEE CHOCOLATE BOURBON PECAN PIE

BOMBAY CHOPPED SALAD

STRAWBERRY MASCARPONE TART

830 conti st. (in the prince conti hotel) 504.586.0972 • 800.699.7711

www.thebombayclub.com dinner & music nightly

validated parking (at Iberville & Dauphine)

28

sHTo P aLK

BY LORA GHAWALY

SHOPPING NEWS BY MISSY WILKINSON

Belly Up to the Bar ookah smoke, belly dancers and fresh hummus sound like the makings of a good night in a distant Middle Eastern country, but New Orleanians can step right into that culture in a Decatur Street restaurant. “The belly dancing is definitely a big draw,” says Diana Canahuati, owner of Attiki Bar & Grill (230 Decatur St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com). “Regulars know what to expect, but newcomers are amazed by the traditional dancing. It keeps it interesting.” Hookah smoking also was a big draw until the smoking ban forced Canahuati to curtail it until she can get a license. “I’ve been doing hookah since before the smoking ban,” she says. “[Getting the hookah license] will take time, but it’s worth it. Hookah is one of my signatures at Attiki.” Attiki features culinary specialties of the Middle East and the Mediterranean. Italian, Spanish and Greek cuisines star as some of the menu’s major influences. Popular items include paella, kebabs, hummus and rack of lamb. Diana Canahuati fills customers’ Canahuati’s parents immigrated to the United States from Jordan when she requests at Attiki. was 9 years old. She grew up in New Orleans and developed a strong attachment PHOTO BY LORA GHAWALY to the city. In 2005, she opened Attiki in the French Quarter. She chose the name (Attiki means “to give” in Arabic) after honeymooning in Greece, which has a region called Attiki. “Attiki offers traditional music, a relaxed atmosphere,” says Canahuati, who hopes to open a second location some day. “It’s different from the regular bar. You also get to drink something different from other places. Some (bars) don’t offer the variety of international alcohol we do. We just give the whole package.”

H

HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE (2750 Lake Villa Drive, Suite 305, Metairie, 455-4911; www.homeinstead.com/339) has partnered with local nonprofits for the BE A SANTA TO A SENIOR program. Now through Dec. 9, visit two area WALMART stores (300 West Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 464-1653; 8843 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 465-0155; www.walmart.com), pick an ornament from a specially designated tree, buy the gift written on the ornament, and it will be wrapped and delivered by a volunteer to a needy, isolated senior citizen.

BUBBLE TEA & SLUSH WITH REAL FRUITS NOW AVAILABLE

JUNG IS TAKING THE TOUR GROUP TO CHINA FOR 11 DAYS IN MAY 2012. PLEASE CALL FOR DETAILS.

BUY $50 IN GIFT CARDS & GET A $10 CARD FREE 632 S. CARROLLTON

8859 VETERANS BLVD.

IN RIVERBEND

NEAR DAVID DR. WWW.OHENRYS.COM

461-9840

AWARDED #1 BY NEW ORLEANS MAG. AND HIGHLY RECOMMENDED BY GAMBIT

3009 Magazine St. Uptown • 891.8280 SUN - THURS 11 AM - 10 PM • FRI & SAT - 11 AM - 11 PM

WWW.JUNGSGOLDENDRAGON2.COM

NOW OPE N

OPEN TUE-SUN LUNCH 11:30AM-2:30PM DINNER 5:30- 10:30PM

VOTED ONE OF THE BEST

VEGETARIAN MENUS IN NEW ORLEANS -GAMBIT 2010

OPEN THANKSGIVING DINNER ONLY CALL ABOUT OUR ROOM ONLY PACKAGES FOR YOUR NEXT PRIVATE PARTY

NEW!

Chalmette Clinic 705 E. Judge Perez

Complete Wellness Care | Exotic Pet Care Grooming | Toys, Treats, Supplies msah.com | 504-830-4090

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

SERVING HEALTHY, LOW CALORIE,NO MSG & MICROBIOTIC COOKING

O’AMAZING DEAL

4 30 8 M AG A Z I N E S T • 8 9 4 - 9 7 9 7

ART HOME NEW ORLEANS holds a kickoff party for its home tours Friday, Nov. 18 at the New Orleans Museum of Art (City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle; www.noma.org). Admission is $5 and includes entertainment, refreshments and consultations with an interior designer and curator about how to create a home art collection. Tours of art collectors’ homes are from 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 19 and 20. Tickets cost $15 and can be purchased at www.cano-la.com or by calling 218-4807.

WE DO TAKE OUT, DELIVERY & CATERING

GREAT GIFT

866-9741

ORANGE LEAF FROZEN YOGURT (3441 E. Causeway Approach, Mandeville, 337-2338075; www.orangeleafyogurt.com) recently opened a new location in Mandeville. The shop sells frozen yogurt by the ounce in flavors like eggnog and taro.

37

The hisToric New orleaNs collecTioN preseNTs

0\[PR_a` V[ aUR 0\b_afN_Q sponsored by southern eagle

Tin Men

o

R

s

h

R

a in in e

!

friday, November 18

with sparkling wine and beer provided by southern eagle

doors open 5:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;¢ music 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8 p.m. â&#x20AC;¢ 2 1 & older $10 at the door â&#x20AC;¢ free for thnoc members

A52 56@A<?60 ;2D <?92.;@ 0<9920A6<;

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > NOVEMBER 15 > 2011

 The Williams Research Center

38

"

?\fNY @a_RRa

 "!  " !##

dddU[\P\_T

TIRED OF TURKEY? MAKE RESERVATIONS AFTER THANKSGIVING

FRIDAY LUNCH SAT & SUN BRUNCH WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;LL FILL YOUR HOLIDAY WITH

MERRIMENT && GLEE CALL TO BOOK A FESTIVE HOLIDAY PARTY.

5908 MAGAZINE STREET (CORNER OF MAGAZINE & ELEONORE) 891-8495 · WWW.MARTINIQUEBISTRO.COM FRIDAY LUNCH â&#x20AC;¢ SAT & SUN BRUNCH â&#x20AC;¢ TUES-SUN DINNER

YOU ’LL BE

AMAZED I T ’ S B E E N N E A R LY

5 0 YEARS Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

SINCE DOWNTOWN

40

N EW OR LE AN S H A D A F U L L- S E R V I C E

GROCERY STORE

IT WILL B E WO RT H T H E WA IT

OP ENING 11.15.11 • 10 A M

70 1 BA RO NNE AT GIR OD

www.rouses.com

>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << << MUSIC >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 45 >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> >> <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

FILM

51

ART

53

STAGE

EVENTS

59

61

<

CUISINE

67

NOV 19 — 20

GOMELA

New Orleans Fringe Festival NOV. 16-20 WWW.NOFRINGE.ORG

NOV

TICKETS $8 WITH ONETIME PURCHASE OF $3 FRINGE BUTTON; FIVESHOW PASS $30

19

Domestic Variations is an aerialist/dance piece about home spaces and femininity by Seattle-based Ticktock Dance.

Brooklyn duo Holy Ghost! wasn’t content with merely summoning the ghosts of Muzak past on 2011’s self-titled moonwalk (DFA) — the disco fetishists went and resurrected one, landing an inimitably mush-mouthed verse by Michael McDonald on hot-mod closer “Some Children.” Jessica 6 and Eli Escobar open. Tickets $15. 9 p.m. Saturday. The Parish at House of Blues, 229 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com

OAK STREET PO-BOY FESTIVAL

NOV

20

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

THE NEW ORLEANS FRINGE FESTIVAL PRESENTS 70 SHOWS. BY WILL COVIELLO

T

HOLY GHOST!

At Michalopoulos’ Studio, Artist Inc. presents its own contemporary cabaret show UnRoute as well as shows by other dance- and physical theater-oriented groups. Fringe organizers welcomed the growth of the packaged BYOV shows. “We create a structure,” says Fringe director and cofounder Kristen Evans. “We love it when people both fill it and take it in new directions.” Organizers actually shrunk the number of juryselected shows, hoping to pick fewer shows and offer an extra performance of each during the festival’s five days. The BYOV portion expanded considerably, however, so the festival grew by 10 shows to a total of 70 at 34 venues. In its fourth year, the Fringe presents its usual broad array of alternative theater, dance, comedy, burlesque, performance art, puppetry, spoken word, music, circus and freakshow acts and all sorts of genre mash-ups. There are both local performers and groups from Portland, Ore., to Brooklyn and Baltimore. Shows at seven Fringe-managed venues were jury selected and one was admitted by lottery from the pool of remainPAGE 42

Try everything from a down home pork chop po-boy to a refined pork cheek version at the annual festival. Vendors offer all sorts of originals, including dessert and vegetarian options. There also are three stages featuring music by the Rebirth Brass Band, Mia Borders, George Porter Jr. and his Runnin Pardners and others. Visit the website for details. Free admission. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Sunday. Oak Street beginning at South Carrollton Avenue; www. poboyfest.com

NOV

21 INDIAN JEWELRY WITH PRINCE RAMA

What sounds like a spicetrade bazaar — Prince Rama and Indian Jewelry (pictured) at Siberia — is actually a psych/rock mindbender featuring drone rangers from Brooklyn and Houston, respectively, at New Orleans’ burgeoning home for the bizarre. Call for ticket information. 10 p.m. Monday. Siberia, 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-8855

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

Troupe Surge he city’s largest alternative theater event, the New Orleans Fringe Festival presents plenty of thought-provoking work. But it really got some other theater people thinking last year. Half of the shows in the 2010 festival were admitted in the Bring Your Own Venue (BYOV) portion, in which performers arranged for their own venues and applied to be included in the festival as an independent show rather than going through the juried selection process to gain a spot in one of the Fringe-managed venues. Several people saw the opportunity to apply to the 2011 event with not just an independent show but a miniature festival within the festival. “I saw like 15 shows last year,” says Gregory Gajus. “And I said, ‘Hey, this is great, but I’d like to see more queer-themed content.’” Gajus is clearing space in his Asian art gallery Deity Arts of the Extreme Orient and presenting three shows from San Francisco in this year’s Fringe. Mudlark Public Theatre was ahead of the curve last year and again hosts the resident puppet theater troupe’s show as well as two visiting shows that incorporate puppetry.

Kumbuka Drum and Dance Collective celebrates its 30th anniversary of exploring percussion and dance influences from Africa, Haiti and New Orleans. The program includes the new work Revolution as well as its signature Dance de Calinda. Tickets $20 general admission, $15 students/seniors/CAC members. 7:30 p.m. Sat., 3 p.m. Sun. Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org

41

WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

PAGE 41

ing applicants. (Some fringe festivals select significant numbers of participants by lottery.) Other Fringe events include the Goodchildren Social Aid & Pleasure Club parade (2 p.m. Sat.), and there is an afternoon of kid-friendly activities at the festival’s Fringe Tent headquarters (corner of Press and Dauphine streets) from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday. There also are after parties each night. See the festival website for a complete schedule and breakdown of shows by category (ie. puppet, circus, with nudity, kid-friendly, etc.). Gauging future growth is simple, Evans says. “It’s up to audiences,” Evans says. “If they fill seats and want it, [the festival] is going to keep growing.”

Below are previews of some of the shows included in the festival.

’33

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

7 p.m. Wed., 9 p.m. Fri., 5 p.m. Sat., 11 p.m. Sun., Shadowbox Theatre (2400 St. Claude Ave.) Jazz singer Bremner Duthie singlehandedly invokes a cabaret from the strangely creative and socially permissive period of experimental theater and performance in Weimar Berlin in 1933. The rise of Nazism unsettles the bohemian enclaves of cabarets, and Duthie’s characters weigh the making of art and war.

42

BUTTON WAGON

7 p.m. Thu., 9 p.m. Fri., 5 p.m. Sat., 11 p.m. Sun.; Mardi Gras Zone (2706 Royal St.) The New Mexico-based duo of Ember Bria and Poki look like scruffy mimes, and they present an offbeat combination of clowning, contortionist poses, object illusion and circus arts (pictured on page 39).

DOMESTIC VARIATIONS

7 p.m. Thu., 9 p.m. Fri., 11 p.m. Sat., 9 p.m. Sun.; Den of Muses (Architect Street) A Seattle-based trio of dancer-aerialists perform an often high-flying piece examining the meaning of home — exploring how domestic space and ritual shape gender roles, relationships, dreams and identity.

HIP-HOP IS ALIVE

9 p.m. Wed., 11 p.m. Fri., 7 p.m. Sat., 5 p.m. Sun.; Cafe Istanbul (New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave.) Hip Hop is Alive explores music and culture with a narrative incorporating hip-hop lyrics in choreographed vignettes.

LA CONCIERGE SOLITAIRE

11 p.m. Wed.-Sun. & 3 p.m. Sat.; Southern Rep (The Shops at Canal Place, 365 Canal St., third floor) Cecile Monteyne stars in this one-woman drama. A lonely hotel concierge passes the time by animating hotel guests and their stories.

EE ME AND POLLOCK THEE

7 p.m. Thu., 9 p.m. Fri., 11 p.m. Sat., 7 p.m. Sun.; Marigny Opera House (725 Ferdinand St.) Local musician Jonathan Freilich and playwright Adam Falik present an opera about the relationship between poet E.E. Cummings and painter Jackson Pollack. Performed to live music, the piece explores art, inspiration and obsession.

SHUT UP, YOU’RE FAT

9 p.m. Thu.-Fri., 5 p.m. Sat., 7 p.m. Sun.; Shaolin-Do Martial Arts Studio (4120 St. Claude Ave.) Nancy Hartman’s (pictured above) mostly one-person, nonpolitically correct, often confessional comedy of travelogues recounts everything from her days performing with Penn and Teller at renaissance fairs to humiliating experiences in show business to the pitfalls of watching children’s theater. Inspired by John Waters’ scratch and sniff film Polyester, there is a smell to go with every vignette and lucky audience members can partake of the multi-sensory show.

THE BRIDE OF BLACK LAKE

9 p.m. Wed., 11 p.m. Thu., 7 p.m. Fri., 5 p.m. & 7 p.m. Sat., 3 p.m. & 11 p.m. Sun.; Mudlark Public Theatre (1200 Port St.) The Mudlark Puppeteers present an original work based on the Jewish folktale of a dead bride returning to the world as a spirit (also adopted by Tim Burton for the more whimsical Corpse Bride). Set in Russia in the 1880s against the backdrop of anti-semitic pogroms, Lida drowns before her wedding and is tempted by a supernatural bargain to rejoin her betrothed.

FAUX REAL

7 p.m. Wed.-Sun.; Deity Arts (830 N. Rampart St.) Popular San Francisco performance artist/dancer Monique Jenkinson transforms into drag queen alter ego Fauxnique in this one-woman show exploring the link between female gender issues and the male-dominated world of drag. Fauxnique reflects on gender, ballerina fantasies, beauty secrets, gay prom dates and more. It’s one of three queer-themed shows at Deity Arts.

UNROUTE

9 p.m. Thu., 9 p.m. Sat.; Michalopoulos Studio (527 Elysian Fields Ave.) Reese Johanson’s Artist Inc. organized a 90-minute contemporary cabaret showcase with three of its dance/ physical theater pieces plus short works by other performers visiting Fringe with other full shows. Chair is a solo piece about obsessions with people and things that are ultimately as toxic as they are desirable.

LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Kirk Branch, 6

Wednesday 16 12 BAR — Brass-A-Holics, 9

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 15 BANKS STREET BAR — Michael Matthews & Friends, 10 BLUE NILE — Shane Theriot’s Dirty Power Trio, 10 BMC — Mikey B3 Organ Combo, 6; Peter Novelli, 9; Lagniappe Brass Band, midnight

CHICKIE WAH WAH — ZaZu City, 7

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Bart Ramsey, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — John Rankin, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

D.B.A. — Treme Brass Band, 9 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Jason Marsalis, 8

THE MAISON — Gregory Agid Quartet, 6; Magnitude, 9 MAISON DUPUY HOTEL — Aaron Lopez-Barrantes, 6 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Blues Frenzy, 6; 19th St. Red, 9:30 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Tom Henehan, 8

OLD POINT BAR — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 8

ONE EYED JACKS — Gabby La La, Ratty Scurvics & His Imaginary Band, Chinese Drywall Band, 9

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Camille Boudain & the Living Rumors, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time

BANKS STREET BAR — Micah Mckee’s Songwriters Showcase, 9; Major Bacon, 10:30

BIG AL’S DECKBAR SEAFOOD & BLUES — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 8 BLUE NILE — United Postal Project, 8; Gravity A, 10:30

BMC — Bryce Eastwood, 6; Blues4Sale, 8; Treme Funket feat. Corey Henry, 11 CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — Louis Prima Night feat. John Autin, Austin Clements & Tyler Clements, 8

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Pete Anderson, Monty Russell, 8

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — George Keys, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Ricardo Crespo, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

D.B.A. — Alex, Chaz & St. Louis Slim, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

Sketch & the Dirty Notes, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Andre Bouvier, 6; Emely & Elysian Jass Band, 9:30

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Tom McDermott, noon OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — The Knux, Jordy Towers, 9

HARRAH’S CASINO (MASQUERADE) — Mike Baptiste, 6

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Joe Krown, 8:30 SIBERIA — East of the Wall, Lazarus Heart, Dazein, I, Octopus, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

ST. ROCH TAVERN — J.D. & the Jammers, 7:30 STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles, noon THREE MUSES — Raphael Bas, 7

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Larry Sieberth, 6

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

Thursday 17

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Yo Majesty, Shunda K, Elephant, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES — Between The Buried And Me, 6 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Cracktracks, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Zechs Marquise, Autotomii, Meta the Man, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Mia Borders, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — The Session, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8 KERRY IRISH PUB — Patrick Cooper, 9 LEGENDS BAR & GRILL — Topcats, 9

THE MAISON — The Cat’s Pajamas Funk All Stars, 9; Mario Abney Quartet (upstairs), 9

MAISON DUPUY HOTEL — Aaron Lopez-Barrantes, 6 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Johnny

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Wendell Brunious, 9:30

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Alex Bosworth, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8

Jeremy Davenport, 5:30

D.B.A. — Delgado Community College Honors Program benefit concert feat. Meschiya Lake, Kenny Claiborne & Blood From a Stone, Washboard Chaz, Little Freddie King Band and others, 6

12 BAR — Enharmonic Souls, Ben Labet & the Happy Devils, 9

BANKS STREET BAR — Rockin’ Janelle, 9; Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10 BMC — Griffin Sample Trio, 6; Chapter: SOUL, 8; Eric Gordon & the Lazy Boys, 10:30 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Tom McDermott & Aurora Nealand, 8

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Eric Cashus Clay Memorial Celebration feat. Gregory Davis & Dirty Dozen, Kermit Ruffins, James Andrews, Roland Guerin, Renard Poche and others, 7 CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — George Keys, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Fredy Omar, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 DAVENPORT LOUNGE —

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Beanie Sigel, Freeway, Da U Boys, The Rap Pack, Nesby Phips, Lucy Lou, 10 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Yip Deceiver, Super Nice Bros., 10:30 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Amanda Shaw, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; James Andrews, 8 KERRY IRISH PUB — Michael Brown, 9 LEGENDS BAR & GRILL — Rising Star, 9

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; David Mahoney, 7; Magnetic Ear, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Peter Novelli, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9:30 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Nattie, 8; Frans Schumann, 9; Coventry Jones, 10

OAK — Cristina Perez Trio, 9 OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Mumbles, 9

ONE EYED JACKS — Protomen, I Fight Dragons, 7 PRESERVATION HALL — Survivors Brass Band feat. Jeffrey Hills, 8

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Tom Worrell, 5 RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Paper Diamond, Run DMT, Spamm Kidd, Abboriginal, 10

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Major Bacon, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Lil Nathan & the Zydeco Big Tymers, 8:30 SATURN BAR — Happy Talk Band, 10 SIBERIA — Exhumed, Goatwhore, Havok, Hot Graves, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Kid Chocolate Quintet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 THREE MUSES — Tom McDermott, 4:30; Luke Winslow-King, 7:30

TIPITINA’S — Nasimiyu & the Many Moons, United Seas, Gris Gris, 9

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Larry Sieberth, 6

Friday 18 BANKS STREET BAR — Unnaturals, Rotten Cores, DJ Smut, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8 BAYOU BEER GARDEN — Jeb Rault, 9

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE LOUNGE — Frank Williams Jr. & Friends feat. Bobby Love, 8 BJ’S LOUNGE — Little Freddie King, 10:30

BLUE NILE — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Zena Moses (upstairs), 9; Honey Island Swamp Band, 10:30

BMC — El DeOrazio & Friends, 3; Soul Project, 6; Dana Abbott Band, 9; Lagniappe Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Rhodes Spedale Trio, 8

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Jesse Moore, 5; Paul Sanchez, 8; Harry Hardin’s Electric Yat String Quartet, 10

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Amanda Walker, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Alex Bachari Trio, 5

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 THE CYPRESS — Vettes, Rookie of the Year, Royal Teeth, xDefinition, Static Breakdown, 7 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9

D.B.A. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Hot 8 Brass Band, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Sunpie & the Louisiana Sunspots, 10

EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

ERNEST N. MORIAL CONVENTION CENTER — Dr. Norman C. Francis Endowed Scholarship concert feat. Al Jarreau & John Boutte, 8 FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

GALVEZ RESTAURANT — Campbell Perkins, 6:30

HARRAH’S CASINO (MASQUERADE) — Flow Tribe, 9

HERMES BAR — John Rankin Trio, 9:30 & 11 HI-HO LOUNGE — Mermaid Lounge Reunion feat. Phil Degruy, Valpariso Men’s Chorus, Royal Fingerbowl, Egg Yolk Jubilee, 10 HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION — Concerts in the Courtyard feat. Tin Men, 6 HOUSE OF BLUES — Mac Miller, 9

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Ramblin’ Letters, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Tom McDermott, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Linnzi Zaorski, midnight

JOEY K’S RESTAURANT — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 5 JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Michaela Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30

KERRY IRISH PUB — Danny Burns, 5; Foot & Friends, 9

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Tom Worrell, 7 LEGENDS BAR & GRILL — LA Lightning, 10

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Kristina Morales, 7; Chapter: SOUL, 10; Kings of the Fauborg, midnight MAPLE LEAF BAR — Jake Eckert, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Bryce Eastwood, 4; Lil Red & Big Bad, 7; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10:30

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Damn Hippies, 7; Gallivan Burwell, 9; Gina Forsyth, 10; Iain Micah Weigert, 11

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Vic Shepherd, 2 OAK — Ryan Griffin, 6; Jen Howard, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Rick Trolsen, 5; Johnny J & the Hit-Men, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Lonesome Leash, The Magnolia Beacon, Hurray for the Riff Raff, 9 PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Wolves, Where?, 11

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — The PAGE 47

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

HOUSE OF BLUES — Anthony Hamilton, 7; The Game, Menace, Juice, 11:30

ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — Cristina Perez, 11 a.m.

MUSIC

45

LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

MUSIC

DARTS • POOL • DARTS • POOL

PAGE 45

Mustard Bro, 9:30

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 9:30

MON: FREE POOL 6-10pm

preview

WED: Blues Jam Night 8-11pm THURS: Steak Night 6pm-till

SHAMROCK BAR — Red Moped, 9

SIBERIA — Mermaid Lounge Reunion Fest feat. Orange Eye, 66 Goat, Cambre & Costello, Hairy Lamb, 10

FRI:

Fish Fry Night • 4-8PM

SAT:

Karaoke - Starts at 9PM

SUN: Happy Hour ALL DAY

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10

HAPPY HOUR • MON-FRI • 3-7PM

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; St. Louis Slim & Andy J. Forest, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10 THREE MUSES — Joe Cabral Group, 6:30; Glen David Andrews, 10

TIPITINA’S — John Mooney & Bluesiana, 10 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Larry Sieberth, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Saturday 19 ABITA SPRINGS TOWN HALL — Petty Bones, Fugitive Poets, Wardell Williams, Zion Harmonizers, 7 ATCHAFALAYA — Atchafalaya All Stars, 11 a.m. BABYLON LOUNGE — Bad Grass, Fat Camp and others, 10 BANKS STREET BAR — Mrz Crowley, Misled, 9

BAYOU BEER GARDEN — Dr. Funk, 9

BAYOU PARK BAR — The Void, A Hanging, Sheeple, Crotchbreaker, 10

BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Yojimbo (upstairs), 10; Stooges Brass Band, 10:30

BMC — Andre Bouvier, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6; Sweet Jones (courtyard), 9; Rue Fiya, 9; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, midnight

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Lunar Carnival, 7; Royal Rounders, 9 CAFE PRYTANIA — Cute Machines, Sphynx, Citoyens, 10

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Amanda Walker, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Andy Rogers, 9

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 THE CYPRESS — Joystick, Waffle Stompers, Squirt Gun Warriors, 7 DAVENPORT LOUNGE —

Lykke Li Swedish pop has a spotlight hog in Robyn and a recurring nightmare in Karin Dreijer Andersson (The Knife, Fever Ray). In 25-year-old Lykke Li Zachrisson, the musically loaded country has many things in between: coy baby doll, brash candy grabber, scorned lover and sexual objectifier. Li’s 2007 debut Youth Novels toyed with unexpected juxtapositions, dropping mountain doo-wop over frostbitten tropics and a goo-goo croon onto NC-17 dialogue (“For you I keep my legs apart/ And forget about my tainted heart”). Similarly shaped by producer Bjorn Yttling of Peter Bjorn and John, 2011’s Wounded Rhymes (Atlantic) trades the greatest-hits sequencing and beguiling array of vibes for an arresting consistency and sustained mood, one that plumbs darker, deeper emotional depths. Mid-album triptych “Love Out of Lust,” “Unrequited Love” and “Get Some” is a veritable coming-of-age in 11 minutes flat, moving from ventricle-flooding anthem to multi-tracked a cappella ballad to head-rushing saucy taunt, a hard-to-get girl getting hard. First Aid Kit opens. Tickets $29 in advance, $33 day of show (includes fees). — Noah Bonaparte Pais

NOV

21

Jeremy Davenport, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Courtyard Kings feat. Kristina Morales, 10 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7 EUCLID RECORDS — Whom Do You Work For EP release, 5 FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

WED 11/16

Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes

FRI 11/18

Jake Eckert

SAT 11/19

Khris Royal & Dark Matter

8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

www.themapleleafbar.com

HI-HO LOUNGE — Mermaid Lounge Reunion feat. Hagus, Chef Menteur, White Bitch, Norco Lapalco, 10

PAGE 49

Rebirth Brass Band

New Orleans Best Every Night!

HERMES BAR — Johnny Sansone, 9:30 & 11

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Holy Ghost!, Jessica 6, Eli Escobar, 9

TUE 11/15

TrioTrio w/ Walter SUN Joe JoeKrown Krown SUN “Wolfman” Washington feat. Russell Batiste & Walter 11/20 3/13 & Russell Batiste Wolfman Washington

GALVEZ RESTAURANT — Campbell Perkins, 6:30

HOUSE OF BLUES — Alex Grey feat. Tipper, Nadis Warriors, Orchard Lounge and others, 9

Papa Grows Funk

THU The Trio featuring 11/17 Johnny V & Special Guests

Lykke Li 9 p.m. Monday Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 895-8477; www.tipitinas.com

D.B.A. — Paul Sanchez feat. Alex McMurray & Arsene Delay, 7; Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 11

MON 11/14

3 full bars • 10:30-til 738 Toulouse St. • 523-5530

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8

Showcasing Local Music

VISIT OUR WEBSITE

www.originaldungeon.com

47

LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

MUSIC

PAGE 47 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Minus Ned, Jesse Dupui, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Cyril Neville, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bill Summers, 8; Hot 8 Brass Band, midnight KERRY IRISH PUB — Wheelhouse feat. Heidi Campbell & Paul Tobin, 5; Lynn Drury Band, 9 LEGENDS BAR & GRILL — Meanies, 10 LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Peter Novelli Band, 2; Ted Hefko & the Thousandaires, 3 THE MAISON — Jerry Jumonville & the Jump City Band, 5; Magnitude, 7; Brass-A-Holics, 10; Lagniappe Brass Band, midnight MAPLE LEAF BAR — Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Mumbles, 1; Kristina Morales, 4; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 7:30; Soulabilly Swamp Boogie Band, 11 MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Clint Kaufmann, 8; Mr. Steve, 9; Devil Killing Moth, 10

OAK — Kristin Diable, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Dana Abbott, 9:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Big History CD release, 9

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Swing Kings feat. Steve Pistorius, 8 RITZ-CARLTON — Catherine Anderson, 1 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Space Heaters, 10

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Rockin’ Dopsie Jr., 9:30

SIBERIA — Mermaid Reunion Fest feat. Rotary Downs, The Geraniums, Jai Alai, Strawberry Presents, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis Quintet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Luke Winslow-King, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10 THREE MUSES — Ted Hefko Trio, 6:30; Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Larry Sieberth, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Sunday 20

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Empress & Tasting Darkness, The Honorable South, 8 ATCHAFALAYA — Sam & Boone, 11 a.m.

BANKS STREET BAR — Royal Rounders, 9

BLUE NILE — John Dobry Band, 7; Hamid Drake, Ivo Bol (upstairs), 10; Mainline, 10:30

Sunrise Jazz Band, 7

MANDEVILLE TRAILHEAD — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 4:30

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Tom Mcdermott & Kevin Clark, 11 a.m.; Ricardo Crespo, 3:30; Javier Olondo & Asheson, 7 MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Jim Hession, 2 OLD POINT BAR — Craig Paddock, 3

BMC — Soulabilly Swamp Boogie Band, 3; Alex Bosworth, 6; Jack Cole, 9

PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street All-Stars feat. Lars Edegran, 8

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Unnaturals, Split Lips, 11

RITZ-CARLTON — Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m.; Catherine Anderson, 2

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m.; Smoking Time Jazz Club, 8

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Sandy Hinderlie, 11:30 a.m.

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Amanda Walker, 6:30

ROOSEVELT HOTEL (BLUE ROOM) — James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m.

COLUMNS HOTEL — Chip Wilson, 11 a.m.

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Louisiana Hellbenders, 10

FINNEGAN’S EASY — Robin Clabby, Chris Alford, Erik Golson & Nick O’Gara, 12:30 FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

HI-HO LOUNGE — Mardi Gras Indian practice, Skin ‘N’ Bones Gang, 6; 7th Ward Creole Hunters, 8 HOMEDALE INN — Sunday Night Live Jam Session feat. Homedale Boys, 7

HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m. HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Jonathan Tyler & the Northern Lights, Happenins, 8

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charlie Hunter & Scott Amendola, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Kristina Morales, 6; Pat Casey, 10; In & Out, 2 a.m.

TIPITINA’S — Cajun Fais Do-Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Mario Abney Quartet, 6

Monday 21 APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8

BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 10

BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10 BMC — Lil Red & Big Bad, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9 CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Steve Monroe, 6:30

LOUIS J. ROUSSEL PERFORMANCE HALL — Shades of Praise Interracial Gospel Choir, 7

D.B.A. — Jesse Moore, 6; Glen David Andrews, 9

THE MAISON — Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac

SALE STORE HOURS 7AM - 9PM nOw Open sundays 11AM-6PM

1 / 2 OFF ON ALL C LOTHI & SHOES NG

Now accepting donations on behalf of AMVETS

601

NEW LOCATION TERRY PKWY · GRETNA

THREE MUSES — Linnzi Zaorski, 7

COLUMNS HOTEL — David Doucet, 8

MADIGAN’S — Anderson/ Easley Project, 9

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 17TH

ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 10 a.m.

KERRY IRISH PUB — Beth Patterson, 8

LE PAVILLON HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8:30 a.m.

USA

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — John Fohl, 9:30

DRAGON’S DEN — Cartright, 10

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren PAGE 50

3-6pm DAILY • happy hour $2 mondayS gAme RentAls • PBR PInts jameSon ShotS

THURS. • 9pm • LADIES NITE

FRIDAY • 11/18 • 9 pm

red moped

sAtuRDAY • 11/19 • 10pm

dj & danCe ConteStS EVERY SUNDAY • 8pm-2Am

karaoke

F o o tB A l l

On 10’ Big SCReen & 30 FlAt scReens

holiday parties BookIng now

4133 S. Carrollton ave ( @ T u l a n e ) 301-0938

S H a M R O C K Pa R T Y. C O M

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — “Songs of the Lower Mississippi Delta” CD release feat. Matt Hampsey & Bruce Barnes, Phillip Manuel, Erica Falls, Mike Harris, Leroy Etienne, Eric Lucero, 2

TIPITINA’S — Bonerama, 10

THRIFT CIT Y

49

FILM

LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

preview

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING AMIGO (R) — John Sayles’ drama is a fictional account of the Philippine–American War. Chalmette Movies ANONYMOUS (PG-13) — The

film explores the theory that Edward de Vere was the true author of the works credited to William Shakespeare, set amid a time of scandal in Elizabethan England. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place

BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

COURAGEOUS (PG-13) — From the creators of the Christian drama Fireproof, the movie centers on police officers in various stages of fatherhood and their struggles with faith. AMC Palace 20 DOLPHIN TALE (PG) — Harry Connick Jr. stars in the true story of the people who helped a dolphin struggling to survive after being caught in a crab trap. Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

HURRICANE ON THE BAYOU (NR) — The film tells the story

of Hurricane Katrina and the impact that Louisiana’s disappearing wetlands has on hurricane protection. Entergy IMAX

IDES OF MARCH (R) — In the political thriller based on an acclaimed play by Beau Willimon, Ryan Gosling plays a staffer who is introduced to the dark side of politics while working on a presidential campaign. Canal Place, Prytania IMMORTALS (R) — Zeus choos-

es a mortal man to lead the fight against King Hyperion (Mickey Rourke). AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

IN TIME (PG-13) — Justin

Timberlake stars in the sci-fi thriller about a world where everyone is programmed to die at age 25. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand,

The Scumbag Cinema series continues at Antenna Gallery with a couple of offbeat haunted house films. The Japanese half, Hausu (1977), is a Japanophile’s treasure with its bizarre blend of cutesy (kawaii) and spirited (genki) schoolgirls going on a retreat to visit Gorgeous’ (Kimiko Ikegami) mysterious aunt, who lives in a haunted home prone to bloody supernatural events. Upset that her father has remarried after the death of her mother, Gorgeous skips out of a family trip to seek out her mother’s sister. The girls go by nicknames that stem from their interests, so Gorgeous is accompanied by Fantasy (Kumiko Oba), KungFu (Miki Jinbo) and others. A black-and-white flashback to Gorgeous’ grandparents’ separation as her grandfather went off to war previews some lasting family curses, and it also signals other detours and unexplained genre meltdowns that at times are bizarre and amusing nonsequiturs. The film veers from a technicolored Sid and Marty Krofft-style bubblegum pop surrealism to sometimes campy horror-gore. The double feature also includes the unrelated 1986 American horror film House (aka Ding Dong, You’re Dead), which features a Vietnam veteran turned horror writer who is having troubles with his career. He moves into a house where his son disappeared and is pestered by ghosts and annoying neighbor Harold (George Wendt, aka Norm from Cheers). Director Steve Miner also directed the second and third installments of Friday the 13th. Free admission. — Will Coviello

NOV

16

ND JILL” EL A K C A J “ R E L D N A N ADAM S -WIL IAMS WADDY WACHT A G U D S I N N E D Y B N DUCTION A FILM DY MUSICBY RUPERT GREGSO STORYBY BEN ZOOK O R P D A O R N E SON/BROK ROOKS ARTHUR KEVIN GRA RT SMIGEL TIM HERDLIRIECHYTED ENNIS DUGAN I D A M Y P P A H A BY D PRESENTS MUSIC ICHAEL DILBECK B STEVE KOREN ROBE S E R U T C I P A I B COLUM AL PACINO SUPERVISION BY M VIVIANO AL EN COVERT JACK GIARRAPUTO TODD GARNER A D KATIE HOLMESPEXRECOADNUUTICVERES BARRY BERNARDI BETSTAINNDLER PRODUCEDBY ADAM SANDLER N & ADAM SCREENPLAYBY STEVE KORE

Hausu and House 9 p.m. Wednesday Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St.; www.press-street.com/antenna

Hollywood 14 J. EDGAR (PG) — Clint

Eastwood directs Leonardo DiCaprio in a candid look at the life of the FBI director, who harbored many of his own secrets. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

Kalahari Desert, a life-anddeath struggle between a real lion king and a fierce, young contender unfolds. Entergy IMAX MARGIN CALL (R) — The thriller follows key figures at an investment firm in a 24-hour period amid the height of the financial crisis. AMC Palace 20

JACK AND JILL (PG) — A man’s

MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE (R) — Elizabeth

LIONS 3-D: THE ROAR OF THE KALAHARI (G) — In Botswana’s

MONEYBALL (PG-13) — Brad Pitt plays Billy Beane, the general manager of the Oakland Athletics who used a computer-based analysis to draft

twin sister visits him and refuses to leave in the comedy starring Adam Sandler, who plays both twins. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

Olsen stars in the Sundance hit about a young woman struggling to readjust to normal life after fleeing a cult. Canal Place

check local listings for theaters and showtimes

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

FOOTLOOSE (PG-13) — The 1980s classic is re-imagined in a modern setting with eye-catching choreography. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

Hausu and House

51

NUTCRACKER Gregory Schramel ARTISITIC DIRECTOR

Photo by David J. L’Hoste

FILM

THE

LISTINGS players. AMC Palace 20 PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3 (R) —

The latest installment of the night vision-horror franchise takes place before the other two films, when the main protagonists were children dealing with supernatural occurrences. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 PUSS IN BOOTS (PG) — The

popular character from the Shrek series gets his own bigscreen adventure. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

TICKETS : 504-528-3800 ADULTS: $30 • STUDENTS: $20

NOVEMBER 26 AT 2PM & 7PM NOVEMBER 27 AT 2PM ROUSSEL HALL, LOYOLA UNIVERSITY

NEW ORLEANS BALLET THEATRE 2011

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

WWW.NOBT.ORG

52

REAL STEEL (PG-13) — In the near future, where giant robots have replaced humans in the sport of boxing, a washed-up former fighter (Hugh Jackman) teams up with his estranged son to build and train their own high-tech fighter. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE RUM DIARY (R) — Johnny

Depp stars in the adaptation of the Hunter S. Thompson novel, an unhinged account of a journalist’s stint at a Puerto Rican newspaper. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9 TAKE SHELTER (R) — An ordinary family man is haunted by apocalyptic visions, compelling him to obsessively work on building a storm shelter in his backyard — which heightens the suspicion of everyone around him. Canal Place TOWER HEIST (PG-13) — When staff members from a Manhattan high-rise become victims of a Ponzi scheme, the group plots to pull off a heist to get their money back. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14 UNDER THE SEA 3-D (G) — Jim Carrey narrates the documentary exploring the Great Barrier Reef. Entergy IMAX A VERY HAROLD AND KUMAR CHRISTMAS (R) — The stoner

romp is back with more hijinx and Neil Patrick Harris cameos. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

OPENING FRIDAY HAPPY FEET 2 (PG) — The dancing CGI penguins are back for a sequel. THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN, PART 1 (PG-13) — The

mythical creature romance series nears its end with the first part of the conclusion.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS THE 39 STEPS (NR) — Alfred

Hitchcock directs the 1935 British spy-chase thriller. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

AND GOD CREATED WOMAN (NR) — Roger Vadim directs

the 1956 Brigitte Bardot vehicle. Free admission. 7:30 p.m. Monday, La Divina Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com

AUDUBON CHARTER SCHOOL FRENCH MOVIE NIGHT — The

school hosts an outdoor screening of Ratatouille to benefit the 5th grade class’ trip to France. The event also features food, drinks and a silent auction. Suggested donation is $5 per person, $10 per family. 6 p.m. Friday, Coliseum Square Park, Coliseum and Euterpe Streets; www.coliseumsquare.org

BRIT WIT — The Big Top

screens British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

THE BUSINESS OF BEING BORN (NR) — Actress Ricki Lake and

filmmaker Abby Epstein’s documentary explores the ways women give birth today, focusing particularly on natural and home births. Epstein appears at the screening. The screening is part of the Newcomb Feminist Film Series. Free admission. 7 p.m. Friday, Newcomb College Campus, Woldenberg Art Center, Freeman Auditorium, 327-0009; www.newcomb. tulane.edu

THE GRAPES OF WRATH (NR) — Henry Fonda stars in John

Ford’s 1940 film adaptation of the John Steinbeck novel. Tickets $5.50. Noon SaturdaySunday and Nov. 23, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

THE MATCHMAKER (NR) — The film follows the relationship between an Israeli teenage boy and the unusual matchmaker who employs him. The screening is part of the New Orleans Jewish Film Festival. Call 887-5158 or email debbie@nojcc.org for details. Admission $5. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Shir Chadash Synagogue, 3737 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 889-1144; www. shirchadash.org

MY LIFE (NR) — Jonathan Lee’s documentary uses archival footage and interviews to paint a portrait of the 1960s author, countercultural icon and intellectual heavyweight. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:15 p.m. Tuesday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net SCUMBAG CINEMA FILM SERIES — The gallery screens

the horror-comedies Hausu (1977) and House (1986). Free admission. 9 p.m. Wednesday, Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. press-street.com

THE SHINING (R) — Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 horror film finds a man (Jack Nicholson) descending into madness in an isolated hotel while snowed in with his family. Tickets $8. Midnight FridaySaturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com SIGUR ROS: INNI (NR) —

Vincent Morisset directs the concert film of the enigmatic Icelandic band. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 9 p.m. Tuesday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

WE STILL LIVE HERE: AS NUTAYUNEAN (NR) — Anne

Makepeace’s documentary tells the story of the recent cultural and linguistic revival of the Wampanoag tribe of Southeastern Massachusetts. A panel discussion follows the screening. Free admission. 6 p.m. Friday, Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www. ashecac.org AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 2624386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 6411889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 5276012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

MOVIES IN THE PARK. The

New Orleans Recreation Development Commission hosts free outdoor screenings of family movies on Fridays and Saturdays at greenspaces across the city. Visit www. nola.gov/Residents/NORD/ Movies-in-the-Park for the full schedule and other details. 7:45 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

PAUL GOODMAN CHANGED

Scan for movie times.

LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

ART EVENTS PROSPECT.2. Dan Cameron’s

art biennial features works by more than 26 local, national and international artists on display in traditional and alternative venues. Visit www. prospectneworleans.org for details. Through Jan. 29.

ART Photogravures by Josephine Sacabo, through December.

ades St. — Works by Rebecca Rebouche, ongoing.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Annual

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing.

miniature exhibition, through Dec. 3. AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 —

Works by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing. ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www. angelakinggallery.com — Paint-

OPENING

ings by Terri Hallman, through November.

CREATIVE GLASS AT YAYA. 3924 Conti St., 529-3306; www. yayainc.com — Grand opening

ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. press-street.com — “Instruc-

party for the public-access, full-service glass studio and art gallery, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday.

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — “Celebr-8,” a show

tions,” a group show featuring gallery members writing and responding to written instructions; “The Response,” an installation by gallery artists in response to the previous gallery show “The Instructions”; both through Dec. 4.

BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana!

United We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing. BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing. CAFE BABY. 237 Chartres St., 3104004; www.markbercier.com —

Paintings and works on paper by Mark Bercier, ongoing. CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing. CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www. callanfineart.com — Works

by Eugene de Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

featuring 25 member artists in celebration of the co-op’s eighth anniversary, through November. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

ANTON HAARDT GALLERY. 2858 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. antonart.com — Works by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing.

SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “The Boudin Trail,” a

Matilde Alberny; jewelry and paintings by Annie Moran; both through November.

of Italian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paint-

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The

travelling exhibit from the Southern Foodways Alliance, through Jan. 9. Opening reception 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday.

GALLERIES 1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery. blogspot.com — Works by Diego Larguia, through November. 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — “Women

Work Wonders,” group exhibition featuring works by members of the Women Caucus of Art, through Nov. 28.

811 HOWARD GALLERY. 811 Howard Ave., 524-3872; www. francoalessandrini.net — “ID,

Picture Identification,” portraits by Franco Alessandrini, through December. 9TH STREET STUDIO. 1029 9th St., 899-6686; www.9th-streetstudio.com — “One: A Collaboration Between Paint & Metal,” works by Alexis Walter and Rachael Adamiak, through Dec. 30. A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com —

ings, sculpture and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ART HOUSE ON THE LEVEE. 4725 Dauphine St., 247-8894 — “Art By Committee,” an interactive exhibit by Robert Tannen for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — “White,” works by Dale Chihuly; “Every Doubt That Holds You Here,” photographs by Ted Kincaid; both through Dec. 24. ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists

work on site in all media; watercolors and limitededition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing.

ATELIER-MAGASIN. 3954 Magazine St. — Ceramics and paintings by Julie Silvers, through Dec. 2. Wood and metal sculptures by Kelly Guidry; photographs by Amy James; portraits by Clay Judice Jr.; paintings by George Marks; all ongoing. BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www. barristersgallery.com — “Retro-

spectacle,” paintings by Scott Guion, through Dec. 3.

THE BEAUTY SHOP. 3828 Dry-

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition

COUPON

HAPPY HOUR ALL DAY SATURDAY

50

%

OFF

ALL CUT FLOWERS IN STOCK EXPIRES 12/12/11

CASH & CARRY ONLY NOT VALID W/ ANY OTHER COUPONS. COUPON MUST BE PRESENT AT TIME OF PURCHASE.

METAIRIE 750 MARTIN BEHRMAN AVE (504) 833-3716 COVINGTON 1415 N. HWY 190 (985) 809-9101 VISIT US ON

WWW.VILLERESFLORIST.COM

breakfast, lunch, dinner & late-night

CheCk OuT Our

new menu items

For local delivery please call:

504 373 6439 Sunday - WedneSday 7am-10pm ThurSday - SaTurday 7am-laTe

620 Conti St. new Orleans, la 70130

gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art.

CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www.carolrobinsongallery. com — “Still Life: Portrait and Landscape,” works in oil by Curtis Stewart Jaunsen, through Nov. 29. CARROLL GALLERY. Newcomb Art Department, Woldenberg Art Center, 314-2228; www. tulane.edu/~art/carrollgallery — “Tulane Contemporary.2,” works by full-time Tulane faculty members, through Nov. 22. CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — “Merely

Beautiful,” mixed-media landscapes by Danna Ruth Harvey; “Reading New Orleans,” oil paintings by Joan Griswold; all through Nov. 26.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www. collectiveworldartcommunity. com — Paintings from the

Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COLLINS C. DIBOLL ART GALLERY. Loyola University, Monroe PAGE 54

Great Pizzas Unique Wines

Family & Friends

Isabella’s Gallery Available at both Isabella’s Gallery locations:

2035 METAIRIE ROAD

www.marktwainspizza.com

3331 Severn in Metairie ~ 504-779-3202 1901 Manhattan on the Westbank ~ 504-304-4861 www.isabellasgallery.com www.facebook.com/isabellasgallery

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL. 300 Gravier St., 522-1922; www. windsorcourthotel.com — Works by Christine Sauer. Artist’s reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday.

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by

“Since 1969”

53

ART

LISTINGS

PAGE 53 Library, 6363 St. Charles Ave., fourth floor, 861-5456 — Mixed media by Avish Khebrehzadeh, through Jan. 29. COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “The

Whelming, Part 1,” paintings and drawings by Blaine Capone, through Nov. 26.

COURTYARD GALLERY. 1129 Decatur St., 330-0134; www. woodartandmarketing.com —

Hand-carved woodworks by Daniel Garcia, ongoing.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 5243936 — “Speculations of Philosophy,” mixed-media assemblages by Gregory J. Hackenberg, through Dec. 1. DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Echelon,”

works by Amy McKinnon, Tom Richard and Andrew Tyler, through Dec. 3. DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists

Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

FLEXSPACE.2. 638 Clouet St. —

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

“After You’ve Been Burned by Hot Soup You Blow in Your Yogurt: The Guantanamo Project,” multimedia works by Margot Herster, through Dec. 10.

FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com —

Prints by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing.

FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www. fredrickguessstudio.com —

Paintings by Fredrick Guess, ongoing. THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org —

ENJOY A SPECIAL

THANKSGIVING DINNER WITH US

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 —

Photography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing.

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing.

737 octavia st. [UPtown] 504.895.0900

www.flamingtorchnola.com

OPEN 11AM-3PM THANKSGIVING DAY reservations recommended

54

Todd White, ongoing.

on canvas by Kim Albrecht, through Dec. 2.

lUnch & dinner 7 days a week

Private rooms accomodate 15-100 gUests

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www.galerieroyale.com — Mixed media

satUrday & sUnday BrUnch 11am-3Pm

Book yoUr holiday Party today

“Unbidden,” photographs by Lee Deigaard; large scale works by Kyle Bravo; “Rain,” works by Barb Hunt; “Crossing Lines,” works by William Downs and Brooke Pickett; all through Dec. 4.

OPEN CHRISTMAS EVE & NEW YEAR’S EVE

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — “Boundary,”

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

sculpture by Eva Hild, through Nov. 26. GALLERY ORANGE. 819 Royal St., 701-0857; www.gallery-orange. com — “Beneath the Surface,” works by Susan Morosky, through November. GALLERY VERIDITAS. 3822 Magazine St., 267-5991; www. gvnola.com — “In the Spirit of Shozo,” a retrospective exhibition of paintings by Shozo Nagano, through December. GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paint-

ings by George Schmidt, ongoing.

GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www.goodchildrengallery. com — “Hit Refresh Part 1,” an

exhibition of gallery artists curated by Nick Stillman, through Dec. 4.

GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs; works by Christy Lee Rogers; both ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www.guthriecontemporary. com — “The Space in Between,” paintings by Bernd Haussmann; glass sculpture by Kazuo Kadonaga, through November. “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing. GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www. guylymanfineart.com — Mixed media with mechanical light sculptures by Jimmy Block, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by

David Harouni, ongoing.

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www. heriardcimino.com — “4 Works: 1968-2010,” neon light sculpture by Keith Sonnier, through Nov. 25. “Mallarme,” works by George Dunbar, through November. HOME SPACE GALLERY. 1128 St. Roch Ave., (917) 584-9867 — “Redheaded Stepchild,”

sculpture by Kevin Baer, Thor Carlson, Kourtney Keller, Jonathan Pellitteri, Cynthia Scott and Patrick Segura, through Dec. 4.

ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Delgado Community College, Isaac Delgado Hall, third floor, 615 City Park Ave., 361-6620 — “Below Sea Level,”

a panoramic video installation by by Pawel Wojtasik for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 7793202; www.isabellasgallery.com — Hand-blown glass works

by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing.

JACK GALLERY. 900 Royal St., 588-1777 — Paintings, litho-

graphs and other works by Tom Everhart, Gordon Parks,

Al Hirschfeld, Stanley Mouse, Anja, Patrick McDonnell and other artists, ongoing. JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www. jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “Crystallography,” paint-

ings by Carol Scott, through November. “The Painter on An Extended Voyage,” paintings by Bernard Beneito, through Jan. 29.

JIMMY MAC POP-UP GALLERY. 802 Elysian Fields Ave. —

“Mudcolors,” mixed media on canvas by Jimmy Mac, through Jan. 1. JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com —

“Junk Shot,” mixed media by Skylar Fein, through Saturday.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery. com — Paintings by Don Picou

and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KEN KIRSCHMAN ARTSPACE. NOCCA Riverfront, 2800 Chartres St. — “Off the Beaten

Path: Violence, Women, and Art,” a touring group exhibit produced and curated by Art Works for Change in conjunction with Prospect.2, through Dec. 16.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists. L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “The Value of

Value,” still life paintings by Benjamin J. Shamback; sculpture by Kate Samworth; both through Nov. 26.

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — “Sun-

flowers,” hand-painted silk wall hangings by Ray Cole; watercolors by Sean Friloux; “A 30-Year Retrospective of Photography,” photographs by Eliot Kamenitz; “Delta Dogs,”

LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

clay sculpture by Larone Hudson; all through Jan. 4. LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www. louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings by Mallory Page, ongoing.

ART

spotlight ARTDOCS Benefit Art Auction

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. martinechaissongallery.com — “Close Your Eyes,” works by Norman Mooney, through November. MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — Paint-

ings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing.

MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www. michelleywilliams.com —

Works by Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS HEALING CENTER. 2372 St. Claude Ave., 9489961; www.neworleanshealingcenter.org — Works by

Keith Duncan for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29, 2012.

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane. edu — Works by Nick Cave and Joyce J. Scott for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. OAK STREET GALLERY. 111 N. Oak St., Hammond, (985) 345-0521 —

Hammond Art Guild Holiday Show and Sale, through Dec. 14.

luctant Memories,’ mixedmedia paintings by James Henderson, through Dec. 3.

ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local

and national artists, ongoing.

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. PETER O’NEILL STUDIOS. 721 Royal St., 527-0703; www. oneillgallery.com — Works by Peter O’Neill, ongoing. PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing. POETS GALLERY AND CUSTOM FRAMING. 3113 Magazine St., 899-4100 — “Carnival of

Saints and Souls II,” a group exhibition featuring dolls and photography, through November. PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER. 923 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-7032; www.prcno.org — “Penn Station: A Distant

View,” large-scale photographs by Becca Fitzpatrick for

menu Appetizers

PHOTO BY CHARLIE VARLEY

The seventh annual ARTDOCS benefit art auction features works by more than 70 artists, including several current Prospect.2 participants (Gina Phillips, Srdjan Loncar, Dan Tague and Dawn Dedeaux). Other artists providing pieces include Jaqueline Bishop, Sandy Chism, Skylar Fein, James Michalopoulas, Blake Boyd, Justin Forbes, Krista Jurisich and many others. The event also features entertainment by the Panorama Jazz Band, aerialists and others, and there’s food and drinks. ARTDOCS works with Sisters of Charity and other community partners to provide medical care for artists, musicians and writers who do not have health insurance or the means to afford basic health care services, says co-founder Jonathan Ferrara (pictured left). Since 1999, the program has provided more than 4,000 patient visits. For more information about the program or art in the auction, visit www.artdocs.com. Tickets $15 for individuals, $25 for couples. — Will Coviello

NOV

17

ARTDOCS Benefit Art Auction 6:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Thursday 725 Magazine St., 827-2833; www.artdocs.com

Prospect.2, through January. REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 896-6369; www.newmanschool.org —

“United We Stand: American Propaganda Posters of WWII,” 44 propaganda posters used by the U.S. and other Allied Forces during World War II, through Thursday. RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS GALLERY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www. rhinocrafts.com — “Muses:

Art Inspired by Artists,” works by Rhino artists, through Saturday. Works by Margo Manning, Chris Menconi, Chip Tipton, Andrew Jackson Pollack and others, ongoing. RIVERSTONE GALLERIES.

719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 5259988; www.riverstonegalleries. net — Multimedia works by Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing. RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue. com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing. ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www. rosetreeglass.com — Hand-

blown glass works, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart.com — Works by

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing. SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SCOTT EDWARDS PHOTOGRAPHY GALLERY. 2109 Decatur St., 610-0581 — “Burlesque PAGE 56

Cheese Straws · Cheese Puffs Roasted & Salted Mammoth Pecans Spanakopita · Mini Crab Cakes with Remoulade Sauce · Fig & Pistachio Baked Brie en Crôuté · Lump Crabmeat Dip · Spinach Salad Butternut Squash · Turtle Soup Seafood Gumbo

Entrees

Herb Roasted Turkey · Deep Fried Turkey · Roasted Pork Tenderloin Beef Tenderloin · Orange Honey Glazed Ham · Grilled Duck Breasts Wrapped w/ Bacon

Accompaniments

Turkey Gravy · Marchand de Vin Sauce · Cranberry Conserve Cornbread Sausage & Pecan Dressing Oyster Dressing · Crawfish Cornbread Dressing · Seafood Stuffed Mirliton Casserole · Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes · Classic Potatoes au Gratin · Sweet Potato Crunch Casserole · Spinach Casserole · Green Bean Casserole w/ Mushroom Sauce Brussels Sprouts w/ Shallots and Bacon · Roasted Asparagus Spears with Parmesan · Wild Mushroom Ragoût with Proscuitto · Corn Macque Choux with Tasso · Wild Rice Pilaf w/ Almonds and Golden Raisins

Desserts

Apple Walnut Crumble Pie · Pumpkin Pie · Pecan Pie · Mincemeat Pie Apple Spice Cake with Caramel Sauce Cranberry-Pear Crisp · Espresso Chocolate Swirl Cheesecake Cheesecake · Hummingbird Cake Angel Food Cake with Lemon Icing Pumpkin Bread Loaf · Caramel Cup Custard · Palm Beach Brownies Lemon Squares

Last day to place Thanksgiving orders is Friday, November 18. Orders may be picked up on Wednesday, November 23rd between 10 am - 4 pm

Holiday To-Go Menu NOW ACCEPTING ORDERS FOR THANKSGIVING CALL AHEAD TO ORDER!

SOUPS Abita Beer & Cheddar Soup Crab and Corn Bisque Smoked Pork Soup

MAIN COURSES Hot Smoked Salmon Smoked Turkey Smoked Prime Rib

SIDES Shrimp & Eggplant Dressing ShaneSmoked Sausage and Cornbread Stuffing Cole Slaw Potato Salad Biscuits

DESSERTS Red Velvet Cake, Carrot Cake, Chocolate Cake Pumpkin Pie Apple Pie • Crack Pie Mocha Chip Cookies

AND MORE!! FAT HEN GRILL

1821 HICKORY AVE HARAHAN

(504) 287-4581

FAT HEN GROCERY

7457 ST CHARLES AVE

(504) 266-2921

5701 Magazine Street

OPEN WEDNESDAY–MONDAY

www.gotocheznous.com

www.fathengrill.com

899-7303

(closed Tuesdays)

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “Re-

Thanksiving

55

ART

LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

PAGE 55

Exposed,” a group photography exhibition, through December. SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www.sheilaart. com — Works by Sheila Phipps,

wares at the festival. Visit www. nojazzfest.com for details. There is a $30 application fee. Application deadline is Nov. 30.

review

ongoing.

SPARE SPACES

SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. 444 Erlanger St., (985) 646-4375 —

ALVAR LIBRARY. 913 Alvar St., 5962667 — “Youth,” sculpture by Betty

“Andy Warhol: Celebrities,” 15 silk-screened works by the artist, through Dec. 16.

Petri; “The Solitary Chair,” sculpture by Michael Moreau; both ongoing.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www.sorengallery. com — “Light & Stone,” abstract mixed-media works by Steven Seinberg, through Nov. 29.

Paintings by YAYA senior guild and alumni, ongoing.

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel.com —

JAX BREWERY. 600 Decatur St., 2997163 — Works by YAYA youth artists, ongoing.

STAPLE GOODS. 1340 St. Roch Ave., 908-7331; www.postmedium.org/ staplegoods — “Fresh Produce,”

works by Thomasine Bartlett, Aaron Collier, Robyn Denny, William DePauw, Daniel Kelly, Anne Nelson, Laura Richens and Cynthia Scott, through Jan. 8. “Fresh Produce,” works by gallery members in conjunction with Prospect.2 St. Claude Satellites, through Jan. 8. STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Mahalia: Queen of

Gospel Music,” a group exhibition of works inspired by Mahalia Jackson, through Jan. 6.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart. com — Contemporary sculpture

and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing.

STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 9420200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel

Sessions: First Installment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by YAYA artists, ongoing.

56

T-LOT. 1940 St. Claude Ave., (865) 567-9766; www.t-lot.tumblr.com —

“Parallel Play,” a group exhibition featuring works on paper, architectural installations, sculpture and performance, through January. TAYLOR/BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — “Wanderlust,”

paintings and drawings by Michele Muennig, through Nov. 26. THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the

Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works by Bill

happy hour

TUES-SAT

OPEN AT 9AM FOR BRUNCH

3-6PM on gamedays

COME TRY OUR BLACKBERRY JALAPENO SMOKED RIBS

Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

TROUSER HOUSE. 4105 St. Claude Ave. — “Salon des Refuses,” an exhibi-

tion of contemporary art by local, national and international artists, through November.

UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — Works by Ivan Vezzoli

for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

3701 IBERVILLE STREET • NOLA 70119 504.488.6582 • KATIESINMIDCITY.COM MON.11AM-3PM • TUES-THURS.11AM-9PM FRI-SAT.11AM-10PM • SUN BRUNCH. 9AM-3PM

VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www. venusiangardens.com — “Luminous

Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455;

JW MARRIOTT NEW ORLEANS. 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www. marriott.com — Works by Charlene

Insley, ongoing.

Prospect.2: Works by Nick Cave and Joyce J. Scott New York Times art critic Roberta Smith put it best: “Whether Nick Cave’s efforts qualify as fashion, body art or sculpture, and regardless of what you ultimately think of them, they fall squarely under the heading of Must Be Seen to Be Believed.” Of course, Smith never lived in a city with our Mardi Gras Indians, the next closest thing to Cave’s mixed-media Soundsuits, but she’s right: Their presence is redolent of exotic energies from the far reaches of the imagination — if not the planet. A former dancer-turnedinstructor at the Chicago Art Institute, Cave made his early suits out of twigs before moving on to more colorful materials such as beads, buttons, sequins and feathers — a look not unlike Fi Yi Yi Big Chief Victor Harris’ striking Mardi Gras Indian suits at the New Orleans Museum of Art during Prospect.1. Former Prospect director Dan Cameron says Cave does include Mardi Gras Indians among his influences. Cave’s suits’ shamanic presence also recalls African ceremonial regalia, and they are worn in live performances, which makes them fine companion pieces for Joyce Scott’s beaded sculptures in the adjacent gallery. Also a performance artist deeply influenced by African and African-American traditions, Baltimore-based Scott is a creator of bead sculptures that are decorative yet acerbic, often beautiful yet biting. A critic of any form of violence, institutional and random, as well as all depredations against women, Scott knows how to be seductive without pulling her punches. Cobalt, Yellow Circles is a deeply hued maze with floating figures not unlike a Nigerian Yoruba beadwork version of a Navajo dream catcher. Nearby, a grotesque beaded head emerges from a green glass, pistol-shaped bottle filled with bullets. Titled Head Shot, it draws you in then creeps you out. The mix of seduction and revulsion, beauty and beastliness is what is known as the human condition, and what Scott and Cave do with it makes this show worth seeing. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU JAN

29

Prospect.2: Works by Nick Cave and Joyce J. Scott Newcomb Art Gallery, Tulane University, Woldenberg Art Center, 865-5328; www.prospectneworleans.org

www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works by Juli

Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

CALL FOR ARTISTS NEW ORLEANS JAZZ & HERITAGE FESTIVAL CRAFTS VENDORS. Artists

and craftspeople are invited to submit applications to sell their

LIBERTY’S KITCHEN. 422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011 — Paintings on canvas by YAYA artists, ongoing. PEACHES RECORDS. 408 N. Peters St., 282-3322 — “Gospel and Blues,” pho-

tographs by Rita Posselt, ongoing.

MUSEUMS 1850 HOUSE. 523 St. Ann St., 568- 6968 — Works by Sophie Calle for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent exhibits of

jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records. ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 1998-2008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org — Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing. CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno. org — “NOLA Now Part I: Swagger for a Lost Magnificence,” through Jan. 29. Prospect.2 show featuring Jonas Dahlberg, George Dunbar, Karl Haendel and others, through Jan. 29. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” student-created quilt, ongoing. GEORGE & LEAH MCKENNA MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ART. 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www. themckennamuseum.com — “The

Invisible Man,” a pop-up exhibition by Gris Gris Parlour in conjunction with Prospect.2, through Saturday.

GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gacc-nola. com — Museum exhibits depict the

colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The 18th Star:

Treasures from 200 Years of Louisiana Statehood,” through Jan. 29.

LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

THEATER CRIMES OF THE HEART. Actor’s

Theatre of New Orleans, WTIX-FM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-4111 — Beth Henley’s tragi-comedy centers around three sisters who must deal with some mistakes from their past. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday through Nov. 27.

FIDDLER ON THE ROOF. North-

shore Harbor Center, 100 Harbor Center Blvd., Slidell, (985) 781-3650 — A poor dairyman tries to instill in his daughters Jewish tradition in the musical. Tickets $30 general admission, $27 seniors, $20 students and $15 children 12 and under. 2 p.m. Sunday.

STAGE LET YOURSELF GO! A MUSICAL BOOK REPORT OF IRVING BERLIN. NOCCA Riverfront,

Nims Blackbox Theatre, 2800 Chartres St., 940-2875; www. nocca.com — NOCCA students perform in the musical revue that pays tribute to the composer and lyricist. Tickets $15. 7 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Saturday. NEW ORLEANS FRINGE FESTIVAL. The festival show-

cases provocative works from emerging and established performing artists at various venues. Visit www.nofringe. org for the full schedule and other details. WednesdaySunday.

PLAY DATES. Mid-City Arts Theater, 3540 Toulouse St., 488-1460 — Gary Rucker stars in Sam Wolfson’s comedy that explores love and relationships, from childhood crushes to marriage and everything in between. Visit www.theatre-13.com for reservations. Tickets $25. 8 p.m. ThursdaySaturday. SHINE! THE HORATIO ALGER MUSICAL. Stage Door Canteen

GREASE. Tulane University, Dixon Hall, 865-5105 ext. 2; www.tulane.edu — Tulane’s Musical Theater Workshop presents the famous rock musical that follows teenagers in the 1950s as they navigate the complexities of love, cars and drive-ins. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 Tulane students and faculty. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

Playmakers Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 8931671; www.playmakersinc.com — Stephen Mallatratt’s horror play follows a lawyer whose visit to a client’s funeral leads him to a terrifying discovery. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 students. 8 p.m. FridaySaturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

HAPPY DAYS. Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 298-8676; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — Four Humours Theater presents Samuel Beckett’s play, in which a woman buried in a sandy mound of earth tries to distract herself and keep her spirits up. The show is performed outdoors behind the theater. Call 948-4167 or email fourhumourstheater@ gmail.com for reservations. Tickets $10 general admission, $13 seniors and students. 3 p.m. Saturday-Sunday through Nov. 27. LET FREEDOM SWING. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The museum’s original retrospective musical highlights 1940s jazz and swing. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m. Sunday.

THE WOMAN IN BLACK.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

RAZOR BLADE WALTZ REVUE.

Dragon’s Den, 435 Esplanade Ave.; www.myspace.com/dragonsdennola — The burlesque show features striptease, fire, weapon play and music by the Unnaturals and Fire Capone & his Strike Anywheres. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Saturday.

THE RICKY GRAHAM & FRIENDS SHOW. Mid-City Arts Theater,

3540 Toulouse St., 488-1460 — Yvette Hargis, Mandy Zirken-

W.E.L.L. BIRTHDAY VARIETY SHOW. AllWays Lounge, 2240

St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www. theallwayslounge.com — W.E.L.L. (Women Empowered and Loving Life) hosts a variety show featuring Katey Red, burlesque dancers and others to celebrate the organization’s first anniversary. Tickets $10 suggested donation. Doors open at 7 p.m., performances at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

AUDITIONS SCHOOLHOUSE ROCK! LIVE.

Cutting Edge Theater at Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www. cuttingedgeproductions.org — The theater seeks performers ages 6-16 for the January production of the educational rock musical. Auditioners should prepare at least 32 bars of a song and bring pre-recorded music. 2 p.m. Sunday.

DANCE KUMBUKA AFRICAN DRUM & DANCE COLLECTIVE. Contem-

porary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno. org — The company presents “Gomela,” an anthology of 30 years of work. Tickets $20 general admission, $15 students. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday.

WE BUY AND SELL traditional • contemporar y • vintage

Basic Queen Set $139

OPERA A MASKED BALL. Mahalia Jack-

son Theater for the Performing Arts, 1419 Basin St., 525-1052; www.mahaliajacksontheater. com — Giuseppe Verdi’s opera is a tale of a mistaken love triangle that turns deadly. Visit www.neworleansopera.org for details. Tickets $20-$150 (plus fees). 8 p.m. Friday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday.

COMEDY COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 944-0099; www. lostlovelounge.com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 3715543; www.maisonfrenchmen. com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m.; show is 8 p.m. Friday. JACKIE JENKINS. 12 Bar, 608 Fulton St., 212-6476; www.12barnola.com — The stand-up comedian performs. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. PAGE 60

Any furnishings for your:

• • • •

home office restaurant hotel

sleeper sofa $99 Big Daddy Queen Set $269

framed Scenes of New Orleans $29-$59

C/F Canal Furniture

3534 Toulouse St (at Bayou St. John) | Mid City 504-482-6851 | Mon-Sat:10am-5pm

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

Deutsches Haus, 1023 Ridgewood St., 522-8014; www. deutscheshaus.org — John “Spud” McConnell, Becky Allen, Mo Brennan McConnell and others star in the Tennessee Williams parody. Call 2599888 for reservations. Tickets $15. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday through November.

at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944; www.stagedoorcanteen.org — Hal Linden stars in the concert staged reading inspired by the characters and stories of Horatio Alger. Tickets $60 general admission, $100 patron tickets (includes a reception after the performance with Linden). 7 p.m. Thursday.

THE GLASS MENDACITY.

bach, Matthew Mickal, Jefferson Turner and Brian Albus join Graham on stage in the cabaret show. Call 488-1460 or email info@midcitytheatre. com for reservations. Tickets $25. 6 p.m. Sunday.

59

LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT STAGE

PAGE 59

OPEN FOR THANKSGIVING ∙ LUNCH & DINNER

Lunch Buffet Daily LUNCH

11:30AM - 2:30PM

DINNER

5:30PM - 10:30PM

9 2 3 M E TA I R I E R D . 8 3 6 - 6 8 5 9

CLOSED TUES.

Nothing Beats a Classic! If you are looking for the classic comfort food you will find it at Ted’s Frostop on Claiborne at Calhoun. Our Menu features the always famous Loto Burger, shakes, fries, breakfast and much more – even New Orleans Beignets are coming soon!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

See You Soon!

60

Ice cold mug

at 6047 MAGAZINE ST. 899-4223

of original

tbeer Frostop Ruorcohase! with a p

h 12-31-2011

Valid throug

504-861-3615

www.tedsfrostop.com

Happy Hour

1/2 off all apps & specialty cocktails Mon-Thurs 5pm - 7pm Bar service only

tuesday — friday

5pm — 10pm

review

Red PHOTO BY RIDE HAMILTON

The lights come up on a painter’s studio with huge canvases, some painted, some blank. Mark Rothko (Bob Edes Jr.) stands in work clothes, smoking a cigarette and staring intently at something hanging on the fourth wall that separates him from the audience. Ken (Sean Glazebrook), a well-dressed young man, enters. “What do you see?” asks Rothko, gesturing at what we soon realize is a painting.“Let the picture do its work. Lean into it. Engage with it. Now what do you see?” “Red,” Ken says. This cunning simplicity launches the fascinating play Red. It’s 1958. Rothko, a curmudgeon with a vanity that knows no bounds, has received a lucrative commission to paint a series of murals for The Four Seasons restaurant. It is a great coup for an artist who has struggled most of his life with few creature comforts. Rothko, however, considers his pared-down paintings as spiritual sanctuaries — “places” meant to be entered visually for contemplation. He believes their presence is so strong, they will entice viewers to meditate, even when placed in a chic restaurant. Rothko’s work during this late period had evolved into colored rectangles on a single-colored ground — abstraction taken to its minimalist limits. When Ken answers “red” to Rothko’s question, it’s both comic and accurate. In Edes’ masterful handling, Rothko is a force of nature. He is restless and out of control — partly because of a liberal imbibing of whiskey. He continually harangues Ken, who aspires to be a painter himself, and hires the young man as his assistant. But Ken holds his own and gradually overcomes the intimidation. The character study of Rothko and the conflict between the two men make Red a hypnotic evening. Rothko savors the victory of his generation: crushing cubism. No one can be a cubist anymore! And he claims to have learned all he knows from past masters. “It’s not the blank canvas you fear,” he says. “It’s Velasquez.” How do you achieve something great, but also new. How do you surmount the past?” Ken has his personal struggles as well. Rothko’s argument for the emotional power of color takes on a meaning for both men, and the master continues battling other developments in the art world. The highly accomplished and literate drama won author John Logan a 2010 Tony Award for Best Play, and it is a challenging work. Director Aimee Hayes deserves a tip of the hat for gathering a top-notch cast and guiding the actors to strong, nuanced performances. — Dalt Wonk

NOV 17— 20

Red 8 p.m. Thu.-Sat., 3 p.m Sun. Southern Rep, The Shops at Canal Place, 365 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www.southernrep.com Tickets $29-$35

MESMERIZING MISTRESS MO.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.-nolacomedy.com — The performer stages her “naughty comedy hypnosis show.” 7 p.m. Friday, 9:30 p.m. Saturday. PERMANENT DAMAGE STANDUP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar,

2441 A.P. Tureaud Ave., 9484003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8

p.m. Wednesday. SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts 9 p.m. Thursday.

STUPID TIME MACHINE. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — The improv com-

edy troupe performs. Tickets $5. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts 9 p.m. Wednesday. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

Listings editor: Alex Woodward listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 15 TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 17 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during its weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Saturday 19 DIRT & WORMS. Veterans Park Greenhouse, Williams Boulevard, next to Kenner City Hall — Children can learn

what compost is and what worms can do for the garden. Call 468-7268 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

6 Westside Shopping Center, Gretna, 264-5309; www. mykoolsmiles.com — The New Orleans chapter of Mocha Moms launches its children’s literacy program with refreshments, giveaways and an appearance by NFL player Marlon Favorite. Visit www. nolamochamoms.org for details. Free admission. 10 a.m. to noon. SATURDAY STUDIOS: YOUNG MASTERS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — Children explore and interact with artworks in the museum’s collection and then create their own works in the museum’s studio. The program is for children in the second to fifth grades. Call 539-9608 or email ebalkin@ogdenmuseum. org for details. Admission $15 members, $18 nonmembers. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

EVENTS Tuesday 15 BIPARTISAN POLICY CENTER SUMMIT. Tulane University,

6823 St. Charles Ave., 8628000; www.tulane.edu — The

theme of the third annual summit is “Taking the Poison out of Partisanship.” Visit www.bipartisanpolicy.org/ nola-2011-agenda for the full schedule and other details. Free admission. 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University

Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE. Tulane-

Lakeside Hospital, 4700 South I-10 Service Road West, Metairie — The peer support group meets the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Visit www.dbsaneworleans.org for details. 7:30 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP.

Grief Resource Center, 1221 S. Clearview Pkwy., fourth floor, 723-3628 — Facilitated by licensed counselors and therapists, the Akula Foundation Grief Resource Center’s group is open to any family that has experienced a death or other significant loss. Space is limited; pre-registration is required. 6:15 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. Third Tuesday of every month and First Tuesday of every month. Through Dec. 6. NATIONAL PHILANTHROPY DAY.

Sheraton New Orleans Hotel, 500 Canal St., 595-5511; www. sheratonneworleans.com — The Greater New Orleans chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals hosts the luncheon and Champagne reception honoring contributions in the philanthropy community. Visit www.afpneworleans.afpnet.org for details. Admission starts at $60 members, $75 nonmembers. 11 a.m to 2 p.m. PANEL DISCUSSION: ROTHKO IN NEW ORLEANS. Contemporary

Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 5283800; www.cacno.org — The CAC and Southern Rep Theater host a discussion about artist Mark Rothko’s time in New Orleans moderated by Gambit political editor Clancy Dubos. Free admission. 7 p.m. THE PEOPLE SAY PROJECT.

Louisiana Humanities Center, 938 Lafayette St., Suite 300, 523-4352; www.leh.org — Louisiana Humanities Center program director Brian Boyles moderates a discussion with local artists and musicians. This week’s discussion features Anne Gisleson from the Antenna Gallery and NOCCA and Vera Warren-Williams from the Community Book Center. Call 620-2632 or email boyles@ leh.org for details. 5 p.m. reception, 6 p.m. discussion.

PUBLIC RELATIONS ASSOCIATION OF LOUISIANA LUNCHEON .

Ralph’s on the Park, 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www.

— The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. Noon.

preview Eric 'Cashus' Clay Memorial

Many New Orleanians knew Eric Dwayne “Cashus” Clay from the local music scene. He was a member of the brass band/hip-hop group Coolbone and worked with bands as a stage production manager for Festival Productions Inc., the producer of the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. Clay died June 14 in Dallas. He was 40. “He was an all-around great-spirited guy,” says Curtis Watson, a friend and member of Buckwheat Zydeco. “He always had a smile on, and music was his life.” A native of Louisville, Ky., Clay studied music at the University of New Orleans, where he met many local musicians. He played trumpet and rapped for Coolbone, and in 2000 he joined the staff of Festival Productions. After Hurricane Katrina, he married Dawn Melanie Washington and they split time between New Orleans and Dallas. He is survived by his wife, father Eric L. Clay and sister Jamila Clay. There is a memorial ceremony for Clay at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17, in City Park (at the Singing Oak near the Wisner Boulevard entrance) followed by a 7 p.m. concert at Chickie Wah Wah honoring and celebrating his life. Performers include Gregory Davis, Derrick Freeman, Todd Duke, Thaddeus Richard, Mark Brooks, Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Kermit Ruffins, Dr. Michael White, Delfeayo Marsalis, Roland Guerin, James Andrews and others. All proceeds go to defray Clay’s medical expenses. Contact Heather Stamm (hstamm@fpi-no.com) for information about donations. Suggested donation $10. — Will Coviello

NOV

17

Eric “Cashus” Clay Memorial Celebration Chickie Wah Wah, 2828 Canal St. 304-4714; www.chickiewahwah.com

ralphsonthepark.com — The association’s luncheon focuses on ways businesses and specifically PR professionals can use Google+. Visit www.facebook. com/pralnola for details. Admission $25 PRAL members, $30 nonmembers. 11:30 a.m to 1 p.m.

4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for people who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Wednesday 16

Foods Market, 3420 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 8888225; www.wholefoods.com — Healthy eating specialist Ely Navarro shows how to create a healthy Thanksgiving meal, and participants can get samples and recipes. Space is limited to 15 guests. Admission $10. 6 p.m.

COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET.

Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market, French

Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital,

HEALTH STARTS HERE: THANKSGIVING. Whole

JAPAN’S RECOVERY FROM THE EARTHQUAKE & TSUNAMI .

Tulane University, Woldenberg Art Center, Freeman Auditorium, 314-2200; www. tulane.edu — Hisoshi Sato, consul general of Japan in Nashville, presents the lecture. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. LUNCHBOX LECTURE. National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org

NONPAC MEETING . Seventh

District Station, 10555 Lake Forest Blvd. — The New Orleans Neighborhood Policing Anti-Crime Council holds its monthly meeting. 7 p.m.

PROTECTING OUR CHILDREN.

Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac. org — Betsy McAlister Groves, director of the Child Witness to Violence Project at Boston Medical Center, is the featured speaker at the discussion on effects of community and domestic violence on children. The event also includes dinner. Free admission. 6 p.m. RESEARCHING NOTARIAL RECORDS FROM THE COLONIAL PERIOD TO TODAY. Clerk of

Civil District Court Notarial Archives, 1340 Poydras St., Suite 500, 568-8577; www. orleanscdc.com — The seminar teaches attendees how to use notarial records to conduct a title search and discover the history of a property. Admission is free, but space is limited. Call 680-9604 for details. 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

WOMEN & WINE ON WEDNESDAYS. Marigny

Brasserie, 640 Frenchmen St., 945-4472; www.marignybrasserie.com — The women’s networking and social event features wine specials. Visit www. womenwinewednesday.com for details. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Thursday 17 BOYS HOPE GIRLS HOPE TENNIS CLASSIC . Beau Chene Country

Club, 602 Beau Chene Drive, Mandeville, (985) 845-3571; www.beauchenecc.com — The

tournament features competitive play as well as food from local restaurants, a silent auction, family activities and prizes for tournament winners. Call 484-7744 or visit www. boyshopegirlshope.org/nola for details. Admission $85. 6 p.m. Thursday-Friday, 9 a.m. Saturday-Sunday. BOYS TOWN LOUISIANA REPROM . Gallier Hall, 545 St.

Charles Ave., 565-7457 — The nonprofit child and family service organization hosts a “prom” where guests can vote for community leaders and celebrities to be the king and queen of the event. The event also features hors d’oeuvres and live music by Levee Dawgs.

Visit www.boystown.org/ reprom for details. Admission $50. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. BUILD NOW WINE & CHEESE TASTING. Ste. Marie, 930

Poydras St., 304-6988; www. stemarienola.com — The nonprofit that builds affordable housing hosts a networking event with representatives from Glazer and St. James Cheese Company discussing wine and cheese pairings. Reservations are recommended. Call 324-3964 or email holbein@buildnownola.com for details. Admission $35. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

EPILEPSY & SEIZURE EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT GROUP.

East Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The Epilepsy Foundation of Louisiana holds a monthly support group for adults who have or are impacted by epilepsy or seizure disorders. The group meets in the Foundation Board Room. Call (800) 960-0587 or email kelly@epilepsylouisiana. org for details. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

“LAST CALL WITH CARSON DALY” SCREENING EVENT.

Bruno’s Tavern, 7538 Maple St., 861-7615; www.brunostavern.com — Fuse TV hosts a screening of the show with bar specials, free food, giveaways and music. Visit www.fuse.tv/ lastcallparty for details. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. NEW ORLEANS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ANNUAL MEETING.

Hyatt Regency Hotel, 601 Loyola Ave., 561-1234; www. neworleans.hyatt.com — Wendell Pierce discusses how the film industry is affecting the local economy at the organization’s annual meeting. Call 799-4260 or email sphoenix@ neworleanschamber.org for details. Admission $40 members, $50 nonmembers. 11 a.m. PARENTS OF TROUBLED ADULTS MEETING . Jewish Family

Service, 3330 West Esplanade, Suite 600, Metairie, 831-8475; www.jfsneworleans.org — The bi-monthly meeting offers support to parents whose adult children suffer from depression, mental illness, addiction disorders and other difficulties. Dr. Georgette Somjen discusses “Educating Ourselves on Medical Treatment of Substance Dependence.” Call 831-8475 or 828-6334 for details. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE.

Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 5699070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

MOCHA LITERACY READING NOOK KICK-OFF. Kool Smiles,

EVENTS

61

EVENTS

LISTINGS

seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

preview

Friday 18 LAKEVIEW SHEPARD CENTER GOLDEN COMMUNITY LUNCHEON. Community

Church, 6690 Fleur de Lis Drive, 483-2918; www.communitychurchuu.org — The

luncheon for seniors features a comedy performance, door prizes and more. Reservations are requested. Visit www. lakeviewshepherdcenternola. org for details. Admission $5 suggested donation. 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK. Armstrong Park, N.

Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

YATS ANTI-CANCER PARTY.

62

Margaret Gardens Inn, 1133 Margaret Place, 522-7677; www.margaret-place.com — Young Adults Taking a Stand (Against Cancer) hosts the party with drinks, hors d’oeuvres and a high-end raffle. Email yatsnola@gmail. com or visit www.yatsagainstcancer.com for details. Admission $30. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

Saturday 19 AFRICAN RETENTIONS IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN ART.

Mahalia Jackson Early Childhood & Family Learning Center, 2405 Jackson Ave. — Charlie

Johnson, assistant professor for the College of Education and Human Development at Southern University at New Orleans, presents the lecture. 1:30 p.m.

ALL SAINTS SOIREE. First NBC

Bank, 201 Baronne St. — Save Our Cemeteries’ annual fundraising event is a masked cocktail gala with a silent auction, music by Ingrid Lucia and more. Visit www.saveourcemeteries.org/all-saints-soiree for details. Admission starts at $65. Patron party 7 p.m., gala 8 p.m.

ART HOME NEW ORLEANS.

The Creative Alliance of New Orleans’ event features a tour showcasing home art collections, plus workshops and lectures from curators, collectors and art dealers. Call 218-4807 or visit www.cano-la.org for

Angola to Zydeco

Reese Fuller was a reporter and editor for two Lafayette-based newspapers before becoming a teacher, and the essays in Angola to Zydeco are drawn from his reportorial travels around South Louisiana. He’s covered the Angola Prison Rodeo, cockfighting in Rayne and a folk artist/hoarder in Grand Coteau. The book also includes his conversations with Louisiana luminaries (Boozoo Chavis, Marc Savoy, James Lee Burke and Elemore Morgan Jr.), but the real charm is meeting people like Greg Kerr, an Opelousas-based faith healer who works through newspaper ads. Joining Fuller will be Treme consultant and general man-about-town Davis Rogan, who promises — in Fuller’s words — “to do that voodoo that he do.” — Kevin Allman

NOV

19

R. Reese Fuller with Davis Rogan 1 p.m.-3 p.m. Saturday Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266; www.gardendistrictbookshop.com

details. Admission $15 per day, $25 for the weekend. 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. AZUCAR BALL . InterContinental Hotel, 444 St. Charles Ave., 636-1836 — The New Orleans Hispanic Heritage Foundation hosts the black-tie ball with live music by Julio y Cesar and Rumba Buena, a silent auction and food from local restaurants. Proceeds from the event benefit the organization’s scholarship fund. Call 595-5139 for details. Admission $150 general admission, $200 patron party, $100 guests ages 30 and under. 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. BARATARIA BUCCANEERS. Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, French Quarter Visitor Center, 419 Decatur St., 589-2636 — Guests can learn about the wetlands of Jean Lafitte and his Baratarian pirates with canoeing, a ranger-guided walk and a walk focusing on the history and economics of piracy. Call 689-3690 ext. 25 for details. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. SaturdaySunday. BEAUJOLAIS FESTIVAL . JW Marriott New Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The Gulf Coast chapter of the French American Chamber of Commerce hosts the festival with French food, wine, live

music by the Yat Pack and an auction. Visit 2011beaujolaisfestival.eventbrite.com for details. Admission $50 members, $60 nonmembers. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. EAGLE WATCH . Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING . Christ Church

Cathedral, 2919 St. Charles Ave., 895-6602 — ERACE meets in the church’s Westfeldt Room for its weekly discussion group. Call 8661163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. FORE! KIDS GOLF BALL .

Roosevelt Hotel, 123 Baronne St., 648-1200 — The foundation that funds children’s service organizations through golf events hosts its annual gala featuring live music by MoJeaux, an auction and dinner. Visit www.forekidsfoundation.com for details. Admission $150. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

EVENTS

LISTINGS

Judaism or considering conversion. Reservations are recommended. 9 a.m. LOY KRATHONG FESTIVAL. Wat Wimuttayaram Buddhist Temple, 1601 Stanton Road, 394-3599 — The Thai festival features traditional food, music, dancing and Loy Krathong customs. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. NEW ORLEANS KIDNEY WALK.

Audubon Park, Shelter 10, 6500 Magazine St. — The 2.2mile walk helps support the National Kidney Foundation of Louisiana’s public education programs and and patient services. Call 861-4500 or visit www.kidneyla.org for details. Registration at 8 a.m., walk at 9:30 a.m.

OAK STREET PO-BOY FESTIVAL.

Poet Laureate Series

A Reading by

NAOMI SHIHAB NYE

PUSHCART PRIZE WINNER AND GUGGENHEIM FELLOW

Kendall Cram Room Lavin-Bernick Center Tulane University Thursday, November 17, 2011 7:00 PM Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

Free and open to the public

64

The free festival spanning seven blocks of Oak Street features vendors selling a variety of po-boys, as well as music, arts and crafts and a children’s area. Visit www. poboyfest.com for details. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING . Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. ST. CATHERINE’S DAY HAT PARADE. Women showcase

elaborate and unusual hats in the walking parade, which features live music by Norbert Slama. The parade starts at the corner of St. Charles Avenue and Pleasant Street. Visit www.hatnola.com for details. 10:30 a.m.

Monday 21 TOASTMASTERS MEETING.

This event is sponsored by the Creative Writing Fund of the Department of English For more information call: 865-5160

Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — New Orleans Toastmasters

Club hosts an open weekly meeting (except holidays) to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 251-8600 or visit www. notoast234.freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

Goodwill Training Center, 3400 Tulane Ave. — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. Email susan_unp@yahoo.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

FALL HARVEST centerpiece

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

815 FOCIS STREET [OFF VETERANS ]

for the day we give THANKS arrangements starting @ $40

837-6400

American Cancer Society, 2605 River Road, Westwego, 833-4024 or (800) ACS-2345; www.cancer.org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient service programs.

Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information. ANOTHER LIFE FOUNDATION VOLUNTEERS. Another Life

Foundation seeks volunteers recovering from mental illness to help mentor others battling depression and suicidal behaviors. Free training provided. For details, contact Stephanie Green at (888) 5433480, anotherlifefoundation@ hotmail.com or visit www. anotherlifefoundation.org. BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION . Bayou Rebirth

seeks volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details.

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS VOLUNTEERS. Big Brothers Big

Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, 3097304 or (877) 500-7304; www. bbbssela.org — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other outings you both would enjoy. Call for information.

CASA NEW ORLEANS. The

organization seeks volunteer court-appointed special advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. The time commitment is a minimum of 10 hours per month. No special skills are required; thorough training and support is provided. Call Brian Opert at 522-1962 ext. 213 or email info@casaneworleans.org for details. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. CCFM and marke-

tumbrella.org seek volunteers to field shopper questions, assist seniors, help with monthly children’s activities and more. Call 495-1459 or email latifia@marketumbrella. org for details.

EDGAR DEGAS FOUNDATION .

The nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call 821-5009 or email info@degashouse.com for details. GREATER NEW ORLEANS FAIR HOUSING ACTION CENTER .

The center seeks part-time civil rights investigators with excellent writing skills, reliable transportation and no criminal convictions to help expose housing discrimination in the New Orleans metro area. Call 717-4257 or email mmorgan@ gnofairhousing.org for information. HANDSON NEW ORLEANS.

The volunteer center for the

Greater New Orleans area invites prospective volunteers to learn about the various opportunities available, how to sign up to attend service projects and general tips on how to be a good volunteer. Call 483-7041 ext. 107, email volunteer@ handsonneworleans.org or visit www.handsonneworleans.org for details. HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS.

Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 832-8111 for details. JACKSON BARRACKS MUSEUM VOLUNTEERS. The museum

seeks volunteers to work one day a week for the Louisiana National Guard Museum. Volunteers prepare military aircraft, vehicles and equipment for display. Call David at 837-0175 or email daveharrell@yahoo.com for details. JEFFERSON COMMUNITY SCHOOL . The charter school

that educates at-risk middle school students who have been expelled from Jefferson Parish’s public schools seeks adult mentors for its students. Call 836-0808 for details.

LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS.

Dorothy Dorsett Brown LA/ SPCA Campus, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., Algiers, 368-5191; www.la-spca.org — The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Dionne Simoneaux at dionne@la-spca.org.

MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 8885880 for details. MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION . The MDA seeks

volunteers ages 16 and older for its weeklong summer camps around the country. Call (800) 572-1717 or visit www.mda.org/summercamp for details. SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS. New Orleans

Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details.

TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION .

The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upperschool New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

VOLUNTEERS CAN LEAD PROGRAM . The program

allows residents to assist the New Orleans Police Department at its district stations. Email vocal@nola.gov for details.

WORDS 17 POETS! LITERARY & PERFORMANCE SERIES. Gold

Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www.goldminesaloon.net — Poet

Bernadette Mayer reads and signs Ethics of Sleep, and poet Philip Good reads and signs Untitled Writings from a Member of the Blank Generation. An open mic hosted by Jimmy Ross follows. Visit www.17poets.com for details. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. COOKBOOK CLUB. Garden

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — Jen and John Yates, creator of the Cake Wrecks blog and authors of Wreck the Halls: Cake Wrecks Gets Festive, appear at the meeting. Guests are encouraged to recreate their favorite “wreck” from the blog on a cupcake for the meeting. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch

Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday.

CORNELL LANDRY. Octavia

Books, 513 Octavia St., 8997323 — The children’s author signs and reads from Le Petit Bonhomme Janvier. 1:30 p.m. Saturday.

College, Moreau Center, 4123 Woodland Ave., Algiers — The author discusses and signs Creole Genesis: The Bringier Family and Antebellum Plantation Life in Louisiana. 2 p.m. Sunday. DAVID ARBO. St. Tammany

Parish Library, Covington Branch, 310 W. 21st Ave., Covington, (985) 893-6280; www.sttammany.lib.la.us/ covington.html — The author signs and discusses Covington. 11 a.m. Saturday. DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s

EDWARD BRANLEY. Maple

Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop. com — The author signs and discusses Maison Blanche Department Stores. 6 p.m. Saturday.

FRIENDS OF THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE .

Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 5962625; www.nutrias.org — The group hosts twice-weekly

HUNT SLONEM . Martine Chaisson Gallery, 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www.martinechaissongallery.com — The artist signs Dominique Nahas’ The Worlds of Hunt Slonem. 7 p.m. Saturday.

SOCRATES CAFE . St. Tammany Parish Library, Folsom Branch, 82393 Railroad Ave., Folsom, (985) 796-9728 — The philosophical group holds a monthly discussion. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.

JAMES NOLAN . Maple Street

SOUTHERN LOUISIANA CHAPTER OF ROMANCE WRITERS OF AMERICA . East

Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author signs, discusses and reads from Higher Ground. 6 p.m. Thursday.

JASON FLORES-WILLIAMS. Faubourg Marigny Art & Books, 600 Frenchmen St., 947-3700; www.fabonfrenchmen.com — The author reads from “In the Battle of the Open Heart,” a piece written about his Occupy Wall Street experience. 8 p.m. Friday. LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP.

Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES.

Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. NAOMI SHIHAB NYE . Tulane

University, Lavin-Bernick Center, Kendall Cram Lecture Hall — The poet and writer signs and reads from her works. 7 p.m. Thursday.

OCTAVIA BOOKS BOOK CLUB.

Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The group discusses Brian Doyle’s Mink River. 10:30 a.m. Saturday.

PASS IT ON . George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturdays. POETRY MEETING . New

Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. R. REESE FULLER. Garden

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author signs and discusses Angola to Zydeco: Louisiana Lives. Davis Rogan also performs at the signing. 1 p.m. Saturday.

THE SCENE OF THE CRIME . St. Tammany Parish Library, Slidell Branch, 555 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 893-6280; www.stpl.us — The group

Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — Author, playwright, director and teacher Rosary Hartel O’Neill discusses dialogue at the meeting. Visit www.solawriters.org for details. 10 a.m. Saturday.

SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spokenword, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground

Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday.

UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. UNO ENGLISH DEPARTMENT DISCUSSION SERIES. University

of New Orleans, Liberal Arts Building, 2000 Lakeshore Drive, 280-6657; www.uno. edu — Susan Larson, Abram Himelstein and Christopher Chambers are the guests at the discussion. Email aeboyd@ uno.edu for details. 2 p.m. Wednesday. WALTER ISAACSON . Jewish Community Center, 5342 St. Charles Ave., 388-0511; www. nojcc.org — The author signs and discusses Steve Jobs. 7 p.m. Thursday. Isaacson also appears at Garden District Book Shop (The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266) noon Thursday. THE WELL: A WOMEN’S POETRY CIRCLE . St. Anna’s Episcopal

Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121; www.stannanola. org — The group meets at 2 p.m. Mondays. Call 289-9142 or email poetryprocess@ gmail.com for details.

CALL FOR WRITERS BOB KAUFMAN BOOK PRIZE IN POETRY. Trembling Pillow

Press presents the contest. The winner will be published in 2012. Visit www.tremblingpillowpress.com for details. Submissions deadline is Tuesday. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

K A E ST MB BO

K

R STEA

TENDE

SS OODNE

W/GN FRENCH O

. BREAD

MOSCA’S EST. 1946

Open Tuesday - Saturday 5:30 pm –9:30 pm

504.436.8950 4137 Hwy 90 7329 FRERET • 861-7890 (1 block off Broadway)

WestWego

www.moscasrestaurant.com WE ACCEPT RESERVATIONS

Now Accepting NOLA Bucks!

MEXICAN & CUBAN FOOD

Best Fajitas in Town!

PUERCO FRITO - $10.50 ROPA VIEJA - $8.15 Come Have Lunch With Me!

COUNTRY FLAME

620 IBERVILLE STREET • 522.1138 OPEN EVERYDAY ‘TIL 8:30PM

MARK’S

MUFFLER SHOP since 1984

AUTHORIZED FLOWMASTER DEALER 5229 St. Claude Ave. New Orleans 504-944-7733 w w w.mar k smuf f le r sho p.co m

Join Us at the

PoBoy Festival Sunday November 20 Goes Great with PoBoys

Hot Chocolate Ole Fashion NOLA Nectar Soda Chocolate-Dipped Zapp’s Chips

gourmet pizzas Hand Made Freshly Prepared Dough With Our Own Sauce

Create your own 10” Pizza with our favorite toppings or try our specialty pizzas. Mediterranean • Blackened Shrimp Grilled Chicken Alfredo • Margarita Pizza We also have lactose free soy mozzarella cheese

3939 Veterans • 885-3416

(between Cleary Ave & Clearview) Mon-Tues 11-3 • Wed-Thurs 11-7:30 Fri 11-8:30 • Sat 11-8:00 www.parranspoboys.com

5707 Magazine St. · 504.269.5707 www.BlueFrogChocolates.com

Attiki

bar & grill experience the mediterranean

BELLY DANCER

Every Fri & Sat Night

FOOD SERVED TIL 1AM

Worldly Wine/ Martinis

HOOKAH 230 DECATUR

11AM-4AM DAILY

www.attikineworleans.com 504-587-3756

G ott Gour met Cafe uses the fre s h

Menu Tailgateeekend

every w our new Come try u items & 11am-9pm daily men list! Tue-Fri Sat-Sun 8am-5pm new wine Weekend Breakfast Sat-Sun

3100 Magazine St. • 504-373-6579 www.gottgourmetcafe.com

m es t ingredients available for our home a

at the Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net — The bar hosts a free weekly poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

meets to discuss mystery novels the third Monday of each month, through December. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

CRAIG A. BAUER. Holy Cross

sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

THE

m ake all of our signature recipes dail y.

EVENTS

D AVA ELIVE IL A RY BLE !

d e dressings, sauces and meats to

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

65

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <ROOT FOR THE RESTAURANT > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >Root (200 Julia St., 252-9480; www.rootnola.com) is slated < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <to open this week in the Warehouse District, taking over the former location of Feast. Its menu is a wide-ranging collection of charcuterie, comfort food and international flavors, from WHAT hanger steak to Korean-style chicken wings to daily foie gras Fat Hen Grocery preparations. Root is a partnership between Maximilian Ortiz and chef Phillip Lopez, who are alumni of the Besh Restaurant WHERE Group and Rambla, where Lopez was recently chef. They serve 7457 St. Charles Ave., lunch and dinner Monday through Saturday and late-night 266-2921; www.fatThursday through Saturday. hengrill.com

am

B

WHEN

Breakfast, lunch and dinner Wed.-Mon. HOW MUCH

Moderate

RESERVATIONS

Accepted

WHAT WORKS

Brunch all day, Berkshire pulled pork

SIX COURSES, 20 YEARS

Over two decades, dishes like oysters Giovanni, with its “stained glass” array of sauces, and seafood salads served in martini glasses became the calling cards of Cafe Giovanni (117 Decatur St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni.com). To celebrate his restaurant’s 20th anniversary, chef Duke LoCicero is promoting a six-course dinner of these and other Cafe Giovanni specialties. The dinner includes wine pairings, costs $65 and is served nightly during November.

five 5 IN

Five Lamb Dishes

WHAT DOESN T

Focus suffers in the multi-faceted concept

ELEVEN79

CHECK, PLEASE

Rack of lamb is marinated with mint and rosemary and served over braised fennel.

Fat Hen adds new twists as it nests Uptown

1179 ANNUNCIATION ST., 299-1179 www.eleven79.com

IRIS

321 N. PETERS ST., 299-3944 www.irisneworleans.com

Smokin' Groceries

Lamb meatballs bob in a hearty, golden soup.

Shane Pritchett smokes meats in-house at Fat Hen Grocery.

A CHEF’S DINER CONCEPT EVOLVES AS IT GROWS.

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

BY IAN MCNULTY

A

tled sauces and smoked meats by the pound. Thinking of Fat Hen as a family restaurant with barbecue rather than a gussied-up barbecue restaurant helps set expectations. The selection of meats is limited, and while the pulled pork and smoked wings are excellent, the St. Louis-style ribs I tried were cut far too close to the bone and were too dry. Sauces are good, but I was always looking for more. Fat Hen lacks the single-minded focus of a pure barbecue joint, but it does offer a great deal more variety and addresses more appetites. For instance, the smoker is used on marinated feta that goes into an omelet with crabmeat and herbs, and it also is employed to smoke deli meats for some impressive sandwiches, particularly a fat club and one of the better Reubens I’ve had lately. The seersucker platter, with house-made pickles, sliced sausage and very creamy pimento cheese, could be a Southern answer to the ploughman’s lunch. Fat Hen Grocery has an attractive, sunny setting, a friendly BYOB policy (no corkage fee) and a busy brunch scene, but that’s also when the normally fine service tends to lag. This building has hosted a progression of restaurants in recent years, and it looks like Fat Hen Grocery sees more customers on a good weekend than several of its predecessors did in their entire brief life spans. The barbecue could use some more attention, and the place is no bargain, but Pritchett is onto something good here.

1432 ST. CHARLES AVE., 595-6755 www.theirishhouseneworleans.com

A slice of lamb belly is served with mint sauce over polenta cake.

JAMILA’S MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE 7808 MAPLE ST., 866-4366

House-made merguez and roasted lamb come with couscous.

MONDO

900 HARRISON AVE., 224-2633 www.mondoneworleans.com

Broiled lamb T-bones are served with goat cheese agnolotti.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2009 Sables d'Azur Rose COTES DE PROVENCE, FRANCE / $15-$16 RETAIL

Dry southern French roses are versatile and can be enjoyed year round, and they pair well with many traditional Thanksgiving dishes. This bottling is a blend of Grenache, Syrah and Cinsault, and it offers aromas of citrus zest, white peach and red berries. On the palate, taste strawberry, raspberry, watermelon, grapefruit, pleasing minerality and refreshing acidity. Drink it with sushi, tempura, oysters, foie gras, ratatouille, grilled fish, pork loin and hearty dishes like cassoulet. Buy it at: Cork & Bottle and Bacchanal. Drink it at: KPaul’s Louisiana Kitchen, NOLA and Emeril’s. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

strong aroma of wood smoke suffuses the air at Fat Hen Grocery, and the menu includes ribs and pulled pork. But despite such evidence, this new restaurant on St. Charles Avenue isn’t a barbecue joint so much as it is the latest incarnation of the evolving effort by its creator, Shane Pritchett, to give comfort food basics some of the innovation and attention of the high-end restaurant world where he earned his stripes. Like much on the menu, the pulled pork costs a few dollars more than you might expect from the casual digs here. But it’s from Berkshire pigs, a particularly fine pedigree. On Fat Hen’s plate — or on a sandwich or under poached eggs on the breakfast-all-day menu — it yields a deeply colored, crusty-to-candied pile of very satisfying pork. Pritchett added barbecue to his Fat Hen menu less than a year ago, and he says it’s his way of returning to his native Texan roots. He was formally trained and served as chef du cuisine at Emeril’s Delmonico before leaving to open the original Fat Hen Grill in Harahan. That place looked like a diner, and it functioned like one — but with a creative, chef-driven menu. It soon spawned a second location in Kenner, but later Pritchett consolidated his efforts at a single and different Harahan address, where he revamped the menu and remade the place as a blend of barbecue, diner and family restaurant. In July, he opened Fat Hen Grocery in Uptown, with the addition of a take-out deli and a tiny grocery section for his bot-

IRISH HOUSE

67

>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>> <<<<<<< >>>>>>> <<<<<<<< >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>

Crescent City

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>

<<<<

Steak House

<<< <<<<< >>>>>>>>> <<< >> <<

A Legendary Dining Experience in New Orleans

1934 – 2011

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. >>>>>>>>> Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave., Harahan, 287-4581; 7457 St. Charles Ave., 266-2921; www.fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pit-cooked barbecue options include St. Louis-style spare ribs. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground in-house daily. Reservations accepted. St. Charles Avenue: breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Hickory Avenue: breakfast, lunch and dinner Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $$ O’HENRY’S FOOD & SPIRITS — 634

S. Carrollton Ave., 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 461-9840; www.ohenrys.com — Complimentary peanuts are the calling card of these casual, family friendly restaurants. The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL BAYOU BEER GARDEN — 326 N.

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $ THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

River Road, 834-4938; www. therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133

S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

ZADDIE’S TAVERN — 1200 Jeffer-

son Hwy., Jefferson, 832-0830 — Zaddie’s serves burgers, alligator sausage, boudin, tamales and meat or crawfish pies. Thursday’s steak night special features a filet mignon, butter-garlic potatoes, salad, grilled French bread and a soft drink for $15. No reserva-

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy.

59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialties at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks

St., 202-4741; www.bookoobbq. com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. The Cajun banh mi fills a Vietnamese roll with hogshead cheese, smoked pulled pork, boudin, fresh jalapeno, cilantro, cucumber, carrot, pickled radish and sriracha sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.Sat. Cash only. $

SAUCY’S BBQ GRILL — 3244 Severn

Ave., Metairie, 322-2544; www. saucysbbqgrill.com — Saucy’s serves slow-smoked St. Louisstyle pork ribs, pulled pork, brisket, smoked sausage and grilled or jerk chicken. Side items include smoked beans, mac and cheese, coleslaw and Caribbean rice. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828 Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE —

527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Grilled Brewhouse ribs are served with house-made barbecue sauce. During October, nightly Oktoberfest specials include entree choices like Vienna Schnitzel and roasted chicken with Speck ham. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL —

4905 Canal St., 488-7357; www. beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, sauteed mushrooms

or house-made hickory sauce. Other options include a grilled chicken sandwich. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www. budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and 24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish po-boys. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St.,

861-7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

TUES–FRI 11:30am–9:30pm SAT 4-10pm • SUN 11:30-9pm

821-3271 More than just great food...

ECO CAFE & BISTRO — 3903 Canal

St., 561-6585; www.ecocafeno.com — Eco Cafe serves sandwiches like the veggie club, layered with Swiss cheese, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, spinach and baby pickles. There are fresh squeezed juices, and Friday and Saturday evenings feature tapas dining. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

HOLIDAY

GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100

Magazine St., 373-6579; www. gottgourmetcafe.com — This cafe serves a variety of gourmet salads, sandwiches, wraps, Chicago-style hot dogs, burgers and more. The cochon de lait panini includes slow-braised pork, baked ham, pickles, Swiss, ancho-honey slaw, honey mustard and chili mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

6

book your holiday parties private dining now areas corporate parties rehearsal dinners business meetings

Call Our Special Events Planner

PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PAGE 72

Gift Certificates Available

mon-fri 9am-5pm

504.581.1103 or

504.525.4790 tommysneworleans.com

Smoked Duck & Hens Spiral Cut Smoked Ham Gourmet Mac n’ Cheese Caribbean Rice Louisiana Yam Casserole Pumpkin Spice Cheesecake

Call Today

504-322-2544 Your Metry Neighborhood Hangout Mon-Thurs 11am-8pm Fri-Sat 11am-9pm 3244 Severn Ave at 17th St saucysbbqgrill@gmail.com

saucysbbqgrill.com

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > NOVEMBER 15 > 2011

Jefferson Davis Pwky., 302-9357 — Head to Bayou Beer Garden for a 10-oz. Bayou burger served on a sesame bun. Disco fries are french fries topped with cheese and debris gravy. No reservations. Lunch and dinner, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

tions. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $

71

Out2Eat page 71 PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-

1112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton

now serving world cuisine by chef guillermo peters 3903 canal St

(cornEr of n. Scott)

Mid-city, nEw orlEanS

72

482.1225

EcocafEno.coM

89

$

*

(reg. $132)

includes comprehensive exam (#0150), x-rays (#274), cleaning (#1110) or panorex (#330) *NEW PATIENTS ONLY — EXPIRES 11/27/11

DR. GLENN SCHMIDT DR. STEPHEN DELAHOUSSAYE FAMILY DENTISTRY Call For An Appointment

UPTOWN KENNER

Now available at 2 locations!

8025 Maple St. @ Carrollton · 861-9044 www.uptownsmiles.com 1942 Williams Blvd., Suite 8 · 469-9648 www.kennersmiles.com

St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metai-

rie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 4648884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 2673328; www.thekupcakefactory. com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes. The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. The Strawberry Fields tops strawberry cake with strawberry buttercream frosting. Other options include white chocolate raspberry and a banana cupcake. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult

PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

ton Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

@ Eco cafE

ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carroll-

canal street bistro

COFFEE/ DESSERt

Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

cepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www. tryyuen.com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations ac-

Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices

including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONtEMPORaRY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 5254455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www. greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ Lee Mouton serves a platter of barbecue at Boo Koo BBQ (3701 Banks St., 202-4741; www.bookoobbq.com). PHOTO By CHERyL GERBER

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485;

www.oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. The hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713

St. Louis St., 581-4422; www. antoines.com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter

St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop. com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CUBAN/ CARIBBEAN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL —

437 Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www.mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Caribbean mac and cheese pie is made with chunks of lobster, tomatoes, scallions, garlic and creamy cheese sauce and is served over a bed of spicy corn maque choux. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL — 1100 Constance St., 722-3168;

KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 El-

meer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — The wine emporium offers gourmet sandwiches and deli items. The Reuben combines corned beef, melted Swiss, sauerkraut and Russian dressing on rye bread. The Sena salad features chicken, golden raisins, blue cheese, toasted pecans and pepper jelly vinaigrette over field greens. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Fri., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St.,

561-5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant.com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the half-shell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia

St., 895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and coriander-spiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www. martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stoneground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge

Perez, Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 8855565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

Must be ordered by Monday, 11/21 at 11am

FEED 12-14 PEOPLE

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p

1 Cooked Turkey · Soup · Vegetables · Potatoes · Gravy Oyster or Cornbread Dressing · & Apple or Pumpkin Pie

$240 including tax

MAKE RESERVATIONS FOR THANKSGIVING DAY OPEN 11AM-7PM

3100 19TH STREET · 834-8583

600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

985/626-4476

At Ridgelake & Causeway

985/345-6789

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE —

923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100

N. 19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni. com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tassomushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ MOSCA’S — 4137 Hwy. 90 W.,

Westwego, 436-8950; www. moscasrestaurant.com — This family-style eatery has changed little since opening in 1946. Popular dishes include shrimp Mosca, chicken a la grande and baked oysters Mosca, made with breadcrumps and Italian seasonings. Reservations accepted. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$$

RED GRAVY — 125 Camp St., 561-

8844; www.redgravycafe.com — The cafe serves breakfast items including pancakes, waffles and pastries. At lunch, try meatballs, lasagna and other Italian specialties, panini, wraps, soups and salads. Open Sundays before New Orleans Saints home games. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast and lunch Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italianstyle eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ page 72

Join Us for LUNCH Specializing in

HOT PASTRAMI & CORNED BEEF • FALAFEL CHOPPED LIVER • MATZOH BALL SOUP

Buy 1 Sandwich & Get 1 FREE

G

of equal or lesser value.

G

Dine in only. Up to $6.95 Value. Expires 12/31/11

“Best New York Deli

in New Orleans”

3519 SEVERN

Mon-Thur 10am-7pm Fri.& Sun. 10am-3pm www.koshercajun.com

888-2010

O

R YA ONLI DER KO NE NO @ LA. CO M

MI

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

starting from $5.50

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > NOVEMBER 15 > 2011

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro.com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

www.therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $

Bringing you quality, consistency and value since 1971.

73

Do You Want A New Smile? IT’S POSSIBLE WITH ESSIX.® ESSIX IS: INVISIBLE • AFFORDABLE • REMOVABLE • COMFORTABLE • QUICK Essix is similar to Invisalign but much less expensive.

Actual results from a patient treated by Dr. Schmidt after wearing the Essix aligners for 9 months.* * Actual treatment times may vary.

BEFORE

AFTER

"I am thoroughly satisfied with how my teeth look after this treatment. Within a year and a half, my teeth looked great and straight! I have more confidence now that I can smile without people looking at crooked teeth." — Linda Cobrido, New Orleans "Dr. Schmidt and his staff are the best! Everyone is friendly and professional. Dr. Schmidt made my smile look amazing. I am so pleased with the end result." — Katie Williams, New Orleans

ARE YOU A CANDIDATE? Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

• Did you previously wear braces and

76

your teeth have begun to shift?

• Are your upper and lower teeth crowded? • Is there a gap between your two front teeth? • Are your teeth slightly crooked? If you answered " YES" to any of these, call today for a Consultation. Get the NEW SMILE you've been waiting for! For a free report, request one from contactriverbend@aol.com.

49

$

*

CONSULTATION SPECIAL TO 1ST 5 CALLERS ONLY

*EXPIRES 11/27/2011

GREAT SMILES - WITHOUT BRACES

GLENN SCHMIDT, D.D.S., M.S. GENERAL DENTISTRY UPTOWN 8025 Maple Street @ Carrollton · 504.861.9044 www.uptownsmiles.com

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com page 75

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., 571-7561

— Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. Original topping choices include everything from sprouts to black bean and corn salsa to peanut butter. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef poboys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $

PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416; www.parranspoboy. com — Parran’s offers a long list of po-boys plus muffulettas, club sandwiches, pizzas, burgers, salads, fried seafood plates and Creole-Italian entrees. The veal supreme po-boy features a cutlet topped with Swiss cheese and brown gravy. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $ TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St.,

899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEAFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700 Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www.lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon

St., 598-1200; www.redfishgrill. com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy.,

737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland

Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548;

www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — 322

Magazine St., 522-7902; www.centraarchy.com — This traditional steakhouse serves USDA prime beef, and a selection of super-sized cuts includes a 40-oz. Porterhouse for two. The menu also features seafood options and a la carte side items. Reservations recommended. Diner daily. Credit cards. $$$

CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001 N. Broad St., 821-3271; www.crescentcitysteaks.com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. There are porterhouse steaks large enough for two or three diners to share. Bread pudding with raisins and peaches is topped with brandy sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations

recommended. Fulton Street: Lunch and dinner daily. Veterans Memorial Boulevard: Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S

IN

THE

MARIGNY

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135 N.

Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental

Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www. pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle

soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

place your order now for Thanksgiving

504-276-9095 • www.flourpowernola.com 77

EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS FARM LABOR TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

High Point Leasing, Pocahontas, AR has 1 position for grain; 3 mos. experience required for job duties listed; must be able to obtain clean DL within 30 days of hire; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $8.97/ hr 3/4 work period guaranteed from 12/20/11 - 10/20/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order 278910.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

S/R Farms, Inc. Harveyville, KS has 1 position for grain, hay, corn & livestock; 3 mos. experience required for job duties listed: must able to obtain clean DL within 30 days of hire; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $11.52/hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 12/31/11 - 5/1/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order 5876164.

DOMESTIC/HOUSEHOLD

MUSIC/MUSICIANS

FT NANNY NEEDED

MAJOR NASHVILLE PRODUCER

Must Drive. Experience a plus $32,000/year 504-722-5752.

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR

Major Nashville Producers seeking new artists & songwriters. If you are a singer/songwriter call 615-972-1767

MODELING/ACTING

RETAIL

MOVIE EXTRAS

People needed now to stand in the background for a major film. Earn up to $300 per day. Exp not Req. CALL NOW AND SPEAK TO A LIVE PERSON. 877-426-8310. To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT

FRIENDLY FACES WANTED

Now accepting applications for several full, part time positions. Must be motivated, hard working & friendly. Retail experience a plus. Apply in person Mon-Fri, 12-5pm only. Southern Candymakers, 334 Decatur St.

We are looking for the opening management team for Restaurant R’evolution.

Call (504) 483-3100

VOLUNTEER

We are currently hiring for:

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Fischer Honey Farm, Winnie, TX, has 5 positions for bees & honey; 3 mos. experience required for job duties listed: must be able to obtain clean DL within 30 days of hire; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $10.57/ hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 12/31/11 - 10/31/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX6819984.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Martin Farms, Brownfield, TX has 1 position for cotton & irrigation; 3 mos. experience required for job duties listed: must able to obtain clean DL within 30 days of hire; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.65/hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 1/1/12 - 6/2/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order 6819714.

Sommelier and ASSISTANT SOUS CHEF HOURLY LINE COOK BUSSER SERVER HOST/HOSTESS

We offer competitive wages and benefits. Apply in person at 700 Conti Street Mon - Fri 9am to 4pm Email: employment@royalsonestano.com Fax: 553.2337 EOE/Drug Free Workplace

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

aSSiStant PaStry Chef

DREAM

If you are interested, please contact Ja’net Torrance at

504.553.2335

EOE/Drug Free Workplace

Taste the

NOW HIRING • Managers 1009 Poydras St.

Apply on-line

Walk-Ons.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

PLAY IT • LIVE IT • LOVE IT

79

CLASSIFIEDS 6-mth-old Rodesian Ridgeback/ hound mix.

AUTOMOTIVE

Sugar- friendly, affectionate, highly trainable. Playful & active. snuggler contact Ann Marie zmom8699@yahoo.com

DOMESTIC AUTOS

ALLEY CAT

‘09 PT CRUISER

DSH White with Gray Tabby Markings, de-clawed, appx 1 year old, Vet Ck/ Vacs/Neut./Litter Trained/ Super Sweet/ Rescue Wt. 9 lbs.. (504) 460-0136

$9,995 504-368-5640

‘10 CHEVROLET HHR $11,995 Several to Choose From! 504-368-5640

Caffe

Adorable male 5/mo old Bobtail kitten Very sweet and playful ,tested vacs neutered 504 462-1968

‘10 CHEVY COBALT LT $10,995 Several To Choose From! 504-368-5640

Catahoula mix, male, w/ heart warming smile

IMPORTED AUTOS ‘06 LEXUS IS 350 $19,995 504-368-5640

‘09 ACURA TSX $21,995 Call 504-368-5640

‘10 HONDA CIVIC

$15,995 Several to Choose From! 504-368-5640

‘10 KIA OPTIMA $11,995 504-368-5640

‘10 VOLVO S40 $18,995 504-368-5640

MASSAGE EXTRAORDINAIRE

24 yrs exp to give you the ultimate in relaxation. Call Matteo. LA 0022, for your next appt. Metairie area. 504-8320945. No Outcalls

QUIET WESTBANK LOC

Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123.

STRESS? PAIN?

Relax with a massage. Amazing Hands by Patrick. LMT Lic 4005. 504-717-2577 www.amazinghands.us

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES ‘08 VW TOURAG V8 $22,995 Call 504-368-5640

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

DANCE

80

NEW ORLEANS DANCE ACADEMY

Classical Ballet for children & adults. Home of Ballet Hysell, Koenka, Fiesta Flamengo, D’project. 5956 Magazine St. 504-891-0038 nodanceacademy@ aol.com

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

In Home Personal Training “Where we bring the gym to you” For info: 504-994-3822 www.trainertogonola.com

LICENSED MASSAGE NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BODY & FOOT MASSAGE Open 7 days - 10am-10pm Jasmine Health Spa 614 Causeway, Metairie 504-273-7676 Chnese Health Spa 2424 Williams Blvd Suite S Kenner - 504-305-5177

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

RELAX RELAX RELAX

Swedish massage by strong hands. Call Jack at 453-9161. La lic #0076.

DSH, Gray/Brown/Black Tabby white chest, chin, feet. Appx. 1years, Neut. Vacs/Vet Ck/litter trained/Rescue. Small, Precious, Talkative & Gentle! Great for child or Senior. 7 lbs. (504) 460-0136

Elijah

5 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

Kit Kit

Muted Gray Tabby DSH , appx. 1 yo, VetCk/Vacs/Spayed/ Litter Trained/ Super Sweet/ Rescue (504) 460-0136 Beautiful long hair Russian Blue mix 5 yr old sweetie ,spayed vacs ,504 462-1968

Princess Leila

solid white 6yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots rescue 504 462-1968

Terrier mx needs a loving & caring home

Jojo- shots current, sweet as can be, snuggler, great w/ kids/cats/chickens. Traci- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

LOST/FOUND PETS Looking for Benji

My neighbors found this dog in Luling Wednesday night (11/2) & brought him to Old Metairie because they thought he was lost. My neighbor put him in their shed, but he apparently got out overnight (on Aris between Canal Street & Metairie Road). The rightful owner in Luling was located Thursday morning. The dog is 16 years old! Tan & white; red collar & cataracts in each eye. Please call (504) 256-6553 if you have seen him. This is so heartbreaking!!! Thank you. P.S. Two current photos can be seen at the link below.

ANNOUNCEMENTS HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

ADOPTIONS ADOPT

Adoring couple longs to adopt newborn. secure, endless love awaits. Christine & Paul, 1-800-774-0854. Expenses paid. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS NEW BOOK CLUB

With Focus On NOLA’s history, culture, influences, etc. joan34@me.com

LOOKING FOR BENJI!

Dog found in Luling Nov. 2. Brought to Old Metairie (on Aris between Canal & Metairie Rd), but got out of shed. Owner located Nov. 3. 16 yr old tan & white, red collar. Has cataracts in both eyes. 504-256-6553 if you see him.

REWARD- LOST

(Mid City but could be anywhere by now),Ozzie, male, brown/black stripe (brindle), pit mix, sweet, call him & he will come, hold him &call me asap, Traci 504-975-5971.

PET ADOPTIONS Alexa

Purrfect 5/mo old adorable, beautiful & sweet kitten silver tabby ,vacs & spayed . rescue 504 462 -1968

PLUMBING

PROFESSIONAL

HUSBANDS FOR HIRE CONSTRUCTION

ROOTER MAN

EDITING WORLD’S BEST WRITING HELP

NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL Additions, renovations, patios, carpentry, painting, flooring, plumbing, electrical, roofing, fencing & more James Cupp Jr. LA Lic Contractor, mechanical contr, master plumber. 504-401-0343. www.HusbandsForHireConstruction .com

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. KennerJefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-6520084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

REMODELING/RENOVATION INSULATION AUDUBON SPRAY FOAM INSULATION

Save up to 50% on ac/heat bills; live more comfortably; Improve sound control, reduce your carbon footprint. Roland (Rusty) Cutrer Jr, Owner 504-432-7359 www.audubonsprayfoam.com

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

FRERET GARDEN CENTER & LANDSCAPING

RHINO SHIELD OF LOUISIANA Never Paint Your Home Again! Free Evaluation * Financing Available 1-877-52-RHINO www.rhinoshieldlouisiana.com

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

Weekly Tails Madre is a 2-year-old, spayed, Hound/

SERVICES

AIR COND/HEATING SAVE $100

AC/HEATING UNIT REPLACEMENT Authentic Air, LLC Air Conditioning & Heating. Lic & Ins . 24/7 Emergency. All Major Brands. 504-421-2647. AuthenticAirLLC.com

SUPERIOR AIRE INC

Trane 3 Ton Freon Replacement System, 13 seer, 10 year compressor. $3990 INSTALLED 12 months same as cash 504-465-0688

DELUXE PEST CONTROL

Commercial & Residential Celebrating 50 yrs in New Orleans Great Rates & Service. 504-837-5800 www.deluxepestcontrol.com MADRE Kennel #A13635211

To Advertise in

Call 483-3100

NEED A NOTARY NOW?

SCHOENFELD LAW CORPORATION 24-hr mobile notary services. Successions, Wills, Power of Attorney, etc, We’ll come to you! 504-416-2489

“Your Roofing Professional” Shingle roofs, flat roofs, slate roofs, tile roofs, roof repairs, insurance claims. FREE INSPECTIONS. Member BBB & HBA. GAF certified. (504) 810-1100

2 mi west of Airport on Airline Hwy 504-466-8813 Fall Landscaping Clean Up Special Free Estimates

REAL ESTATE

Total Condo Problem Analysis Carolyn Aiken Chesnutt Attorney at Law (504) 909-7367

ROOFING

The Cracked Pot Garden Center

Home of the $650 Termite Damage Repair Guarantee! WE DO IT ALL... Termites, Roaches, Rats & Ants Too. New Orleans Metro - 504-834-7330 2329 Edenborn, Metairie www.terminixno.com

LEGAL SERVICES

GEAUX CONSTRUCTION

10% OFF FALL COLOR CHRISTMAS TREES HAVE ARRIVED We offer: Maintenance, Ladnscaping, Irrigation, Lighting, Christmas Trees, Fleur de Lis Wreaths & Custom Decorating. (504) 895-3022

TERMINIX

RESEARCH PAPERS - FICTION - ESSAYS 452-3697 or ROBERBRIDE@LIVE.COM

ATTN: CONDO ASSOCIATIONS

PEST CONTROL ANNOUNCEMENTS

PETS

HEALTH/FITNESS TRAINER TO GO

CHATTY CAT

MISHKA

MERCHANDISE

‘11 HYUNDAI SONATA $16,977 504-368-5640

Buddy boy- medical done, housebroken. Likes o/ dogs & toys. Super sweet. No sm kids. contact foxcfox@att.net

GENERAL CONTRACTORS

LEONA Kennel #A13789280

Shepherd mix with an unbelievable disposition. She’s housetrained, knows how to sit, come and drop-it, is great on a leash and enjoys life. Madre will require TLC during her heartworm treatment. To meet Madre or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. Leona is a 1-year-old, spayed, DSH with gray/white markings. She’s UBER-laid back, likes to snuggle, likes ear and back rubs and would LOVE an oversized couch to lounge on all day. To meet Leona or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe CBD/WAREHOUSE DISTRICT

FRENCH QUARTER

1 RIVER PLACE • $1,149,000 Breathtaking view of the River & Bridge. Wall of windows allows natural light to flow thru. 2BR/2BA condo. Amaz flrpln. 1918 sq ft w/elegant dsgnr details Joy North • Gardner Realtors 504-400-0274 • cocohocke@aol.com

922-24 Dauphine St. $875K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

MID-CITY

Best Value in French Qtr

1020 ESPLANADE #103. Lovely 2 br, 2 ba condo, high ceil in den, sparkling pool, courtyd, fenced pkg. Private attached alley could be dog run. $349K. Lana Sackett, Gardner Realtors, 504352-4934. www.lanasackett.com

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY PRIME FQ COMMERCIAL

301 Decatur St. Rare corner. Zoning allows live entertainment. 9,000 sq ft (Approx 3,000 sq ft ea. floor). Beautiful light filled loft style spaces. Possible owner financing. $1,650,000. Judy Fisher Inc. 504-388-3023.www.JudyFisher.net

2231 N. RAMPART- MARIGNY Free standing cottage w/2 charming porches. Bright open fl plan, hdwd flrs throughout, ss appl, ceramic cntrr & bath. Huge bdrm w/skylights. Secure offst. pkng. $159,000. Robert Armstrong 504-616-3615

3924 B CLEVELAND $160K

Off Canal & Carrollton. 2br/1ba, CA&H, hdwd flrs, crown molding, ss appliances. Washer/Dryer/Fridge included. (504) 559-1993

FRENCH QUARTER STUDIOS

514 DUMAINE , Units 3 & 6. Charming ground & 2nd fl courtyard/ balcony. Awesomely located. Each unit $105,000 www.JudyFisher.net; Judy Fisher, Inc, 504-388-3023

GENTILLY $174,900

2500 GENTILLY BLVD. 2BR/2BA, Lr, dr, den, kit w/granite, fp, hdwd flrs, inground pool. Call (504) 669-7263.

835 Royal St. $349.5K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

617 Duphine St. $268K Spacious light filled condo. Great floor plan. Fabulous pool and courtyard. Being sold furnished. In the heart of the quarter.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

Million Dollar Club; Gold Award Winner

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

938 Royal St. A $215K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 2123-25 LAUREL ST $270K

Restored 2 unit Creole cottage in Lwr Gard Dist. Walk to Mag St. Nr CBD. 6BR/2BA, all elec, cen a/h, 2900 sf liv area, porch. 30x158 lot. John, 508-5799.

621-623 9th Street

Lovely Double, Uptown area. 2 bdrm, 1 ba each side, hardwood floors, ceil fans. $185k. Call April Gongora, Gardner Realtors, 504-606-0466.

8309 Sycamore Street & 2214 Dante Street

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226

Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

Ann de Montluzin Farmer broker SALE PENDING 1016 NAPOLEON AVE • $350,000 3 br, 2.5 bA, 2088 Sq Ft. Spacious 1st floor w/ wrap around pvt brick patio. Separate dining room and living room with built in bookshelves. Wood burning fireplace in den with French doors opening onto the patio. Located at rear of complex so very private. Assigned parking space. Located on parade route and close to Magazine Street and many amenities. Must see!

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737 farmeran@gmail.com www.demontluzinrealtors.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

BUYING OR SELLING - CALL ME Barataria Waterfront Property Vacant Lot in English Turn Westbank Dwellings Call Cecelia, 583-2902, Gardner Realtors

The gauntlet has fallen! Seller & Lender want to sell! Quality & detail throughout this historic restoration. A :1BD/1BA grnd flr condo. D: 2BD/2BA 2nd lvl condo. Hi ceil & orig wd flrs. Granite counters & stainless appl in kitch. Whirlpool tub. The pool is cool! In trendy Treme. Bank must approve short sale.

CORPORATE RENTALS

Mins. from downtown Covington. Custom European estate on Bogue Falaya River. Main hse 3500 sf, 3 br, 3.5 ba. Guest hse 1000 sf, 2 br, 1 ba. On 4.66 acres. $1,099,000. By Appt. 985-5022882. CovingtonRiverEstate.com.

METROWIDE APARTMENTS

NOLA * Gretna * Metairie * Kenner. Affordable Luxury Living, 1, 2, 3 BDs, $545 & up! Gtd. Pkng, Lndry, Courtyards, FREE WI FI. 504-304-4687 www.BrunoInc.com

421 Burgundy Units 1 -5 $105k - $235k

Make this your Vieux Carre getaway! 5 charming condos for sale! Common courtyard, common Washer/Dryer, Balcony overlooking Burgundy St. 3 guest quarter condos and 3 condos in the main house. Ask agent about financing options. Owner/Agent.

New Orleans Area (Metairie) 10 Min to Downtown N.O.

1 & 2 Br Apts, 1 Ba, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras From $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2200 Pasadena, Met. 504-491-1591.

NEW ORLEANS RIVERFRONT

2 BR, 2.5 BA. Furn, healthclub, pool, parking. All util incl, wifi. Min 1 month. $3000/mo. Also Penthouse $3800/ mo. 781-608-6115.

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

GENERAL RENTALS

WESTBANK

1323 Esplanade A&D $149,999$169,999

COVINGTON ELEGANT COUNTRY LIVING

COMMERCIAL RENTALS CBD ON ST. CAR LINE

720 Carondelet - Lots of exposure. Possible deli, diner, retail, office. 1200 sq ft Contact: REO LLC. ronkeever@ hotmail.com.

512 Wilkinson Row $465,000

This is a commercial ground floor condo presently outfitted for a commercial occupant but can be used residentially. Quaint street near Jackson Square in the heart of the French Quarter zoned VCC2. 1,680 sq. ft.

919 St Philip # 6 $224,000

Spacious one bedroom located in the lower French Quarter. Nice open floorplan with new flooring throughout. Splashy renovated tiled bathroom. Local grocery store is conveniently located nearby. Lush courtyard. Only a few blocks from your favorite restaurants and festival attractions.

Samara D. Poché 504.319.6226 sam@fqr.com

504.949.5400

sampochesells.com

THE FERNANDEZ HOUSE

927 DAUPHINE STREET $1,895,000 An excellent example of an early creole cottage set in a serene compound. Beautiful courtyard with mature plantings in a classic partere garden. Property consists of the main house, 4 income producing apartments and a large bonus space-- office, workshop, gym, etc. Parking for multiple cars. Great location.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 www.frenchquarterrealty.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

Large executive sized home (5000 sq. ft.) on double lot with gourmet kitchen, chic master bath, huge den, 4 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, sutdio/game room/2nd den and an office plus a six (6) car garage and 3 bedroom/2 bath rental (great tenant at $1575 per month) on an adjacent property. Package Price $ 699,000 Sycamore house may be sold separately for $ 529,000

PRICED TO SELL NOW

427 ARABELLA Unique sgl. architectually designed interior, 2-3 BR, 2 BA, 2000+ sq ft. Only $385K. 917 RACE Historical 1850’s gem. Beautiful stairway, orig pocket doors, L shaped yd, much more. Call for info. $350K 3655-57 TCHOUPITOULAS Ready to rent, nice dble, lg yd, new roof. $110K. Lois Landry Realty, 504-586-1019

81

CLASSIFIEDS PUZZLE PAGE BROADMOOR

FAUBOURG ST. JOHN

REDUCED SALE PENDING

JOHN SCHAFF CRS

(c) 504.343.6683 (O) 504.895.4663

3222 Coliseum 4941 St. Charles 2721 St. Charles 5528 Hurst 1750 St. Charles 1750 St. Charles 20 Anjou 1544 Camp 3915 St. Charles 1544 Camp 1544 Camp 1224 St. Charles 2721 St. Charles

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 15 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 80

86

TOO LATE! ..............................$2,495,000 Grand Mansion.......................$2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) ............$1,579,000 TOO LATE! ..............................$1,300,000 TOO LATE! ................................ $429,000 Commercial ............................. $349,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) ................ $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) ................. $239,000 TOO LATE!................................. $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) ............................ $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) ............................ $149,000 (Only 6 Left!)...............starting at $79,000 (efficiency condo)..................... $169,000

1208/1210 S. GENOIS

3104-06 ST. PHILIP

IMMEDIATE CASH FLOW. Property is currently getting $1800 rent, potentially more. Gutted after Katrina, renovations completed in 2006 include new roof, dry wall, and wiring, 2 new central heaters installed since 2006. Long term tenants, excellent return on investment. Close to the Blue Plate Mayonnaise Building. $125,000

LARGE DOUBLE GREAT BLOCK. This double is in the Heart of Faubourg St John -- walking distance to the Bayou. Structurally sound -- needs updating. Explore the possibility of converting to a fabulous single or renovate as double and have premium rentals. High ceiling, mantles, original floors under carpet -- likely.

(504) 895-4663

$165,000


Gambit: November 15, 2011