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FASHION

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WHAT GUYS WANT Lumberjack chic

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FROST + FROCKS Sparkling gowns for ice princesses

HOME

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FEATURE How to make pro pizza at home

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WINTER WONDERLAND Jim Mounger’s holiday extravaganza

SHOPPING

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NEW & COOL Flock to pelican accessories

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CUE KIDS Keeping the tiniest New Year’s resolutions

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CUE TIPS Local beauty products and two new lingerie shops

PERSPECTIVES

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FROM THE EDITOR Special snowflakes

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SHOP DOGS Boogie of C. Collection

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CONTENTS

JANUARY 2014


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rom the snowflake pin in the fashion spread (p. 31) to the winter wonderland on display in the home feature (p. 21), there’s a distinctly frosty motif in this month’s CUE. It’s easy to see the appeal of the snowflake: it displays a beautiful symmetry, and snowflake decor manages to be festive and nondenominational — a real plus when decorating for the holidays in a cultural melting pot. In fact, the only problem with the snowflake might be its local scarcity. For all its good points, it’s not really a season-appropriate motif in southern Louisiana. I’m sure just about anyone who reads this has had the dubiously pleasant experience of running the air conditioner on New Year’s Eve or wearing a coat and scarf to Celebration in the Oaks not because the weather’s cold, but because it ought to be. A Yankee transplant recently marveled to me about the warm, humid winter weather. He wondered if he’d ever get used to wearing T-shirts in December. I didn’t know what to tell him. Even though I grew up in Baton Rouge, I never shook the feeling that our warm winter weather is somehow wrong. It doesn’t jibe with the images on TV and in catalogs: snowmen, icicles, glowing hearths. I still have to remind myself that the holidays look a lot different

PHOTO BY JANINE JOFFE | MAKEUP BY MARIA BARREDA

FROM THE EDITOR

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ON CUE M I S SY W I L K I N S O N |

in the humid subtropical South than in the snowy northern areas where many of these ad campaigns are produced. But that doesn’t make our weather wrong. It just means we get to wear our snowflakes as glittery pins on our lapels, not melting in our coifs, while going from party to party unfettered and comfortable in cocktail dresses and open-toed heels. And really, I’m fine with that.

MARGO DUBOS | EDITOR

DORA SISON |

O Y S T E R P L AT E S & A C C E S S O R I E S

4843 magazine street | 899.4843 oysterianola.com

P U BL I S H E R PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

EDITORIAL

CHRISTIN GREEN

K A N DAC E P O W E R G R AV ES

A DVE R TI SI NG C OORD INATOR

M A N AG I N G E D I TOR

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christing@gambitweekly.com

CON T R I BU T I N G W R I T E RS

K AT E G R AC E B AU E R , LEE CUTRONE

AC C O U N T E X E C U T I V E S

INTERN

JILL GIEGER

L AU R E N H A R T M A N

S E N IOR ACCOU N T E X ECU T I V E

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jillg@gambitweekly.com

PRODUCTION G R A PH IC D E S I G N E RS

LYN VICKNAIR, PAIGE HINRICHS, JULIET MEEKS, DAVID KROLL , JASON WHITTAKER

JEFFREY PIZZO 4 8 3 -3 145 jeffp@gambitweekly.com L I N D A L AC H I N 4 8 3 -3 14 2 lindal@gambitweekly.com

PR E- PR E SS COOR D I N ATOR

K AT H RY N B R A DY

D I S P L AY A DV E R T I S I N G

S A N DY S T E I N B R O N D U M

SHANNON HINTON KERN 4 8 3 -3 14 4

shannonk@gambitweekly.com

KRISTIN HARTENSTEIN

A DV E R T IS I N G D I R EC TOR 4 83 -3150 sandys@gambitweekly.com

4 8 3 -3 14 1

MICHELE SLONSKI

KELLIE LANDECHE

ADV E R T I S I N G A D M I NI STR ATO R 4 83 -3140 micheles@gambitweekly.com

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kristinh@gambitweekly.com

2900 ELYSIAN FIELDS TUESDAY - SATURDAY • 10:00 am-6:00 pm

kelliel@gambitweekly.com

GA MB IT | 392 3 B I ENV I L L E STREE T | NE W O R L E A N S , L A 7 0 1 1 9 504. 4 8 6.5900 | response@gambitweekly.com

GOT AN IDEA FOR CUE ? EMAIL US: cue@gambitweekly.com J A N U A RY. 2 0 1 4 < < <

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NEW + COOL

WINGS

OF GLORY

TAKE FLIGHT WITH ACCESSORIES FEATURING NEW ORLEANSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; FINEST FEATHERED FRIEND.

SHOPPING

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BY L AU R EN H A R T M A N A N D M I S SY W I L K I N S O N

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Pelican handbag, $150 at the Historic New Orleans Collection (533 Royal St., 504598-7147; www.hnoc.org). New Orleans Pelicans T-shirt, $32 at The Pelicans Nest (New Orleans Arena, 1501 Girod St., 504-587-3663; www.pelicansteamstore.com).

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Flying pelican pendant, $65 at Sterling Silvia (41 French Market Place, 504-299-9225; 4861 Magazine St., 504-309-5806; www.sterlingsilvia.myshopify.com). Decoupaged art glass tray, $98 and up at Hazelnut (2735 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, 985-626-8900; 5515 Magazine St., 504-891-2424; www.hazelnutneworleans.com).

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Pelican stationery, $13 at the Historic New Orleans Collection. Pelican glasses, $72 for a set of four at the Historic New Orleans Collection.

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MIGNON FAGET

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Handcrafted in America 3801 Magazine Street 504.891.2005 Lakeside Mall 504.835.2244 Canal Place 504.525.2973 800.375.7557 â&#x20AC;˘ www.mignonfaget.com

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W H AT G U Y S W A N T

FA S H I O N

THE MODERN-DAY

LUMBERJACK 1

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RUGGED STYLES INSPIRED BY THE QUINTESSENTIAL OUTDOORSMAN BY K AT E G R AC E B AU E R

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Buffalo horn buttons bring a Western touch to the plaid utility shirt, $195 at Billy Reid (3927 Magazine St., 504-208-1200; www.billyreid.com). A zip-up suede jacket is a wardrobe essential, $1,495 at Billy Reid. A camouflage backpack lets a modern lumberjack carry his necessities in style, $350 at Friend (2115 Magazine St., 504-218-4214; www.friendneworleans.com).

modern lumberjack needs a 4 Aflask for his spirit of choice. $29 each at SoPo (629 N. Carrollton Ave., 504-609-2429; www. soponola.com).

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Patterned long johns are cozy yet manly, $40 at Fraques (821 Baronne St., 504-373-6153; www.fraques.com). Made of bison leather and Italian wool, “Canyon” boots by Trask marry form and function, $495 at Rubensteins (102 St. Charles Ave., 504-581-6666; www.rubensteinsneworleans.com).

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FEATURE

HOME

THE GAS FLAMES IN THIS PIZZA OVEN BY KALAMAZOO CREATE A CRUST SIMILAR TO THOSE COOKED IN TRADITIONAL WOODFIRED OVEN, $6,495 AT NORDIC KITCHENS AND BATHS.

LIFE OF PIE With a bit of insight and a few easy-to-use tools, you can craft a pizza with a nice bite to it.

— LEAH DRILL

ESSENTIAL TOOLS FOR MAKING RESTAURANTQUALITY PIZZA AT HOME BY L A U R E N H A R T M A N

izza has undergone a renaissance in New Orleans in recent years. From foldable New York-style slices to deep-dish Chicago-style pizzas, there’s a pie for every palate. And for people who want to bake delectable pizzas in the comfort of home, there’s a cornucopia of tools available. Whether your budget allows for a modest investment (a pizza stone and quality olive oils) or a lavish one (an open-flame home pizza oven), there’s a way to add pizzazz to your pizza. The first key is to start with quality ingredients. Kristina Bradford of Whole Foods Market (citywide; wholefoodsmarket.com) recommends a corn flour-based crust. “Corn flour … gives the pizza a tender yet nutty crust,” Bradford says. Corn flour is an easy-to-use ingredient for pizza crust because it keeps the dough from being too soggy. She recommends coating the crust with a quality olive oil. Different sauces pair better with different crusts. “With a hearty, wheat crust, a deep marinara is a good pairing, but if a lighter crust is selected, you might go with an oil or vinegar dressing,” Bradford says. Olive oils and infused oils add earthy and spicy flavors and are an unexpected alternative to tomato-based sauce. “Many people go straight to a pungent marinara, but there are plenty of oils that can be used as the base for your ingredients,” says Denise Dussom, co-owner of Vom Fass (5725 Magazine St., 504-302-1455; www.nola.vomfassusa.com). The ingredients that will top the pizza should determine which oils you will use. “Go with what works best with the ingredients you have at hand,” Dussom says. “If you plan on making a pizza with vegetables as the main ingredient, basil extra virgin olive oil will serve its purpose. Dipping the ingredients in the infused oil beforehand is always a great idea.” She recommends pairing olive oils with flavorful cheeses. For example, truffle extra virgin olive oil pairs well with sheep’s milk blue cheese and creamy goat cheese. “We use a blend of white

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THE PIZZA MASTER’S ESSENTIAL SET INCLUDES AN ALUMINUM PIZZA SCREEN TO KEEP THE CRUST FROM BROWNING TOO QUICKLY, A PIZZA SCOOPER AND A BRASS CLEANING BRUSH TO SCRAPE OFF ANY CHEESY MESS. INCLUDED WITH PURCHASE OF THE PIZZA OVEN BY KALAMAZOO, $6,495 AT NORDIC KITCHENS AND BATHS.

HOME

and black truffles to create a complex web of flavor, with hints of garlic and mushroom,” Dussom says. “Coat a thin layer over the dough before cooking, and once the crust is done cooking, begin placing bite-sized pieces of the desired cheeses.” Sweet and spicy vinegars pair well with poultry and seafood toppings. “If you put star fig chili vinegar with garlic extra virgin olive oil to dip your crust in, it’s divine,” Dussom says. After deciding on toppings and a sauce, it’s time to choose a cooking method. A traditional yet rarely used cooking method is a cast iron skillet in a conventional oven. “Many customers ask how to get the crispy yet tender crust we produce in our pizza station. Our first suggestion is to invest in a cast iron skillet,” Bradford says. “It is an affordable item that gives the pizza the same texture as a wood-burning oven. A cast iron skillet raises the temperature of the pizza. It does not trap moisture in, keeping the dough from getting soggy.” Pizza stones are another affordable option for baking a crisp crust. Their porous, ceramic materials essentially recreate the conditions of a brick oven. “A pizza stone is designed to distribute the heat in the oven evenly through the pizza and keep moisture out,” says Leah Drill, a spokesperson for Bed Bath and Beyond (citywide; bedbathandbeyond.com). The store offers a 15-inch round pizza stone by Hartstone Pottery for $29.99. “This particular design is easy to convert from the freezer to the oven, and its surface allows for easy cleanup.” Since this pizza stone is ceramic, drastic temperature change can cause it to fracture. To prevent this, preheat the stone in the oven for 45 minutes prior to cooking. For people who want an authentic crust cooked over an open flame and have the means to install a pizza oven, Nordic Kitchens and Baths (1818 Veterans Memorial Boulevard, Metairie, 504-888-2300; www.nordickitchens.com), offers an artisan pizza oven made by Kalamazoo. The stainless steel oven’s gas flames give pizza crust the texture and crispness a traditional wood-burning oven brings, but with greater convenience and faster cooking times. “The cooking time for an artisan-style pizza in this oven when preheated for 45 minutes to 500 degrees is only three minutes,” says Antoinette Theriot-Heim of Nordic Kitchens. Whether you cook your next pizza in a cast iron skillet, on a pizza stone or over flames, creativity and proper tools are the secrets to success. “Pizza essentials don’t have to be a hassle to get your hands on,” Drill says. “With a bit of insight and a few easy-to-use tools, you can craft a pizza with a nice bite to it.”

HERB-INFUSED OLIVE OILS AND VINEGAR ARE A FLAVORFUL SUBSTITUTE FOR MARINARA SAUCE, $7.99 AND UP AT VOM FASS.

PIZZA STONES HELP REPLICATE THE EFFECTS OF A BRICK OVEN. PIZZA STONE, $29.99 AT BED BATH & BEYOND. J A N U A RY. 2 0 1 4 < < <

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SINCE 1940

C A LL 5 0 4 . 2 8 8 . 8 3 81 TO S I G N U P A N D K EE P Y O U R C LOT H ES LO O K I N G Y O U N G ’ S ! NEW ORLEANS

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CONNECT

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LAKEVIEW | 905 HARRISON AVENUE | (504) 872-0931

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UPTOWN | 6227 S. CLAIBORNE AVENUE | (504) 866-5371

YOUNGSDRYCLEANING.COM


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Magazine St & Louisiana

BuffaloExchange.com #iFoundThisAtBX

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JIM MOUNGER’S HOLIDAY DECOR BRINGS SOMETHING NEW AND UNEXPECTED EVERY YEAR

WINTER WONDERLAND BY

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or 15 years, attorney and art collector Jim Mounger has turned to his friend, event designer and display artist Bently Graham, for help creating memorable holiday decor at his Uptown home. Typically, the two bounce ideas off each other and narrow them down. This year, when Graham asked what the theme would be, Mounger had an instantaneous, one-word reply: snowflakes. “It’s always a collaboration between Bently and myself,” Mounger says. “It’s really a Christmas installation. It’s not your normal green tree.” A traditional fir would fall flat in the Mounger residence, where contemporary furnishings and art are set against a clean, high-ceilinged backdrop that looks like an airy Soho loft. Mounger bought the circa-1900 house, which had been carved into a four-plex, 11 years ago. He gutted the interior and returned it to a single family home with as much wall space as possible for showcasing his colorful collection of paintings, sculpture and other art — much of it by Louisiana artists. He often is asked to host charitable events and conceived of the small kitchen at the rear of the house as a place for caterers to set up.

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(PREVIOUS PAGE) IN THE SUNROOM, GRAHAM TRANSFORMED A PAIR OF WALL-MOUNTED METAL AND GLASS VASES INTO A GRACEFUL PYROTECHNIC EVOCATION OF FALLING SNOW AND LIGHTS. (RIGHT) GRAHAM DECORATED THE COVERED OUTDOOR DECK WITH MYLAR GARLANDS AND LARGE SNOWFLAKES THAT LIGHT UP. HE GAVE A SEASONAL TWIST TO THE FLUTED, MAGNOLIA-FILLED VASES BY ADDING SILVERY SHOOTS AND GLITTER ENCRUSTED SNOWFLAKES ATTACHED TO FLOCKED STEMS. (BELOW) A CONTEMPORARY LIGHT FIXTURE IS REMINISCENT OF A CHRISTMAS TREE. SNOWFLAKES DO DOUBLE DUTY HERE AS MAKESHIFT COASTERS FOR CHAMPAGNE FLUTES. (FACING PAGE) TOWERING VASES FILLED WITH SNOW, TWIGS AND GLISTENING FOIL TOP THE DINING TABLE. BETWEEN THE VASES, A WHITE SCULPTURE BY DALE CHIHULY RESEMBLES A MASSIVE, HOLLOW SNOWBALL.

BENTLY GRAHAM’S TIPS

FOR HOLIDAY DECORATING 1

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Think outside the box and use your surroundings. For example, I like to go to Jefferson Variety and find interesting, inexpensive fabrics instead of ordinary off-the-shelf ribbon on the tree. Don’t be a store snob. It’s a little bit like dressing. If you have a good sense of style, you can go anywhere and find cool stuff. It’s about your own personal style and interpretation. I shop at upscale stores and big box stores. I scavenge everywhere. Narrow down your theme. Get a general concept and stick to it and don’t go all over the map. Continuity is key. There is nothing wrong with recycling things from year to year. If your theme is snowflakes, you probably have some silver or white things you can incorporate. Things should be contained. For example, instead of piling candles on a table, group them on a pretty tray and accent them with powdery snow. Keeping things contained gives a display a stronger sense of organization.


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New Orleans Auction Galleries N o w

A c c e p t i n g

504-566-1849 - 510 Julia

C o n s i g n m e n t s

Street - NewOrleansAuction.com - Info@NewOrleansAuction.com

LA AUCTION LICENSE AB-363, STEINKAMP #1265, THOMAS #1833/23% BUYER’S PREMIUM (3% DISCOUNT FOR PAYMENTS MADE BY CASH, CHECK, OR WIRE)

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HOME

“Jim always wants something different and out of the mainstream,” Graham says. “He likes the Christmas decor to be new and fresh and to make a statement like the art.” One year, Graham worked with artist Erica Larkin to construct a tree of green metal piping. Another year, he wrapped a tree in swaths of green tulle. Inspiration comes from a variety of sources: the cerulean blue of a Dale Chihuly glasswork hanging in the entryway; an installation of chains, wire and other raw metals shown at Prospect. 1; fluid environmental works by European artist Christo; and display windows of high-end, iconic retailers like Barneys and Bergdorf Goodman. “It’s never a literal interpretation, but we have used some of the elements [of those things],” Graham says. From there, they begin the process of bringing the idea to life. Some years, Mounger peruses a favorite store in Baton Rouge for items to incorporate. Most years, Graham shops at big box stores for ordinary materials (such as inexpensive fabrics) that can be used in extraordinary ways. This year, Graham, who also decorates The Shops at Canal Place for the holidays, amassed a trove of white ornaments, lacy snowflakes, snowy branches and bags of powdered paper snow along with a retro, iridescent tree. He began creating a winter wonderland during the balmy week before Thanksgiving. The result is just what Graham and Mounger envisioned — especially at night, when hundreds of tiny white lights are aglow. Graham topped the succulents flanking the footpath that leads to the front door with snowflakes and suspended Mylar tassels trimmed with illuminated snowflakes from the house’s upper and lower galleries. Against the leaded glass panes of the double front door, he hung wreaths from last year. He tweaked the Champagnecolored wreaths to fit this year’s theme by replacing their blue embellishments with silver ones and adding sprays of miniature snowballs. A tree in the entryway serves as a centerpiece for the decor. Mounted on top of a snowbank of sheer organza and twinkling PAGE 27

THE CHRISTMAS TREE, VISIBLE WITH ONE OF THE FRONT DOORS AJAR, GLOWS LIKE THE INSIDE OF A JEWEL BOX AFTER DARK.

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mesh, it is a focal point in a room filled with impressive art. Behind the tree, a wedding dress of hand-carved wooden words by New York artist Lesley Dill echoes the color and conical shape of the tableau. For the dining room’s triptych of glass-topped tables, Graham filled towering vases with an arrangement of paper snow, twigs and glistening foil. In the sunroom just beyond the kitchen and dining areas, he festooned a wall-mounted pair of vases by local artist Mitchell Gaudet with rivulets of snow and light. Outside, he decorated the wooden-decked patio with Mylar garlands, LED snowflakes and a pair of white metal tabletop trees. He added silvery, light-reflecting shoots and glitter-encrusted snowflakes to the tall, magnolia-filled vases displayed behind the sofa. This year, as in years past, Mounger and Graham critiqued the display over a glass of wine. “I love working with Jim,” Graham says. “We have a similar design sensibility. I’ll do something and he’ll say ‘Yeah, I love it’ or ‘Let’s add this or that.’ But it’s always similar.” In early December, Mounger heads to New York for a few days. “I go to get the feel of Christmas,” he says. “I like the spirit of the people and I like the cold.” On the other hand, he knows he needn’t go far to experience a white Christmas. Even if this year brings record high temperatures, there will be plenty of snowflakes at home.

(ABOVE) THE EXTERIOR OF JIM MOUNGER’S UPTOWN HOUSE, WHICH LOOKS ALMOST EXACTLY AS IT DID WHEN IT WAS BUILT MORE THAN 100 YEARS AGO, HERALDS THE SEASON WITH SNOWFLAKES. THE SEVEN LARGE URNS LINING THE UPPER AND LOWER GALLERIES ARE BY PHILIPPE STARCK. (LEFT) BENTLY GRAHAM (LEFT) AND JIM MOUNGER.

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FROST + FROCKS SILVER SHIFT DRESS, $420 AT ELIZABETH’S; RHINESTONE DROP EARRINGS, $59 AT YVONNE LAFLEUR.

Sparkling looks for winter soirees P H OTO G R A P H Y BY N O L A P ER R I N


BLACK DRESS BY BCBG, $448, CUFF BRACELET, $100, AND TEARDROP EARRINGS, $35, ALL AT HEMLINE METAIRIE.


DROP EARRINGS, $59, SEQUIN SHIFT DRESS, $499, BOTH AT YVONNE LAFLEUR; SPARKLY SANDALS, $160 AT ELIZABETH’S.


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DROP EARRINGS, $399, SNOWFLAKE BROOCH, $79, BANGLE BRACELETS, $39 EACH, ALL AT YVONNE LAFLEUR; SLEEVELESS PRINTED FLOOR-LENGTH GOWN, $440 AT SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ON THE COVER: BLACK AND IVORY SATIN COCKTAIL DRESS, $325, SHEARED RABBIT LOOP, $225, BOTH AT SAKS FIFTH AVENUE; DROP EARRINGS, $59 AT YVONNE LAFLEUR; JOHN HUMPHRIES BRACELET, $1,050 AT MIGNON FAGET; BLACK PUMPS BY CORSO COMO, $129 AT FEET FIRST.


PHOTOGRAPHER NOLA PERRIN (504-304-1191; WWW.NOLAPERRIN.COM)

STORE INFORMATION ELIZABETH’S (204 METAIRIE ROAD, METAIRIE, 504-833-3717)

MODELS ADRIENNE HATCHER CHELSEA DARLING

STYLING MARGO DUBOS AND MISSY WILKINSON

MAKEUP ROBERT HUDSON (504-866-6007; WWW.ROBERTHUDSONMAKEUP.COM)

HAIR JAMIE GANDY FOR FIFI MAHONY’S (934 ROYAL ST., 504-525-4343; WWW. FIFIMAHONYS.COM)

CAMERA INTERN KARA KHAN

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT WHITE FUR JACKET, $499, SNOWFLAKE PIN, $79, ALL AT YVONNE LAFLEUR.

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ANDREW VILLARREAL

FEET FIRST (526 ROYAL ST., 504-569-0005; 200 METAIRIE ROAD, METAIRIE, 504-324-9124; 4122 MAGAZINE ST., 504-899-6800; WWW.FEETFIRSTSTORES.COM) HEMLINE METAIRIE (605 METAIRIE ROAD, METAIRIE, 504-309-8778; WWW.SHOP-HEMLINE.COM) MIGNON FAGET (THE SHOPS AT CANAL PLACE, 333 CANAL ST., 504-524-2973; LAKESIDE SHOPPING CENTER, 3301 VETERANS MEMORIAL BLVD., METAIRIE, 504-835-2244; 3801 MAGAZINE ST., 504-891-2005; WWW.MIGNONFAGET.COM) SAKS FIFTH AVENUE (THE SHOPS AT CANAL PLACE, 301 CANAL ST., 504-524-2200; WWW. SAKSFIFTHAVENUE.COM) YVONNE LAFLEUR (8131 HAMPSON ST., 504-866-9666; WWW.YVONNELAFLEUR.COM).


ACCESSORY BOUTIQUE

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CUE K I D S

HIGH

SHOPPING

RESOLUTION

MAKE KIDS’ NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS EASIER TO KEEP WITH THESE FUNCTIONAL GOODS AND GIFTS. BY L AU R EN H A R T M A N

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“I will do my chores.” Responsibility chart, $20 at Le Jouet (1700 Airline Drive, Metairie, 504-837-0533; www.lejouet.com).

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“I will save my pennies.” Piggy bank, $19.99 at Magic Box Toys (5508 Magazine St., 504-899-0117; www. magicboxneworleans.com). “I will make crafts instead of watching TV.” Designyour-own-tote bag kit, $49.99 at SOPO (629 N. Carrollton Ave., 504-6092429; www.soponola.com). “I will ride my bike safely.” Helmet, $26 at Le Jouet. “I will keep my markers and crayons organized.” Desk organizer, $50 at SOPO. “I will learn to speak French.” French ABC blocks, $45 at SOPO.

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“I will keep my room clean.” Beanbag storage chair, $170 and up at SOPO.

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SHOPPING

CUE T I P S

UNDERNEATH

IT ALL

s temperatures drop across New Orleans, Magazine Street heats up with two new lingerie shops, Bonjour Lingerie (4214 Magazine St., 504-309-8014; www.facebook.com/bonjourNOLA) and Trashy Diva Lingerie Boutique (2044 Magazine St., 504-522-5686; www.trashydiva.com). Bonjour owners Angelique Poppo and Jill Townsend began their collaboration in 2006 while working at House of Lounge. After House of Lounge closed in June 2013, the pair followed their dream of opening their own store. They considered buying the House of Lounge space, but eventually chose a different location on Magazine Street. “We wanted to do it our way,” Poppo says. At Bonjour Lingerie, women can get properly fitted for bras, which are stocked in sizes from A to G cups. Other sizes are available via special order. “Lots of women not only do not know what size they are, but they also don’t know what size they are wearing at that very moment,” Poppo says. “We measure them and then give them a range of choices.” The store’s walls are lined with bras in rich jewel tones and colorful prints. Bonjour Lingerie also stocks racy accessories and gifts, including massagers, riding crops, lavish feather boas and

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LINGERIE AFICIONADOS CONGREGATE AT THE NOVEMBER GRAND OPENING OF BONJOUR LINGERIE.

NO CONTRACTS GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE WWW . ONETOONEPERSONALTRAINING . COM

RESOLUTION HEADQUARTERS

“The surest way not to fail is to determine to succeed.” 504.891.5121

HOME OF THE

735 OCTAVIA ST • NEW ORLEANS 1 block from Magazine St. Whole Foods Market www.facebook.com/121nola

MINUTE WORKOUT

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sequined pasties. The former House of Lounge was perfect for the team at Trashy Diva, who aimed to build on the success of their French Quarter lingerie store by opening a second location near their Magazine Street apparel and shoe shops. At Trashy Diva Lingerie Boutique, the lingerie has a pin-up vibe. “We like to keep the aesthetic of a retro feel,” says manager Brooke Parker. “However, we stay on top of trends when it comes to cut, color and keeping high quality.” The store offers bras studded with spikes and custom steelboned corsets. There are half-slips and petticoats perfect for peeking out from circle skirts, as well as silk robes and ornately beaded 1920sstyle shawls. Store owners encourage customers to choose pieces that make them feel comfortable and confident, whether that means simple basics or a look fit for a burlesque bombshell. “You don’t have to buy sexy lingerie to feel sexy in lingerie,” Poppo says. “Lingerie is not something only meant for viewing in the bedroom. It’s what you have on underneath every day.” — MARY CROSS

A SWEET W STORY

SHOPPING

hen Benardett Jno-Finn left her native Caribbean island of Dominica to attend Syracuse University in upstate New York, her skin did not adapt well to the northern climate. “Due to the change in weather, I developed eczema and dermatitis,” says Jno-Finn, who holds a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry. Using her biochemistry knowledge and herbs her mother shipped from St. Croix, Jno-Finn developed a line of brown sugar scrubs that nourish and moisturize. “Brown sugar has a higher vitamin and mineral content (than salt or white sugar) and draws moisture to the skin,” she says. After graduating in 2007 and coming to New Orleans to take a job working with the Mayor’s Office of Health Policy & AIDS Funding, Jno-Finn began selling her scrubs in local markets, including The Freret Market and Sankofa Farmers Market. “I had no idea what the response would be, but it turned out to be incredible,” she says. Now, her line of beauty products, named Senica (www. senicanaturals.com), includes not only scrubs but also soaps, bath salts, candles, lotions and more. They’re all handmade in New Orleans with herbs Jno-Finn grows herself. — MISSY WILKINSON

SENICA SUGAR SCRUBS START AT $9 AND ARE AVAILABLE AT WHOLE FOODS MARKET.

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SHOP DOGS

PERSPECTIVES

BOOGIE BY K AT E G R AC E B AU E R PHOTOS BY CHERYL GERBER

ally Bliss, manager at the C. Collection (8141 Maple St., 504-8615002; www.ccollectionnola.com), always wanted an English bulldog — and now she’s able to call one her co-worker. Bliss got four-year-old Boogie the bulldog from a breeder in Springfield, Mo. The pup’s appetite (she eats three meals a day) and the fact that English bulldogs are a very social breed made bringing Boogie to the store a no-brainer. “She really just loves attention and enjoys being close to people,” Bliss says. “She doesn’t like to be left alone.” Boogie’s disposition resembles that of a sweet little lady: slightly slow moving, sociable and in tune with fashion. Bliss says Boogie is laid back, just like the atmosphere at the store. C. Collection opened in 1995 when owner Anne Lynne Charbonnet realized there was a shortage of contemporary women’s boutiques in New Orleans. At the time, Charbonnet says, C. Collection was one of the few shops in the city that catered to young adults. Now, shoppers can find basics at the Riverbend boutique as well as trendy pieces like faux fur vests, Aztec print skirts and sweaters, colored denim, game day ensembles and accessories. “We’ve broadened our audience,” Charbonnet says. “We now cater to a wider age range from 15-year-olds to 50-year-olds. It’s great because we feel as though a larger group of women are simply more stylish these days.” The staff at C. Collection says the store is fun and lively, and Boogie certainly adds to the energy. “She’s a celebrity,” Bliss says. Boogie embraces new trends and will model everything from accessories to entire ensembles. She frequently appears on the store’s Facebook page wearing headbands and scarves. “You can put anything on her and she’ll just sit there and let you,” Bliss says. “And then we crack up.” Boogie also enjoys snoozing behind the desk but is always eager to entertain customers. “When customers hear her snoring and ask to see her, she happily comes out of her crate and shakes her little butt,” Bliss says. “She loves it.”

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PLAYING DRESS UP SLEEPING GETTING ATTENTION FROM CUSTOMERS PLUSH BLANKETS J A N U A RY. 2 0 1 4 < < <

CUE 47

Cue, Jan 2014  

Lumberjack chic; sparkling gowns for ice princesses; a home holiday extravaganza and more

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