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LE ROYAL ROUGE SHOW The Flirting. The Variety. The Fun. July 25 – October 28

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Tickets on sale at 1-800-745-3000, Ticketmaster.com, harrahs.com and at the Harrah’s Box Office on show days, 3pm – 8pm. Tickets start at $29.99.

Showtimes and dates are subject to change. Blackout dates may apply. Harrah’s reserves the right to change, cancel, or amend this offer at any time. Non-transferable and non-negotiable. Additional restrictions may apply. Not valid with any other offer. Valid at Harrah’s New Orleans only. This offer not intended for excluded patrons. Facebook is a registered trademark of Facebook, Inc. Twitter is a registered trademark of Twitter, Inc. Must be 21 or older to enter casino or gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® ©2012, Caesars License Company, LLC.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

Wednesdays – Sundays • 8pm Harrah’s Theatre

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contents

staff

Publisher  |  Margo DuBos administrative Director  |  MarK KarCHEr  editorial Editor  |  KEVIN aLLMaN Managing Editor  |  KaNDaCE PoWEr graVEs Political Editor  |  CLaNCY DuBos arts & Entertainment Editor  |  WILL CoVIELLo special sections Editor  |  MIssY WILKINsoN staff Writers  |  aLEX WooDWarD,   CHarLEs MaLDoNaDo

Editorial assistant  |  LaurEN LaBorDE  listingsedit@gambitweekly.com Contributing Writers   

July 31, 2012    +    Volume 33     +    Number 31

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pullout

JErEMY aLforD, D. ErIC BooKHarDT,   rED CoTToN,  aLEJaNDro DE Los rIos,   MEg farrIs, KEN KorMaN, BrENDa MaITLaND,   IaN MCNuLTY, NoaH BoNaParTE PaIs,   MEgaN BraDEN-PErrY, DaLT WoNK Contributing Photographer  |  CHErYL gErBEr

Interns  |  NICoLE KosTEr, MaTTHEW HosE production Production Director  |  Dora sIsoN special Projects Designer    sHErIE DELaCroIX-aLfaro

Web & Classifieds Designer  |  MarIa Boué graphic Designers     

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

LINDsaY WEIss, LYN BraNTLEY,   BrITT BENoIT, MarK WaguEsPaCK Pre-Press Coordinator  |  gEorgIa DoDgE

4

display advertising fax: 483-3159 | displayadv@gambitweekly.com advertising Director  |  saNDY sTEIN BroNDuM  483-3150  [sandys@gambitweekly.com] advertising administrator  |  MICHELE sLoNsKI  483-3140  [micheles@gambitweekly.com] advertising Coordinator  |  CHrIsTIN JoHNsoN  483-3138  [christinj@gambitweekly.com] sales & Marketing Coordinator  |  BraNDIN DuBos  483-3152  [brandind@gambitweekly.com] senior account Executive  |  JILL gIEgEr  483-3131 [ jillg@gambitweekly.com] account Executives    JEffrEY PIZZo  483-3145  [jeffp@gambitweekly.com] LINDa LaCHIN  483-3142  [lindal@gambitweekly.com] aMY WENDEL  483-3146  [amyw@gambitweekly.com] sTaCY gauTrEau  483-3143  [stacyg@gambitweekly.com ] marketing Marketing Director  |  JEaNNE EXNICIos fosTEr  Marketing Intern  |  LIZETTE LaNDrY  classifieds 483-3100 | fax: 483-3153 classadv@gambitweekly.com Classified advertising Director  |  sHErrY sNYDEr  483-3122 [sherrys@gambitweekly.com] senior account Executive  |  CarrIE MICKEY-LaCY  483-3121 [carriem@gambitweekly.com] business Billing Inquiries 483-3135 Controller  |  garY DIgIoVaNNI assistant Controller  |  MaurEEN TrEgrE Credit officer  |  MJ aVILEs operations & events operations & Events Director  |  Laura CarroLL operations & Events assistant  |  raCHEL BarrIos

on tHe cover

American Dreaming ......................................15 Immigration courts are in crisis nationwide  — including New orleans. Two local men tell  their stories

7 in seven

Seven Things to Do This Week .................5 grace Potter, Fiddler on the Roof and more

news + views

News .........................................................................7 rep. steve scalise is championing telecommunication reform while receiving hefty  contributions from the telecom industry Bouquets + Brickbats .....................................7 Heroes and zeroes C’est What? ..........................................................7 Gambit’s Web poll Scuttlebutt .........................................................10 News briefs and politics Commentary ..................................................... 11 Thoughts on the consent decree 

Music .....................................................................36 PrEVIEW: Dirty Projectors and Wye oak .....39 Film ........................................................................40 rEVIEW: The Do-Deca-Pentathion .............40 rEVIEW: Music From the Big House ......... 41 Art ...........................................................................45 rEVIEW: NOLA Now, Part II: The Human Figure .............................................46 Stage .....................................................................49 rEVIEW: Urban Education Smackdown ... 51 Events ...................................................................52 PrEVIEW: White Linen Night .......................54 Crossword + Sudoku ...................................62

Talkback .............................................................. 11 City Council responds to Gambit’s “brickbat” on traffic cameras  Clancy DuBos ...................................................12 Mean grrls and good ol’ Boys Blake Pontchartrain ......................................13 a famous french Quarter fire

sHopping + style

What’s in Store ................................................23 Vom fass

eat + drink

Review ..................................................................25 Chiba Fork + Center ....................................................25 all the news that’s fit to eat 5 in Five  .............................................................27 five tapas spots 3-Course Interview  ......................................27 Chocolatier Cheryl scripter

classifieds

arts + entertainment

A + E News .........................................................35 satchmo summerfest

Market Place .....................................................55 Mind + Body + Fitness  ...............................56 Weekly Tails + Cat Chat ..............................56 Employment ......................................................58 Real Estate ........................................................59 French Quarter Properties .......................63

gambit communications, inc. Chairman  |  CLaNCY DuBos  +  President & CEo  |  Margo DuBos 

CoVEr DEsIgN BY Dora

gambit (IssN 1089-3520) is published weekly by gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville st.,  New orleans, La 70119. (504) 486-5900. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited  manuscripts even if accompanied by a sasE. all material published in Gambit is copyrighted:  Copyright  2012 gambit Communications, Inc.  all rights reserved.

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seven things to do in seven days Fiddler on the Roof Thu.-Sun. Aug. 2-5 | Tulane Summer Lyric Theatre finishes its season with the Broadway classic Fiddler on the Roof. Set against the backdrop of anti-Semitism in Russia at the turn of the 20th century, Tevye has tried to raise his five daughters in accordance with Jewish culture and tradition. But as the three eldest prepare to marry, they all confront changes. At Dixon Hall. PAGE 49. Mahayla Fri. Aug. 3 | Born again from the remnants of the band that succeeded it (Big Blue Marble), Dave Fera’s Mahayla has a new EP in the works and a familiar presence onstage: pocket-sized Australian spitfire Yanti Turang of pre-Katrina rockers Pocketfoxx. At Circle Bar. PAGE 37. Satchmo SummerFest Fri.-Sun. Aug. 3-5 | Two days of free live music anchor the Satchmo SummerFest. There’s plenty of traditional and contemporary jazz as well as brass band and Mardi Gras Indian music. There also are scholarly presentations, film and video clips of Louis Armstrong, a kids’ area and more. At the Old U.S. Mint. PAGE 35.

AUG

Grace Potter and the Nocturnals with Kenny Chesney and Tim McGraw | Kenny Chesney and Tim McGraw have been two of country music’s top touring acts for a decade. This double bill features each doing long sets of their own material and performing together. The two also have joined opening act Grace Potter and the Nocturnals on stage at some tour stops. Potter wowed audiences at the 2012 New Orelans Jazz & Heritage Festival with her mix of country, rock and blues. At the Superdome. PAGE 37.

PonyKiller with Lovey Dovies Sat. Aug. 4 | Arson Anthem bassist Collin Yeo goes his own way with PonyKiller, whose 2011 psych/rock debut The Wilderness (Housecore) is thick with high plains drifts and moody blues. Lovey Dovies and Dummy Dumpster open at Den at Howlin’ Wolf. PAGE 37.

Thunder Soul Mon. Aug. 6 | DJ Soul Sister and the Charitable Film Network kick off a series of musicthemed documentaries with Thunder Soul. The film chronicles the reunion of Houston’s renowned Kashmere High School Stage Band, a jazz band converted into a funk machine by the beloved and gifted bandleader Conrad “Prof” Johnson. At Cafe Istanbul. PAGE 40.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

White Linen Night Sat. Aug. 4 | White Linen Night features gallery openings in the Warehouse District and an afterparty at the Contemporary Arts Center. The Julia Street block party features food booths from 20 local restaurants and music by The Good Country Hey Brahs, Picnic, Jim McCormick and Mark Carson and Jim Smith’s Damn Frontier. The Mod Dance Party DJs spin retro hits at the CAC afterparty. PAGE 53.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

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B L A K E P O N TC H A R T R A I N 13

knowledge is power

Politics On Demand

While Congressman Steve Scalise is seeking to regulate broadcasters and video providers, he’s also taking their checks.

heroes + zeroes The Institute of Museum and Library Services

awarded the Louisiana Children’s Museum (LCM) a $148,000 Museums for America grant to fund literacy initiatives. LCM was selected from more than 400 applicants. The two-year federal grant will benefit a citywide literacy program and a campaign for school readiness in conjunction with the Head Start Program.

The Youth Rescue Initiative (YRI)

gathered 4,200 books for at-risk pre-K through eighth-grade students during its fourth annual Power Through Reading book drive. To date, the initiative has collected more than 28,000 books donated to literacy and reading programs and has partnered with the New Orleans Public Library and the Lindy Boggs National Center for Literacy at Loyola University. YRI was founded in 2008 to provide support to at-risk youth.

By Jeremy Alford

I

video providers were basically limited to cable and satellite compaRep. Steve Scalise, nies. Today, content can be viewed R-Metairie, says his on desktop computers, laptops, telecommunications smartphones, tablets, certain DVD bill doesn’t play players, gaming consoles, wired favorites and is long televisions and a bevy of specialty overdue reform. units that can be used in lieu of cable and satellite boxes. The notion that the law lags behind technology is hardly new. Ever since the Industrial Revolution, technology has far outpaced the law. For lawmakers and policy makers, the issue becomes not just how can the law keep up, but how can it do so without wreaking havoc in the marketplace. Scalise says his bill would “allow the market to operate in a way that advances innovation and technology, while simultaneously benefiting consumers.” To get the wide-ranging discussion moving, and to determine what still works and what should be scrapped or overhauled, the House Energy and Commerce Committee convened a hearing on June 27 to better understand the video marketplace. According to his latest quarterly fundraising report filed with the Federal Election Commission, Scalise collected $7,000 just three days later, on June 30, from individuals, businesses and PACs with skin in the game: $3,000 from employees of EATEL, page 8

c’est

Arts Midwest and the National Endowment for the Arts

awarded the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane a $25,000 grant for the program “Shakespeare for a New Generation.” Arts Midwest gave more than $1 million in grant funding to 42 programs in the U.S., supporting performances of the Bard’s works for young audiences. The Shakespeare Festival at Tulane will provide 100 area students from public schools with show tickets and transportation.

Rokeisha Barrios,

the wife of a former NOPD cop convicted in the Danziger case, admitted she fraudulently received more than $33,000 in federal funds from the Gulf Coast Claims Facility (GCCF). Barrios pleaded guilty to making a fraudulent GCCF application in her husband’s name, claiming her husband was a commercial fisherman and hotel employee before the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. She was placed on probation and ordered to pay full restitution.

? Vote on “C’est What?” at www.bestofneworleans.com

Do you support the City Council’s unanimous decision to extend school zone hours in New Orleans?

71%

No

29%

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THIS wEEK’S question:

How do you think all the off-season drama will affect the New Orleans Saints ability to play this year?

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

t’s good to be U.S. Rep. Steve Scalise these days. The Metairie Republican has become his party’s top recruiter in the House and he’s flying around the country looking for prospects for the fall ballot. Back home, Scalise is almost guaranteed re-election and should be considered a fixture in the 1st Congressional District for the foreseeable future. His fundraising bears that out — but it raises questions as well. During the current two-year election cycle, Scalise has received more than $1.1 million in contributions, including $467,000 from political action committees, or PACs. According to the Center for Responsive Politics, which crunched some of the figures for this story, a PAC is a “popular term for a political committee organized for the purpose of raising and spending money to elect and defeat candidates.” Breaking down Scalise’s numbers further, $96,500 came from PACs connected to the communications and electronics industries. It’s not the largest sector for Scalise when it comes to PACs. That honor belongs to energy and natural resources PACs, which have given him $101,500. Communications and electronics PACs follow closely behind, though, accounting for roughly 8.8 percent of Scalise’s total receipts this cycle. Scalise’s new best friends have names like Time Warner, CBS, Viacom and the National Association of Broadcasters. It’s not that surprising, given that Scalise sits on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, which has a hand in regulating broadcasters. The committee has 23 Democrats and 31 Republicans, including Rep. Bill Cassidy of Baton Rouge, a Republican. In contrast to Scalise, however, Cassidy has collected a mere $26,500 from communications and electronics PACs during the current election cycle — $70,000 less than his metro New Orleans colleague. Scalise also raised more during the most recent quarter from television and movie companies than Cassidy has collected in the last six quarters. Cassidy’s biggest PAC donors are connected to health care, a major policy issue for the Red Stick representative, who also happens to be a physician. Why is all this noteworthy? Because Scalise, a systems analyst, is sponsoring the Next Generation TV Marketplace Act to redefine the relationship between broadcasters and video providers. Couple that fact with his fundraising efforts, and his relationship with the telecommunications industry cries out for scrutiny. Scalise argues that the current federal laws have become outdated as technology has progressed and entertainment streams have moved online. For example, he says the federal Communications Act was amended nearly 20 years ago, when

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

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a cable provider based in Gonzales, La.; $2,500 from General electric, which owns part of NBC; $1,000 from the American Cable Association; and $500 from the president of Bright House Networks, another cable television provider headquartered in New York. About a week and half before the June 27 hearing, scalise also received $2,500 from Dish Network, bringing scalise’s total from broadcasters and video providers to $9,500 during the second quarter alone. As for other receipts prior to the second quarter, here’s a sampling of individual PAC donations scalise has scooped up since he first introduced the proposed act:     • American Cable Association: $1,000     • CBs Corp.: $1,000     • Charter Communications: $2,000     • Clear Channel Communications: $1,000     • Comcast Corp.: $7,500     • Cox enterprises: $2,000     • DiReCTv Group: $10,000     • Motion Picture Association of America: $1,000     • National Association of Broadcasters: $4,000     • National Cable and Telecommunications Association: $10,000     • sony Pictures entertainment: $1,000     • Time warner: $1,000     • Time warner Cable: $10,000     •  viacom international: $2,500     • walt Disney Co.: $2,000 scalise insists there are no connections between his bill and the donations. “i’ve been able to get support from all across the industry,” he says. “if you read the bill closely, there’s something for everybody to like and dislike. “My bill doesn’t pick winners and losers. The current law picks winners and losers.” Over the last few decades, scalise says, communications and entertainment technology has advanced rapidly while laws governing the industry have remained relatively unchanged. He says there’s a need to create a marketplace where video providers would be able to choose whether they want to negotiate with broadcasters and copyright holders — rather than being required to, as under current law — in order to purchase content to resell to consumers. The proposed legislation has a simple enough premise: the laws that regulate markets for cable and satellite broadcasting shouldn’t apply to the myriad other options that have sprouted up for the new generation of pay television. supporters of scalise’s bill include Thomas schatz, president of the Council for Citizens Against Government waste. schatz says broadcast-


news + views broadcasting companies, Cardenas says, and broadcasters “take risks by investing significant amounts of money into content production and marketing.” Therefore, he says, they should have the right to determine its distribution. Duane Parde of the National Taxpayers Union, which is backing scalise’s bill, argues that the kind of power and influence that comes from such authority has created some unique situations over the years. He says a recent dispute between DirecTv and sunbeam Television threatened to black out the super Bowl for hundreds of thousands of consumers, and Cablevision customers in New York were blacked out from the first two games of the world series in 2010. “The rules have not kept pace and still reflect the single-provider landscape that existed in 1992,” Parde says. “in a true free market, cable, satellite and other operators could negotiate with multiple broadcasters for the same content, which in turn would encourage more reasonable prices and fewer blackouts.” Compulsory copyright licenses and retransmission consent regulations put the government in the middle of what should be strictly private sector negotiations, scalise says. “The government should not be in the business of picking winners and losers, and we need to implement common-sense reforms that lift the heavy hand of government from traditional distributors and ensure it’s not extended to new technologies,” he says. As for the money involved in the issue, particularly the donations he has received from industry players, scalise says it has no impact whatsoever on what is essentially the “beginning of a work in progress.” Additionally, he says none of his contributors were given special access to negotiations or drafts of the legislation. “i discuss policy with everyone,” scalise says. “i often meet with people who have given me no money over the years. it doesn’t matter to me.” while scalise admits that fundraising has had some influence over policymaking in washington, he adds that it “sure hasn’t for me.” still, he says, raising money is important for politicians who want to be re-elected; he declined to comment directly on how legislation and committee assignments can increase those chances. “it’s expensive to run campaigns, so you have to raise money,” scalise says. “Fundraising is a necessary part of being in politics.” And if your industry has business before the Congress, donating appears to be an equally necessary part of being in business. Jeremy Alford is a freelance journalist based in Baton Rouge. Contact him through his website: www.jeremyalford. com or on Twitter: @alfordwrites.

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ers have used their positions under the 20-year-old law to deny viewers popular programs as a way to leverage higher rates out of providers. “Additionally, the bill will repeal the compulsory copyright license, in which the government dictates the royalties [video providers] pay to broadcasters for their content, instead of allowing these royalties to be determined by a free market,” schatz says. scalise adds that the bill also would repeal media ownership caps, which limit the number of broadcast stations a single company can own in a given media market, and lift the ban on broadcasters owning a newspaper in the same market. Not everyone is happy with scalise’s proposals, however. speaking on behalf of the National Association of Broadcasters, Hearst Television President David Barrett suggests such a setup would favor video providers — and put broadcasters at a disadvantage. “As an industry that creates content, or acquires the rights to content, it is imperative that broadcasters have the right to negotiate over how our content is distributed,” Barrett says. “Congress should reject any erosion of the bedrock principles of retransmission consent and market exclusivity because they are essential to the system of broadcasting.” Retransmission consent is a key element in the current law. it gives local Tv stations the option of negotiating “retransmission rights” with cable operators and satellite providers such as Dish and DirecTv. Popular Tv stations demand cash or other considerations in the course of such negotiations, but cable operators and satellite providers can refuse to carry stations that demand too much money, or make counterproposals. Al Cardenas, chairman of the advocacy group American Conservative Union, supports the existing rules for retransmission and says he’s concerned they will be lost unless scalise’s bill is changed. He says the current process helps create a marketplace that ensures broadcasters are compensated by video providers for the use of their signal and content. Retransmission consent, which came about when the Communications Act was amended in 1992, requires the involved parties to negotiate for the use of a local broadcast signal. “This prevented the pay-Tv industry’s previous practice of using the signal for free and then profiting from its retransmission by selling the broadcasters’ content as part of their basic service,” Cardenas says. it also reflects a fundamental tenet of federal copyright law — that the creator/owner of a “copyrightable work” gets to determine how it’s used and reused, and can demand compensation for any use. The programming that is most viewed today is still produced by

9


news + views

scuttlebutt Quote of the week

Bra fitting available

“we don’t know what to fully expect from this consent decree because we haven’t seen it. we had hoped to be a part of negotiations, to give meaningful input to the city or at least to the written version before it was signed. That didn’t happen, but regardless of the outcome, we will do our best to perform our function as the public mandated.” — A statement from the office of New Orleans Independent Police Monitor Susan Hutson, shortly after federal and city officials announced the final adoption of the long-awaited 122-page consent decree.

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State rep SayS She’S being encouraged to run The contest for the District B seat on the New Orleans City Council became a three-way race last week when Dana Kaplan, executive director of the Juvenile Justice Project of Louisiana, announced she would begin collecting the necessary signatures to appear on the Nov. 6 ballot. Broadmoor improvement Association president LaToya Cantrell and Eric Strachan, former chief of staff to Councilwoman Stacy Head, already have announced they will run. Now a fourth name has surfaced: state Rep. Helena Moreno. sources tell Gambit that Moreno is seriously considering jumping into the race for District B, which encompasses the CBD, warehouse District and Garden District as well as parts of Central City, Mid-City and Uptown. Reached by phone, Moreno was noncommittal but didn’t deny the reports, telling Gambit, “i’ve had a lot of supporters and many elected officials urge and encourage me to run for this seat.” Moreno was elected to the state House of Representatives in 2010 in a special election to fill the District 93 slot vacated by Karen Carter Peterson, who won another special election for the state senate. Moreno previously ran for U.s. Congress in 2008 after leaving a reporting job at wDsU-Tv. “At this point, i love my spot [in the Legislature],” said Moreno, who is vice-chairwoman of the House Criminal Justice Committee and sits on the powerful House Appropriations Committee. “But because of the number of calls i’ve received, i’ve talked to my team and other elected officials [regarding] how best to serve the city. we’ll see what happens.” The qualifying period for area elections is Aug. 15-17. The open primary will be held Nov. 6, with a runoff Dec. 8 if necessary. — KeviN ALLMAN

Head start head forceS out carrere, charbonnet Selected Former Assistant City Attorney Freddie Charbonnet was selected as the interim District e councilman at a special meeting of the City Council July 26. Charbonnet replaces Jon Johnson, who stepped down from the office July 18 after plead-

ing guilty to federal charges of funneling FeMA funds into his failed campaign for the state senate in 2007. The candidates for the interim position were sankofa Community Development Corporation founder and executive director Rashida Ferdinand, businessman Ronald Carrere, lawyer Michael Darnell (who served as interim councilman after Oliver Thomas pleaded guilty to accepting bribes and resigned in 2007) and Charbonnet. Carrere — considered by some to be the early favorite — withdrew his name before the early morning vote, as did Ferdinand. sources say Carrere pulled out of contention after meeting with At-Large Councilwoman Stacy Head. with only Charbonnet and Darnell remaining, the council selected Charbonnet in a 4-2 vote. Council members Jacquelyn Brechtel Clarkson, Susan Guidry, Kristin Gisleson Palmer and Head, who increasingly vote as a bloc on the council, were in favor; Diana Bajoie and Cynthia Hedge-Morrell were opposed. Charbonnet, a lawyer in private practice, will serve until a winner is determined by a special election Nov. 6 (Dec. 8 if a runoff is necessary). He cannot run in that race. Had Ferdinand been selected instead, New Orleans would have had an all-female City Council for the first time in its history. — sTAFF RePORTs

Passing the gavel head could be city council preSident aug. 9 Councilwoman At-Large Stacy Head is slated to take over the council presidency next month from current president Jacquelyn Brechtel Clarkson. Danielle Viguerie, Head’s director of communications, says Clarkson plans to call for a vote to hand over the presidency during the council’s regular meeting Aug. 9. The two at-large council members typically take turns serving one-year terms as president, starting in May of each year. Clarkson has been the council’s presiding officer since May 2011. Council members thus could have elected Head to the position following her May 2 oath of office as the new at-large member, but instead they re-elected Clarkson and named Head vice-president. The reason for the delay? viguerie says Head wanted to polish up on parliamentary procedure before taking over as council president and has been taking a class on Robert’s Rules of Order. — CHARLes MALDONADO

news radio WWno-fM, npr to partner With neW nonprofit neWSrooM Officials from the University of New Orleans (UNO), wwNO-FM, National Public Radio (NPR) and the New Orleans business community gathered at UNO July 27 to announce a new partnership in the form of a nonprofit newsroom, NewOrleansReporter.org. “i’m proud to say my university will be on the cutting edge of digital journalism,” UNO presi-

dent Dr. Peter Fos told the crowd. The structure will create a new umbrella organization, UNO Public Media, which will encompass both wwNO-FM and wwNO.org’s original newsgathering, as well as that of NewOrleansReporter. org. Both will be in partnership with NPR and will be headed by wwNO general manager Paul Maassen. Fundraising for the newsroom will be done by a new group, Friends of Quality Reporting, spearheaded by Greater New Orleans inc. president Michael Hecht and educate Now! head Leslie Jacobs. A proposal circulating earlier this week among business leaders and potential donors promised “Friends of Quality Reporting will be separated from the editorial function by a strict firewall.” That earlier proposal had contained figures saying NewOrleansReporter.org would require $6 million in donations and sponsorships to get off the ground with a team of 10 reporters and 10 support staff. At the press conference, Hecht said that figure had been amended to $4.5 million. The original proposal also promised a $250,000 in kind match from NPR, but Kinsey Wilson, NPR’s executive vice president and chief content officer, said “we haven’t put a specific amount of money into this,” adding that the new newsroom would benefit from existing NPR management systems. it’s wwNO’s latest expansion into establishing a larger news presence in New Orleans; earlier in the week, the station announced partnerships with the city’s other nonprofit newsroom, The Lens, as well as the local culture website Nolavie. “This is not about The Times-Picayune per se,” Maassen said, referring to the paper’s plan to scale back to three days a week (plus special Monday New Orleans saints sections) in the fall. Nevertheless, Gambit has learned that at least one familiar T-P name has been contacted about a possible role as a news editor. On July 23, wwNO-FM dumped its longtime top-40 classical music format and began running news-oriented shows that are familiar to NPR listeners in other cities. NewOrleansReporter.org is scheduled to launch by year’s end, further upending the New Orleans media world. — KeviN ALLMAN

bobby for governor … of new Orleans? politico proMoteS Jindal The website Politico had an amusing slipup in a July 24 article about Newt Gingrich’s picks for the GOP vice-presidential nomination. The article concluded, “Gingrich said the strongest vice presidential possibilities are, in order of most likely, sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell, New Orleans Gov. Bobby Jindal and former Minnesota governor Tim Pawlenty.” Not sure if governing the Crescent City is a promotion or a demotion from the job he’s got — but we’re pretty sure it’s not the job Jindal wants. — KeviN ALLMAN


FeeDBacK Greenlighting School Zone Extensions

Jac q uely n Brec htel c l a rk son

City CounCil president

s tacy he a d City CounCil viCe-president

k ri s tin Gi sle son Pa lmer CounCilwoman distriCt C

cy nthi a hedGe- morrell

susa n G. Guidry

CounCilwoman distriCt d

di a n a Ba Joie

Jon John son

CounCilwoman distriCt a

CounCilwoman distriCt B

CounCilman distriCt e

Note: This letter was sent before Johnson resigned from council.

thinking out loud

Badly Needed Reforms hen he was a candidate for mayor in late 2009 and early 2010, Mitch Landrieu talked about negotiating a consent decree with the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to overhaul and permanently reform the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD). Last week, Landrieu and U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, along with other local and federal officials, unveiled a consent decree that one high-ranking DOJ official called “unprecedented in scope and nature.” Based on allegations laid out in the 12page complaint the feds filed in connection with the consent decree, nothing less than history-making constraints on NOPD would suffice. The complaint read more like an indictment, and for good reason. In March 2011, DOJ presented a lengthy report on its investigation of NOPD’s policies, procedures and practices. The report exposed systemic constitutional violations, ranging from use of excessive force; unconstitutional stops, searches and arrests; biased policing; failure to provide effective policing services to people with limited English proficiency; and a failure to investigate sexual assaults and domestic violence. The report also noted NOPD’s failures in such areas as officer recruitment, promotion and evaluation; training and supervision; community oversight; and, of course, the corrupted and much-abused “paid detail” system. Many of these ills were well-known long before the DOJ report, and to his credit Landrieu started addressing them shortly after taking office. Holder noted as much last week. The difference is that the reforms already initiated by Landrieu and NOPD — along with many more demanded by DOJ — will now have the full force of a federal court order behind them. They cannot be amended or ignored by the whim of the next mayor or police chief. Going forward, the reforms will be institutionalized and regularly reviewed by U.S. District Judge Susie Morgan and a soon-to-be-named independent monitor to make sure they are fully and faithfully implemented. The reforms include: • Higher recruiting standards and more rigorous training for all officers. This includes 40 hours of use-of-force training; 24 hours of training on stops, searches and arrests; and four hours on bias-free policing — all within the first year. • Stronger policies on constitutional stops, searches and arrests. • A 16-hour limit on the number of hours worked in a 24-hour period (including details), and a 24-hour total limit on the number of hours worked on paid details per week. • Moving management of the paid detail system outside of NOPD. • Additional training for and reporting of use of force.

• Training for cultural awareness and community engagement. • Better technology to improve constitutional policing and accountability measures, including in-car cameras to monitor officer conduct in relation to misconduct, use of force and bias-free policing. • A comprehensive analysis of all NOPD policies and procedures. The monitor will be chosen jointly by the city and DOJ in the coming months. Once in place, the monitor will file quarterly public reports to the judge; the city will have to file status reports every six months — and publish annual reports on data the consent decree now requires NOPD to collect and make public. The agreement also requires the city to create a Crisis Intervention Team of specially trained officers who will respond to calls involving individuals in mental distress. In light of recent state cuts to area mental health services, this is a critical component. The duration of the consent decree is open-ended, but by its own terms the

If NOPD fails to remain troublefree, the judge can extend the federal oversight — and impose penalties. intense federal scrutiny will remain in force for at least four years. By then or at any time afterward, if NOPD can show that it has committed no violations for two consecutive years, the judge may ease or lift the decree’s terms. If NOPD fails to remain trouble-free, however, the judge can extend the federal oversight — and impose penalties. In virtually every respect, the consent decree uses a heavy-handed approach to address longstanding problems at NOPD. In light of NOPD’s history, this approach strikes us as necessary. More than 10 years ago, as he was leaving office, then-Mayor Marc Morial reflected back on the significant reforms that his police chief, Richard Pennington, brought to NOPD during his stint as the city’s top cop. His only regret, Morial said at that time, was that he did not institutionalize those reforms. Morial’s concern was well-placed; Pennington’s reforms were quickly undone by the Nagin administration, and New Orleans paid a heavy price. Last week’s consent decree brings to NOPD not only a far-reaching set of badly needed reforms, but also the kind of institutional permanence that will enable them to take root and make a lasting difference.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

n “Bouquets & Brickbats,” (News & Views, July 17), Gambit states that the City Council’s action to extend school zone hours is “nothing but a naked grab for red-light camera cash.” We are writing to correct that misstatement. At the June 28 City Council meeting, the administration provided a “by request” ordinance for first reading. The ordinance, authored by Councilwoman Jackie Clarkson would increase the hours for school zones. The rationale was that the Orleans Parish School Board (OPSB) and the Recovery School District (RSD) desired increased hours to reflect when students were actually coming and going from school. The council favored sending the ordinance through a committee process to vet the matter publicly; however, because school starts in a few weeks, the administration advised that the committee process would be problematic, as signs reflecting the new hours needed to be made and installed expeditiously. Prior to adoption on July 12, the OPSB and RSD leadership contacted the council to confirm that they desired the increase of hours and that several school leaders and parents made the request. Council staff obtained written letters of support from the OPSB and RSD and requested that a representative from each entity attend the council meeting to outline their rationale for this request, address the public and answer any questions. Because there is such public and media skepticism relating to traffic law enforcement, the council publicly (at the council meeting) demanded that the administration and school systems do widespread media and public announcement outreach to educate the public regarding the school zone changes. In addition, the council publicly and privately urged the administration to provide a grace period for any school zones that had speed camera enforcement relative to the new school zone hours. Any one of us will gladly discuss this with you further and, of course, any of us (and our staffs) are always available to clarify and explain any action of the council.

commeNtaRy

11


clancy DuBos

Follow Clancy on Twitter: @clancygambit

politics

an Unfair Process

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

ew orleans City Council President Jackie Clarkson described the process for selecting the interim District E councilman as “very democratic.” I suppose in the strictest sense she’s correct. The council did, after all, take a vote on Freddie Charbonnet’s appointment. The vote was 4-2. Charbonnet beat out fellow attorney Michael Darnell, who served as interim at-large councilman after oliver Thomas resigned in disgrace in 2007. But to call what happened at last Thursday’s special council meeting “democratic” — or a “process” at all — is laughable. That’s too bad, because when Jon Johnson resigned his District E seat after pleading guilty to federal conspiracy charges, the council had a golden opportunity to adopt and implement a forward-looking template for filling vacancies on an interim basis, one rooted in transparency and based on public input. Instead, the council lapsed into the kind of old-time cloakroom machinations that voters thought they were tossing out when they elected this bunch.

12

Here’s what happened: After Johnson resigned, Clarkson asked the remaining six council members to compile a list of acceptable candidates. Each council member forwarded three names to Clarkson, who listed them in alphabetical order (after removing duplicate nominations) and sent the list back to her colleagues with a request that each select

At that point, Clarkson says, she intended to let the public speak for and against the finalists. But then a funny thing happened: Two of the four finalists dropped out. one of them, Rashida Ferdinand, a 9th Ward artist, apparently decided at the last minute to focus on her art. Ronald Carrere, a mortgage consultant for Liberty Bank, left for reasons that remain publicly

I can’t see a dime’s worth of difference between the Power Grrls and the Good Ol’ Boys. just two names from that list. When she got the second round of nominees back from her colleagues, she again removed the duplicates and — voila! — the list contained only four names. We have to take Clarkson’s word that this was a fair process, because none of it transpired in public, and none of the nominees was publicly identified, let alone publicly vetted, in advance.

unexplained. What is known is that he was seen walking into the hallway with AtLarge Councilwoman stacy Head minutes before the start of the special meeting. When he returned a few minutes later, he glumly announced his withdrawal from the competition. suffice it to say Head convinced him not to remain in contention. With only two names left on the list, Clarkson dispensed with public input and

the four white ladies of the council made their selection in short order. All this is no reflection on Charbonnet; he was merely a spectator. But if Charbonnet was the best choice, no one will ever be able to tell by the selection process — which makes that process as unfair to him as it was to the other candidates and the public. That’s a shame, because the council could have adopted an open and transparent process for filling vacancies on an interim basis. Yes, as Clarkson has noted, the City Charter places the selection process squarely within the council’s purview, but post-Katrina political sensibilities also require a lot more transparency than what was on display last week. Much has been made over the fact that, after Johnson resigned, New orleans had its first-ever all-female City Council. Based on last week’s events, I have to confess I can’t see a dime’s worth of difference between the Power Grrls and the Good ol’ Boys. I doubt the public sees much difference, either.

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BlakePONTCHARTRAIN

Hey Blake,

Can you tell us about the attack on the St. Louis Cathedral that happened around 1905? I think nitro was used. If I remember correctly, the front rooms blew up, and crowds came from all over to see the damage. J. Craven Dear J., It’s hard to imagine a more startling event than a bomb exploding in St. Louis Cathedral. Around 3 p.m. on Sunday, April 25, 1909, folks heard a loud noise. They paid little attention until they learned the noise was an explosion at the cathedral, which had been standing since 1794. Thousands rushed to the scene. The building was ablaze and smoke poured though the open windows. When firefighters entered the church, they saw lots of destruction caused by the blast, but not a soul was injured. At first it was believed a bomb made of nitroglycerin was detonated on the second story of the church on the front vestibule on Chartres Street, wrecking everything in the vicinity. As luck would have

Questions for Blake: askblake@gambitweekly.com

NeW ORLeANS know-it-all

it, however, the main force of the explosion went downward through the floor instead of upward toward the tower, which would have caused greater damage. It would have been easy for anyone to enter the church, because it was always open. Fortunately, few people were in the building at the time, but there was a christening party waiting at the altar. Police surmised the bomber went up a stairway leading to the organ loft, placed the bomb amid some debris left by workmen, lit the fuse and left the building before the bomb went off. Mayor Martin Behrman immediately promised that the city would give a $250 reward for the arrest and conviction of the guilty party or parties. The Knights of Columbus and Gov. Jared Y. Sanders’ office also offered rewards, totaling $1,000. The police acted quickly, and two men were taken into custody almost immediately: Ferdinand Palma, who immigrated from Sicily seven years earlier, and his friend Angelo Caputo. Both were seen near the cathedral around the time of the explosion. Someone claimed they saw Palma behaving oddly on a streetcar near the cathedral after the explosion. Two other Italian suspects also were ques-

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

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tioned, but they were released that night. Palma and Caputo were released the next day for lack of evidence against them. In early May, fire marshal deputies considered the possibility that there was no bomb at all and that the explosion was caused by dust ignited by a flame or an electric spark. The deputies quoted chemical authorities to support the theory. Damage to the cathedral was assessed at about $10,000 because the choir loft and the organ were damaged and many stained-glass windows were broken. Almost immediately, fundraising began to restore the cathedral, including a concert at the French Opera House, a festival at City Park, and a baseball game. No one ever was charged in the incident.

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BY CHARLES MALDONADO

W

hat makes someone desirable to live in the United States — or, failing that, what makes someone not-too-objectionable to remain in the United States, despite how he or she might have gotten here — is a formula always in flux. It depends on where you live, who’s in power in Washington, D.C., the health of the economy and the current makeup of the electorate. Add in politics, particularly in an election year, and it becomes even more complicated. Joaquin Navarro Hernandez knows this all too well. Navarro Hernandez has been facing deportation in New Orleans Immigration Court since early 2010. In that time, he’s been a labor organizer, a spokesperson for immigration reform and a plaintiff in a successful lawsuit against the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency. Now he’s something else: a “prosecutorial discre-

tion” candidate, the possible beneficiary of a 2011 rule change seeking to take low-priority deportation candidates off immigration courts’ increasingly bloated dockets. “I came here to be able to work to better my family,” says Navarro Hernandez, his Spanish translated by Jacinta Gonzalez, lead organizer for the Congress of Day Laborers of the New Orleans Workers’ Center for Racial Justice (NOWCRJ). “I’m a day laborer. I do painting. I do concrete work. … Things like that.” Navarro Hernandez’s son and mother, to whom he sends part of his earnings, are “back home,” which is as specific as he’ll get about his native land. Because he’s still in litigation, he can’t reveal his country of origin, but U.S. Border Patrol’s 2010 arrest records say he’s a Honduran who came into the U.S. illegally by way of Laredo, Texas.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

crowded dockets and national politics both play a role in america’s immigration courts. but for two new orleans men, the red tape is personal.

15


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

    For her part, Gonzalez seems to regard Navarro Hernandez  as a friend for whom she has great affection. But to her — and  to Navarro Hernandez as well — he’s also a symbol of the brokenness of immigration enforcement in this country. Navarro  Hernandez is a member of what NOWCRJ calls the Southern  32 — a group of Congress of Day Laborers organizers who  are all in deportation proceedings. Gonzalez claims that the  proceedings against Navarro Hernandez and the rest of the  Southern 32 are retaliation for their activism against alleged  abuses by day-laborer employers and immigration officials.       Navarro Hernandez is also tagged with a nine-digit alien  registration number identifying him as one of hundreds of  thousands of people in pending deportation proceedings  throughout the country — more than 3,000 of whom are in  New Orleans. He’s had that status for two-and-a-half years,  more than half the time he’s lived in the city.     “I don’t know what’s going to happen right now,” Navarro  Hernandez says. “We know that August will be the next court  date. We don’t know what will continue in the future.”

16

The immigration debate is confounding in part because, on  a case-by-case level, it often involves difficult determinations  about a person’s “status.” Practically speaking, that can come  down to a putting a legal definition of “worth” or “value” on a  human being.     The U.S. State Department’s website lists more than a  dozen visa categories for family-sponsored immigrants, ranging from IR-1 (spouse of a U.S. citizen) to F4 (family fourth  preference for siblings of U.S. citizens) to V visas (spouses  and under-21 children of green card holders — plus five categories of employee visas). There also are more than 20 types  of nonimmigrant alien visas — for tourists, victims of human  trafficking, temporary guest workers and free trade agreement  professionals from Chile and Singapore, among many others.      It gets even more confusing from there. If you’ve been  married for less than two years, your status is considered  conditional. You won’t qualify for an IR-1 and must apply for a  CR-1 instead. Also, V visas have actually not been issued for  several years. Applicants who would have qualified for V visas  are now issued F2 visas. Finally, some countries only offer  limited U.S. visa services, or are suspended from offering visa  services, or do not have a United States embassy.      Attorney Larry Fabacher has practiced immigration law  in New Orleans for 37 years. He says he understands how  frustrating the system can be for someone like Navarro Hernandez. Fabacher defends “at least several hundred” people  from removal every year. And, he says, he can’t even wrap his  mind around the law.     “It’s so complicated, you can’t believe it,” he says. “It just  goes on and on.”      For others, like Lorenzo Torres, a 17-year-old soon-to-besenior at the International School of New Orleans, the everchanging rules have presented him with an opportunity — or  so he hopes. An undocumented immigrant from Mexico, Torres has been in the country since he was a child, was brought  in by his parents, has a clean record and is poised to graduate  from high school.       Torres, who has been living in New Orleans for six years,  moved here from Nashville when he was nine.      “My mom left my hometown, Chiapas, when I was like five  or something,” he says, adding that she moved to Nashville.  She later sent for him. “But my brother stayed back in Mexico,  because she couldn’t afford to bring us both over. Me being  the younger brother, she said, ‘OK, I’m going to bring someone to bring you over, but you’re going to come alone. I was  like, ‘Absolutely. All I want is to see my mom.’”      The boy was brought to the border by a coyote — a paid immigrant smuggler — where a car picked him up and took him  to Nashville. The family moved to New Orleans in 2006. Today,  Torres works as a volunteer for NOWCRJ.      “Since I have this mind for technology, I’m always helping  them with all of that,” he says. “I know how systems work. I can  work with computers and sound systems.”     Torres is the ideal candidate for a new program, announced  by Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Janet 

Lorenzo Torres, a 17-yearNapolitano, that could possibly grant him legal, if only temporary, status — and keep him off the immigration   old at the International court rolls.  School of New Orleans,     Napolitano, under the direction of President Barack  plans to register with Obama, announced in June that young people who came  U.S. Citizen and Immigrainto the country as children — a class of people who would  tion Services in hopes of have been eligible for legal residency under the proposed  being granted temporary but never-passed DREAM Act — will be granted relief from  deportation proceedings and become eligible for two-year,  legal status, but his family renewable work permits. (DREAM stands for Development,  worries that giving his Relief, and Education for Alien Minors.) information to the federal     Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials  government might create who spoke to Gambit for this article say they have identified  even more problems. approximately 800 to 1,000 people in the court system who  would be eligible for temporary legal status under DHS’s  PHOTO BY June directive, but DHS estimates as many as 800,000  CHARLES MALDONADO people not yet in the courts could be eligible to apply to  United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for work permits — which, for many,  would mean eligibility for financial aid for college.     Torres talks about joining the Navy and then going to college after next year, but he’s not sure  what to do without legal status. He’s told his school counselors about his situation, but they don’t  know what to tell him, he says.     “They’re like, ‘I don’t know. Have you tried public or state or private [universities]?’” he says. “Private is too much and I can’t work. Public, I have to have certain things, certain requirements, and I  don’t meet up.”     So he plans to register with USCIS — even though his parents are concerned about him giving  his name and information to the federal government. “We just had this conversation with his mom,”  Gonzalez says. “She was worried about it.”      Torres acknowledges it’s something to be worried about, but he figures he should take the opportunity. He worries that the risk of deportation would be worse. (ICE declined the opportunity to  comment on Torres’ specific case.)     “All I know is the U.S., New Orleans,” Torres says. “Basically my life is here, but since I have nothing in Mexico, I want to get my career first, my job first, but I also want to serve this country because,  for the little they have given me, I want to give them twice as much, because I know what I have.      “If I lose it, I have nothing.”    Immigration court backlogs nationwide have skyrocketed in the past decade — from 166,000  pending cases in 2001 to 314,000 cases as of June 2012, according to a recent report by Syracuse University’s immigration data analysis program, known as TRAC. Since the review began,  page 18


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

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111,000 new cases were added in immigration courts, says ICE spokeswoman Gillian Christensen. Locally, TRAC reports 3,373 pending cases in New Orleans Immigration Court, up from 284 in 2002 and 2,003 at the end of the 2011 fiscal year. On June 17, 2011, ICE director John Morton sent a memo directed to all ICE field officers, special agents and chief counsels. The subject line reads “Exercising Prosecutorial Discretion Consistent with the Civil Immigration Enforcement Priorities of the Agency for the Apprehension, Detention, and Removal of Aliens.” ICE asked its attorneys to exercise what is called “prosecutorial discretion” (or PD) by reviewing certain types of cases and getting as many of them off immigration court dockets as appropriate. “The goal being that, as an agency, we have the capacity to remove 400,000 cases per year” by deportation, Christensen says. “We want to make sure we remove the correct 400,000 people.” Finding the “correct” people

means giving low priority to some deportation cases — offering special consideration to people with no criminal records, the elderly, people with family legally residing in the country, crime victims and, as in Navarro Hernandez’s case, “individuals engaging in a protected activity related to civil or other rights.” “The big thing that we’re looking for when we’re doing the review is people who have equities in the United States. They’ve established themselves here,” says Vincent Picard, spokesman for the ICE Southern Region in Atlanta. Picard adds, “Any serious criminal activity is going to be a disqualifier.” One year after the 2011 PD guidelines went into effect, however, the system is still seriously overtaxed. An investigation by The New York Times, published in early June, found that of 300,000 nationwide cases slated for review as of the middle of last year, only about 4,400 cases were closed by prosecutorial discretion by May 29, 2012. (That went up to just under 5,700, TRAC Immigration reported on June 28.) Locally, TRAC Immigration found that, of 2,001 cases pending in New Orleans Immigration Court as of September 31, 2011, only three were closed by PD as of the end of May.

Joaquin Navarro Hernandez, a day laborer who came to town following Hurricane Katrina, has been facing deportation for more than two years.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

PHOTO BY CHARLES MALDONADO

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

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    “Immigration Court in New Orleans is a great, efficient and  competent court. The judge we have [William Stogner] is  just a wonderful person and very knowledgeable in the law,”  Fabacher says. If there’s a problem, either with the backlog or  the apparent lag in processing prosecutorial discretion, it’s  not with the operations of the court, he says.      The large local backlog reflects the national pattern. Fabacher says the problem in New Orleans is understaffing, not  to mention the transfer, over the past few years, of a number  of cases from the larger Oakdale Federal Detention Center’s  immigration court. Oakdale, which has three judges, still gets  more than 10,000 new cases per year compared to about  1,800 last year at New Orleans Immigration Court, according  to the Department of Justice’s Executive Office of Immigration Review (EOIR)’s annual statistics. But New Orleans now  handles all cases from the region involving arrested immigrants who aren’t offered or aren’t able to pay a bond.      New Orleans Immigration Court has only two ICE lawyers  and one judge (Stogner). Those three people must now  handle nearly 3,400 active cases, up from only a few hundred  just a few years ago.      “I guess in Texas or in places like that, it’s a lot larger,”  Fabacher says. “But here, 3,500 cases, where in the last five  years, six years, we’ve had 400-500 cases and we had four or  five immigration attorneys for the government — now we have  two, who are very seasoned and very good lawyers — it’s just,  what can you do?”      As for prosecutorial discretion, Fabacher says a decision to  offer or agree to that takes time, work (including a background  check) and serious consideration.     “I would characterize it as not giving the store away, but  having a serious look at a case,” he says. “I think that they  approach that for multiple agendas. Maybe they want to help  the family. Maybe it looks like the alien has an opportunity to  immigrate over the long run. Or they just want to get people  out of the jails. I find the lawyers for the government are very  professional. They’re not crazy or angry.”      Fabacher also points out that the TRAC statistics fail to take  into account the people who refuse PD because they have a  good case. When someone is granted a closure by discretion,  the case doesn’t disappear. It’s just taken off the docket.     It’s not a guarantee of anything, and many immigrants  whose cases are closed this way aren’t eligible for work  permits. On the other hand, if someone wins a case, he or she  walks out of court a legal resident of the United States.     “That happened today” for a client, Fabacher says. “They  wanted to give him PD. I called him up and said, ‘They want to  give you this PD. Do you want this?’ And he says, ‘No, I have a  good court case.’ He says he wants to get this over with.” The circumstances of Navarro Hernandez’s arrest still  trouble him.     “On January 12, 2010, I was waiting for my employer on the  day laborer corner. We were going to do work on the West  Bank,” he says. “It was almost 10 in the morning.”      He says a nearby business owner came by and talked to the  gas station clerks, asking they not sell beer to workers in the  lot.     “About 20 minutes later Border Patrol came,” he says.  “They asked someone else for their papers, so I decided to  leave the area and go toward my house.”      He started walking away, but a civilian followed him in his  car, driving the wrong way on a one-way street to cut off Navarro Hernandez. Then he got out of his car.     “He told me to stop. I continued to walk toward my house.  He kicked me in the legs. He threw me to the ground. I got really bad scrapes on my knees and my elbows. Then he put his  knees on my back,” Navarro Hernandez says. “He was holding me above my neck and trying to put me in the vehicle. But I  wouldn’t allow it because I didn’t know what was happening. I  didn’t know if he was trying to rob me or mug me [or] kill me. I  didn’t know what was going on.”     According to Navarro Hernandez, the man called the New 

Veteran New Orleans imOrleans Police Department (NOPD), and minutes later, four  cop cars arrived. The police cuffed him and summoned  migration attorney Larry Border Patrol agents, who came shortly thereafter. The  Fabacher says the current agents processed him at the Border Patrol New Orleans  immigration court system Station office in Algiers, then took him to Orleans Parish  is overwhelmed with too Prison. Navarro Hernandez, now a target for deportation,  many cases — nearly 3,400 sought legal assistance from NOWCRJ and its legal direcat present — all of which tor, J.J. Rosenbaum. (In an email to Gambit, Rosenbaum  are being serviced by only writes, “We did ask for prosecutorial discretion from the  ICE office of chief counsel in New Orleans, and we haven’t  two lawyers and one judge. heard a response.” If offered PD, Navarro Hernandez says,  “It’s so complicated you he would not turn it down.) can’t believe it,” he says of     When he was released on bond after four days, Navarro  current immigration law. Hernandez says, he found that the official record of his  apprehension, a document called an I-213 or Record of  PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER Deportable Alien, wasn’t consistent with events as he  remembered them.     The I-213 narrative as written by the Border Patrol Agent, whose name is redacted, states he  pulled into the gas station while on patrol — neither acting on a tip nor resulting from surveillance of  the corner where the day laborers came to look for work.      It continues: “I noticed several people running away from the gas station. I suspected that they  might be illegal aliens. I was able to apprehend one of these subjects after a brief foot chase.”  There is no mention of the civilian Navarro Hernandez alleges attacked him, nor any mention of  NOPD. Rosenbaum made a Freedom of Information Act Request to Border Patrol, including all  documents and call logs related to the arrest and records of other arrests at the same corner, but  the agency didn’t respond.      In December 2010, Navarro Hernandez sued for the documents. His complaint alleges that the  arresting officer’s report was “blatantly inaccurate,” that Navarro Hernandez was arrested “without  reasonable suspicion or probable cause and with excessive force,” and that Border Patrol agents  had engaged in a pattern of improper surveillance and raids of day laborer corners that had nothing  to do with the agency’s immigration related missions: prevention of illegal entry and human smuggling.     An April 2011 filing by Border Patrol acknowledges the involvement of an “unknown and unidentified citizen” and “unknown and unidentified officers of the New Orleans Police Department.” And  in a deposition filed in May of that year, Manuel Padilla, who was chief patrol agent in New Orleans  at the time of the arrest, says day laborer corner raids were well outside the agency’s purview.     U.S. District Court Judge Carl Barbier ruled in favor of Navarro Hernandez in February 2012,  noting in his opinion that the issues of targeted immigration enforcement and local police involvement in immigration raids are of “substantial public interest in the City of New Orleans, where the  plight of the large population of immigrant workers who have assisted in rebuilding efforts after  Hurricane Katrina has been a matter of particular concern.”     In spite of Barbier’s ruling, and in spite of Navarro Hernandez’s apparent eligibility for PD, his  case in New Orleans Immigration Court drags on.      “I was really hopeful that those promises would give us the right to remain, but what I’ve seen so  far is that they haven’t fulfilled them, and that people are still being deported,” he says.     Asked about his hopes for people like Torres, who would seem eligible for clemency under the  June DHS order, Navarro Hernandez reflects on his own case and says, “I really hope the same  thing doesn’t happen to them.”  


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

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Company Vom Fass sells oils, vinegars, spirits and wine straight from the cask.

Fass products. “If you want to make an impression, just go to the store and grab some ice cream and drizzle some of our oils over it,” Dussom says. Special events like cooking classes and wine tastings showcase the versatility of the products; a recent event featured four French wines, an absinthe cocktail and absinthe cookies. “We had a wine tasting here, and there was one woman who didn’t drink wine,” Dussom says. “We had iced tea in the back, but no sugar or lemon because I wasn’t anticipating serving tea. I told her, ‘you’re welcome to put some of the honey vinegar and the calamansi in (the tea).’ I couldn’t keep her away from the fruit vinegars.” Some oils sold at Vom Fass can be used in beauty regimens. “We carry wellness oils, like an argan oil from Morocco,” Herman says. “Besides cooking with it, it’s very good for your hair and skin. right now you’re seeing a lot of beauty products with argan in it, but ours is the real thing without any additives.” She and Dussom urge people to come in the store, ask questions and learn about the versatility of oils and vinegars. “It’s a place where you can come and feel comfortable and get some advice about things,” Dussom says.

SHopping nEWS CorkS n CanVaS (119 Focis St., Metairie, 832-5536; www.corksncanvas.cmo/metairie) hosts a benefit night 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday, July 30. The cost is $40 per person, and 50 percent of proceeds goes to Jefferson Dollars For Scholars. There will be free snacks, soft drinks and wine for participants, who create their own paintings at the event.

In conjunction with the Louisiana Sales Tax Holiday Friday, Aug. 3, and Saturday, Aug. 4,

by Missy Wilkinson

ThE ESplanadE mall (1401 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 468-6116; www.shoptheesplanade.com) hosts a back-to-school fashion show 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 4. There also will be activities and giveaways in the mall’s center court. ThE ogdEn muSEum oF SouThErn arT (925 Camp St., 539-9560; www.ogdenmuseum.org) hosts a Construct Jewelry trunk show 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 4, during White Linen Night.

Get a jump on sizzling summer utility bills. CALL US TODAY FOR... • A 50% LA Tax Rebate on attic insulation

• Plus up to $2,000 from the LA Hero's Program • Plus up to $500 in Federal Tax Credits

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JULY 31 > 2012

t Vom Fass (5725 Magazine St., 302-1455; www.vomfassnola.com), customers can taste-test everything in the store, including olive oils, liquors, wine and fruit vinegars. Although some might balk at the idea of drinking vinegar, Vom Fass is slowly changing that reluctance. “Star Forest raspberry is a vinegar you can drink by itself. It’s been aged for seven years,” says managing partner Christine Herman. “oils and vinegars aren’t just for salads anymore. you can use them for just about anything.” There are 300 Vom Fass locations worldwide, but only seven are in the United States. Herman and co-owner Denise Dussom take pride in their rare, exotic merchandise: The pumpkin seed oil is made in Stryia, Austria, and Vom Fass is the only Louisiana distributor of Urbani truffle salt and truffle cream sauce, which Dussom calls “the rolls-royce of truffles.” Vom Fass — German for “from the cask” — recently added scotches, whiskeys, brandies, wines, liqueurs and spirits, many of which blend well with oils and vinegars. “Instead of putting Creme de Cassis in your champagne for a Kir royale, we put the Star Forest raspberry,” Herman says. A Tales of the Cocktail competitor recently bought Calamansi Waldburg Balsam vinegar to use in his margarita recipe. restaurants Domenica, GW Fins, Patois and Luke also use Vom

23


24

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012


EAT drink

+

FOrk + center BY IAN MCNulTY Email Ian McNulty at mcnulty@cox.net

putting everything on the table what Chiba 

where

8312 Oak St., 826-9119;  www.chiba-nola.com

when

lunch Thu.-Sat.,   dinner Mon.-Sat.,   late-night Fri.-Sat. 

how much expensive 

reservations accepted 

what works

hot appetizers, live seafood,  late-night happy hour

what doesn’t

some dishes are more  about concept than craving

Annunciation opens

    Annunciation (1016 Annunciation St.,  568-0245) serves contemporary Creole  cuisine, but its chef, Steve Manning,  jokes that at the moment it can seem “like a  crabmeat and vegetable restaurant.”      The menu features crabmeat prominently, so there is risotto with crabmeat,  and lobster, shrimp and soft-shell crab are  topped with crabmeat in meuniere sauce.        A dish of fried oysters topped with Brie  suggests Annunciation’s lineage. That dish  is a signature appetizer of Clancy’s (6100  Annunciation St., 895-1111; www.clancysneworleans.com), where Manning was  chef for many years until leaving to develop  Annunciation with business partners. The  restaurant opened in late July.      Annunciation replaced Deanie’s, an oldfashioned plate lunch place in business  since 1967 (which had no relation to the  Deanie’s Seafood restaurants in Bucktown  and the French Quarter). The change is  radical, but Manning says something like  a throwback to the old Deanie’s is in the  works. He plans to add modestly priced  lunch service in about a month, utilizing the  soul food recipes of his kitchen staff.       “The old Deanie’s had its fans, and a lot  of the people working down here in the  Warehouse District don’t want to do the 

check, please

a contemporary, edgy approach to Japanese cuisine 

page 27

WinE OF THE week

roll Model

The satsuma-strawberry roll is one of Chiba’s unique sushi bar items. PHOTO BY CHErYl GErBEr

By Ian McNulty 

M

enus at local Japanese restaurants tend to run long  but often are short on originality. People who frequent  sushi bars usually can order their favorite rolls by rote.      Visit Chiba, however, and you’ll want to give that menu a  closer look. Chiba is new, thoroughly contemporary and very  stylish. In its own way, however, the food manages to make  Japanese cuisine seem exotic and revelatory again.      Here, a recent special featured glistening salmon slices,  twisted into shapes like chess pieces, each wrapped around  a fat, tart blackberry with pearly red bits of tobiko. Fruit is  used like sweet fish in some rolls, like the satsuma-strawberry roll, a showstopper. And while I’d rarely recommend steak  at a Japanese restaurant. A New York strip here is a welcome  exception. It is sliced as thin as sashimi and proved nearly as  tender — its scarlet depths streaked with a mirin marinade  with the warm spices of tasso underneath it.     First-time restaurateur Keith Dusko opened Chiba in March.  Dusko logged many years in New York City’s Japanese restaurant scene and has brought that experience to bear here.  Chiba stands out from local Japanese restaurants in many  ways, and price is one of them. You’ll end up paying here what  you’d expect at a nice bistro. A happy hour (daily from 4 p.m.  to 6 p.m. and reprised an hour before closing each night) has  good deals on a few rolls, hot bar snacks and drinks. 

    Chiba’s overall approach avoids predictability, and it’s  refreshing but not without pitfalls. A yellowtail ceviche special  with blueberries and shredded sweet potato required better  chopstick skills than we could manage. I was excited to see  how the Chiba grand platter might reinterpret a chilled fruits de mer platter, but it resulted in some of the dullest eating in  the house, with disagreeably bitter clams and squid salad  minced to the point of mush. Soy-soaked oyster shooters were  the only part of the elaborate presentation I’d repeat.       These were exceptions, however. In addition to its creative  successes Chiba keeps an exceptionally well-stocked sushi  bar. The tuna, for instance, starts off with beautiful maguro  the color of red wine and ranges up a few rungs to otoro, the  fattiest — and most expensive — cut, which arrives the color  of rose. Chiba also makes a specialty of live shellfish, which  are done in by the sushi knife just after you order it. A good  raw scallop should be full of sweet, marine flavor; Chiba’s live  scallop has that but also a floral silkiness. The acidic bounce  from a lemon garnish practically made the scallop flesh jump,  and chased with some cool, melon-scented sake, it was an  unforgettable taste.       Now that New Orleanians can get a sushi lunch at a grocery  store and have sashimi delivered like pizza, it’s nice to find a  restaurant like Chiba that shakes things up again.  

BY BrENDA MAITlAND Email Brenda Maitland at winediva1@earthlink.net

2011 Castano Monastrell Rosado Yecla, Spain $10-$12 Retail

Bodegas Castano in southeastern Spain  produces this refreshing rose from 25- to  30-year-old vines. A blend of 90 percent monastrell — known as mourvedre  in France, where the varietal thrives in  Provence and southern rhone — and 5  percent each syrah and cabernet sauvignon, the juice receives  brief skin contact  before fermentation.  The wine exhibits floral  scents and strawberry  aromas in the glass.  On the palate, taste  red berries, spiciness,  some herbal notes, an  appealing minerality  and a crisp, dry finish.  Serve chilled with grilled salmon, tuna  tartare, barbecued ribs, herb-roasted  chicken, salads, leg of lamb, stuffed peppers, pasta and spicy Asian cuisines.  Buy it at: W.I.N.O. and Bacchanal.   Drink it at: W.I.N.O.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

Chiba breaks the mold on sushi bar fare.

25


Lunch Specials starting at 7.95 including soup & your choice of appetizer. Uptown

August Moon Restaurant Chinese & Vietnamese Cuisine Sesame Squid Salad

3635 Prytania St (at Amelia) • 504.899.5129 Mon-Fri 11am-10pm • Sat 5-10pm • Sunday Closed

Westbank 875 Manhattan Blvd (near Westbank Expy) Harvey • 504.302.7977 11am-10pm • Fri & Sat Open ‘til Midnight Closed on Tuesday

For full Menu please visit our web site:

www.moonnola.com Vietnamese Fresh Spring Rolls

Dine In • Take Out • Catering UPTOWN LOCATION OFFERS FREE DELIVERY.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

Banquet room available at Westbank location. For your health, our food is prepared with fresh ingredients & contains absolutely no MSG.

26

FREE crab rangoons WITH ANY ORDER Available at both Uptown & Westbank locations. Not valid with any other offers or discounts. Coupon must be provided to receive offer. Expires 8.31.12.

one coupon per table


page 25

interview $20 lunch thing all the time, so this will be a different option,” he says. Annunciation serves dinner Monday through Saturday.

Kimchi on Claiborne

Summer dinner specials

Summer is typically a bit slower than the rest of the year for New Orleans restaurants, and many respond with creative specials to entice local diners. One program is underway at RioMar (800 S. Peters St., 525-3474; www.riomarseafood.com), where chef Miles Prescott has taken the helm in the kitchen (Adolfo Garcia, RioMar’s founding chef and co-owner, recently sold his share in the restaurant to focus on his other projects). These dinners mostly explore Spanish regions, and Prescott says the focus is on the contemporary style of restaurant cooking in these areas rather than strictly traditional dishes. The Basque region is in the spotlight Aug. 5-11. For

FIVE SpOtS FOr tapaS

ChOCOLATIER AND OWNER OF BITTERSWEET CONFECTIONS

a

New Orleans native, Cheryl Scripter worked in marketing for the manufacturing industry before returning home to pursue a new line of work. She started selling homemade chocolates casually to friends and neighbors and eventually, through a mixture of self-education and culinary classes, she learned to become a chocolatier. She was a vendor at the Crescent City Farmers Market for years before opening her own shop in Lakeview. Last year, she relocated Bittersweet Confections (725 Magazine St., 523-2626; www.bittersweetconfections.com) to the Warehouse District. Now, in addition to showcasing fine chocolates and custom cakes, Bittersweet Confections serves as a coffee shop, opening at 7:30 a.m. to serve handmade bagels and, on Saturdays, Belgian waffles.

Barcelona Tapas

You’re around chocolate all day. Do you ever get sick of it? Scripter: I have this weird fascination with chocolate. It was a passion that turned into an infatuation that has turned into craziness. I love eating it. At my house, I have chocolate from regions all over the world. I have friends who travel and I’m lucky because they always bring chocolate back for me. I’m easy to shop for. I won’t even go on a trip without chocolate. I’m not like a smoker who needs a cigarette, but it’s close.

Mimi’s in the Marigny

You must encounter some pretty visceral responses from customers. S: Well, many people do have a passion for chocolate. One of the nice things about my work is that when people come in my store, they’re happy. They smell things that are delightful and see something pretty. We see a lot of smiles here. You can get a chocolate bar just about anywhere. What makes something fine chocolate? S: Chocolate is such a fun substance to work with because there are so many different types and percentages, and there are different needs too. I get to educate people. I can tell them about a type of chocolate, and they taste it and they realize why it tastes so much better than what you’re going to get off the shelf. That’s because it’s made with natural ingredients. It’s fun to taste this and taste that and learn the story of these different chocolates as they come from the cocoa plantation to the table. — IAN MCNULTY

the week of Aug. 13-18, the menu will be based around sherry and the region south of Madrid, and during Aug. 20-25, Prescott will offer a Peruvian-themed menu, bringing in the Japanese influence in that country’s contemporary cuisine. These five-course meals vary in price, but generally are around $40 and increase to $70 with wine and cocktail pairings. Meanwhile, a Mano (870 Tchoupitoulas St., 208-9280; www.amanonola.com) normally focuses on the cooking of southern Italy, but for its own summer series the restaurant picks a specific region and offers its specialties for one night. Campania is featured Wednesday, Aug. 1, and the series concludes Aug. 8 with Sardinia. These are four-course meals, served “family style.” The cost is $35.

Vega Tapas Cafe (2051 Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com) features Mediterranean nations each week. Turkey is highlighted through Aug. 4, then it’s on to Greece (Aug. 6-11), Italy (Aug. 13-18), France (Aug. 20-25) and Spain (Aug. 27-Sept. 1). Each menu includes five to nine small plates and costs $27, with optional wine pairings for an additional $15. Bayona (430 Dauphine St., 525-4455; www.bayona.com) hosts internationally themed summer dinners less frequently but stretches them through September. They feature four courses with wine pairings for $88. The remaining dinners feature China’s Szechuan province (Aug. 29), Turkey (Sept. 12) and Argentina (Sept. 26).

720 Dublin St., 861-9696 Pinchos, Basque-style nibbles on baguette slices, are a specialty.

Cafe Granada 1506 S. Carrollton Ave., 865-1612 www.cafegranadanola.com Traditional tapas share the menu with entrees.

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 www.mimisinthemarigny.net A longtime late-night option for traditional Spanish flavors

RioMar 800 S. Peters St., 525-3474 www.riomarseafood.com At lunch, the excellent selection ranges from anchovies to zarzuela, a fish stew.

Vega Tapas Cafe 2051 Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-2007 www.vegatapascafe.com Flavors from around the globe fill a wide-ranging menu.

OFF

the

menu

Trends, notes, quirks and quotes from the world of food.

“The public can be misinformed about what we do. They jump to their own conclusions.” — David henninger, chief marketing officer for hooters, quoted in an Associated Press story about the growth of the “breastaurant” dining concept. With more competitors like Twin Peaks and Tilted Kilt Pub & Eatery featuring scantilyclad servers, the 29-year-old hooters chain is trying to reshape its image. henninger said those efforts would include showcasing the life stories and career aspirations of its waitresses.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

New Orleans has scant options for Korean food, so the arrival of Little Korea (3301 S. Claiborne Ave., 821-5006) is bound to draw some interest, even though its menu of traditional Korean dishes has an unusual sideline in Vietnamese food. Little Korea’s building originally was a Taco Bell franchise, and previously it had been lightly renovated into Orleans Seafood, which served boiled and fried seafood and Chinese food. The owners have given the place a more thorough makeover, but its fast food roots are still evident. The drive-through window remains, but Little Korea doesn’t use it. Table service is handled by staff who are eager to explain dishes to customers unfamiliar with Korean cuisine. One mainstay is the dol sot bibimbap, a hearty rice dish with beef, vegetables and egg served in a hot stone pot that binds the rice together and cooks the grains at the bottom into a crunchy, toasty crust. The menu has a wide range of entreesized soups, panko-battered fried meat and seafood dishes, stir-fries and a few vegetarian options. If you have at least two people at your table, you can get an order of Korean barbecue (with short ribs, brisket or pork belly) prepared at the table on a portable grill. Most dishes at Little Korea cost between $11 and $15. Nearly every Korean entree comes with a selection of banchan, a wide-ranging array of fermented or pickled vegetable side dishes, of which the spicy, fermented cabbage kimchi is the best known. Traditionally, Korean cooking shares some of the fundamentals of the cuisines from neighboring Japan and northern China. The connection to Vietnamese cooking is more of a stretch, but manager Sunnie Park says Little Korea serves pho, spring rolls and rice noodle salads to give customers more options. Little Korea serves lunch and dinner Monday through Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

ChEryl SCrIptEr

FIVE in

27


Sizzling SummEr mEnu 3-course Lunch $26 25¢ Vodka martinis

with purchase of lunch entrée

Tues-Fri 11am-3pm

Happy Hour

5pm-7pm • tues-fri Select half priced drinks & appetizers

Sunday Brunch 11am-3pm

featuring endless Mimosas and Bloody Mary’s with purchase of first cocktail

3835 Iberville St. in Mid-City Lunch Tuesday-Friday 11am-3pm • Dinner Tuesday-Saturday 5-10pm Sunday Brunch 11am-3pm (504) 309-3570 • www.redemption-nola.com

WINE BAR

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

Open 7 Nights a Week

28

3442 Saint Charles Ave

4EXMSSR 7EMRX'LEVPIW%ZI [MXL0EXI2MKLX (MRMRK

Open at Noon Friday-Sunday www.thedelachaise.com • 504.895.0858


Parran's Catering

to

EAT

and

Banquet Room

LUNCH & DINNER COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

you are where you eat

Out 2 Eat is an index of Gambit contract advertisers. Unless noted, addresses are for New Orleans. Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN CAFE BEIGNET — 311 Bourbon St., 525-2611; 334B Royal St., 524-5530; www.cafebeig net.com — Cajun hash browns are made with andouille sausage, potatoes, bell peppers and red onions and are served with a scrambled egg and French bread. No reservations. Bourbon Street: Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Royal Street: Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $ O’HENRY’S FOOD & SPIRITS — 634 S. Carrollton Ave., 8669741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 461-9840; www.-ohenrys.com — The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

TED’S FROSTOP — 3100 Calhoun St., 861-3615 — The Lotto burger is a 6-oz. patty with lettuce, tomatoes, onions and Frostop’s secret sauce. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BAR & GRILL BAYOU BEER GARDEN — 326 N. Jefferson Davis Pwky., 302-9357 — The 10-oz. Bayou burger serveDisco fries are french fries topped with cheese and debris gravy. No reservations. Lunch and dinner, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $ DMAC’S BAR & GRILL — 542 S. Jefferson Davis Pkwy., 3045757; www.dmacsbarandgrill. com — There’s gumbo, seafoodstuffed po-boys, sliders and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ DOWN THE HATCH — 1921 Sophie Wright Place, 522-0909; www.downthehatchnola.com — The Texan burger features an Angus beef patty topped with grilled onions, smoked bacon, cheddar and a fried egg. Delivery

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449 River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches and lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., 3010938 — Rib-eye steak, burgers, po-boys, grilled chicken, spinach and artichoke dip and more is available. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks St., 202-4741; www.bookoobbq. com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., latenight Fri.-Sat. Cash only. $

burgers and more. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280; www.jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-7890; www.cafefreret. com — Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100 Magazine St., 373-6579; www.gottgourmetcafe.com — This cafe serves a variety of gourmet salads, sandwiches, wraps, Chicago-style hot dogs,

Birthday Parties, Wedding Receptions, Rehearsal Dinners, Sweet 16's FULL CATERING • BAR SURROUND SOUND • PARKING

3939 Veterans • (504) 887-8812 (between Cleary & Clearview)

3 for $33

3-Course Dinner tues - wed - thurs lo c a l fa r m s • lo c a l f i s h

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola. com — The kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

BURGERS

ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St., 525-8045; www. antoines.com — The Caprese panino combines fresh mozzarella, pesto, tomatoes and balsamic vinaigrette. The ham and honeyDijon panino is topped with feta and watercress. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ALGIERS 5145 Gen DeGualle Dr. • 504.393.1107 MARRERO 1995 Barataria Blvd. • 504.348.2008

PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK — City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — The cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CHINESE

CAFE

www.olivebranch.com

in Metairie

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE — 5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of desserts plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

SAUCY’S BBQ GRILL — 4200 Magazine St., 301-2755; www. saucysnola.com — Saucy’s serves slow-smoked St. Louis-style pork ribs, pulled pork, brisket, smoked sausage and grilled chicken. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL — 4905 Canal St., 4887357; www.beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, sauteed mushrooms or house-made hickory sauce. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Check out our menu online!

Catering Available

Large Banquet Room

lo c a l f l avo r s

Reservations 861-7610 723 Dante Street (Riverbend)

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood. Delivery available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

5725 Magazine Street

(504) 302-1455 Free Tasting Daily!

COFFEE/DESSERT PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601 Magazine St., 899-4260; www.pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry toppings. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-4455; www.bayona. com — Sauteed Pacific salmon comes with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ OAK — 8118 Oak St., 3021485; www.oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. No reservations. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.

Ample Parking

O

R YA ONLI DER KO NE NO @ LA. CO M

MI

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

starting from $5.50

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

SOMETHIN’ ELSE CAFE — 620 Conti St., 373-6439; www.somethingelsecafe.com — Shrimp baskets, boudin balls, alligator corn dogs, burgers, poboys and more are on the menu. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, late-night Thu.Sat. Credit cards. $$

available. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

Monday-Saturday

Brand New

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OuT to EAT BOILED CRABS and SHRIMP, RAW + CHARGRILLED OYSTERS boiled • grilled • FRIED SEAFOOD

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

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coated in house barbecue sauce and served with two sides. Slow-roasted beef is sliced thin, doused in gravy and served on 10-inch French loaves. No reservations. 24 hours daily. Cash only. $

CREOLE

FRENCH

ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422;  www.antoines.com — Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

FLAMING TORCH — 737  Octavia St., 895-0900; www. flamingtorchnola.com — Coffeeand coriander-spiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MELANGE — 2106 Chartres St., 309-7335; www. melangenola.com — Lapin au vin is a farm-raised rabbit served with demi-glace, oven-roasted shallots, tomatoes, potatoes and pancetta. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily, brunch Sunday. Credit cards. $$

SERVING UP YOUR

PBR

com  — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and red wine vinaigrette. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

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MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000  N. Peters St., 524-4747 — This Creole restaurant serves crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice bread pudding and more. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ REDEMPTION — 3835  Iberville St., 309-3570; www. redemption-nola.com — Roasted duck breast is served with red onion and yam hash, andouille, sauteed spinach and grilled Kadota fig jus. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ — Toulouse Street Wharf,  569-1401; www.steamboatnatchez.com — The Natchez serves Creole cuisine while cruising the Mississippi River. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

CUBAN/CARIBBEAN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437 Esplanade Ave.,  252-4800; www.mojitosnola. com — Aruba scallops are seared and served with white chocolate chipotle sauce with jalapeno grits and seasonal vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sat.-Sun., dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519  Severn Ave., Metairie, 888-2010;  www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.Thu. Credit cards. $ MARTIN WINE CELLAR —  714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie ,  896-7350; www.martinwine.com  — The Reuben combines corned beef, melted Swiss, sauerkraut and Russian dressing on rye bread. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Fri., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

LUNCH: Weds-Fri, 11am-2pm DINNER: Tues-Sat, 5-9:30pm

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QUARTER MASTER DELI — 1100 Bourbon St., 529-1416;  www.quartermasterdeli.com  — Slow-cooked pork ribs are

MARTINIQUE BISTRO —  5908 Magazine St., 891-8495;  www.martiniquebistro.com — Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace comes with stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E.  Judge Perez, Chalmette,  262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd.,  Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn  Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647  Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge,  737-8146; www.breauxmart. com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S —  2483 Royal St., 944-6666;  www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE —  4308 Magazine St., 894-9797  — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-C Metairie Road,  Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT —   3100 N. 19th St., Metairie   834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com  — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce.

Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ CAFE GIOVANNI — 117  Decatur St., 529-2154; www. cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ ITALIAN PIE — 3706 Prytania  St., 266-2523; www.italianpie. com — In addition to regular Italian pie pizzas, pastas, salads and sandwiches, this location offers a selection of entrees. Seared tuna comes over a spinach salad with Thai peanut dressing. Baked tilapia is topped with crabmeat and creamy bordelaise and served over angel hair pasta with glazed baby carrots. No reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ MOSCA’S — 4137 Hwy. 90 W.,  Westwego, 436-8950; www. moscasrestaurant.com — This family-style eatery has changed little since opening in 1946. Popular dishes include shrimp Mosca, chicken a la grande and baked oysters Mosca, made with breadcrumps and Italian seasonings. Reservations accepted. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$$ RED GRAVY — 125 Camp St.,  561-8844; www.redgravycafe. com — The cafe serves breakfast items including pancakes, waffles and pastries. At lunch, try meatballs, lasagna and other Italian specialties, panini, wraps, soups and salads. Open Sundays before New Orleans Saints home games. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411 Chastant St.,  Metairie, 885-2984; 7839 St.  Charles Ave., 866-9313; www. vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Try house specialties like veal- and spinach-stuffed canneloni. Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE CHIBA — 8312 Oak St.,  826-9119; www.chiba-nola. com — Chiba puts creative local touches on Japanese cuisine. The satsuma strawberry roll bundles scallop, yellowtail, strawberry, mango, jalapeno, wasabi tobiko and tempura flakes and is topped with spicy sauce and satsuma ponzu. Pork belly steamed buns are served with Japanese slaw and pickled onions. Reservations recommended. Lunch Thu.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St.,  891-3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and sal-


OuT to EAT ads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro. com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ORIGAMI — 5130 Freret St., 899-6532 — Nabeyaki udon is a soup brimming with thick noodles, chicken and vegetables. The long list of special rolls includes the Big Easy, which combines tuna, salmon, white fish, snow crab, asparagus and crunchy bits in soy paper with eel sauce on top. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-7253; www.rocknsake. com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

YUKI IZAKAYA — 525 Frenchmen St., 943-1122; www. facebook.com/yukiizakaya — This Japanese tavern combines a selection of small plates, sake, shochu, live music and Japanese kitsch. Dishes include curries, housemade ramen soups, fried chicken and other specialties. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY K-PAUL’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN — 416 Chartres St., 596-2530; www.chefpaul.com — At chef Paul Prudhomme’s restaurant, signature dishes include blackened Louisiana drum, Cajun jambalaya and the blackened stuffed pork chop. Lunch service is deli style and changing options include po-boys and dishes like tropial fruit salad with bronzed

MANNING’S — 519 Fulton St., 593-8118; www.harrahsneworleans.com — Named for former New Orleans Saints quarterback Archie Manning, this restaurant’s game plan sticks to Louisiana flavors. A cast iron skillet-fried filet is served with two-potato hash, fried onions and Southern Comfort pan sauce. The fish and chips feature black drum crusted in Zapp’s Crawtator crumbs served with Crystal beurre blanc. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ TOMAS BISTRO — 755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942 — Tomas serves dishes like semiboneless Louisiana quail stuffed with applewood-smoked bacon dirty popcorn rice, Swiss chard and Madeira sauce. The duck cassoulet combines duck confit and Creole Country andouille in a white bean casserole. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ZACHARY’S RESTAURANT — 902 Coffee St., Mandeville, (985) 626-7008 — Chef Zachary Watters prepares dishes like redfish Zachary, crabmeat au gratin and Gulf seafood specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN BABYLON CAFE — 7724 Maple St., 314-0010; www. babyloncafe.biz —The Babylon platter includes stuffed grape leaves, hummus, kibbeh, rice and one choice of meat: lamb, chicken or beef kebabs, chicken or beef shawarma, gyro or kufta. Chicken shawarma salad is a salad topped with olives, feta and chicken breast cooked on a rotisserie. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed

Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and charbroiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THE GREEN BURRITO NOLA — 3046 St. Claude Ave., 949-2889; www.facebook.com/ the-green-burrito-nola — The steak burrito features Cajunspiced beef slow-cooked with bell peppers, banana peppers, onion and squash and rolled in a flour, spinach, whole wheat or tomato-basil tortilla with basmati rice and beans. Spicy fish tacos are dressed with house pico de gallo. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Cash only. $

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JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S. Carrollton Ave., 4869950; www.juansflyingburrito. com — Mardi Gras Indian tacos are stuffed with roasted corn, pinto beans, grilled summer squash, Jack cheese and spicy slaw. Red chile chicken and goat cheese quesadilla features grilled Creole chicken breast, salsa fresca, chile-lime adobo sauce, and Jack, cheddar and goat cheeses pressed in a flour tortilla. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LUCY’S RETIRED SURFERS’ BAR & RESTAURANT — 701 Tchoupitoulas St., 523-8995; www.lucysretiredsurders.com — This surf shack serves California-Mexican cuisine and the bar has a menu of tropical cocktails. Todo Santos fish tacos feature grilled or fried mahi mahi in corn or flour tortillas topped with shredded cabbage and shrimp sauce, and are served with rice and beans. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily, late night Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguesestyle fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub.com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE COLUMNS — 3811 St. Charles Ave., 899-9308; www. thecolumns.com — There’s live music in the Victorian Lounge at the Columns. The menu offers such Creole favorites as gumbo and crab cakes and there are cheese plates as well. Reservations accepted. Breakfast daily, lunch Fri.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Thu., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., 525-8899; www. gazebocafenola.com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JULY 31 > 2012

WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola.com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

shrimp. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

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OUT to EAT and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www. hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur St., 527-5000; www. marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

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SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-8855; www.siberianola.com — The Russki Reuben features corned beef, Swiss cheese, kapusta (spicy cabbage) and Russian dressing on grilled rye bread. Potato and cheese pierogies are served with fried onions and sour cream. No reservations. Dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $. $

NEIGHBORHOOD ARTZ BAGELZ — 3138 Magzine St., 309-7557; www. artzbagelz.com — Artz bakes its bagels in house and options include onion, garlic, honey whole wheat, cinnamon-raisin, salt and others. Get one with a schmear or as a sandwich. Salads also are available. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $ KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe.com — Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA DON FORTUNATO’S PIZZERIA — 3517 20th St., Metairie, 302-2674 — The chicken portobello calzone is filled with grilled chicken breast, tomato sauce, mozzarella, ricotta, portobello mushrooms and sun-dried tomato mayo. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ MARK TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the

Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NEW YORK PIZZA — 4418 Magazine St., 891-2376; www. newyorkpizzanola.com — Choose from pizza by the slice or a whole pie, calzones, pasta, sandwiches, salads and more. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA — 4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 3021133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., 571-7561 — Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368 Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., 899-3374; www.mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416; www.parranspoboy. com — Parran’s offers a long list of po-boys plus muffulettas, club sandwiches, pizzas, burgers, salads, fried seafood plates and Creole-Italian entrees. The veal supreme po-boy features a cutlet topped with Swiss cheese and brown gravy. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $ SLICE — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800; www.slicepizzeria. com — Slice is known for pizza on thin crusts made from 100 percent wheat flour. Other options include the barbecue shrimp po-boy made with Abita Amber and the shrimp Portofino, a pasta dish with white garlic cream sauce, shrimp and broccoli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THE STORE — 814 Gravier St., 322-2446; www.thestoreneworleans.com — The Store serves sandwiches, salads and hot plates, and there is a taco bar where patrons can choose their own toppings. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $$

SEAFOOD GALLEY SEAFOOD RESTAURANT — 2535 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-0955 — Blackened redfish is served with shrimp and lump crabmeat sauce, vegetables and new potatoes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ GRAND ISLE — 575 Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — The baked Gulf fish is topped with compound chili butter and served with local seasonal vegetables and herb-roasted potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200; www. redfishgrill.com — Seafood favorites include hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Barbecue oysters are flash fried, tossed in Crystal barbecue sauce and served with blue cheese dressing. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy., 737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548; www. bigmommaschickenandwaffles. com — Big Momma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — 322 Magazine St., 522-7902; www.chophousenola. com — This traditional steakhouse serves USDA prime beef, and a selection of super-sized cuts includes a 40-oz. Porterhouse for two. The menu also features seafood options and a la carte side items. Reservations recommended. Diner daily. Credit cards. $$$ CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001 N. Broad St., 821-3271; www.crescentcitysteaks. com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. There are porterhouse steaks large enough for two or three diners to share. Bread pudding with raisins and peaches is topped with brandy sauce. Res-


ouT to EAT ervations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite, or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

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SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915 — Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

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VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Paella de la Vega combines shrimp, mussels, chorizo, calamari, scallops, chicken and vegetables in saffron rice. Pollo en papel features chicken, mushrooms, leeks and feta in phyllo pastry. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

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THAI SUKHO THAI — 4519 Magazine St., 373-6471; 1913 Royal St., 948-9309; www.sukhothai-nola.com — Whole deepfried redfish is topped with fried shrimp and scallops and served with vegetables and three-flavored chili sauce. Pineapple seafood curry includes either shrimp or a seafood combination in spicy red coconut curry with crushed pineapple, bell pepper, broccoli, zucchini and sweet basil. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania St., 899-5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

breakfast specials available until noon

504 373 6439

Ladies XS to 3XL | Mens S to 2XL

Sunday - WedneSday 7am-10pm ThurSday - SaTurday 7am-laTe

812 ROYAL STREET | 504.523.1371 NEW ORLEANS | 1.800.352.3206 www.californiadrawstrings.com

620 Conti St.FrenCh QuarTer www.somethinelsecafe.com

OPENING AUGUST 1 IN MAGGIE MAY’S • BAY ST. LOUIS, MS

This is what a Jersey Girl does

with Creole Tomatoes... Garden Fresh, Seasonal Summer Specials Red Gravy supports local farmers & fishers.

Roseann

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE —135 N. Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Traditional Vietnamese pho with pork and beef highlight the menu. The vegetarian hot pot comes with mixed vegetables, tofu and vermicelli rice noodles. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$ LE VIET CAFE — 2135 St. Charles Ave., 304-1339 — The cafe offers pho, banh mi, spring rolls and rice and noodle dishes. Pho is available with chicken, brisket, rare beef or meatballs and comes with a basket of basil, bean sprouts and jalapenos. Vietnamese-style grilled beef ribs come with a special sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 3689846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • SAT. & SUN. BRUNCH 125 CAMP ST. 504-561-8822 • 504-561-8844 NEW HOURS & ADDITIONAL SEATING MONDAY- FRIDAY : 6:30- 2P.M. SAT. & SUN. : 9A.M. - 2P.M. CLOSED TUESDAY

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

CAFE MINH — 4139 Canal St., 482-6266; www.cafeminh.com— The watermelon crabmeat martini is made with diced watermelon, Louisiana jumbo lump crabmeat, avocado, jalapenos and cilantro and comes with crispy shrimp chips. Seafood Delight combines grilled lobster tail, diver scallops, jumbo shrimp and grilled vegetables in a sake soy reduction. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

fried oyster oMelette

33


34

PARISH

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012


MUSIC 36 FILM 40

S TAg E 4 9 E V E N T S 52

AE +

ART 45

what to know before you go

Booking a Band Satchmo SummerFest features live music and more. By Matthew Hose

T

[Armstrong] knew it right away,” Ory said. “And if he played a tune once, he never forgot it.” Ory was a mentor both as a musician and a friend to Armstrong, McCusker says. “He doesn’t play in other people’s bands; he played in Ory’s band,” McCusker says. “That made it all the more ironic that [Ory is] best known as a sideman.” Ory pioneered a method of trombone-playing called “tailgating,” in which the trombone plays the rhythm (usually along with a banjo or piano) while the trumpets and cornets play the melody. Ory often took a backseat to Armstrong’s loud and energetic trumpet playing, McCusker says. But Ory remained the foundation on which the rest of his band was able to flourish. In the band’s “collective improvisation,” the distinguishing trait of traditional jazz, band members improvised while keeping rhythm. Armstrong eventually followed King Oliver to Chicago, where there were more lucrative opportunities. Ory went to Los Angeles and established himself at several clubs. Then Armstrong got a recording contract with Okeh Records that gave him freedom to hire his own musicians and choose material. At the time, that type of artistic freedom in a record contract was unprecedented. Armstrong sent for Ory and recruited two other members of Ory’s original band, Johnny Dodds and Johnny St. Cyr. They formed his powerhouse band, Louis Armstrong’s Hot Five. Armstrong’s choice of the original Kid Ory Band lineup speaks volumes to Ory’s greatness as a bandleader, McCusker says. The Hot Five became one of the most successful jazz recording groups ever, releasing jazz standards

including “Muskrat Ramble” Louis Armstrong (left) invited (written by Ory) and “Struttin’ Edward “Kid” Ory (second With Some Barbecue.” from right) to play in his Hot Other seminars at the Old U.S. Five band. Mint during Satchmo SummerPHOTO COURTESY OF THE HOgAN JAzz Fest include Ricky Riccardi’s ARCHIVE AT TULANE UNIVERSITY presentations of rare TV clips and films featuring Armstrong, Satchmo SummerFest archivist and jazz trombonist DaAug vid Sagar’s talk on King Oliver’s Old U.S. Mint band and others. 400 Esplanade Ave. The festival features contemporary and traditional jazz, 522-5730 brass bands and more on two www.fqfi.org stages from noon to 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the Old U.S. Mint. Saturday headliners include the Preservation Hall-Stars, Treme Brass Band, Stooges Brass Band, Delfeayo Marsalis and the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, Lars Edegran’s Ragtime Orchestra with Lionel Ferbos and others. Sunday brings Kermit Ruffins and the Barbecue Swingers, Leroy Jones and New Orleans’ Finest, Wendell Brunious, Don Vappie and the Creole Jazz Serenaders and others. The NOLA Jitterbugs hosts dance lessons between sets. The festival also includes food vendors and kids’ activities on the second floor of the mint. There will be a jazz Mass said at St. Augustine Church at 10 a.m. Sunday, followed by a second-line parade to the festival grounds.

3-5

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

he scholarly conference portion of the annual Satchmo SummerFest has examined just about every aspect of Louis Armstrong’s personal life, career and legacy. This year, author John McCusker previews his forthcoming book about Edward “Kid” Ory and Ory’s relationship with Satchmo, and there are other panels, free live music and more. McCusker, a photographer for The TimesPicayune for 26 years, wrote Creole Trombone: Kid Ory and the Early Years of Jazz and has guided jazz history tours in New Orleans since 1994. At the seminar “Dipper and the Kid” (1 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 5), he discusses the relationship between Armstrong and Ory. Ory first noticed Armstrong when the 12-year-old cornet player was leading the Colored Waifs Band down South Rampart Street on Labor Day 1913, McCusker says. Armstrong had been sent to the Colored Waifs Home for Boys after he was caught firing a pistol on New Year’s Eve. Ory, the trombone player and leader of the hottest band in town, told Armstrong he was impressed by his playing. “That would be like LeBron [James] knocking on the door in some kid’s neighborhood and saying, ‘You wanna go shoot some hoops?’” McCusker says. Neither Armstrong nor Ory forgot that moment. After he was released from the juvenile facility, Armstrong followed the Kid Ory band. He finally got a chance to play with the group when he was 19. Joe “King” Oliver left Ory’s band to go to Chicago. “Kid Ory called me and said, ‘You still playing that cornet?’…[I was] taking Joe Oliver’s place in the best band in town,” Armstrong wrote in his journal. Under Ory, Armstrong “learned stylistic direction and modeled himself into a professional,” McCusker says. Ory had all the best gigs in town, and Armstrong’s fame quickly grew in New Orleans for his wildly improvised and energetic playing. “All you had to do was hum or whistle a new tune and

For a full schedule, visit www.fqfi.org/satchmosummerfest

35


MUSIC listings

Showcasing Local Music MON 7/30

Papa Grows Funk

TUE 7/31

Rebirth Brass Band

WED 8/1

Bachaco

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 faX: 504.483.3116

FRI 8/3

Feed the Kitty

all show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

big Horns, 6; smokin’ time Jazz band, 10

SAT 8/4

Treme Funktet featuring Corey Henry

TUeSDAY 31

WeDneSDAY 1

Banks Street Bar — glish, ayatolla gold, 9

AllWays Lounge — Clear plastic masks, fly golden eagle, 10

BMC — Carolyn broussard, 5; eudora evans & Deep soul, 8; st. legends brass band, 11

SUN Joe Krown Trio w/Walter Joe Krown Trio Washington & SUN 8/5 “Wolfman” feat. Russell Batiste & Walter Batiste 3/13 Russell Wolfman Washington

Bombay Club — matt lemmler, 6

New Orleans Best Every Night!

Bullets Sports Bar — Kermit ruffins, 6

8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

Chickie Wah Wah — Honey island string trio, 8

(504) 866-9359

Circle Bar — sultan bathery, birthstone, blacksmoke band, 10

www.themapleleafbar.com

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JULY 31 > 2012

36

Thursdays at Twilight Garden Concert Series

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

Phil Melancon

Joined by fellow entertainers Larry Barron, Alden Hagardorn, and vocalist Heidi Campbell.

AUGUST 2

book your DINNERor COCKTAIL private dining event now !

areas

corporate parties rehearsal dinners business meetings

Call Our Special Events Planner Gift Certificates Available

mon-fri 9am-5pm

504.581.1103 or

504.525.4790 tommysneworleans.com

Rock ’N’ Bowl — Jerry embree, 8:30

Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Delfeayo marsalis & the Uptown Jazz orchestra, 8 & 10

THU The Trio featuring Johnny 8/2 V, & Special Guests

6

Ralph’s on the Park — Joe Krown, 5

The Saint — Heat Dust, adults, fagettes, the Clap, 9

Complete listings at www.bestofneworleans.Com

More than just great food...

Charlie gabriel, 8

Columns Hotel — John rankin, 8 Crescent City Brewhouse — new orleans streetbeat, 6 d.b.a. — treme brass band, 9 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — tom Hook, 9:30 The Famous Door — Darren murphy & big soul, 3 Funky Pirate — blues masters feat. big al Carson, 8:30 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Calvin Johnson, 8 Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville Cafe — Colin lake, 3; Joe bennett, 6:30 The Maison — gregory agid, 6; pocket monster, 9 Maple Leaf Bar — rebirth brass band, 10

Adults: $10 / Children 5-12: $3 Children 4 & Under = FREE Mint Juleps and other refreshments available for purchase For more information call

(504) 483-9488

Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill — lagniappe Jazz Quintet, 6; pocket aces brass band, 9:30 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — tom Hook, 9:30; michael liuzza, 10 Old Point Bar — Josh garrett & the bottom line, 8 Preservation Hall — preservation Hall-stars feat. shannon powell, 8 Ralph’s on the Park — Joe Krown, 5

Banks Street Bar — i’m fine, worn in red, Choi wolf, 9 Bistreaux — aaron lopezbarrantes, 7 Blue Nile — soundman presents, 8; billy iuso & the restless natives, 9; gravity a, 11 Buffa’s Lounge — ben De la Cour, 7 Cafe Istanbul — ricky sebastian, 8 Candlelight Lounge — treme brass band, 9 Circle Bar — fly golden eagle, Clear plastic masks, banditos, 10 Columns Hotel — andy rogers, 8 Crescent City Brewhouse — new orleans streetbeat, 6 d.b.a. — walter “wolfman” washington & the roadmasters, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — bob andrews, 9:30 The Famous Door — Darren murphy & big soul, 3 Funky Pirate — blues masters feat. big al Carson, 8:30 Howlin’ Wolf Den — King rey, origami ghosts, good Vibes, 10 Irvin Mayfield’s I Club — Kermit ruffins DJ session, 6 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Kipori woods, 5; irvin mayfield’s noJo Jam, 8 Maple Leaf Bar — bachaco, 10 Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill — lucky Jukebox brigade, 6; Krewe de groove, 9:30

Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Joe Krown, 8 & 10

Old Point Bar — brent walsh Jazz trio feat. romy Kaye, 7

Spotted Cat — Cindy Chen, 4; meschiya lake & the little

Preservation Hall — preservation Hall Jazz masters feat.

Spotted Cat — ben polcer, 4; orleans 6, 6; st. louis slim & the frenchmen st. Jug band, 10 Stage Door Canteen, National World War II Museum — Victory belles, noon Three Muses — tara reynolds, 4:30 Victory — sombras brilhantes, 8

THURSDAY 2 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top — sun Hotel, ava luna, narcissy, 9 AllWays Lounge — Kid Carsons, picnic, elli perry, Chris pickering, 10 Bacchanal — Courtyard Kings, 7 Banks Street Bar — Claude bryant & the allstars, 9 Bistreaux — aaron lopezbarrantes, 7 Blue Nile — micah mcKee & little maker, 7 Buffa’s Lounge — gina forsyth, 8 Circle Bar — guitar lightnin’ lee, DJ pasta, 10 Columns Hotel — fredy omar, 8 Crescent City Brewhouse — new orleans streetbeat, 6 Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30 d.b.a. — Jambalaya brass band, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — todd Duke, 9:30 The Famous Door — Darren murphy & big soul, 3 Funky Pirate — blues masters feat. big al Carson, 8:30 Hard Rock Cafe — boot Hill, 8 House of Blues (Parish) — famous stranger, tnC boys, scoopy, frank foota, noonieb & t.stewie and others, 10 The Inn on Bourbon — Desantis Duo, 6 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — roman skakun, 5; James rivers movement, 8 Maple Leaf Bar — the trio, 10 Mimi’s in the Marigny — washboard Chaz blues trio, 9 Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill — alabama slim blues review, 6; blues Jam feat. the 30 x 90 blues women, 9:30 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — lucky Jukebox brigade, 9

page 38


Irvin Mayfield

s

Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown

Love Sessions

For schedule updates follow us on:

AUGUST A FESTIVAL OF GIVING 18-29 300 BOURBON STREET • NEW ORLEANS 504.553.2299 • WWW.SONESTA.COM

Gerald French

Jason Marsalis

SATURDAYS 8pm 8/4 Joe Krown Swing Band 8/11 Jaz Sawyer’s Crescent City

All-Stars 8/25 Don Vappie

Midnight Brass Band Jam featuring 8/4 & 25 Déjà vu Brass Band 8/11 Brass-A-Holics SUNDAYS 8pm 8/5, 12 & 26 Tyler’s Revisited featuring Germaine Bazzle &

Paul Longstreth

MONDAYS 8pm 8/6 & 27 Gerald French & the

Original Tuxedo Jazz Band 8/13 George French Band

TUESDAYS 8pm 8/7 Jason Marsalis 8/14 Dwight Fitch Jr. 8/28 Calvin Johnson Quintet

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

Movement

FRIDAYS 5pm The Professor Piano Series featuring 8/3 & 31 Joe Krown 8/10 Larry Seiberth 8/17 Tom Worrell 8pm Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown Midnight Burlesque Ballroom featuring

Trixie Minx & Romy Kaye

s irvinmayfield.com

Germaine Bazzle

AUGUST 2012 CALENDAR

WEDNESDAYS 5pm Kipori Woods 8pm 8/1, 8, & 15 Grammy Award-winning Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam presents the music of Harold Battiste $15 Cover 8/29 Wess “Warmdaddy” Anderson THURSDAYS 5pm Roman Skakun 8pm 8/2, 9, 16 & 30 The James Rivers

7 NIGHTS A WEEK 8PM MON-SUN

James Rivers

37


MuSiC LISTINGS page 36

AMERICAN & EUROPEAN

CRAFT BEER

SMALL BATCH WHISKEY CRAFTY HOUR weekdays 4pm to 6pm

$2 off

AMERICAN CRAFT PINTS (16 OZ) NOLA | STONE | BROOKLYN | STILLWATER EVIL TWIN | CANTILLON | PARISH BREWING MIKKELLER | GREEN FLASH|BASIL HAYDEN ELIJAH CRAIG | PAPPY VAN WINKLE LAGAVULIN | OBAN | TALISKER LAPHROAIG FINE AMERICAN WHISKEYS ISLAY, HIGHLAND & LOWLAND SCOTCHES.

Old Point Bar — Big Al & the Heavyweights, 8 One Eyed Jacks — Lyrikill, 7 Preservation Hall — Survivors Brass Band feat. Jeffery Hills, 8 Ralph’s on the Park — Joe Krown, 5 Ray’s — Bobby Love Band, 6 Rock ’N’ Bowl — Geno Delafose, 8:30 The Saint — Scarecrow Sonic Boombox, Super Nice Bros., Porcharitas, The Clap, Fagettes, 10 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — John Ellis & Double Wide, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Sarah McCoy, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; Jumbo Shrimp, 10 St. Roch Tavern — J.D. Hill & the Jammers, 8:30 Three Muses — Tom McDermott, 4:30; Luke Winslow King, 7:30 Tipitina’s — Scorseses, Ashes of Babylon, Elephant Skeleton, 9 Vaughan’s — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30 Windsor Court Hotel (Cocktail Bar) — Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 6

Friday 3 Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

UPSTAIRS BAR

38

IS NON SMOKING

5 PM TIL MIDNIGHT DOWNSTAIRS 24 HOURS A DAY

1732 ST. CHARLES AVE. THEAVENUEPUB.COM

Banks Street Bar — Autotomii & Friends, 10 Bayou Bar at the Pontchartrain Hotel — Philip Melancon, 8 Bayou Beer Garden — Mo Jelly, 8:30 Bistreaux — Aaron LopezBarrantes, 7 Blue Nile — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 7; Stooges Brass Band, 11 Buffa’s Lounge — Zola!, 8 Cafe Istanbul — Erika Falls, 9 Circle Bar — Mahayla, 10 Columns Hotel — Alex Bachari Trio, 6 Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6

Friday, August 3 STONE RABBITS Saturday, August 4 ROTTEN CORES + The Unnaturals

••••••••••••••••••• OPEN EVERY DAY 2PM-2AM

521 E. Boston Street

Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 9 d.b.a. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Soul Rebels Brass Band, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Joe Krown Trio, 10 Emeril’s Delmonico — Bob Andrews, 7 Funky Pirate — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

Green Room — Stone Rabbits, 10 Hotel Mazarin — Jerry Christopher, 4:30 House of Blues — Cha Wa, 5 Howlin’ Wolf Den — Jag, 10 Hyatt Regency New Orleans — Anais St. John, 9

Saturday 4 AllWays Lounge — Tucker Fuller, Love Songs, 9 Atchafalaya — Atchafalaya All Stars, 11 a.m. Banks Street Bar — Masta Blasta, 9 Bayou Bar at the Pontchartrain Hotel — Philip Melancon, 8

The Inn on Bourbon — De- Bistreaux — Aaron LopezSantis Duo, 6 Barrantes, 7 Irvin Mayfield’s I Club — Blue Nile — Washboard Little Freddie King, 10 Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Flow Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Play- Tribe, 11 house — Joe Krown, 5; Leon Bombay Club — Leroy “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8 Jones Quintet, 9:30 Jimmy Buffett’s MarBuffa’s Lounge — Royal garitaville Cafe — Truman Rounders, 8 Holland, 5; Joe Bennett, 8 Cafe Istanbul — Gaynielle JuJu Bag Cafe and Barber Neville, 9:30 Salon — Michaela Harrison, Circle Bar — The Breton Todd Duke, 7:30 Sound, Joe Adragna, 10 Landlubbers Pub & Club Clever Wine Bar — Scott — Dana Abbott, Redfish Sanders Quartet feat. Olivier Blues Band, 3 Bou, 8 & 10 Le Bon Temps Roule — Crescent City BrewJeff “Snake” Greenberg, 7 house — New Orleans Mardi Gras World’s River Streetbeat, 6 City Ballroom — Jammin’ Davenport Lounge — on the River feat. Bucktown Jeremy Davenport, 9 Allstars, Scott Schmidt Band, 5 d.b.a. — John Boutte, 8; Little Freddie King, 11 Mercedes-Benz Superdome — Kenny Chesney, Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Tim McGraw, 4:30 Bar — Los Tres Amigos, 10 Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill Dragon’s Den — Brother/ — Tiki Troubadour, 4; Freddy Ghost, Baby Boy, 10 Omar con su Banda, 7; Javier Emeril’s Delmonico — Olondo & AsheSon, 10:30 Bob Andrews, 7 Old Point Bar — Rick Funky Pirate — Blues Trolsen, 5; J.D. Hill & the JamMasters feat. Big Al Carson, mers, 9:30 8:30 One Eyed Jacks — AgalGreen Room — Rotten loch, Taurus, Pallbearer, The Cores, Unnaturals, 10 Dropout, 9 House of Blues — Dirty Patrick’s Bar Vin — Jerry Projectors, Wye Oak, 9 Christopher Trio, 4:30 Howlin’ Wolf — Rebirth Preservation Hall — PresBrass Band, 10 ervation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 Howlin’ Wolf Den — PoRock ’N’ Bowl — Top Cats, nykiller, Dummy Dumpster, Lovey Dovies, 10 9:30 Hyatt Regency New OrRusty Nail — Country leans — Anais St. John, 9 Fried, 10 The Inn on Bourbon — Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro DeSantis Duo, 6 — Ellis Marsalis Trio, 8 & 10 Irvin Mayfield’s I Club Spotted Cat — Ben Polcer, — Los Hombres Calientes 4; Washboard Chaz Blues feat. Irvin Mayfield & Bill Trio, 6; Cottonmouth Kings, Summers, Javier Gutierrez 10 & Vivaz, 8 Three Muses — Royal Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Roses, 6; Glen David AnPlayhouse — Joe Krown drews, 9 Swing Band, 8; Deja Vu Tipitina’s — Revivalists, Cha Brass Band, midnight Wa, 10 Jimmy Buffett’s MarTwist of Lime — Bad Grass garitaville Cafe — Truman CD release, 10 Holland & Friends, 2 & 5; Joe Bennett, 8 Windsor Court Hotel (Cocktail Bar) — Shannon Landlubbers Pub & Club Powell Trio, 5 — Big Daddy-O, 8

Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill — Carolyn Broussard & Company, 12:30; Hillbilly Hotel, 4; Emily Estrella & the Faux Barrio Billionaires, 7:30 New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park — Omagh Community Youth Choir, 1 Old Point Bar — Dana Abbott Band, 9:30 Preservation Hall — Preservation Hall Swing Kings feat. Will Smith, 8 Ritz-Carlton — Catherine Anderson, 1 The River House — Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 7 Rock ’N’ Bowl — Deacon John & the Ivories, 9:30 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Lionel Ferbos & the Louisiana Shakers, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Casual Baby, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; The Davis Rogan Band, 10 Stage Door Canteen, National World War II Museum — Victory Belles, 11 a.m. Three Muses — Cristina Perez, 6; Shotgun Jazz Band, 9 Tipitina’s — NOD, 10 Tommy’s Wine Bar — Julio & Caesar, 10 Windsor Court Hotel (Polo Club Lounge) — Shannon Powell Band, 9

SuNday 5 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top — A Hanging, Fat Stupid Ugly People, Choi Wolf, 2 Banks Street Bar — NOLA County, 9 Blue Nile — Mykia Jovan, 7; To Be Continued Brass Band, 10 Buffa’s Lounge — Some Like it Hot!, 11 a.m. Cafe LaSalle — John Warren, 11 a.m. Cafe Rani — Courtyard Kings, 11 a.m. Columns Hotel — Chip Wilson, 11 a.m. Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6 d.b.a. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Louisiana Hellbenders, 10 Funky Pirate — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 Hi-Ho Lounge — Coathangers, Jaill, Trampoline Team, 9

House of Blues — Ken Swartz & the Palace of Sin, 3 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 8 Jackson Brewery Bistro Bar — Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, noon Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville Cafe — Truman Holland & Friends, 3; Ched Reeves, 6:30 Kermit’s Treme Speakeasy Restaurant & Bar — Kermit Ruffins, 7:30 Le Pavillon Hotel — Philip Melancon, 8:30 a.m. Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill — Kevin Clark & Matt Lemmler, 11:30 a.m.; Riccardo Crespo, 4; Javier Gutierrez & Vivaz, 8:30 National World War II Museum — Rocky’s Hot Fox Trot Orchestra, 2 Old Point Bar — Picked Clean, 1; Jesse Moore, 3:30 Preservation Hall — Storyville String Band feat. Seva Venet, 8 Ralph’s on the Park — Joe Krown, 11 a.m. Ritz-Carlton — Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m.; Catherine Anderson, 2 Roosevelt Hotel (Blue Room) — James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m. Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Leroy Jones & New Orleans’ Finest, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Rights of Swing, 3; Kristina Morales & the Bayou Shufflers, Every other Sunday, 6; Pat Casey & the New Sounds, 10 Three Muses — Rapahel Bas & Norbert Slama, 5:30; Jayna Morgan, 8 Tipitina’s — Youth Music Workshop feat. Cliff Hines Trio, 1; Cajun Fais Do-Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30 Triage — Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 6

MoNday 6 AllWays Lounge — Salt Wives, 9 Apple Barrel — Sam Cammarata, 8 Banks Street Bar — N’awlins Johnnys, 10 BJ’s Lounge — King James & the Special Men, 10 Columns Hotel — David Doucet, 8 Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6 d.b.a. — Glen David Andrews, 10


MUsIc LISTINGS PREVIEW

Dirty Projectors with Wye Oak

AUG

So much has been made of Dirty Projectors’ silly concepts (Don Henley as a post-apocalyptic opera protagonist, Black Flag genetically altered 04 from a childhood memory, Bjork adopting a pod of whales) that it’s easy to gloss over the sensational albums they have spawned, each more accomplished — and, it should be noted, less embellished — than the last: 2005’s sprawling The Getty Address, 2007’s punctilious Rise Above, 2009’s majestic Bitte Orca and its 2010 EP remora, Mount Wittenberg Orca. With July’s Swing Lo Magellan (Domino), the Brooklyn band follows both trends to their tail-swallowing apotheoses. Being a Dirty Projectors record, this new LP has tracks built around popcorn syncopation (“About to Die”) and West African guitar gymnastics (“Just From Chevron”), and another (“Unto Caesar”) in which mega-mastermind David Longstreth tonguetwists, “Down the line, down the mercenary Barbary/ Down the line, dead the martyrs’ morbid poetry.” But it’s balanced by first-take, best-take epiphanies (“Uh, that doesn’t make any sense, what you just said,” cosinger Amber Coffman answers him) and a vertebral trio of devout hymns (“Swing Lo Magellan,” “Dance For You,” “Impregnable Question”) that do nothing more than follow chord progressions divined from the songwriting gods. Incidentally, Magellan’s release date, July 10, is shaping up as a Farmers’ Almanac oddity — it’s the birthday of the two best records of 2012. (Frank Ocean’s tidal Channel Orange is the other; you figure out the order.) Wye Oak, whose Civilian still resonates from the annals of 2011, opens. Tickets $20 advance purchase, $23 day of show, $45 balcony seating. — NOAH BONAPArTE PAIS

Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — John Fohl, 9:30

taville Cafe — Brint Anderson, 3; Ched reeves, 6:30

6; Chris Polacek & the Hubcap Kings, 9:30

— Charmaine Neville & Friends, 8 & 10

The Famous Door — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

Kermit’s Treme Speakeasy Restaurant & Bar — Kermit ruffins, 6

Old Point Bar — Brent Walsh Jazz Trio feat. romy Kaye, 7

Maple Leaf Bar — Papa Grows Funk, 10

Preservation Hall — Preservation Players feat. Mark Braud, 8

Spotted Cat — Sarah McCoy, 4; Dominick Grillo & the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 6; Kristina Morales & the Bayou Shufflers, 10

Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Gerald French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8 Jimmy Buffett’s Margari-

Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill — Meghan Stewart Quartet,

Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro

Three Muses — Kristin Diable, 7

clAssIcAl/ concERts Trinity Episcopal Church — 1329 Jackson Ave., 5220276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth Organ recital feat. Albinas Prizgintas, 6; Sun: Omagh Community Youth Choir, Shades of Praise, 5

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

9 p.m. Saturday House of Blues 225 Decatur St. 310-4999 www.hob.com

39


FiLM

and a young man from the projects. Canal Place

listings

F THE HOME O

KATY PERRY: PART OF ME (PG) — the film follows the pop star on her 124-show national tour, showing onstage footage, candid offstage moments and interviews with friends and family. AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14

Oyster Burger

Summer Specials

3 COURSE PLUS GLASS OF WINE $20 M-TH 5PM-7PM

LUNCH SPECIALS M-F MENTION THIS AD & RECEIVE A FREE CUP OF GUMBO

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) — animal friends trying to make it back to the Central park Zoo are forced to take a detour to europe. Hollywood 14

Complete listings at www.bestofneworleans.Com

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 faX: 504.483.3116

EXP. 8/31/12

www.Huckleberrys.US • 1821 Hickory Ave. • Harahan • 504.305.6066

Now ShowiNg THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN (PG-13) — a teenage spider-man (andrew garfield) tries to sort out his identity, feelings for a girl (emma stone) and his parents’ disappearance. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (PG-13) — fantasy and reality collide for a young girl in a remote Delta town after her father falls ill. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place

It’s

GEAUX

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

time

BERNIE (PG-13) — a beloved resident of a small texas town (Jack black) is charged with murdering the elderly widow he looks after (shirley maclaine). Chalmette Movies BRAVE (R) — in the pixar film, the daughter of scottish royalty must discover courage

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to save her kingdom from chaos. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) — the third installment of Christopher nolan’s batman series introduces the characters Catwoman and bane. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (R) — the gang from the franchise embark on a journey after cataclysm sets a continent adrift. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE INTOUCHABLES (PG) — in the french hit, an unlikely bond develops between a rich man crippled in an accident

MADEA’S WITNESS PROTECTION (PG-13) — when a wall street banker is framed and placed under federal protection, the banker and his family are shipped to madea’s (tyler perry) house. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 MAGIC MIKE (R) — a handyman by day and a stripper in an all-male revue at night, mike (Channing tatum) discovers the downsides of stripping after he takes a novice under his wings and falls for his sister. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 MOONRISE KINGDOM (PG13) — wes anderson’s latest concerns a peaceful island community that falls into chaos when two love-struck 12-yearolds run away. Canal Place SAFETY NOT GUARANTEED (R) — aubrey plaza is a magazine intern who finds a man (mark Duplass) seeking a partner for time travelling. AMC Palace 20 SAVAGES (R) — a lucrative business selling marijuana is crashed when a drug cartel

REViEw thru the Do-Deca-pentathlon (r) AUg 2 p.m. & 7 p.m. tue.-thu. as unlikely as it may seem, one day metairie may be famous as the original Chalmette movies home of the filmmaking Duplass broth8700 w. Judge perez Drive, ers. their recent Jeff, Who Lives at Home stands as one of 2011’s best movies, Chalmette, 304-9992 and The Do-Deca-Pentathlon — which was www.chalmettemovies.com made in 2008 but only found a distributor after the brothers’ recent success — arrives as another welcome surprise from mumblecore mavericks mark and Jay Duplass. The Do-Deca-Pentathlon was inspired by the real-life escapades of two brothers (childhood friends of the Duplasses in metairie) who devised a series of 25 athletic events to prove unequivocally which brother reigns supreme. what if the brothers grew up estranged but remained insanely competitive and replayed the original (inconclusive) contest despite advanced age and out-of-shape bodies? the Do-DecaPentathlon pits 30-something brothers mark (Duplass regular steve Zissis) and Jeremy (mark Kelly, from tV’s Mad Men) against each in epic battle over the course of one hugely uncomfortable family weekend. locally shot in quick-and-dirty style even by Duplass brothers standards, The Do-Deca Pentathlon overcomes significant limitations via honest and memorable performances. it’s not as accomplished as the brothers’ recent work, but it remains true to their peculiar m.o. and sibling rivalry is something most of us have no trouble understanding. laser tag, anyone? — Ken Korman

The Do-Deca-Pentathlon

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FIlM LISTINGS leader demands a piece of the action. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 STEP UP REVOLUTION (PG-13) — A Miami dance crew turns their performances into protest art when a businessman’s plans threaten to displace the people’s neighborhood. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 TED (R) — Seth MacFarlane directs the comedy about a man (Mark Wahlberg) who, as a child, wished for his teddy bear to come to life — and 30 years later, the foul-mouthed bear is still his companion. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 TO ROME WITH LOVE (R) — Woody Allen directs Alec Baldwin, Jesse Eisenberg, Ellen Page and others in the comedy that follows four tales unfolding in the Italian city. AMC Palace 20 THE WATCH (R) — A neighborhood watch group (Ben Stiller, Vince Vaughn, Jonah Hill and Richard Ayoade) that mostly goofs off is forced to take their jobs more seriously. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

OPENING FRIDAY DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: DOG DAYS (G) — The latest installment of the book-turned-film series, Greg Heffley (Zachary Gordon) finds himself in a summer vacation gone wrong.

sPEcIAl scREENINGs ASSASSIN’S BULLET (R) — In the Bulgarian thriller, a vigilante begins killing terrorists in Europe and a former FBI field agent (Christian Slater) is brought in to find the assassin. Tickets $8 general admission, $7 students and seniors, $6 members. 4 p.m. Fri.-Sun., 6 p.m. Mon. and nightly through Aug. 9, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG (NR) — An eccentric inventor (Dick Van Dyke) struggling to support himself and his family creates a magical car. Tickets $5.50. Noon Sun. and Aug. 8, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com DARK HORSE (NR) — An immature 30-something who lives with his parents meets his female counterpart (Selma Blair) and sets out to marry her. Tickets $8 general admission, $7 students and seniors, $6 members. 8 p.m. Fri.-Mon., then nightly through Aug. 9, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

TOTAL RECAL (PG-13) — In the remake of the 1990 sci-fi film, a man (Colin Farrell) seeks out the services of a company that erases clients’ memories to get rid of his nightmares — but then secrets come to life that make him a hunted man.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012


FILM LISTINGS REVIEW

Music From the Big House

Canadian roots musician Rita Chiarelli chased the ghosts of bluesman Robert Pete Williams and folksinger Lead Belly (among others) all the way to the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola, where these legendary Louisiana musicians long ago made their names. What Chiarelli found was something unexpected: a lesson in forgiveness, especially as it applies to incarcerated men often dismissed by society as unworthy. Another result of Chiarelli’s Angola visits was Music From the Big House, a soft-spoken and apolitical documentary about prisoners — many serving life THRu 7 p.m. Tue.-Thu. sentences without hope for parole AUG Zeitgeist Multi-Disci— who find a little redemption by plinary Arts Center, playing heartfelt soul, blues, country and gospel in what may be the least 1618 Oretha Castle joyous place on earth. Haley Blvd. Shot in atmospheric black and white by 352-1150 Canadian director Bruce McDonald, the film takes place over the course of a week www.zeitgeistinc.net at Angola. It follows a group of talented inmates as they prepare to sing and play with Chiarelli at a concert for fellow prisoners and their families. Interspersed among the musical scenes are oneon-one conversations between Chiarelli and the musicians that quietly draw out their humanity and render politics irrelevant. Some audiences reportedly have responded negatively to information at the end of the film that includes inmates’ individual crimes. But anything else would have been dishonest. The truth may hurt, but there’s no shot at forgiveness without it. — KEN KORMAN

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RESERVOIR DOGS (R) — Quentin Tarantino’s 1992 debut follows a botched robbery. Tickets $8. Midnight Fri.Sat., Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com THE SOJOURNERS (NR) — Steven Scaffidi’s documentary recounts a trip to Medjugorje in Croatia where Mary, the mother of Jesus, has reportedly been appearing for 30 years. The screening benefits the Rumbo family, whose home recently burned, killing two family members. Call 6690189 for details. 6 p.m. live music, 7 p.m. screening Fri., Divine Mercy Catholic Church, 3325 Loyola Drive, Kenner, 466-5016; www.divinemercy-

parish.org SUMMER STOCK (NR) — Judy Garland and Gene Kelly star in the musical about a woman whose farm is invaded by her sister’s theater troupe. Tickets $5.50. Noon. Wed., Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com TAKE THIS WALTZ (R) — A married woman who begins a summer affair with her neighbor. Tickets $8 general admission, $7 students and seniors, $6 Zeitgeist members. 5:15 p.m and 9:15 p.m. Tue.-Thu., Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net THUNDER SOUL (PG) — A documentary about alumni of Houston’s Kashmere High School Band who play a tribute concert for their beloved band leader. A Q&A with members of the original band follows the screening. Email mail@ charitablefilmnetwork.org or visit www.press-street.com/ film for details. Free admission. 7 p.m. Mon., Cafe Istanbul,

New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave.; www. neworleanshealingcenter.org

CALL FOR FILMMAKERS DEFEND THE GULF SHORT FILM SHOWCASE. The Charitable Film Network seeks short films about the Gulf of Mexico’s environmental issues. Winners receive prizes. Visit www.healthygulf.org/shortfilmshowcase for details. Submission deadline is Aug. 15. AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 262-4386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012

COLUMBIA PICTURESMUSICPRESENTS AN ORIGINAL FILM PRODUCTI ON A FILM BY LEN WISEMAN “TOTAL RECALL” BRYAN CRANSTON JOHN CHO BY THE SHORT STORY EXECUTIVE AND BILL NIGHY BY HARRY GREGSON-WILLIAMS PRODUCERS RIC KIDNEY LEN WISEMAN “WE CAN REMEMBERINSPIRED IT FOR YOU WHOLESALE” BY PHILIP K. DICK SCREEN SCREENPLAY STORY BY RONALD SHUSETT & DAN O’BANNON AND JON POVILL AND KURT WIMMER BY KURT WIMMER AND MARK BOMBACK PRODUCED DIRECTED BY NEAL H. MORITZ TOBY JAFFE BY LEN WISEMAN STARTS FRIDAY, AuGuST 3

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

LOUISIANA: 200 YEARS OF STATEHOOD (NR) — The museum screens Louisiana Public Broadcasting’s new documentary. A reception preceeds the screening. Call 767-4465 or email jbrown@ lpb.org for details. Reception 5 p.m., screening 6 p.m. Sat., National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944

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Sample a variety of craft and specialty beers from around the world.

QUARTER HORSE RACING AND MORE SATURDAY, AUGUST 18TH • RACING BEGINS AT 4PM $10 GENERAL ADMISSION - KIDS 12 & UNDER FREE

PLUS LIVE CAMEL & OSTRICH RACING! Saturday, August 18th Fair Grounds Clubhouse Advanced Purchase: $30 General Admission Tickets On Sale Now at Ticketmaster.com 5pm-9pm $35 General Admission 4pm-9pm $60 VIP Admission

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

Must be 21 to attend. *Admission allows access to all racing activities.

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QUARTER HORSE MEET OSTRICH RACE: 7:10PM CAMEL RACE: 8:40PM AUGUST 15 – SEPTEMBER 1 LOCAL MASCOT RACE: 7:55PM WEDNESDAYS THROUGH SATURDAYS POST TIME: 12:40PM

All race times are approximate and subject to change.

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ART

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COMPLETE LiSTiNGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 FAX: 504.483.3116

ART EVENTS REFLEXION & PROJEXION ART PARTY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St. — Push Pin-Up Productions hosts a juried exhibition of emerging artists at the party also featuring DJs, food and drinks. Reservations are required. Email eileenquadros@ gmail.com for details. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday. WHITE LINEN NIGHT. New Orleans Arts District, Various galleries on Julia Street and St. Charles Avenue — New Orleans Arts District’s annual event features openings at area galleries, plus live music, food, speciality cocktails and an after-party at the Contemporary Arts Center. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

OPENING

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 5221999; www.arthurrogergallery. com — “Love Heals,” paintings by Holton Rower; “Quiver,” glassworks and mixed media by Rob Wynne; “Altogether Elsewear,” video by John Pilson; all through Sept. 15. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. CALLAN CONTEMPORARY. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.callancontemporary.com — “Dream Documents,” works by Raine Bedsole, through Sept. 28. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www.carolrobinsongallery.com — Group exhibition featuring Nell Tilton, Jere Allen and Doug Sweet, through August. Opening Wednesday. COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Maga-

FOUNDATION FINE ART GALLERY. 608 Julia St., 568-0955; www.foundationgallerynola.com — “All Alive and Close Enough to Touch,” prints by Rob Stephens, through Nov. 3. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 8994687; www.guylymanfineart. com — “20/20 Vision,” photographs by Lindsey Roussel, Chriselda Pacheco and Rebecca Mason. Reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 5257300; www.heriardcimino.com — “Between the Pages,” works by Aaron McNamee, through Sept. 24. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www. jeanbragg.com — “V’allumer!” oil paintings by Chuck Broussard, through August. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www.jonathanferraragallery.com — “St. Claude,” a group exhibition featuring Angela Berry, Hannah Chalew, Kiernan Dunn and others; “Omissions,” paintings, gouache and watercolors by Stephen Hoskins; both through Aug. 25. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www. lemieuxgalleries.com — “They Were Hopelessly Outnumbered,” sculpture and drawings by John Donovan; through Sept. 29. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 3094249; www.octaviaartgallery. com — “Living With Pop,”

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — Jewelry by Lauren Eckstein Schonekas of Construct Jewelry, ongoing; “Louisiana Contemporary,” a juried exhibition of contemporary Louisiana art, through Sept. 24; “New Southern Photography”; Louisiana photographs from the museum’s permanent collection; “Historic Louisiana Landscapes and Portraits”; works by H. Cole Wiley and Lin Emery; all through Sept. 23. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. SIBLEY GALLERY. 3427 Magazine St., 899-8182 — “Linens and Libations,” paintings and sculpture by Elaine Gleason, Eddie Granger and Christina Gracim through Sept. 26. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

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GALLERIES ANTIEAU GALLERY. 927 Royal St., 304-0849; www. antieaugallery.com — Works by Chris Roberts-Antieau, Bryan Cunningham and John Whipple, ongoing.

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ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Group exhibition featuring Darin Butler, Amy Archinal, Myra Williamson-Wirtz, Louise Guidry, Bettina Miret and Tim Johnson, through July. BENEITO’S ART. 3618 Magazine St., 891-9170; www. bernardbeneito.com — Oil paintings, prints, postcards and license plates by Bernard Beneito, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “New Orleans Loves to Second Line All the Time,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www. byrdiesgallery.com — Paintings by Peter Ladetto, through Aug. 8. D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “So Much Art, So Little Time iii,” an annual retrospective of gallery artists and artists from the past 10 months of exhibitions, through Wednesday. DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032; www. dumoisgallery.com — “Cold Drink,” the gallery’s annual printmaking invitational, through Aug. 26. THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.

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504-298-TRIO

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4:00-Till for Dinner Closed Tuesdays Happy Hour: Wed-Fri 4-6:30

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JULY 31 > 2012

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by Elsie Semmes, mosaics by Christine Ledoux, jewelry by Belle Bijoux and works by Joshua Windham, through August. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

zine St., 722-0876; www. coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “Face to Face,” paintings by Scott Hebert, through Aug. 25. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

works by Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann, Roy Lichtenstein, Keith Haring and others, through Sept. 29. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

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art LIStINGS rEVIEW

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

NOLA NOW, Part II: The Human Figure

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tHRu aUG

11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Contemporary Arts Center 900 Camp St. 528-3805 www.cacno.org

It is huge. Featuring more than 100 New Orleans artists, The Human Figure, curated by Don Marshall at the Contemporary Arts Center (CAC), is a smorgasbord of paintings along with a smattering of photography, sculpture and mixed-media pieces. But more than any medium, it is defined by tone and content in works ranging from predictable to eccentric to over the top. Beyond all that, it also is a remarkable mix of established artists and lesser-known talents whose unexpected accomplishments convey the sense of a parallel art universe hidden just beyond the usual gallery and museum scene. It can be a disorienting viewing experience because familiar imagery often appears juxtaposed with unusual or bizarre content. that’s OK once you notice the pattern. Just relax and go with the flow. Phil Sandusky’s atmospheric self-portrait with his nude model in the background is typical of this accomplished local impressionist’s work. Right next to it is Katrina Andry’s Western Perception of the Other, a large color woodcut of a young woman with a wild Afro and clownish blackface makeup. Petting a large snake crawling up her legs as her stiletto heels frame a half-eaten apple on the ground, this near picaresque figure confronts cliches about African-American women with polemical visual satire. Nearby is Mark Bercier’s Tsana, a proper and eloquently painted teenage girl whose coy innocence hints at veiled mischief — a paradigm totally reversed in an adjacent painting of a young woman licking the toes of her reclining unseen partner in a work titled Feet, painted by an artist identified only as VonHaffacker, which seems more guided by impulse than polemics. But even works by leading artists can be surprising. Auseklis Ozols’ untitled reclining nude is gorgeously painted, but the model’s expression is so zoned out it recalls old opium den scenes of yore. Around the corner is a similarly reclining nude by a somewhat less-known artist, Jane talton-Ayrod. Here Manet’s iconic Olympia is reborn as a reclining nude Barbie doll in Odalisque Plastique (pictured), talton’s zany update of the timeless lounging seductress theme. At the other extreme, religious painting takes a Creole turn in George Schmidt’s locally themed Sacra Conversazione, in which a baby Jesus on Mary’s lap points to a celestial map of New Orleans as cherubs play banjos and nuns clap to the beat. But Nique Le transome’s Deus Ex Machina self-portrait suggests a Vietnamese holy martyr with a long-stem carnation clenched between his teeth as blood from a barbed-wire crown of thorns trickles down his cheeks. Much could be said about Keith Perelli’s paintings, Alex Podesta’s or Evelyn Jordan’s sculptures, or Craig tracy’s, Gus Bennett’s or Josephine Sacabo’s photos, but you get the picture. Marshall, the CAC’s first director, has managed to present an entire art community in a refreshing, if sometimes slightly disorienting, new light. — D. ERIC BOOKHARDt

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art LIStINGS org — Photographs by Ves Pitts, works by Sally Heller and Nina Schwanse and mixed-media assemblages by John Otte, all through Sunday.

GARDEN DISTRICT BOOK SHOP, THE RINK. 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — “Summer Showcase II,” a group exhibition by gallery artists, through Sept. 23. GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www.goodchildrengallery.com — “Something Here From Somewhere Else,” a group exhibition curated by Sesthasak Boonchai and Srdjan Loncar, through Sunday. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www. jeanbragg.com — “Architecture of the Spirit,” paintings by David Dillard, through July. MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 5580505; www.michalopoulos.com — Paintings and other works by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — “Splash: the Freedom of Artistic Expression,” works by Stephen Williams, Aziz Diagne and Cathy DeYoung, through July.

SECOND STORY GALLERY. New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave., 710-4506; www.thesecondstorygallery.com — Works by Adam Montegut, Cynthia Ramirez, Gina Laguna and others, through thursday. SIBLEY GALLERY. 3427 Magazine St., 899-8182 — Group exhibition featuring paintings and sculpture by David Rex Joyner, Eddie Granger, Julie Robinson and Wanda Sullivan, through July. ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 8928650; www.sttammanyart.org — Annual national juried artists exhibition, through Aug. 11. STAPLE GOODS. 1340 St. Roch Ave., 908-7331; www. postmedium.org/staplegoods — “Distances,” mixed media by the St. Paul, Minn. youth group Art of Struggle, through Sunday. STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 5689050 — “Enduring Legacies: Seven Black Artists,” a group

STUDIO 831. 532 Royal St., 304-4392; www.studio831royal.com — “In a Mind’s Eye,” sculpture by Jason Robert Griego, ongoing. UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “2-D/3-D: Part II,” a group show of works by students in the University of New Orleans’ Master of Fine Arts program, through Sunday.

SParE SPaCES EAST BANK REGIONAL LIBRARY. 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — “Becoming Louisiana: Path to Statehood,” a traveling exhibition commemorating 200 years of Louisiana statehood, through Aug. 12.

Call for artiStS ARTMOOR. New Orleans Public Library, Rosa Keller Branch, 4300 S. Broad St., 596-2675; nutrias.org — the library seeks artists working in a variety of mediums to display and sell work in its monthly art exhibit. Call 481-7998 or email educationcorridor@broadmoorimprovement.com for details. BOMBAY SAPPHIRE ARTISAN SERIES. the nationwide art competition gives regional winners the chance to exhibit at Art Basel Miami, and the overall winner will get to exhibit at his or her own gallery show in New York. Local gallery L’Entrepot also will host exhibitions featuring submitted works. Visit www. sapphireartisanseries.com/ submission for details. Submissions deadline is Aug. 24. LOUISIANA HOME GROWN HARVEST MUSIC & ARTS FESTIVAL. the inaugural festival, held Sept. 21-23, seeks arts and crafts vendors. Email homegrownfestnola@gmail.com or visit www.homegrown-fest. com for details. LOUISIANA OYSTER TRAIL. the Jefferson Convention and Visitors Bureau seeks artists for its inaugural campaign that aims to increase awareness and tourism for local seafood restaurants through public art. Call 731-7083, email louisianaoystertrail@gmail.com or visit www.louisianaoystertrail. com for details.

muSEumS CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org — “NOLA NOW, Part II: the Human Figure”, through Sunday. HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St.,

523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “Something Old, Something New: Collecting in the 21st Century,” an exhibition of the collection’s significant acquisitions since 2000, through Feb. 8.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM CABILDO. 701 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm. crt.state.la.us — “New Orleans Bound 1812: the Steamboat that Changed America,” through January 2013. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www. lsm.crt.state.la.us — “the Louisiana Plantation Photos of Robert tebbs,” 60 gelatin silver prints by the architecture photographer, through Nov. 30. “Living with Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” ongoing. “It’s Carnival time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and other items, ongoing. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race,” an exhibition examining the complicity of physicians and scientists in Nazi racial health policies, through Oct. 15. NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — “Drawn to the Edge,” an installation of large-scale drawings by Katie Holden in the museum’s Great Hall, through Sept. 9. “Leah Chase: Paintings by Gustave Blache III”, through Sept. 9. “Dario Robleto: the Prelives of the Blues”, through Sept. 16. “Ralston Crawford and Jazz”, through Oct. 14. “Forever,” mural by Odili Donald Odita, through Oct. 7. SOUTHEASTERN ARCHITECTURAL ARCHIVE. Tulane University, Jones Hall, 6801 Freret St., 865-5699; seaa. tulane.edu — “Following Wright,” an exhibit highlighting Frank Lloyd Wright’s influence with drawings by architects Edward Sporl, Albert C. Ledner, Philip Roach Jr. and Leonard Reese Spangenberg, through Dec. 7. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. southernfood.org — “Lens on the Larder: the Foodways of Southern Appalachia in Focus,” an exhibition of photographs and oral histories by Larry Smith and Fred Sauceman, through Sept. 21. “tanqueray Olive” and “Guinness Pint,” prints by tom Gianfagna, through Jan. 21, 2013. “Lena Richard: Pioneer in Food tV,” an exhibit curated by Ashley Young; “then and Now: the Story of Coffee”; both ongoing.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS GALLERY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., second floor, 5237945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Works by Cathy CooperStratton, Margo Manning, Chad Ridgeway and teri Walker and others, ongoing.

exhibition of works on paper and canvas, through August.

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STAGE listings

Complete listings at www.bestofneworleans.Com

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 faX: 504.483.3116

ThEATER CHERRY DOCS. Mid-City Theater, 3540 Toulouse St., 488-1460; www.midcitytheatre.com — David gow’s drama is a series of meetings between a white supremacist guilty of a vile hate crime (Chris ramage) and his Jewish legal aid lawyer (Dane rhodes). tickets $24. 8 p.m. thursdaysaturday, 7 p.m. sunday. CLIMBING POETREE. Resurrection After Exoneration, 1212 St. Bernard Ave., 943-1902; www.r-a-e. org — the brooklyn-based performance/activist duo blends spoken-word poetry, video and beat-boxing. the performance features excerpts from Hurricane Season: The Hidden Messages In Water, a multimedia show about Hurricane Katrina. Visit www. climbingpoetree.com for details. tickets $6-$20. 7:30 p.m. wednesday.

THE GLASS MENDACITY. Deutsches Haus, 1023 Ridgewood St., 522-8014; www. deutscheshaus.org — John “spud” mcConnell, becky allen and others star in the tennessee williams parody. Call 259-9888 for reservations. tickets $15. 7 p.m. tuesdaywednesday through aug. 29. PROMISES, PROMISES. Cutting Edge Theater, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www.cuttingedgeproductions.org — in the musical based on the film The Apartment and featuring songs by burt bacharach, a junior executive at an insurance company attempts to climb the corporate ladder by allowing his apartment to be used by his married superiors for trysts. tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. fridaysaturday through aug. 18.

VERBATIM VERBOTEN. Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 298-8676; www. theshadowboxtheatre.com — actors present dramatized readings of surveillance tapes, wiretapped conversations, on-camera diatribes, released emails and other transcripts of notorious recorded conversations. tickets $8. 8 p.m. wednesdays through sept. 12. WAITING AROUND: THE RESTAURANT MUSICAL. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www. theallwayslounge.com — ricky graham and Harry mayronne’s musical comedy that once had an off-broadway run depicts life in the service industry. Visit www.waitingaroundthemusical.com for reservations. tickets $20. 8 p.m. mondays through aug. 27. THE WINTER’S TALE. Lupin Theatre, Tulane University, 865-5106; www.tulane.edu — the gavin mahlie all things shakespeare high school program presents the production of the shakespeare romance. tickets $15. 7:30 p.m. wednesday-saturday, 1:30 p.m. saturday-sunday. YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU. St. Philip Neri School, Parishioners’ Center, 6600 Kawanee Ave., Metairie, 8875600; www.stphilipneri.org — the st. philip players present george s. Kaufman and moss Hart’s pulitzer prize-winning comedy that follows the seemingly strange sycamore family. tickets $10 reserved seating, $8 general admission, $5 children under 12). Call 3553919 or email staliancich@

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, Royal Sonesta Hotel, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — trixie minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of leon “Kid Chocolate” brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. friday. THE GOODNIGHT SHOW. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www. theallwayslounge.com — John Calhoun hosts the show that’s in the style of late-night talk shows and features comedy sketches, a house band and interviews with prominent locals. tickets $5. 8 p.m. thursday.

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LE ROYAL ROGUE SHOW. Harrah’s Casino (Harrah’s Theatre), 1 Canal St., 533-6600; www.harrahsneworleans.com — Comedian Jodi borrello hosts the parisian-themed show of can-can dancing and variety acts. tickets start at $30. 8 p.m. wednesdaysunday through oct. 28.

OPERA THE 9TH WARD OPERA COMPANY. the new opera company performs f.C. burnand and arthur sullivan’s Cox and Box and gilbert and sullivan’s Trial by Jury. tickets $10. 8 p.m. friday at the allways lounge (2240 st. Claude ave.), 8 p.m. saturday at University of new orleans’ recital hall (2000 lakeshore Drive).

AUDITIONS BURLESQUE AUDITIONS. show producer rick Delaup and choreographer Dollie rivas seek male and female dancers, plus emcees, variety acts, magicians and others for bustout burlesque, the ’50s-style burlesque show, and strut, the all-male striptease revue formerly called boylesk. email info@bustoutburlesque. com with photos, a brief bio and resume to be considered for an audition. 2 p.m. saturday. CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS. Delgado Community College, City Park campus, 615 City Park Ave., 671-5012; www.dcc.edu — the women’s chorus holds auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit www.crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. monday. FRECKLEFACE STRAWBERRY: THE MUSICAL. Rivertown Repertory Theatre, 325 Minor St., Kenner, 4687221 — Director stephen eckert seeks actors, singers and dancers ages 13-20 to play a variety of roles in his production of the long running off-broadway family musical. auditioners should prepare 32 bars of an uptempo page 51

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FIDDLER ON THE ROOF. Tulane University, Dixon Hall, 865-5105 ext. 2; www.tulane. edu — a poor dairyman tries to instill in his daughters Jewish tradition in the tulane summer lyric musical. tickets start at $28. 8 p.m. thursday-saturday, 2 p.m. sunday.

URBAN EDUCATION SMACKDOWN. Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 298-8676; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — representing new orleans teachers, Jim fitzmorris takes on Democrats and republicans, hostile students, confrontational parents and gov. bobby Jindal in his one-man show. tickets $15 general admission, $10 students and teachers. 8 p.m. friday-saturday through aug. 18.

stphilipneri.org for reservations. 7:30 p.m. friday-saturday, 2:30 p.m. sunday.

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StAGE LIStINGS page 49

REVIEW

Urban Education Smackdown Urban Education Smackdown sounds like an extreme sport. Jim Fitzmorris, who wrote the piece and performs it at the Shadowbox theatre, spent a year teaching in a New Orleans charter school, and this one-man show grew out of that experience. Fitzmorris sometimes refers to his monologues as “rants.” It’s true he pulls no punches, but Smackdown smacks more of candor than fury. Fitzmorris takes a provocative tone from the jump by calling his fictional school “Plessy v. Ferguson” after the infamous 1896 Supreme Court case that upheld segregation, establishing the later-rejected notion of “separate but equal.” It’s not entirely clear what Fitzmorris intends by using this name for the school. Maybe it’s a reference to the damage suffered tHRu 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat. by generations who received AuG the Shadowbox theatre inferior education under segrega2400 St. Claude Ave. tion. the school is predominantly African-American due to white 298-8676 flight from the city, private schools and www.theshadowboxtheatre.com other social factors. the vignettes in Smackdown are detailed and deeply felt. Still, a line must be drawn between the author and the character he portrays. We’ll call that character teacher. David Raphel’s set is simple. there’s a desk with a portable green board behind it. the credits for the show are scrawled in yellow chalk. the teacher enters, wearing gray slacks, a tie and vest. “What in the name of Zeus’s bunghole would make anyone want to be a teacher in New Orleans?” he asks. that mixture of the esoteric and vernacular sets the tone for the show. With sort of caustic script, often the interludes of tenderness are telegraphed and overplayed. We recognize them as deliberate heart-wringers. But Fitzmorris has included touching scenes that are poised, subtle and convince. the teacher has an ultimate nemesis: “that pluperfect motherf—ker Bobby Jindal, a biology major who nonetheless endorses creationism.” the teacher doesn’t have to deal with his nemesis every day. He is engaged in trench warfare with the kids and their parents. the teacher often sympathizes with the students and would like to help. He tells remarkable stories about them and the crushing odds they face. One boy provides part of his family’s income by tap dancing on Bourbon Street at night. the boy not only has no time for homework, he hardly gets any sleep. that’s the kind of student body that haunts the halls of Plessy v. Ferguson. How do schools help such a kid, even under the best of circumstances? the teacher has another obstacle. He can’t get the class to shut up or follow the simplest instructions. Getting strict with a disobedient child isn’t easy. He is confronted by the a parent who proclaims she’s sick of these “f—king teachers,” “f—king principals” and “f— king schools” telling her daughter what she can and can’t do. the tales are often interrupted by a barrage of humorous asides, and we are glad to hear them. Mike Harkins directed this droll bit of sociology. Bravo. — DALt WONK

18

MARDI GRAS CHORUS. Christ the King Lutheran Church, 1001 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 469-4740; www.ctk-nola.org — the men’s barbershop harmony chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 363-9001 or

visit www.mardigraschorus.com for details. 7:15 p.m. tuesday.

THE NERD. Playmakers Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc.com — the theater holds auditions for its September production of the Larry Shue farce. Email ellenmail@bellsouth.net for

details. 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

PEARLS OVER SHANGHAI. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www. theallwayslounge.com — the theater holds auditions for its November production of the comic operetta. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Monday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

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LEGO DUPLO READ! BUILD! PLAY!. Louisiana Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm. org — the touring event for lego’s literacy initiative is tailored for children under 5 and features guided activities, music and building. Visit www.readbuildplay.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. tuesday and thursday. TODDLER TIME. Louisiana Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — the museum hosts special tuesday and thursday activities for children ages 3 and under and their parents or caregivers. admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

THURSDAY 2 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — the ogden offers art activities for kids during weekly after Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

EVENTS TUESDAY 31 “CHOPPED” VIEWING PARTY. Irish House, 1432 Saint Charles Ave., 595-6755; www.theirishhouseneworleans.com — the restaurant hosts a viewing party to watch irish House chef matt murphy compete on the food network show. free admission. 8 p.m. COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS ON COASTAL RESTORATION. New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave., 948-9961; www.neworleanshealingcenter.org — the national wildlife federation hosts the discussion about current environmental issues and projects. email johnsonh@nwf.org or call 315-5083 for details. 6

p.m. to 7:30 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University Square, 200 Broadway St. — the weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, green plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market, French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket.org — the market is open daily and features nine eateries, an oyster bar, a bakery and fresh seafood and produce. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. PAULA DEEN COOKING DEMONSTRATION. Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, 900 Convention Center Blvd. — as part of the Diabetes in a new light initiative, the food network hosts the demonstration during the national medical association Conference. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. STAGE DOOR IDOL: PRELIMINARY ROUND FOUR. Stage Door Canteen, National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944; www.stagedoorcanteen.org — the audience and a panel of local celebrity judges vote for their favorite singers in the museum’s 1940s-themed singing competition. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY 1 COOL & COMFORTABLE ENTERTAINMENT. Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — florist Charlene Vernotzy and longue Vue chefs lead the program on summer entertaining ideas. Call 293-4723 or email jgick@longuevue. com for details. admission $20 members, $25 nonmembers. 10 a.m. to noon. COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 —

the market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. saturday. ENERGY SMART INFORMATION CENTER. Smith Regional Library, 6301 Canal Blvd., 596-2638 — library visitors can meet with an energy smart staff person to learn more about energy smart programs and other ways to conserve. Call (866) 721-0249 or visit www.energysmartnola.info for details. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. THE LAGNIAPPE CLASSIC. Pontchartrain Center, 4545 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 4659985; www.pontchartraincenter.com — Dogs vie for awards based on how they meet established standards for their breeds at the dog show. the event also includes junior showmanship competitions, a microchip clinic, seminars and vendors selling dogrelated merchandise. email lagniappeclassic@gmail.com for details. free admission. 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. wednesday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. thursday-sunday. LUNCHBOX LECTURE. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum. org — the semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of world war ii-related topics. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. noon. MEET THE CURATOR: SUSAN BACHRACH. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — the museum hosts a discussion, book signing and reception with the curator of Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race. 6 p.m. WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. Westwego Farmers & Fisheries Market, Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — the market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art, live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. wednesday and saturday.

THURSDAY 2 FRESH MARKET. Circle Food Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — the Downtown neighbor-

hood market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. ebt and wiC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

NEW ORLEANS ANTIQUES FORUM. Historic New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “Circa 1812” is the theme for the annual forum, which includes panels featuring local and national experts — including antiques roadshow appraisers — social activi-


EVENt LISTINGS ties and opportunities to visit antiques shops in the city. Call 523-4662 or visit www.hnoc.org/antiques.htm for details. Admission starts at $100. ThursdaySunday. OFFICIAL BROTHERS OF THE SUN TOUR PRE-PARTY. Hard Rock Cafe, 415 N. Peters St., 529-5617; www. hardrock.com — Boot Hill performs at the pre-party for the Kenny Chesney and Tim McGraw concert that benefits Second Harvest Food Bank of Greater New Orleans. Admission is a donation of two non-perishable food items. 8 p.m.

Friday 3 MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK. Armstrong Park, N. Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. SATCHMO SUMMERFEST. Old U.S. Mint, 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state.la.us/site/mintex.htm — The festival dedicated to Louis Armstrong includes seminars about the jazz great, plus live music, food from local restaurants, a children’s area and special events like a jazz Mass, a second line and dance lessons. Visit www.fqfi.org/ satchmosummerfest for details. FridaySunday. WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, lectures, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

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BACK TO SCHOOL BASH. The City of Love, 8601 Palmetto St., 895-5410; www.thecityoflove.com — The nonprofit Impact’s annual event provides health resources, backpacks, school supplies and vouchers for school uniforms. Call 895-5410 or email info@loveimpact.org for details. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street Market, Magazine and Girod Streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. E-WASTE AND PAINT DROP-OFF. Whole Foods Market Arabella Station, 5600 Magazine St., 899-9119 — Whole Foods and the Green Project offer a monthly electronic waste and paint dropoff event. Visit www.greenproject.org for details. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation, 13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET. Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than

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30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. LOWER 9TH WARD CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL. Sam Bonart Playground, 1201 Forstall St., between Marais and Urquhart streets — The event features free health screenings, an arts and crafts area for kids, musical performances, food, voter registration and free school supplies. Visit www. donteventripdreamfoundation.org for details. Noon to 4 p.m. NEW ORLEANS LADIES ARM WRESTLING CIRCUS CIRCUS BRAWL BRAWL. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 5698361; www.oneeyedjacks. net — The theatrical arm wrestling competition raises money for Liberty’s Kitchen and features circus-esque halftime entertainment by burlesque dancer Trixie Minx and aerialists Sarah the Bobcat and Niki Frisky. Visit www.nolaw.org for details. Admission $5. 8 p.m. POOCHES ’N’ PIRATES. S&S Consignment Shop, Pelican Plaza Shopping Center, 813 Florida St., Mandeville — Dogs are welcomed at the Caribbeanthemed fundraiser for the St. Francis Animal Sanctuary. The event features a costume contest, rum tastings, themed cocktails and more. Visit www.sfas.org for details. Admission $25. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET. Holy Angels Complex, 3500 St. Claude Ave., 875-4268; www. sankofafarmersmarket.org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. SPUN CROSSROADS’ ART IN MOTION. New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave., 948-9961; www.neworleanshealingcenter.org — The weekly indoor market features clothing and other items from local and regional artists, demonstrations and food. Email wlaker@eatel.net or visit www.spuncrossroads.com for details. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. ST. BERNARD SEAFOOD & FARMERS MARKET. Aycock Barn, 409 Aycock St., Arabi — The market showcases fresh seafood, local produce, jams and preserves, baked goods, crafts, live

entertainment, children’s activities and more. Call 355-4442 or visit www.visitstbernard.com for details. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. ZUMBATHON. Treasure Chest Casino, 5050 Williams Blvd., Kenner, (800) 298-0711; www. treasurechest.com — The American Cancer Society hosts a Zumba fundraiser. Pre-registration is recommended. Call 219-2272 or email tracie.bertaut@cancer.org for details. Admission $25 in advance, $30 at the door. 9 a.m. to noon.

SUNDAY 5 LOCKS OF LOVE CUT-ATHON. Lakeside Shopping Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 835-8000 — The nonprofit that gives hairpieces to financially disadvantaged children suffering from long-term medical hair loss provides haircuts for $15 at the event. Call 491-0342 or email lboudreaux3@cox.net for details. Noon to 5 p.m. STRUT & SWIM. W Hotel New Orleans, 333 Poydras St., 525-9444 — Fashion Week NOLA hosts poolside fashion shows with live music, drink specials, pop up boutiques, giveaways and more on the hotel’s rooftop. This week’s fashion show features designers Kano Branon, Alicia Zenobia and Elise Doran. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. WINE RIDE NOLA FOOD & WINE PAIRING COMPETITION. Windsor Court Hotel, 300 Gravier St., 523-6000; www.windsorcourthotel.com — The event features a reception and four-course dinner with wine pairings overseen by local sommeliers. A portion of the proceeds benefits a local nonprofit. Visit www. sommsunderfire.com/wineride for details. Admission $150. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

SPORTS ZEPHYRS. Zephyr Field, 6000 Airline Drive, Metairie, 734-5155; www.zephyrsbaseball.com — The Zephyrs play the Iowa Cubs. 11:30 a.m. Tuesday.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS CUPCAKE THROWDOWN & ARTIST CAKE WALK. Antenna Gallery, 1521 Poland Ave., no. 3187, 298-3161; www. press-street.com — The gallery seeks bakers, both

White Linen Night

White Linen Night features a block party on Julia Street while Warehouse District art galleries and museums remain open from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Julia Street is blocked off for pedestrian traffic, and there is food from 15 area restaurants. White Linen Night AUG and bars. The Good Country p.m.-11 p.m. Hey Brahs, Jim McCormick 04 6Saturday and Mark Carson, Picnic and Jim Smith’s Damn Frontier provide Warehouse District live music. The Contemporary Arts 528-3805 Center (CAC) hosts an afterparty (9 www.cacno.org p.m.-11 p.m.) with music by the Mod Dance Party DJs. It’s also the closing reception for the CAC’s NOLA NOW, Part II: The Human Figure show (reviewed on page 46). Most galleries open new shows and admission is free. CAC admission $10, free for CAC members. — WILL COVIELLO those under 18 and adults, for a cake and cupcake competition Aug. 18. Email info@press-street.com for details. Application deadline is Aug. 15. GROW GENTILLY SMALL BUSINESS PLAN COMPETITION. The competition awards winners a cash prize plus technical and professional assistance to enhance their businesses. Visit www. cybergrants.com/capitalone/growgentilly for details. Application deadline is Tuesday. HUMANA COMMUNITIES BENEFIT. Humana awards a $100,000 grant to a local nonprofit working to improve health experiences or build healthy communities. Visit www.humana. com/hcb for details. Application deadline is Tuesday.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS CASA NEW ORLEANS. The organization seeks volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. The time commitment is a minimum of 10 hours per month. No special skills are required; thorough training and support is provided. Call Brian Opert at 5221962 ext. 213 or email info@casaneworleans.org for details. GREATER NEW ORLEANS FAIR HOUSING ACTION CENTER. The

center seeks part-time civil rights investigators with excellent writing skills, reliable transportation and no criminal convictions to help expose housing discrimination in the New Orleans metro area. Call 717-4257 or email mmorgan@gnofairhousing.org for information. MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/ mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 888-5880 for details.

WORDS DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s at the Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket. net — The bar hosts a free weekly poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday. FRIENDS OF THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE. Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www. nutrias.org — The group hosts twice-weekly sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday. KATIE J. RAUCH. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The author signs the children’s book Animal Rhymes. 11 a.m. Thursday.

NONFICTION BOOK CLUB. McKeown’s Books and Difficult Music, 4737 Tchoupitoulas St., 8951954 — Participants read nonfiction books of their choice and discuss it with the group. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday. PASS IT ON. George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturday. RYAN HOLIDAY. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and discusses Trust Me, I’m Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator. 6 p.m. Tuesday. SPEAKEASY SUNDAYS. Club Caribbean, 2441 Bayou Road, 957-9666; www.clubcaribbeanneworleans.com — The club hosts an open mic poetry and spoken word night 7 p.m. Sunday. Visit www.spokenwordneworleans.com for details. Admission $5. THE WELL: A WOMEN’S POETRY CIRCLE. St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121; www.stannanola. org — The group is open to all levels meets at 2 p.m. Mondays. Call 655-5489 or email hwoodie104@ gmail.com for details.


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Online: When you place an ad in Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. Note: Ad cancellations and changes for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Please proof your first ad insertion to make sure it is correct. Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

WANTED TO PURCHASE CASH FOR CARS

Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT HAIR/SKIN CARE HAIR SYSTEMS FOR MEN

Professional barber/stylist will help you find the right fit. Certified hair replacement expert. For private confidential appt, 504-453-1890

DON’T SUFFER

WITH HAIR LOSS ANY LONGER Hair growth treatments & Hair Loss Concealers. Your local online retailer. www.HairGrowthCentral.com

LICENSED MASSAGE NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

56

Real Estate Rentals &

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NOLA

MARKETPLACE Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, and more for as little as $60

OPEN SAT & SUN 9-5 OVER 100 VENDORS. Arts & Crafts - Live Music Free Family Fun. Call 1-985-510-SELL www.i12fleamarket.com

MUSIC/INSTRUMENTS 400 ROCK LP’S

From 60’s & 70’s. Sold as collection. Condition varies on records. $800. Call (504) 473-4824

OFFICE FURN/EQUIP

Needs a home or foster ASAP! Luke - happy & very, very, sweet boy. Best in a home s the only dog. Loves toys, treats & walks. If foster, all medical & food will be supplied. PLEASE CONTACT ASAP! THANKS! Laura, naynay1280@aol.com

Sylvester is a completely handsome 6-yr-old Tuxedo boy. He is a funny kitty & absolutely loves to be brushed. He is affectionate, super gentle & completely laid back. When tragedy struck, Sylvester ended up homeless. He is lonely & misses his family. Sylvester is fully vetted; just waiting for someone to love!

SPA EQUIPMENT In from Trade. Call (504) 888-6152

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A financially secure teacher offering endless love dreams of adopting a baby. Pam, 888-661-6460. Expenses Paid

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DHL Maine Coon Mix, 6 yr. old. Rescued from a hoarder in 2007. Beautiful and vivacious girl. Fully vetted. Call 504-4548200, spaymartthriftandgift@gmail.com

Free delivery. Call (504) 888-6152

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Same day appointments available 10am-7pm. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. Jeannie LMT #3783-01. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

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Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123.

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES ANTIQUE TUBS & SINKS

2 Antique claw foot bathtubs (5’), 1 missing legs, kitchen sink - antique porcelain, 1 antique bathroom sink with 2’ pedestal. Everything for $150. Call (504) 865-9352

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URGENT! PIT MIX

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MERCHANDISE

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$125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. 504-952-8404 (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. 504-952-8404 (504) 846-5122

CHAIRS

Armchairs $175 each & Dining Chairs (4) @ $40 each. 504-371-2711 or viola1910@live.com King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $225. Can deliver. 504-9528404 (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $250. 504-952-8404 (504) 846-5122

To Advertise in

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PETS

Weekly Tails

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Beaux is an 8-month-old, neutered, Lab/Shih Tzu (YES, you read that right!) mix. He and his sister, Bella, were surrendered due to their family’s lack of time. They hope they can go home together! To meet Beaux or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

BOXER/SHEPHERD

Sweet, smart & friendly! Mia - 1 yr, SMART, mild mannered, kid friendly, great w/other pups. Mostly housebroken & fixed. (504) 975-5971

BRENDLE: Brown Tabby

Active 10 yr. old with unique black and white markings. She is a sweet girl and quite a talker - loves, loves attention. Fully vetted. Call 504-454-8200, spaymartthriftandgift@gmail.com

CARMEN: 7 year old

Blue Gray/White cat rescued from a large colony in MS. Dainty Southern Belle ready to share her life with a family. Fully vetted. Call 504-454-8200, spaymartthriftandgift@gmail.com

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Calico kitten 3 months old , Very sweet and playful Vetted 504 462-1968.

FOSTER PARENTS NEEDED

For cats & dogs. www.arfl.petfinder. com or call (504) 975-5971

Fergie is a 4-year-old, spayed, DSH who is mostly white with grey tabby markings. Fergie ADORES be petted, cuddled, brushed—you name it, any attention is just fine! To meet Fergie or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

JACK RUSSELL TERRIER

“JR” Great companion dog! Fun loving NOT hyper at all. Laid back & loves to cuddle. Best in a home with no cats, small pets or small children. He likes small & large dogs. tbkestler@cox.net

LUKE: White/Blue Gray

Cat: 8 yr. old boy rescued from Mid City just before Katrina. Outgoing personality, always rolling over for belly rubs. Fully vetted. Call 504-454-8200, spaymartthriftandgift@gmail.com

PIT MIX - LADY

Loves attention, dog arks & a snuggle! Lady, 2 yrs old, 50-55lbs. Loves walks, people, belly rubs, chews & bones. Very loving & devoted. Eager to please her family. Good w/cats, dogs & children. Contact tkbestler@cox.net

PRECIOUS KITTENS

Little Ralphie and 4 sibling kittens all 10 wks old and beautiful need loving homes ,spayed /neutered Vacs, tested. 504 462-1968

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NEED HELP?

Consider the alternative ...

To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org

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CLASSIFIEDS LEGAL NOTICES 24th JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF JEFFERSON STATE OF LOUISIANA

NO. 715-277 DIVISION “I” SUCCESSION OF KATHRYN WEEKS CRABTREE NOTICE OF PETITION TO COMPEL PAYMENT OF INTERIM ALLOWANCE AND EXCLUSIVE USE OF SUCCESSION MOVABLES NOTICE IS GIVEN that Petitioner, Claudia Crabtree, has filed a Petition to Compel Payment of Interim Allowance and to Compel the Exclusive Use and Occupancy of Certain Succession Movables against Kerry V. Crabtree, Testamentary Executor, contending that petitioner should be paid an interim allowance of $1,000.00 per month for the remainder of the administration of the Succession, with payments to relate back to the filing of the said Petition, so long as the amounts advanced do not exceed the amount eventually due to her as legatee with such payments to be charged to her share of the Succession, with such payments to be paid first from income allocable to her share and then to principal, if appropriate, and furthermore why he should not be ordered to show cause at the above date and time and why Claudia Crabtree ought not be awarded exclusive use and possession of certain movable items belonging to the succession of the decedent and more particularly described in the foregoing petition. NOW THEREFORE, in accordance with the law made and provided in such cases, Notice is hereby given that petitioner, Claudia Crabtree, contends that she should be awarded the aforesaid interim allowance, and the heirs, legatees and creditors are required to file Opposition, if any they have, to such Court, within ten (10) days from the date of this publication. Gretna, Louisiana, this 26 day of July, 20112

SWORN TO AND SUBSCRIBED BEFORE ME, this 26 day of July, 2012. D. FRICKEY Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY: Philip A. Gattuso, La Bar #05965 Attorney for Petitioner, Claudia Crabtree P.O. Box 1190 56 Westbank Expressway Gretna, Louisiana 70054 Telephone: (504) 368-4141 Fax: (504) 368-4141 GAMBIT: 7/31/12 WirelessCo, L.P. dba Sprint is proposing to modify an existing telecommunications facility on a building located at 1226 S. Carrollton Ave. A, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA 70118. The proposed modifications consists of removing and replacing 3 antennas with a centerline height of 70 ft. Also, 1 GPS antenna will be installed. 3 equipment cabinets will be removed and replaced with 2 new cabinets on an extant equipment concrete pad. Any interested party wishing to submit comments regarding the potential effects the proposed facility may have on any historic property may do so by sending such comments to: Project 61121324 c/o CHRS, Inc., 451 N. Cannon Ave., Ste. 100B, Lansdale, PA 19446 or call (215) 699-8006.

NO.700-265 DIVISION “ H ” SUCCESSIONS OF FRANK D. DELERY and EULALIE de BEN DELERY NOTICE TO SELL IMMOVABLE PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE The Testamentary Executor of the above Successions has made application to the Court for the sale, at private sale, of the immovable property described as follows: THAT PORTION OF GROUND, together with all the buildings and improvements thereon, and all of the rights, ways, privileges, servitudes, appurtenances and advantages thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining, situated in the Parish of Jefferson, State of Louisiana in that part thereof known as LAKE VISTA OF JEFFERSON SUBDIVISION, according to plan of subdivision made by J. L. Fontcuberta, Surveyor, dated August 2, 1956, copy of which is annexed to Ordinance No. 3289, being Entry No. 83714 in Office of Clark of Court, Parish of Jefferson, Louisiana, said portion of ground is designated and measures as follows: LOT NO. 1, SQUARE NO. 11, bounded by Craig Avenue, 25th Street (now 43rd Street), Eastern boundary of said subdivision and 24th Street (now 42nd Street) and measures 106.41 feet front on Craig Avenue, 53.71 feet in width in the rear, by a depth and front on 25th Street (now 43rd Street) of 141.07 feet and a depth on its opposite side line of 130.85 feet. All in accordance with survey by Charles T. Nelson, Land Surveyor, dated April 23, 1979, a copy of which is annexed to an Act dated May 14, 1979 and registered as Instrument No. 874565, Jefferson Parish, Louisiana. Improvements bear Municipal No. 5433 Craig Avenue, Kenner, Louisiana 70065. On the following terms and conditions, to-wit: The sum of $325,000.00 in “AS IS” condition with buyer waiving redhibition, all cash to seller at closing, subject to Court approval, and subject to the ability of buyer to borrow with the property as security for a loan of eighty percent (80%) of the sale price by a mortgage loan or loans at a fixed rate not to exceed 3.875% per annum, interest and principal, amortized over a period of not less than 30 years, payable in monthly installments or on any other terms as may be acceptable to buyer. A home warranty plan to be purchased by seller not to exceed $660.00. Seller to pay real estate commission. NOTICE is now given to all parties to whom it may concern, including the heirs and creditors of decedents and of these Successions, that they be ordered to make any opposition which they may have to such application, at any time, prior to the issuance of the Order or Judgment authorizing, approving and homologating that application and that such Order or Judgment may be issued after the expiration of seven (7) days from the date of the last publication of such notice, all in accordance with law. BY ORDER OF THE COURT JON A. GEGENHEIMER, Clerk of Court ALVIN J. DUPRE JR. Attorney At Law 5150 Hwy. 22, Suite C-13 Mandeville, LA 70471 (985) 845-7868 Attorney for Executor Gambit: 7/31/12 & 8/21/12

24th JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF JEFFERSON STATE OF LOUISIANA

No. 715-081 DIVISION A SUCCESSION OF GARRY WAYNE HAMM COX Also known as GARY WAYNE COX NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the creditors of this Estate and to all other persons herein interested to show cause within ten (10) days from this notification (if any they have or can) why the Tableau of Distribution and Final Account presented by the Administrator of this Estate should not be approved and homologated and the funds distributed in accordance herewith. Monica Bazile Deputy Clerk 7/24/12 CLERK OF COURT Atty: Robert P. Charbonnet 3750 South Claiborne Ave. New Orleans, LA 70125 (504) 897-3700 Gambit – July 31, 2012

24th JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT PARISH OF JEFFERSON STATE OF LOUISIANA

NO: 629-197 DIVISION “L” SUCCESSION OF HARRY JOSEPH ALLEMAND AND EDNA LEBEOUF ALLEMAND

24th JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT PARISH OF JEFFERSON STATE OF LOUISIANA

NO: 629-197 DIVISION “L”

HOME SERVICES

SUCCESSION OF HARRY JOSEPH ALLEMAND AND EDNA LEBEOUF ALLEMAND

Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

ADVERTISEMENT OF NOTICE OF FILING OF TABLEAU OF DISTRIBUTION HARRY JOSEPH ALLEMAND NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the administratrix of this succession has filed a petition for authority to pay charges and debts of the succession in accordance with a tableau of distribution contained in the petition. The petition can be homologated after the expiration of seven (7) days from the date of this publication; any opposition to the petition must be filed prior to homologation. BY ORDER OF THE 24TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, Patricia Moore, DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT Dated: JULY 24 2012 EDWARD J. DEANO, JR. 895 PARK AVENUE MANDEVILLE, LA 70448 TELEPHONE: (985) 626-1001 Gambit - July 31, 2012

24th JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FOR JEFFERSON PARISH STATE OF LOUISIANA

ADVERTISEMENT OF NOTICE OF FILING OF TABLEAU OF DISTRIBUTION EDNA LEBEOUF ALLEMAND

NO. 705-739 DIVISION “D”

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the administratrix of this succession has filed a petition for authority to pay charges and debts of the succession in accordance with a tableau of distribution contained in the petition. The petition can be homologated after the expiration of seven (7) days from the date of this publication; any opposition to the petition must be filed prior to homologation.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR AUTHORITY TO PAY ESTATE DEBTS

BY ORDER OF THE 24TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, Patricia Moore, DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT Dated: JULY 24 2012 EDWARD J. DEANO, JR. 895 PARK AVENUE MANDEVILLE, LA 70448 TELEPHONE: (985) 626-1001 Gambit - July 31, 2012 Anyone knowing the whereabouts of DARRELL L. CALISTE AND BRENDOLYN BROWN CALISTE, please contact Justin Reese Atty, 2216 Magazine St., New Orleans, LA 70130, (504) 525-1500. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Deloris Rhea Mann, please contact: Attorney Serena C. Vaughan, 504352-9582 Anyone knowing the whereabouts of ELLEN TRIMBLE CANTY AND ELVIN D. CANTY, please contact Justin Reese Atty, 2216 Magazine St., New Orleans, LA 70130, (504) 525-1500. Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Gwendolyn A. Dunnaway, please contact: Attorney Serena C. Vaughan, 504-352-9582 Michael Angelo DiBartolo or anyone knowing his whereabouts, please contact Attorney Catharine O. Gracia, 639 Loyola Ave., 26th Floor, New Orleans, LA 70113 (504) 576-3750.

SERVICES

SUCCESSION OF EVA A. MORALES

NOTICE IS GIVEN to the creditors of this Succession and to all other interested persons, that a Third Tableau of Distribution has been filed by KEVIN M. NEYREY, the Dative Testamentary Executor of this Succession, with his Petition praying for homologation of the Tableau and for authority to pay the debts of the Estate listed thereon; and that the Third Tableau of Distribution can be homologated after the expiration of seven (7) days from the date of the publication of this notice. Any Opposition to the Petition and Third Tableau of Distribution must be filed prior to homologation. DAZERRA J. WASHINGTON Deputy Clerk JUL 19 2012 Jon A. Gegenheimer Clerk of Court Jefferson Parish ATTORNEY: S. FRAZER RANKIN 601 Poydras St, Suite 2775 New Orleans, LA 70130 (504) 568-1990 Gambit 7/31/12

to place your

LEGAL NOTICE

call sherry at 504.483.3122 or email sherrys @gambitweekly. com

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

AIR COND/HEATING SUPERIOR AIRE

Trane 3 Ton Replacement System 13 Seer $3990 Installed Expires 8/31/12 504-465-0688 Air Conditioning - Heating

AIR DUCT CLEANING

Air Duct Cleaning. Call to have your ducts cleaned, Estimated $800 per system. (504) 304-0443

GULF STATES A/C & HEATING

A/C Service Call Special Having problem with your Air Conditioning contact Gulf States A/C and Heating for your Quality Reliable Service. Service Calls for $59.00 (504) 304-0443. Ask about our 3 ton replacement specials starting at $3499.

CLEANING/JANITORIAL BRAZILIAN DEEP CLEANING COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL 20% OFF Free Estimates. References. (504) 939-6687 or (504) 344-8102 **OTHER SERVICES AVAILABLE**

JEFFERSON FEED PET & GARDEN CENTER GREEN GRASS - REAL FAST Grade “A” St. Augustine Sods. Immediate pickup or delivery. Lawn experts since 1950. jefffeed.com 504-733-8572

MORRIS LAWN CARE

Grass Cutting * Tree Trimming * Landscaping Weekly or Bi-Weekly Services Available. Free Estimates. Reference Available. Call Bian, (504) 382-7741

PEST CONTROL TERMINIX

Home of the $650 Termite Damage Repair Guarantee! Specializing in Drywood Terminte and BEDBUG FUMIGATION. Termites, Roaches, Rats & Ants Too. New Orleans Metro - 504834-7330 www.terminixno.com

PLUMBING ROOTER MAN

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. Kenner-Jefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-652-0084. Mandeville 985-6265045. Slidell 985-641-3525. www. RooterManCan.com MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

POOL SERVICES MAGNOLIA POOLS

Specializing in Saltwater Systerms Service, Maintenance, Repair 504-270-7307 www.magnoliapools.org

FLOORS/CARPET/TILE HAVE DIRTY GROUT?

GROUT WORKS, LLC Tile Grout Cleaning Color Sealing & Repair Shower Restoration Natural Stone Care Tile Replacement, Recaulking Commercial & Residential Free Estimates. 504-309-2509. www.grout-works.com

GENERAL CONTRACTORS MIKE’S REMODELING

Small & Big Jobs - We Do It All Custom cabinets, carpentry, painting, sheetrock, ceramic, roofs, kitchen & baths. Call (504) 324-9585

LAWN/LANDSCAPE DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

WINDOWS BEST PRICE IN TOWN!

DOUBLE INSULATED WINDOWS $99 (up to 90 U.I.) HURRICANE PROTECTION Shutters, Bahamas, Panels Roll Downs, Accordian, Colonial Allstate Window & Siding Co. 504469-0066; 985-649-1330 www.allstatewindowandsiding.com

MISC. HOME SERVICES GEAUX VEGGIE!

Creative Container Gardens & Planter Boxes WWW.GEAUXVEGGIENOLA.COM GEAUXVEGGIENOLA@GMAIL.COM FACEBOOK.COM/GEAUXVEGGIENOLA (925) 367-7333

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE

Call (504) 483-3100

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

D. FRICKEY Deputy Clerk 24th JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF JEFFERSON

24TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FOR THE PARISH OF JEFFERSON STATE OF LOUISIANA

57


EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS

JOB GURU

Dear New Orleans Job Guru, “After getting laid off from the job I had for five years, I’ve been looking for work with no success. I’ve had a few interviews, but still no luck. I’m really starting to get depressed. I don’t even go out with my friends any more. Although I’m not totally broke (yet), I feel like I’m an outcast and at a dead end.” — Bryan W., Metairie, LA Dear Bryan, Feeling depressed when you’re out of work is natural. A N.Y. Times / CBS News poll in 2011 found that more than half of the people surveyed stated that they had experienced emotional or mental health problems associated with lack of work, including anxiety and depression. A similar number expressed embarrassment or shame due to not having a job. Bryan, even though depression and other symptoms can be common, Grant Cooper they can also be serious. In order to conduct a truly effective and fruitful job search, you will need to be on top of your game, and having the blues or anxiety will only make matters worse. Just to give you a bit of hope, Bryan, here is the recent success story of a client of mine who was also “down in the dumps” about his job prospects. He was a successful New Orleans small business owner who had been devastated by Hurricane Katrina. He had lived off of his savings, but at over 50 years old, he was feeling discouraged. His sister, who lived out of town, called our office and paid to have a new résumé written for him. We also agreed to give him some basic career coaching. Using his new résumé, he quickly got an interview, although it was for a low-paying job. The interviewer was impressed by his résumé and suggested that he call another department in the same company.

AGENTS & SALES LIFE/HEALTH AGENT

Exper. Series 6a plus. Retired Life Insurance Agent for part or full time considered. New Orleans multi-line agency. Fax resume to 504-488-5390

BEAUTY SALONS/SPAS Experienced MANICURIST

Clean Metairie salon has booth rental for Manicurist w/ some clientele & availability to take walk-ins. Salon provides mani-table, spa chair, storage. Call Arthur, 504-715-4179

STYLIST/NAIL TECH

Elements Salon seeks a talented enthusiastic and creative new stylist to join our Element family. Please call 985-626-8115 for interview appt.

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

58

I’m certainly no therapist, Bryan, and you might consider seeing a professional counselor. Explain that you are unemployed, and ask if they have a sliding scale. Until then, here are a few tried and true techniques: • Join a health club or start working out. Exercise is known to reduce stress, plus you’ll look better. • Volunteer a few hours per week or weekend at a nonprofit. You’ll feel better and meet more people. • Almost every profession has associations or groups. Join them and get active, even if it’s just online. • Make a list each day of three things you can do to advance your job search. Complete at least two out of three. • Keep a daily journal of steps you’ve taken to find work, plus any new ideas you get by asking for advice.

ASSISTANT BISTRO-DELI MANAGER FT position w/ excellent salary & benefits. 5-day workweek, rotating schedule includes evenings & weekends with occasional days. Culinary education, fine dining, & mgmt experience a plus.

Fax resume to Paul Riley @ 504-896-7370 or mail to 714 Elmeer Ave Metairie 70005

TWO TONY’S RESTAURANT

Seeks Experienced FRONT OF HOUSE SERVERS Host/Hostess - Bussers Line Cook . Apply in person Tue-Sat 10am-noon or 3-5pm 8536 Pontchartrain Bl. Lakeview area

He called and made an appointment. Upon his arrival a few days later, it was raining heavily. The receptionist informed him that the interviewer was running late. 50 minutes later, he almost left, thinking he was forgotten. The interviewer finally arrived, apologized for being late, and called him into the office. He was told that there must be some misunderstanding, since there was no job for him. As he told us, “Something just clicked in my head. I said that I understood there was no job for me, but that, as a former business owner, I knew that the hardest thing is to find good people.” He went on to state his good qualities, briefly described his career achievements, and promised to keep in touch in case they ever needed a dependable, hard-working staff member. The interviewer was apparently so impressed with his confidence and polite persistence, that he was offered a full-time position paying $25 per hour right there on the spot!

VOLUNTEER

EMPLOYMENT

FT or PT Tailor is needed for ladies clothing store. Experience preferred.

WIT’S INN

Apply in person @ 1514 St Charles Ave.

504-523-7027

Bar & Pizza Kitchen Pizza Maker & Bartender w/ food experience

Apply in person Mon-Fri,1-5pm 141 N. Carrollton Ave. To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

RETAIL MARY’S ACE HARDWARE

In the Fr. Qtr is looking for a FT Office Assistant/Inventory Control person. Must have strong computer & organizational skills. Familiarity with retail inventory a plus. Friendly, family-style environment. Salary commensurate with experience. Contact: 504-5294465.

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY PIZZA FRANCHISE OPPTY

Pizza Franchise Opportunity. For more information call toll free (855) 978-7767

REACH 5 MILLION

Hip, forward thinking consumers across the U.S. When you advertise in alternative newspapers, you become part of the lcoal scene and gain access to an audience you won’t reach anywhere else. http://www.altweeklies. com/ads.

EMPLOYMENT

NEW ORLEANS

NEED HELP? Consider the alternative... Advertise in the gambit Classifieds Call

483-3100 Email classadv

@gambitweekly.com

New Orleans Job Guru is New Orleans native Grant Cooper. President of Strategic Résumés®, Grant is currently ranked in the Top 2% of 340 LinkedIn National Résumé Writing Experts and has fulfilled contracts for the U.S. Air Force, Kinko’s, the Louisiana Dept. of Labor, the City of New Orleans, the NFL, the NBA, as well as universities, regional banks, celebrities, and major corporations throughout the nation.

Send your questions to New Orleans Job Guru at: grant@resupro.com or 504-891-7222

readers need

You can help them find one.

A NEW JOB

To advertise in Gambit Classifieds’ “Employment” Section call 504.483.3100.


reaL esTaTe

REAL ESTATE

SHOWCaSe

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

MADISONVILLE

GENERAL REAL ESTATE

NOTICE:

DELERY COMARDA REALTORS

RESIDENTIAL * COMMERICAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT More more information call Delery Comarda Realtors (504) 875-3555 www.NOLAHomefinders.com

GINA SAYOUR, REALTOR

Servicing All Your Real Estate Needs - Selling, Buying or Relocating! Direct: (504) 884-5030 www.SayourHome.com Realty Executives, Each Office is Independently owned & Operated. Associate is licensed in the State of La, USA

METAIRIE

414 18th Street, $349K

Neoclassical Revival New Construction. 3 BR, 2.5 BA. 12’ ceil. Master suite w/ his & her’s closets & marble master bath. Wide-plank heart of pine flrs. Complete irrigation sys John Cody Stringer. 504-655-5577. Coldwell Banker, 504-899-4040. Ea. office independently owned & operated.

5533 DAYNA COURT

$549,000, 5bdrms/4baths. Lakewood South. More more information call Delery Comarda Realtors (504) 875-3555 www.NOLAHomefinders.com

5651 CHERLYN DRIVE

LAKEWOOD SOUTH. 5BDRMS/4BA. $575,000. More more information call Delery Comarda Realtors (504) 875-3555 www.NOLAHomefinders.com

5844 MARCIA AVE- 299K 517 METAIRIE LAWN

4 br, 3 baths. $479,000 Must See! Call Gina Sayour, Realtor, (504) 8845030 Realty Executives SELA. Each Office Independently Owned & Operated. www.SayourHome.com

lakewood North. 2 bdrms/2baths. More more information call Delery Comarda Realtors (504) 875-3555 www.NOLAHomefinders.com

5901 BELLAIRE DRIVE

4BR, 2.5 BA home of an interior designer. High ceilings, crystal chandeliers,beautiful baths, gourmet S.S.kitchen. Huge brick courtyard w/ bubbling fountain. Spacious master suite opens to courtyard. $570k. Cathy Dipiazza Cashman, 504-9754397. Alex-Cate Realty, 504-488-4398.

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN

ON BAYOU ST. JOHN

Condo, close to City Park & FQ. 1 BR, 1 BA. New paint & carpet. Central HVAC. Move in condition. Gated bldg. Reserved parking $108,900. 504343-5121.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE 110 COUNTRY CLUB DR.

Lakewood South. 5bdrms/3.5baths. $549,000 More more information call Delery Comarda Realtors (504) 875-3555 www.NOLAHomefinders.com

Lakeview Appraisal Service

Serving the New Orleans Metro Area for over 20 years. Residential Appraisals Kevin T. LaGraize New Orleans R.E. Appraisal Services www.lakeview-appraisal.com kevin@lakeview-appraisal.com 504-284-3445

6324 Bertha Drive

Beautiful Lake Terrace! Move right in! 3 BR, 2 BA brick ranch. Lovely large landscaped back yard. Attached double garage. 1924 (2045 total) sq ft living. Lot size 85 x 115. $325K. Joan Farabaygh. 504-723-5767. RE/MAX Affiliates. 504-838-7656. Ea office independently owned & operated.

1 & 2 Br Apts, 1 Ba, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras From $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2200 Pasadena, Met. 781-608-6115.

NEW ORLEANS RIVERFRONT

2 BR, 2.5 BA. Furn, healthclub, pool, parking. All util incl, wifi. Minimum 1 month. $3000/mo. Also 3 BR Penthouse $3800/mo. 781-608-6115.

COMMERCIAL RENTALS

On the Water. 3 BR, 2 BA, split level, boat launch, great backyard deck. Move-in ready. $189,000. Call 504887-4191

6500 BEAUREGARD AVE

3 BR, 3 BA, approx 2,963 sq ft. It is BEAUTIFUL. renovation. Marble, stone, hardwood. Over the top master bedroom & bath. Open floor plan. Corner lot facing park with private side entrance. $455,000. Cathy Dipiazza Cashman, 504-975-4397. Alex-Cate Realty, 504-488-4398.

6721 CANAL BLVD

Lakeview, 4/bdrms/4baths. $649,000 More more information call Delery Comarda Realtors (504) 875-3555 www.NOLAHomefinders.com

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

METAIRIE

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN

2 UNITS - HIDDEN GEMS

1 bdrm, $685, Renov’t - all new! - near Heart of Metairie. or renov’t 1 bdrm + bonus room, w&d, from $850. 1 brdm, $685. Wtr pd., Rsvd pkg,1 car. No smoking/pets. 504-780-1706 orrislaneapts.com

OLD METAIRIE CHARMING HOME

Off Met. Rd. & Ridgelake., 1350’ Rec. ren. 3/1, LG Kit, LR/DR, Hrwd. Flrs, Lg. Fen. Yd. w/Lg. Garage. CA/H, Recently ren., No smoke/house pets. $1350 + dep. (504) 388-4220

ALGIERS 1304 Evalina St. Superb Office Space

3527 Ridgelake Dr., Metairie. Approx 1,550 sq.ft. 2nd floor of 2 story office bldg. Parking, efficiency kitchen, storage rm, men’s & women’s restrooms. Avail immediately. 1 year lse $2,260/ mo. (504) 957-2360

GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2, 3 & 4 ROOM OFFICES STARTING AT $495 INCLUDING UTILITIES

HIDE-AWAY-LAKE ESTATE SALE

COMING SOON!

Beautiful gut renovation on Grand Rte. St. John: 2300 sq ft, 3 bedroom, 3 1/2 bath home. All new with custom and bespoke finishes. THE BEST neighborhood in the city- walk half a block to Bayou St. John, restaurants, wine store, coffee shop, grocery, pharmacy and Jazz Fest. If you are a kayaker, jogger, picnic having, wine drinking, Bayou lover, who is looking for a wonderful home and life, this house is for you. Offered at $495,000.00. Inquiries should call 504-914-5606.

ONLY 3 LEFT! Priced $112,500 $123,000. Onsight laundry & pool! Gated complex! 1BR/1BA units. Steps to Magazine St. shops & restaurants Call Britt Galloway, (504) 862-0100 or (504) 250-4122. Keller Williams Realty New Orleans. Each Office Independently Owned & Operated. Agent & Broker Licensed in LA, USA

MISSISSIPPI

5416 S. TONTI

Attractive & comfortable 3 BR, 2.5 BA home. Great floorplan. Liv rm, din rm kit, master BR & bath on main level. Teracotta tiles on roof. Bricked driveway & patio, slate porch. $333K. Claudette Blanchard, 504-810-7950. Thomas K. Winiger R.E. Inc, 504-586-8305.

8232 SYCAMORE

Unique large duplex near Palmer Park. 2 units, approx 4200 sq ft living. 6 BR, 4 BA, driveway, cent a/h, lot 60x120. Room for pool. $475K. Dorian Bennett Sotheby’s International Realty 504.944.3605. Dorian Bennett, 504.236.7688. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

New Orleans Area (Metairie) 10 Min to Downtown N.O.

CALL 899-RENT

1940 ala sq ft, 3 BR, 2 BA, corner lot, separate garage. Located in the heart of historic downtown Madisonville. NO FLOODING. Featured in Madisonville Bicentennial 2011 Home Tour Listing. $263,000. Contact owner, Joe Wink 504-309-0374 or 504-452-1303.

2 BR/1 BA Renov, appl, furnished, off st prkg, w&d. $950 mo + $950 dep. Pets negotiable SOLID NR PRISES at (504) 361-1447. Avail By Appt Only.

3324 DESOTO

Living room, large bedroom, tile bath, furnished kitchen. Private fenced backyard. No pets. $750/month + deposit. 504-494-0970

4012 ORLEANS AVE

1 BR, All utilities paid, appls, w/d on site, walk to Park or Bayou. On Canal streetcar line. $725/mo. 713-204-5342

DOWNTOWN 1327 FRENCHMAN ST.

Living room, 1 BR, kitchen, tile bath. No pets. $500/mo. Call 504-494-0970.

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY

CARROLLTON 1701 B S.CARROLLTON

2nd floor, 1/1 w/study & sunroom. Balcony, w&d, furn kit. CA&H, wd flrs. $1050 + deposit. (504) 865-9848 or 504-236-7171

3 BDRMS

Kit appl, fridge & range, w&gas dryer hhkps, Hdwd flrs. Hi celis. large windows. CA&H, Fenced yd. Freshly painted. $1200/mo + dep. Call 504-861-3400

GREAT RIVERBEND STUDIO Large Upper COMPLETELY FURNISHED, Water and cable paid. $850. Call 504-314-1455

821 ROYAL ST. STUDIO

Pool, Courtyard, W/D, cent a/c. $1600. Steve Richards, 504-2581800. Latter & Blum, Inc Realtors, ERA Powered, is independently owned & operated. 504-529-8140.

921 CHARTRES

Quiet, secluded Fr. Qtr condo. 1/1 furn kit, ac w&d on site. Secured gtd entry. Hi ceils, hdwd flrs, ceil fans. Furn. 1/2 blk from Jackson Sq. $1050/mo, wtr pd. Ref req. No smoking/pets. 1 yr lease min. 504-812-4242.

LG CAMELBACK BY RIVER

1113 CAMBRONNE. Up 2 br, 1 ba, dwn furn kit + 3 lg rms, w/d, wd flrs, ceil fans. No smk. $1450. Jack (504) 891-1623

455 Phillip Street, $ 225,000

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

817 Amelia Street, $239,900 SOLD

CORPORATE RENTALS FABULOUS LOCATION

Uptown. On Hip Oak Street. Walk to shops, restaurants, pubs, etc. 2 BR, 2 BA., pool. 2 secured pkg spaces. Gorgeous furniture, cable, flat screens, wi-fi incl. $3000/mo. Call Sylvia, 504-415-6501

FURNISHED 2715 ST. CHARLES AVE

Renovated, elegant, light, spacious. 2 br, 2.5 ba, den, gourmet kit, yd, pkng, formal LR/DR, wood & stone floors. Call for rates & info (415) 359-6445

Was gutted to the studs in 2004/05 and underwent a high quality renovation. 3 independent bedrooms, 2 full baths, master with whirlpool plus nice walk-in closet, off street parking in a great close to town location.

Rustic charm on this unique home fashioned from joining two separate cottages. Great flowing floor plan and with a second front door that’s great for working from home. Off street parking.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226

Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

Spacious, Uptown $374,900 Total Renovation 2009, 3/4 Bdrm, 2.5 Bth - Gorgeous Mstr. Bath Whpl & Walk In Shwr. 2386 Sq.ft. Gourmet Kitchen, Bonus Rm Upstairs. Energy Efficient Foam Insulation, Hdwd Flrs, Tile, Dual HVAC, Corner Lot. 228-297-2267 gloriabw@gmail.com

727 FIRST STREET

5 Year Old Home - Historic Style! Approx 3442 sq ft, 3 BR, 3 BA, bamboo flrs, hardy board ext, Gourmet kit, luxurious baths, bonus rm-3rd flr. $829K . Dorian Bennett Sotheby’s International Realty 504.944.3605. Dorian Bennett, 504.236.7688. Each Office is independently Owned & Operated.

825 Louisiana Ave Condos

BROADMOOR

3239 NASHVILLE AVENUE

311 AUDUBON

Spectacular raised center-hall Cottage. Approx 4208 sq ft, 4BR, 2.5 BA, firepl, wood flrs, custom cabinets, walk-in closets, lot 60 x 96.$790K. Dorian Bennett Sotheby’s International Realty 504.944.3605. Dorian Bennett, 504.236.7688. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act and the Louisiana Open Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. For more information, call the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-273-5718

301 ST. JOSEPH ST. Turn of the Century Cottage

59


REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS MID CITY Above Wit’s Inn, 1BDR/1BA, Kitch-Efficiency. $525/mo. A/C. Stve, Ref, Wi-fi, Wtr Pd, No Pets/Smkrs 486-1600.

Renovated, elegant, light, spacious. 2 br, 2.5 ba, den, gourmet kit, yd, pkng, formal LR/DR, wood & stone floors. Call for rates & info (415) 359-6445

511 & 513 S. CORTEZ ST

3452 CONSTANCE, #A

141 N. CARROLLTON

4765 Demontluzin

935 BURGUNDY

1 BR, fully furnished incl utilities. Courtyard. $1375. Steve Richards 504-258-1800. Latter & Blum, INC/Realtors, ERA Powered, is independently owned & operated. 504-529-8140.

FR QTR RESIDENTIAL EDGE

Elegnt 2 brm - 3 mrbl mntls - dbl lvrm studio apt - fireplc - lvly patio -both apts furn - sec,gate - No pets. (504) 861-3141

LARGE TOTALLY NEW!

6 rooms/2 baths, w&d hkkps, fully equip’d kit. CA&H, wd floors, tile in kit & baths, granite. Balcony, o/s pkng. $1950 + 1 mo deposit. (504) 9451381 or 504-908-1564

GENTILLY 4957 LAFAYE ST

2 BR, 1 BA, 620 sq ft. Furn kit, w/d hkups, a/c & heat. Water paid. Grass cut. $750/mo. Dep & lease. Zimmerman Property Service, 504-494-0970

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE

Call (504) 483-3100

3 BR, 2 BA 1750 Sq Ft, Historic Property, Hardwood Flrs, Yard Service Incl. Move In Now. Steve Richards 504-258-1800. Latter & Blum, INC/Realtors, ERA Powered, is independently owned & operated. 504-529-8140.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE 1BR, 1 BA TOWNHOUSE

Secure bldg. Newly remodeled. Granite, tile, lots of closets. Refrig, stove, w&d. Centrally located near Metairie, UNO & downtown., off st pkg, $775. + dep. 504-228-2282.

LAKEFRONT 500 Lake Marina Dr. #203

Beautiful Lakefront condo overlooking pool. All newly renov. 1 lg BR, 1 BA w/ jacuzzi tub. All new appl, w&d. Amenities incl elevator, lobby mailbox, pool, gym, private covered pkg, no pets. $1100/mo + dep. 504-710-9062, Sandra

ATTRACTIVE 2BR APTS

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beautiful courtyard setting w/pool, quiet neighborhood. Newly remodeled. $850 & $975 (larger apt). 504-495-6044 or 504-756-7347

Each 1/2 shotgun double, 2 BR, living room, furn kit, fans, window units, wood floors, w/d hkups, small yard. $800/mo. Owner/Agnt 504-450-7676.

NEWLY RENOVATED

3 BR, 2 BA, upstairs apt. 1 blk off Carrollton 1 blk off Canal. Granite counters, cent a/h Water & util paid. No pets. $1500. 504-638-1977 aft 3pm.

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1205 ST CHARLES

Studio apt, furn kichen,, bath, hardwood flrs, secure bldg, gated parking, laundry room, fitness cemter, pool, on-site Mgr. $875. 504-430-5719

1205 ST CHARLES/$1075

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. Avail NOW. 985-871-4324, 504-442-0573.

1508 CARONDELET ST- 2 APTS Studio, newly remodeled kit & ba, hdwd flrs. $750 mo. Huge 2 BR Apt. Bright, spacious,, high ceilings, hdwd flrs, $1095. Both have Cent a/h, laundry facility avail 24 hrs. Walk 1 blk to St. Charles St Car, easy access to I-10, CBD & FQ. No pets/No smokers. 1-888-2396566. mballier@yahoo.com

2 BLKS AUDUBON PARK

510 Henry Clay, 2BR, 1 BA, liv rm, din rm, kit with appl, hardwd flrs, high ceil, sunroom. Offst pkg, $1200. 504-874-4330

FOLSOM

2715 ST. CHARLES AVE

1 br, liv rm, kitch w/all appls, wd flrs, hi ceil. No pets. $750/mo + dep & lse. 895-6394 or cell 289-9977.

6319 S. PRIEUR

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

Countryside Home

Nice home on two well landscaped acres; 3 BR, 2 BA. library/office, deep covered front porch, rear deck. Near-by guest cottage 1 BR, 1 BA . $1,700/mo. Stables & pasture avail at extra cost. Hyatt Hood 985-9661131. Latter & Blum, ERA powered is independently owned and operated.

2 bedroom, living room, dining room, furn kitchen, tile bath. No pets. Off Calhoun. $800/mo, Call Gary 504-494-0970

8217 PLUM ST

Furnished Near univ, 1 br, furn kit, wood flrs, cen a/h, new bath, w/d on site. 1 blk to streetcar & Oak St. $1150/mo, Lease. 504-415-1030

To Advertise in

DUPLEX

EMPLOYMENT

2-3bdrms/1.5baths. Furn kit & laundry, CAC, small backyard. $1500 monthly + pet deposit required. Call (504) 895-8141

Call (504) 483-3100

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT 333 JULIA ST.

1BR/1BA, parking, utilities, cable & internet, all for $1850/mo. 1 person only. Up to 6 months lease or negot. Ana Maria, (504) 430-5853. Advantage Realty Group (504) 461-4011

CONDO IN THE BAKERY

Efficiency, w/d, ss appl, HVAC, pool, exercise rm, Jacuzzi, Easy access to Interstate. $1000/mo. 12 mo lse. Bonnie, 504-220-1022 Soniat Realty, 504-488-8988. www.soniatrealty.com

NEED A TENANT FOR YOUR

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

RENTAL PROPERTY?

60

your property

+

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

Find one F.A.S.T. with

Reach over 117,500 readers in Gambit & thousands more at bestofneworleans.com

Find A Super Tenant

is a special package designed especially for rental properties.

BUY 4 WEEKS, GET 4 WEEKS FREE! 5 line ad (bold headline + 4 lines of text) for up to You’ll • 8Aweeks for only $80. Additonal lines $8 each

get:

• The ad also runs on bestofneworleans.com.

To Find A Super Tenant call your account rep or Gambit Classifieds at 504.483.3100 today.


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS I’ve Helped These Buyers Find Their Homes, Now Let Me Help You Find Yours!

JOHN SCHAFF CRS

MORE THAN JUST A REALTOR!

(c) 504.343.6683 (O) 504.895.4663

ERA Powered, Independently Owned & Operated

1215 Napoleon 1750 St. Charles 2 Beresford 14 Fairway Oaks 4941 St. Charles 2721 St. Charles 1750 St. Charles 1224 St. Charles 2721 St. Charles 3222 Coliseum 5528 Hurst 1750 St. Charles 3915 St. Charles 1544 Camp

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 58

62

(4BDRM/3.5BA) ........................ $949,000 (3BDRM/2BA) ........................... $439,000 (5BDRM/3.5BA) ..................... $1,079,000 (4BDRM/2.5BA) ....................... $469,000 Grand Mansion .................... $1,900,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) .......... $1,559,000 Commercial ............................. $349,000 (Only 3 Left!) ........... starting at $149,000 TOO LATE! ................................ $169,000 TOO LATE! ............................. $2,495,000 TOO LATE!.............................. $1,300,000 TOO LATE! ................................ $429,000 TOO LATE! ................................ $315,000 TOO LATE! ................................ $159,000

Debby Valentino CounCe REALTOR®

dvcounce@latterblum.com • dvcounc@aol.com ReCently SolD: 1918 BURGUNDY

!

lD

So

!

lD

So

3228 CHESTNUT 5907 CATINA 4604 NEYREY 4321 ANNUNCIATION 5827 TCHOUPITOULAS

1016 WEBSTER

504-430-7663 Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission

1022 WEBSTER ST.

(504) 895-4663 Latter & Blum, ERA powered is independently owned and operated.


French Quarter

properties

EXQUISITE FRENCH QUARTER COTTAGE

Judy Fisher reALTOrs

PRIME FRENCH QUARTER

Approx 1800 sq ft, 2 BR, 2.5 BA, large master suite, central air & heat, guest cottage with mini kitchen & full bath and side entrance, lush private courtyard. Parking available. • A RARE FinD •

OnE OF tHE mOSt ExQuiSitE REStORAtiOnS in tHE QuARtER

518 Conti St. $725,000

®

504-524-JUDY (5839)

OFFEREd AT

Commercial and/or Residential Rare corner location zoning allows live entertainment. 9,000 sq ft (Approx 3,000 sq ft on each floor). Beautiful light filled loft style spaces. Possible owner financing. Offered at $1,650,000

$995,000

A charming cottage on Orleans in the heart of the Historic French Quarter.

www.ernestocaldeira.com

Ernesto Caldeira - 504.523.1553 | David Abner Smith 504.495.2387

504.944.3605 • 2340 Dauphine St., New Orleans, LA 70117 Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated

301 Decatur St.

www.JudyFisher.net

Casell Art Gallery

Dramatic 4 story masonry. Townhouse with great natural light from large windows and skylights. Located between Chartres & Decatur. Natural woodwork, some cypress floors. A short walk to House of Blues, Canal Place, well known restaurants like K-Paul’s, and the wondrous antique shops on Royal St. Structure was originally built in 1835 by premier architects Gurlie & Guillot for Baron de Pontalba.Offstreet parking and room for a pool if desired.

DORIAN BENNETT 504.236.7688 • dorian@dbsir.com 504.944.3605 • 2340 Dauphine St., New Orleans, LA 70117 www.dbsir.com • information@dbsir.com Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated

617 Dauphine

U

Unit 5

Call us for all your art and framing needs

Fabulous Location in the Heart of the Historic French Quarter!

1 BR, 1 BA top floor condo in very well maintained bldg. Stunning third food views of the best gardens the French Quarter has to offer. Beautiful pool & lush, landscaped courtyard. Washer/dryer on site. $239K.

Margarita Bergen Gallery Director

STEVE R RICHARDS FRENCH QUARTER SALES & LEASING SPECIALIST

504.258.1800

818 Royal Street New Orleans, LA 70116 casellartgallery@bellsouth.net www.casellgallery.com

SRichards@LatterBlum.com Latter-Blum.com/SteveRichards

French Quarter Office 712 Orleans @ Royal • NOLA - 504.529.8140

Cell: 504-495-9181 Phone: 504-524-0671 Fax: 504-524-0611

Latter & Blum, ERA powered is independently owned and operated.

1201 CANAL STREET

1418 Chartres D $225,000 2 bd/1 ba condo half block from Esplanade Ave and steps from Frenchmen St! Fully furn w/ lots of historical charm. Exposed beams, wide plank hardwd flooring, exposed brick, natural light, abundant closet space and a common courtyard!

2 Bedrooms - $257-$359K

Who

Who’s

in R e a l E S TAT E

Downtown New Orleans Living ... Re-Done Right Renovation of Historic Krauss Dept. Store brings NOLA living to a new level. 1 blk from the French Quarter and CBD. Valet parking. 24 hour concierge and security. Rooftop pool and spa, Lounge and fitness center.

JOHN PASZAMANT 504-329-6444 PROPERTY ONE, INC 504-681-3400

www.1201canal.com

An extraordinary collection of extraordinary real estate professionals appearing in the Best of New Orleans issue!

Issue Date: Aug 28 | Copy deadline: aug 20 Call (504) 483-3100 or email classadv@gambitweekly.com

929 Dumaine #14 $106,500

Cozy Pied-a-terre efficiency in the French Quarter with some character! Ceramic flooring in the kitchen and bath. Granite counter tops. Ample closet space. The two skylights are cool! Washer and dryer on site. Common courtyard.

1418 Chartres B • $259,000 2 bd/1 ba condo w/ 2nd Floor STrEET bAlCony. Gleaming hardwood flooring, exposed brick walls & non working marble fireplace. Galley style kitchen overlooks the lush courtyard. Check it out.

Jennifer Shelnutt

504-388-9383 • Jennifer@fqr.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > july 31 > 2012

I invite all my Real Estate clients to come and visit me.

504.949.5400

www.fqr.com

63


Love Sessions

A FESTIVAL OF GIVING

12 Nights of Music 12 Nights of Giving 2 Music Venues AUG 18 - AUG 29

Love Moments

DECISION 2012 at the playhouse

TRUMPET BATTLE

featuring

IRVIN MAYFIELD

vs.

KERMIT RUFFINS

August 18-24 7:30PM DOORS

AT THE I CLUB

DEE DEE featuring BRIDGEWATER and

IRVIN MAYFIELD August 25-29 7:30PM DOORS

At The JW Marriott New Orleans Ticket revenue to benefit the following institutions: New Orleans Public Library, Saturday 8/18; UNITY of Greater New Orleans, Sunday 8/19; The New Orleans Haitian Relief Task Force, Monday 8/20; Son of a Saint Sports Foundation, Tuesday 8/21; Dag’s House, Wednesday 8/22, The New Orleans Chapter of the Links, Inc., Thursday 8/23; The New Orleans Musicians’ Clinic, Friday 8/24

Ticket revenue to benefit the following institutions: Teaching Responsible Earth Education (T.R.E.E.), Saturday 8/25; NO/AIDS Task Force, Sunday 8/26; Music Education Programs including: The New Orleans Jazz Institute, The Roots of Music, and St. Augustine High School Marching 100, Monday 8/27; DashThirtyDash, The Times-Picayune Employee Assistance Fund, Tuesday 8/28; The New Orleans Jazz Orchestra, Wednesday 8/29

TICKETS ON SALE AUGUST 1ST AT 10AM jazzplayhouse.frontgatetickets.com or call 888-512-SHOW

TICKETS ON SALE AUGUST 1ST AT 10AM iclub.frontgatetickets.com or call 888-512-SHOW

Beneficiaries:

Event Sponsors:

For more info, call 504-553-2299 or visit www.sonesta.com Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse at the Royal Sonesta Hotel, 300 Bourbon Street

For more info, call 504-527-6712 or visit www.IClubneworleans.com Irvin Mayfield’s I Club at the JW Marriott Hotel, 614 Canal Street


Gambit: July 30, 2012