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CARDIFF'S STUDENT WEEKLY

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ISSUE 907 NOVEMBER 02 2009

freeword - EST. 1972

sport chats to spin king Shane Warne page 28

Bomb scare shakes Union

Carnage pub crawl slammed

PHOTOS: GARETH LUDKIN

Emma McFarnon News Editor

Bomb hoax costs Union £10,000 after prank call brings building to a standstill Staff were to

ld to wait in So

Gareth Ludkin News Editor The Students’ Union was locked down last Thursday morning after a bomb scare sparked an evacuation and search of the building. At 10.15 am on Thursday October 29, a member of the general public rang the Students’ Union reception claiming that there was a bomb situated in or around the Union. After repeating this statement the individual then hung up. Union staff were quick to follow procedure, with all staff and students in the building being asked to congregate in Solus, before being calmly escorted from the building. The situation for those inside Solus

was initially unclear, before Jason Dunlop, General Manager of the Students’ Union, made an announcement, in which he said: “We’ve got a live security incident running at the moment. We’ve had a phone call making threats against the Union, which obviously we have to take very seriously.” The Union was subsequently closed and searched by staff, while the police were called to investigate the situation and ensure the security of all staff and students. A search of the building was carried out, but nothing except a bag of potatoes, left over from the Fruit and Veg Co-Op, and a box of flyers was found to be at all suspicious. This was the first bomb threat that the Union has ever faced. A suspicious package was left a couple of years ago,

but this incident was the first to cause an evacuation of the building. BT was contacted to trace the call to help aid police in their search for the culprit. Ed Carey, Students’ Union president, said: “We are confident that the police will catch the individual.” A spokesperson for the Union released a statement shortly after the incident, stating: “Cardiff University Students’ Union has agreed protocols and procedures in place and work with the police to manage such incidences. In keeping with these procedures, our staff undertook a thorough search inside the building and the surrounding area within our perimeter. No device was found.” The spokesperson continued by saying, “we now believe this message

lus

to be a hoax.” The Union was able to re-open at around 1.30pm, when it was established that there was no risk to staff or student safety. The two and half hour distruption cost Cardiff University Students’ Union £10,000, a pricey sum for a prank phone call. Ed commended the Union for the way that they dealt with the situation, and also how calmly the students and staff had reacted. The extraordinary events caused a stir around campus, leaving many students wondering what was going on and why the Union was closed. By the afternoon, business was able to continue as usual.

Carnage, the infamous pub crawl, has been attacked by civil leaders and alcohol misuse experts. The event, renowned for its souvenir t-shirts and extensive lists of venues, has been criticised for promoting binge drinking and giving a bad name to the cities it takes place in. Critics have accused the Carnage events of being a “cynical commercialisation” of the youth binge-drinking problem. Swansea council leader, Chris Holley, said: “I’m not happy with an organised glorified pub crawl, but I’m happy for visitors to come to the city any time they like and enjoy the night life. But these organised things send out the wrong impression.” Carnage UK has come under intense scrutiny from police, alcohol misuse experts and even student unions since it was established in 2003. The event sparked outrage recently, after a participating student was photographed urinating on a World War One memorial in Sheffield. Last year the event drew heavy criticism from student bodies including Edinburgh University Students’ Association (EUSA) and the Coalition Against Raising the Drinking Age in Scotland (CARDAS). CARDAS leader and former EUSA Vice-President, Tom French, branded Carnage UK: “[an] irresponsible organisation whose sole purpose appears to be actively promoting binge drinking.” Last year’s EUSA Vice-President, George Thomas, told Edinburgh University student newspaper, The Student: “We’ve banned organisation like Carnage and Student Night Out from using our Students’ Union buildings to promote their tasteless events, but they keep on coming back and finding new ways to sell their booze fests to students – with worrying results.” Alcohol has largely become synonymous with university, and is now said to be as ingrained in university culture as going to lectures. continued on page 3


gair h dd NEWS@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

grr Bi-election results 2009 gair rhydd introduces your newly elected officers

EDITOR DEPUTY EDITOR Simon Lucey CO-ORDINATOR Elaine Morgan SUB EDITOR Sarah Powell NEWS Ceri Isfryn Gareth Ludkin Emma McFarnon Jamie Thunder FEATURES Daniella Graham Robin Morgan OPINION Oli Franklin Paul Stollery COLUMNISTS Tim Hart Oli Franklin POLITICS Damian Fantato LISTINGS Steve Beynon Ed Bovingdon TAF-OD Nia Gwawr Williams Branwen Mathias Cadi Mai SCIENCE & ENVIRONMENT Amy Hall Priya Raj JOBS & MONEY Katie Greenway SPORT Joe Davies Adam Horne Lucy Morgan Robbie Wells CONTRIBUTORS Lizzie Blockley Anne Bochow Arzu Bokhari Zoe Bridger Alex Bywater Michael Cove Lauren Cowle Cari Davies James Davies Jamie Davies Alex Evans Rachel Henson Rhys Howell Ayushman Jamwal Alex Gill Richard Greenan Katie Greenway ! " # $ % ! & ' ths Jordis Lau Camille Lavoix Simon Lucey Siân Powell Ben Price Lucinda Robinson Oliver Smith Michelle Taylor Gethin Thomas Lucy Trevallion Chris Williams Alex Winter Ellen Sutherland-Wootton

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Divya Lakanpal Women's Officer "It's a great honour to be elected as this year's Women's Officer. My key ain is to represent Cardiff University both nationally and internationally in my work within the realm of female employment."

Edmund Schlussel

Rachelle Simons LGBT Officer

Craig Sutherland Postgraduate Officer

"I'm particularly eager to build awareness about the way that uni staff are treated; tuition fees are on the rise, yet there seems to be more and more job cuts."

"I pledge to attend activist training, conferences and keep abreast of news affecting LGBT people. I will blog weekly so I’m accountable and accessible. I also aim to try and end bi and trans invisibility."

"I’d aim to expand the leading ventures which the housing agency embarks on, to ensure that fewer postgraduates are forced into sub-par housing."

Mature Students Officer

Successful block of 14 candidates:

Sally Wood Student Council Chair "We've got lots planned, such as our FM broadcasts, live music nights, outside broadcasts as well as lots of giveaways and prizes throughout the term."

"As council chair I am keen to improve the accessibility and visibility of the Student Council. I feel it's important to keep the Union as transparent as possible."

Amelia Barker Chaitanya Badr Iqbal Chaudhary Tom Chilma Sam Coates Liam Coleman Dan Drummond Daniella Graham Lucy Hiscox George Howard Sohiab Khan Emily King Rajat Praddeep Becky Vaughan

Plans proposed to "kick bad landlords out of Cathays" Alex Evans Reporter Cardiff Council has announced a new public consultation period in order to establish the level of support for an Additional Licensing Scheme that would affect Cathays landlords. The proposed new regulations, backed by Liberal Democrat councillor for Cathays Ward, Simon Pickard, would require individuals wishing to let HMOs – Houses of Multiple Occupation – to obtain a license, granted only if the properties intended for letting meet certain basic safety requirements that render it ‘suitable for occupation’. In addition, the new regulations would require the prospective licenseholder to be a ‘fit and proper person’, barring those with a ‘serious criminal record or bad housing record’ from holding a license – a stipulation Pickard hopes will help rid the area of irresponsible landlords. Commenting on the proposed implementation of the scheme, he stated, ‘It’s time we kicked the bad landlords out of Cathays.’

The new proposal, which would attempt to raise standards for privately owned, shared properties available to rent in the Cathays area, bears particular relevance to Cardiff students, many of whom currently live in residences defined as HMOs by the Additional Licensing Scheme. A study published in 2005 by Cardiff Council found many such residences to be sub-par, with over 58% lacking any provision for escape in the event of fire, and 13.5% lacking Automatic Fire Detection systems and smoke alarms. Almost 9% of HMO properties assessed in the Cathays and Plasnewydd areas were deemed ‘unfit for human habitation’. Cardiff Council cited several issues common to areas of ‘high student density’ as motivating factors behind the proposed introduction of the plans to Cathays, pointing to disproportionately high rates of burglaries and complaints about the accumulation of rubbish occurring in the neighbourhood. In subjecting prospective landlords of privately let student housing to greater scrutiny, it is hoped that conditions of student accommodation in the

area will improve, proving benefical to both students and to other residents of the area. The consultation period will run for two months, from October 15th to December 15th, allowing both tenants and landlords, as well as the general public, to express their views on the scheme. Liberal Democrat MP for Cardiff Central, Jenny Willott and Cardiff Students’ Union President, Ed Carey, are among the proposals proponents. Pickard has urged students, who constitute as much as 75% of the population of some Cathays streets, to take part in the consultation. “Far too many student houses in Cathays are left neglected by poor landlords, with tenants suffering as a result. A license would force landlords to improve the security, safety and energy efficiency of properties.” Said Mr Pickard. “The online questionnaire only takes a few minutes to complete, and will make a big difference” he added. The questionnaire on the scheme can be accessed at www.cardiffdigs. co.uk.

Cancer centre opens in Cardiff Rachel Henson Reporter A new Cancer Research UK Centre has been launched in Cardiff. The centre will focus on understanding the biology of leukaemia, urological cancers, breast cancer and bowel cancer to improve prevention, treatment and early detection of cancers. The partnership between Cardiff University, Cancer Research UK, Velindre NHS Trust and Cardiff and Vale University Health Board hopes to better understand the variations in cancers found in patients and develop suitable treatments for individual cases. The centre will also work with the University to expand existing PhD programmes for training clinical and non-clinical postgraduates. Local research in cancer biology is already supported by Cancer Research UK, the leading funder of cancer research in the UK, and the establishment of this centre will bring an extra £2 million to the work in Cardiff over the next three years. The centres of excellence are part of a prioritised initiative by Cancer Research UK to provide a better understanding of the diseases. Also announced this week was that researchers in Cardiff University’s Department of Primary Health Care and Public Health are to be involved in a new five-year programme to improve cancer diagnosis. The DISCOVERY programme, which will begin in January 2010, stems from a £1.94 million grant from the National Institute for Health Research. The grant will fund six projects, the findings of which have the potential to directly affect clinical practice and health policy. The expertise of researchers at Cardiff University will be drawn on as one of four universities working on the project, led by Bristol University.

NEWS 1 EDITORIAL & OPINION 8 COLUMNIST 11 FEATURES 12 POLITICS 16 LETTERS 19 SCIENCE & ENVIRONMENT 21 JOBS & MONEY 22 LISTINGS 24 FIVE MINUTE FUN 27 SPORT 29


E @GAI H DD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

Carnage under scrutiny

PARTYING: Students dress for the occasion

DISASTER: Student urinates on WW1 memorial

! otorious pub crawl is criticised by civil leaders and alcohol misuse experts continued from front page ! " ! # shows that 52% of male students and 43% of female students drink more than the Government’s recommended guidelines. Cheap alcohol deals and club nights that cater to students mean they can go out anytime and drink cheaply. However, the National Union of Students (NUS) estimates that the average student spends £675 a year on socialising. Chris Sorek, Chief Executive of Drinkaware, said: “Although drinking to get drunk is harmful to your health, at least a third of young adults admit to doing it. Pub crawls often encourage drinking to excess in a limited space of time which can also increase the risk to personal safety of those taking part. Regardless of age, when we get drunk our judgement becomes impaired and our ability to make decisions to keep ourselves safe is lessened.” Carnage UK, owned by Varsity Leisure Group Limited, told gair rhydd: “Carnage UK events are carefully planned, organized and managed… VLG communicates from an early stage with the local Police Licensing department to ensure that the events run smoothly. VLG wants the students to be safe and for the local economy to have the benefit of a boost to its late night trade, at a time of recession, without any trouble. “Stewards are employed to help students move safely from venue to venue… this is in addition to the increased numbers of security industry approved (SIA) door supervisors working at the venues. VLG adopts a proactive approach. A private company registered with the British Ambulance Association is always on hand

to provide medical care for routine occurrences such as asthma attacks, which are a possibility on any occasion. “VLG does not promote binge drinking. VLG insists that participating venues operate a responsible drinks tariff. There are a number of optional tasks printed on the t-shirts purchased by participants. None of the tasks necessitate, nor encourage, the consumption of any alcohol whatsoever. "When each group is scheduled to depart from a venue, stewards are instructed not to ask participants to finish their drinks but simply to make them aware of how long the group has until its scheduled departure time.” They added: “Carnage UK events offer students a choice of venues featuring various genres of music and different fancy dress themes. VLG receives very positive feedback from students, who say its events give them a great opportunity to meet people from different ethnic and social backgrounds and to enjoy themselves in a safe and supervised environment. "Carnage UK events are extremely popular… VLG considers that an alternative to events run by University Students' Unions promotes healthy competition, which benefits students.” The company also commented on the student caught urinating on the World War One memorial in Sheffield. In a statement issued to a local newspaper, they said: “VLG was appalled to see that one individual treated a war memorial in a highly disrespectful manner. VLG has the greatest respect and admiration for all those who lost their lives in the defence of this country. The perpetrator of this despi-

cable act will not be welcome at future events held by Carnage UK.” They also said: “VLG is taking a proactive approach to the supervision of the upcoming event and is providing extra SIA-approved personnel to watch over the war memorial which was the object of one individual’s vile act of disrespect at the earlier event. This will be provided and paid for by VLG. "In addition, a VLG Operations Manager will be contacting the Royal British Legion to present a cheque. In addition, VLG staff will be personally organising a charity collection at the Sheffield event on Sunday October 25 and all funds raised will be donated to the Royal British Legion.” Chief Executive of Drinkaware reminded students: “Regularly drinking to excess can have both short and long

DRUNK: Carnage-goers get messy

term harmful effects on our health, increasing the chances of developing liver damage, some cancers and depression. Adults of all ages should try to stick within the daily unit guidelines. "If young adults are drinking they should have a meal beforehand, space their alcoholic drinks with water or soft drinks, look after their mates and plan their journey home,” When asked about the recent criticisms of Carnage UK, final-year law student, Alastair Miller, said: “In reality this event isn’t even as bad as some of the other options available at university. Pub golf is much worse, and think of all the initiations that have just happened, where you have to down drinks. At Carnage you’re not forced to neck your drink within a certain time.

"Also, most people at university pre-drink, but you wouldn’t at Carnage, so you’re probably just as drunk as you would be if you went out to the Union or a club. I think Carnage is a great event for freshers, it allows them to get to know the pubs around Cathays and get to know one another. At the end of the day, we’re all adults, it’s our responsibility. Nobody is forcing you to attend these pub crawls. Alcohol is just a buzz word, people overuse it.” Third-year medical student, John Mason, said: “I don’t really have a problem with the idea of a pub crawl generally, but I don’t think it’s fair that Carnage charges you to go in places that would be open anyway, It probably looks worse than it actually is, with hoards of drunk people in one place.”


04 NEWS

gairrhydd | NEWS@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

Can Cardiff clinch the Oxymoronic? Commonwealth? Michelle Taylor Reporter The city of Cardiff is drawing up a bid to host the 2022 Commonwealth Games. The Welsh capital would be the centre of the games but facilities in Swansea and Newport would also be utilised. The plans were revealed on the BBC Sport Wales show and talks have begun with Cardiff Council, likely to be followed by an approach to the Welsh Assembly Government for support. Executive member of Cardiff Coun-

cil, Nigel Howells, said: “It's about time now that we seriously consider hosting the Commonwealth Games ... probably the Commonwealth Games of 2022.” Cardiff also hosted the Commonwealth Games in 1958, but could reportedly face competition from Belfast and Birmingham for the 2022 bid. With Manchester having hosted the 2002 games and Glasgow set to play host to the 2014 games, Cardiff stands as good a chance as any city to host the 2022 games. In fact, the city has an impressive history of attracting and hosting major sporting events.

CARDIFF: Home of the 2022 games?

In the last decade alone Cardiff has hosted the FA Cup final, a Rugby World Cup final, Grand Prix speedway, Ashes Test cricket, World Championship boxing and rallying. The bid will mostly centre on existing facilities in the area such as the Millennium Stadium, Cardiff Athletic Stadium, Cardiff International Pool, Newport Velodrome and Swansea's Liberty Stadium. Nigel Howells continued: “The benefits to the region would be huge.” With Manchester gaining an approximated 300,000 more tourists per year, £600m of investment and an estimated 20,000 extra jobs as a direct result of hosting the 2002 games, the significance and implications of making this bid are incredible. The funding for the bid would be similar to the approach Glasgow is taking. Around 20% would be raised by the city council, and 80% by the government. Executive member for the Commonwealth Games delivery for Glasgow, councillor Archie Graham, said: “I would say to Cardiff, go for it. I think it would be fabulous if Cardiff were to get the 2022 Games.”

OXFORD: Missing the point?

Chris Williams Reporter Oxford University’s satirical magazine, Oxymoron, has been banned from the University’s Freshers’ Fayre, after there were fears that students might “not understand the humour.” Event organiser Jake Leeper said: “The concern was that students would simply read the headlines and move on without understanding the meaning." After consulting with the Oxford University Student Union’s VicePresident, Eorann Lean, the items were removed. During the Freshers’ Fayre, the ten-year-old paper had 200 magazines hidden and leaflets taken away.

An editor for the magazine, Jack Robinson, said: “We left our supply of leaflets on the table the day before the fayre and came back in the morning to find a post-it note saying they’d had to take them away.” One student, George Waldersee, who was at the fayre, claimed: “Freshers who have landed places at one of the best universities in the world can tell the difference between satire and real life.” The satirical magazine has previously had headlines such as “Rail replacement buses temporarily replaced by trains”, and “Fall in JSoc membership blamed on the Jews." Although it has been removed from the Freshers’ Fayre, Oxford University has said that the magazine will now be allowed to be distributed around the campuses.

BROADEN YOUR MIND. AND YOUR HORIZONS. AGORWCH EICH MEDDWL. A’CH GORWELION.

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IT’S THE DESTINATION

w w w. s m u . a c . u k


NEWS 05

gair ydd | NEWS@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

Research needs Students skip for charity concentration Lucinda Robinson Reporter

Rachel Henson Reporter A bold suggestion to channel research funding into Britain’s top 30 universities has been made by new head of the Russell Group of Universities, Professor Michael Arthur. In his speech to nearly 300 university and research leaders last week, Prof Arthur claimed that in recent years the £1.5 billion fund has been ‘spread too thinly’, and 90 per cent of it should be distributed to the most successful institutions. He believes this would ‘stop mediocrity’, avoid ‘dilution’, and prevent the danger of jeopardising more ‘critical projects’ that are highly beneficial to both the UK and its international relations. David Maguire, pro vice-chan-

cellor for corporate development at Birmingham University, opposes this idea and argues that "the notion of concentration is against basic democracy." However, Prof. Arthur contests that if we didn’t focus on the best research universities, it is possible that the present international reputation of the UK as a world-class institution for cutting-edge research would be damaged. The Russell Group of Universities is an association of 20 major research intensive universities including Oxford, Cambridge, Nottingham, and Cardiff, holding international standing, profile and performance. Suggestions to favour successful and prestigious research universities such as these are hoped to enhance this first class reputation and research.

Universities to be subject to new league table Emma McFarnon News Editor A government-sponsored body has proposed that college and university courses should be subject to new league tables based on how much students enjoy their classes and how much they will earn when they graduate. The proposals include a rating system for every course, based on the pass rate, student satisfaction (from surveys), employment rate, wage gain for students and inspection results. The system would put consumer pressure on courses, with colleges and universities being forced to make their courses more relevant to local employers to be rated highly. It would also lead to the merger of nearly thirty quangos (quasi non-governmental organisations), including the Qualification and Curriculum Development Agency and Lifelong Learning UK. The aim is to introduce a market that would compel poorly rated courses to improve or close. The move would also allow the government to get rid of up to thirty quangos currently involved in planning education provision in England, saving hundreds of millions of pounds. The review that sparked the idea was carried out by the governmentfunded UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKces). This pow-

erful body will strongly influence a government overhaul of the skills system, expected within the next month, to improve training provision as the country attempts to reskill people after the recession. However, the plans are deeply controversial in that they could lead to similar problems seen in the school system, with schools under pressure to “teach to the test” and select candidates who will pass the exams. Sally Hunt, general secretary for the University and Colleges Union, said: “The league table culture has been a disaster in schools and hospitals. If applied to colleges it will lead to a narrowing of the curriculum and an impediment to innovation.” Chris Humphries, chief executive of UKces, said: “Employers have a real problem getting people with the right skills and our system is pretty unresponsive and massively complex. You could slim the process right down, save money and improve courses.” He also suggested a new nationally set fee for all training courses, similar to the capped university fee, with employers and students sharing the costs. Julian Gravatt, director of funding at the Association of Colleges, said: “You have to trust the consumer and use that rather than the central direction we’ve currently got. We see sense in bringing universities into the system too.”

Last week a group of students skipped outside the Union to raise money for a charity that works with disabled children in orphanages in Belarus. On Wednesday October 28, ten students united to skip for Students for Kids International Projects (SKIP). The event was a huge success and attracted the attention of many budding volunteers. The Cardiff branch of SKIP, formerly known as BACCUP, sends Cardiff students to volunteer in orphanages in Belarus every summer The children in the orphanages have a range of both mental and physical disabilities. While in the orphanage, SKIP Cardiff volunteers offer care, play, education and stimulation for

children, many of whom are victims of an impoverished society. Students provide love and attention to the children who do not regularly receive it in a culture that has a generally negative attitude towards disabilities. SKIP Cardiff will be holding an information evening for any students

who want to get involved in the project on Monday November 02 at 7pm, in the main foyer of Main building, Park Place. Pizza and beer will be provided. To find out about SKIP Cardiff’, please visit www.skipkids.org.uk or email skipcardiff@googlemail.com.

FUND-RAISERS: Students skip for SKIP


08 OPINION

gairrhydd | OPINION@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

freewords EDITORIAL

Est. 1972

Summer Balls, Bomb Scares and Grudge Matches

Well where do I start? So much has gone on this past week: talks of cancelling the Summer Ball at Cooper’s Field, bomb scares at the Union, the University Rugby team beating the Medics Rugby team… It’s all going on. Let’s start with our front page. Thursday morning and the Union receive a call saying that there is a bomb in or around the Union and everyone has to be evacuated. It was all quite exciting at the time – it’s the first bomb threat the Union have ever had (via phone – a couple of years ago they had a suspicious package delivered), but it could have potentially been very serious. Thankfully, two and a half hours later, the building was declared as bomb-free. And it just had to happen on deadline day didn’t it?! But hats off to the Union staff who dealt with the situation extremely efficiently. There have also been questions over the future of the Summer Ball this week, and to whether the Union can (financially) continue to run the event year on year. Not many people know this, but the Summer Ball, despite being a hugely successful event, doesn’t actually make tons of profit. In fact, it is more likely to make a loss, or break even if it’s lucky. The debate was taken to Student Council this week, where no real consensus was reached: to continue or not to continue running the event in Cooper’s Field. Personally, I don’t think the Summer Ball would be the Summer Ball if it was just another end of term Drink the Bar Dry in the Union. The decision has been made to hold the Summer Ball in Cooper’s Field for another year, but with a potential loss of £50k looming, it could be the last ‘proper’ Summer Ball ever. Sad times. On a happier note, the gair rhydd news podcast got up and running this week! Listen to us debate the latest student news stories and front cover stories from GR… and listen to Ceri score nil points. Just give us some time to work out how to get it onto the website before you can enjoy it. Finally I would like to congratulate all those who were successful in the bi-elections last week – see page two for a full run down. P.S. See Five Minute Fun on page 27 for your chance to win £50 worth of YO! Sushi vouchers.

Corrections and Clarifications

The article on page three last week stated that Lampeter University has closed. Lampeter is in fact still open; it has just agreed to merge with another institution as of next year.

Apologies for the apparent error in the article on page five last week about Glamorgan University Professor Mark Brake, who, it has emerged, did not fake a PhD in order to gain extra funding.

Sending a message When Nazi soldiers were put on trial, their excuse was that they were only following orders. Unless we want our soldiers to be void of any moral compass, they need to be allowed to make their own decisions Lucy Trevallion Opinion Writer On Saturday October 24, Lance Corporal Joe Glenton was the first serving soldier in the British Army to join an anti-war march. 'I am marching to send a message to Gordon Brown. He cannot sit on his hands and wait while more and more of my comrades are killed.' The number of British heroes killed on Afghan soil rose to 222 this week. Nevertheless Gordon Brown says the war is a 'success story'. Well, Mr Brown, try telling that to the million orphans and widows you've helped to create. Try telling that to the 2 million internal refugees you've helped to create. The streets are covered in sewage, the water is brown, children are often kidnapped and the women cannot move freely. The health and education services are deteriorating, while drug abuse and prostitution are rising. So lets all applaud Mr Brown for helping to create this 'success story' in our name. If this is success what does failure look like? Apparently it looks like Joe Glenton! A man brave enough to stand up against the government and the army despite the consequences. He's now facing jail. However, perhaps surprisingly, Glenton is acting in line with the Geneva Convention. This means soldiers cannot use the fact that they were 'just obeying orders' as an ex-

cuse. This means that if they are ordered to act immorally and are discovered, they could be singularly blamed and punished. Therefore the Geneva convention encourages soldiers independent moral thought when the government abuses military trust. Some say the army does not work if we encourage opinions, but surely the world

What have we actually achieved? Apart from the 222 British deaths does not work if we discourage them. "They are not doing any good while they are over there" said Peter Brierley who was also at the march. His son, Lance Corporal Shaun Brierley, died in Iraq and earlier this month Peter refused to shake Tony Blair's hand, saying it had 'my son's blood on it'. Lance Corporal Brierley said British troops needed to be withdrawn from Afghanistan as soon as possible - and he's not alone in this view. Paul McGurk who left the Army last month because he could no longer support the war joined the march along with Lance Corporal Glenton. Yet the most inspiring marcher has to be Hetty Bowyer. She's 104 and told the crowd: "I march because I can see no reason for further killing. I have walked on every march against

us going to war. At my age there is not very much I can do but while my legs can carry me I am going to march." The vice-chairman of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament agrees. "They need to leave the country to sort itself out. While the British troops are there they are actually bringing in insurgents who are coming in to fight. NATO forces have been in Afghanistan for eight years and the result appears to be high levels of corruption and terrible losses of life on all sides, civilian and military." The financial cost of Britain's military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq this year alone has soared to more than £4.5 billion. What have we actually achieved? Apart from the 222 British deaths, of course. If the government insists on us staying in the war surely we can use the money more productively, for example education. General Sir David Richards, chief of the general staff, predicts the war will last 40 years.

That's a possible £180 billion of UK taxpayers money spent on a war with no coherent reason behind it! At the protest there was a huge 'incompetent basterds' poster with Browns face superimposed onto it. A lot less pretty than the original, but it illustrates my point perfectly. If Brown actually grows some balls and does his job, rather than following America like a lost child, then soldiers would not leave his army. In 2007 Gordon Brown promised to 'listen and learn.' The march took place on the day a new poll showed two-thirds of Britain want all our troops withdrawn from Afghanistan,. Did Mr Brown listen or learn? Judging from the fact all three major parties are committed to continuing the war in Afghanistan in the coming election, thats a big fat no. Maybe, Mr Brown ,if you pulled the cotton wool out your ears, opened your eyes and listened to your public someone might actually elect you Prime Minister.


OPINION 09

gairrhydd | OPINION@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

I'll show you endangered species...

This week, The Times' AA Gill revealed he has hunted baboons in Africa for sport. What a pathetic attempt at trying to be masculine Lizzie Blockley Opinion Writer The Times’ television and restaurant critic AA Gill is not exactly known for his political correctness. For his sarcasm and dry wit he is widely recognised, and has written numerous pieces that have caused offence to many. For instance he referred to the Welsh as ‘stunted, bigoted, dark, ugly, pugnacious little trolls’. Welsh people need not take too much offence though, as he has nothing very positive to say about any nationality. The English are ‘louty, coarse, unsubtle’ and the Albanians ‘short and ferretfaced’. The man’s dislike of everyone speaks for itself. Funnily enough I

can’t find any offensive sound bites directed at the Scottish, given that Gill hails from Edinburgh. I have to admit to finding Gill’s journalism, always liberally peppered with cruel digs and xenophobic leanings, pretty funny. In a world where political correctness often appears to have gone quite mad, his outspoken rants are somewhat refreshing, and the man does not target one particular nation or race; he hates everyone. I dislike a lot of people too; I understand. However, even for my taste he has gone too far this time, in announcing with pride in his Sunday restaurant review that he and other macho mates went out shooting baboons in Tanzania. I say that this was announced with pride because Gill was writing a res-

A murdered baboon, similar to the one shot by Gill

taurant review; and not a restaurant where they serve baboon. I’m not aware of any such restaurant in fact, because as Gill himself states ‘Baboon isn’t good to eat, unless you’re a leopard’. So the point of killing a member

This is simply a case of immature men who are desperate to reclaim their youth of an endangered species would be? Oh yes, of course, so you can feel like a ‘man’. A ‘recreational primate killer’, in fact; an out-dated stereotype of a man with no place in modern society. The inclusion of this depressing little anecdote in the review of The Luxe restaurant is completely irrelevant and purely for Gill’s own amusement. It can’t be for the reader’s, because no one is laughing. Before I am typecast as a hysterical environmentalist, I’d like to make it clear that I’m not. I neither know nor care what my carbon footprint is and to be honest, during the fox hunting debate I could see both sides of the argument (I am aware that I am now essentially digging my own grave). To clarify, I do not condone animal cruelty in any way, but I understand the need to keep the number of foxes

down for farming, although preferably in a more humane way than chasing them for miles until they die of exhaustion or fear. At least though, there is some justification for specific types of hunting. Pardon me for asking to be informed of the rationale of killing an already endangered species? Gill does in fact compare killing baboons with foxes, stating that the argument in favour of controlling numbers is just ‘a veil for naughty fun’. Perhaps, except that in the case of baboons this isn’t even a valid argument for naughty fun. They are an endangered species; their numbers don’t need culling. Conservation projects suggest that within ten years ‘there will not be a viable baboon population’ and that extinction will then become very likely. It seems that the baboon population will be running the risk of extinction a darn sight more quickly if Mr Gill has decided to make Tanzania his regular holiday destination. This is simply a case of immature men who are desperate to reclaim their youth, assert their masculinity and have too much money. If Gill was your average middle-aged man this display of machismo would have been

downing ten pints or buying a silly car he couldn’t afford. Instead another idiot gave him an overly large phallic symbol and off they went to victimise beings more vulnerable than themselves. Gill claims it is the ‘Robert Redford Out of Africa hat’ that ‘maketh the man’. Don’t lie; it was the big gun that really got you so excited. This was essentially a childish act of unnecessary destruction in which AA Gill should take no pride whatsoever. It was entirely unrelated to his restaurant review and if he truly felt the remorse he describes upon having killed the baboon, he surely would not have included it in a national paper. If this column seems gratuitously o ff e n s i v e , sarcastic and condemnatory, it is because I learnt from the best. Thank you Mr Gill, but in this instance you behaved like an arrogant, selfish, juvenile git. The Times' AA Gill

On the third day, someone made up God 54% of people want Creationism taught in schools. This isn't science, it's fiction. Rhys Howell Opinion Writer A survey taken by polling company Ipsos Mori revealed on Monday that 54% of British adults think that Intelligent Design and creationism should be taught alongside evolution as science in school. Firstly there is no such thing as “Intelligent Design”. It is just creationism, except that you don't say it was God. In 1987 a US court case Edwards v Aguilard ruled that creationism was unconstitutional to teach as science because it religion. So the creationists came up with the idea of Intelligent Design, and tried to shoehorn that into public school systems as well. In another court case Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District in 2005, ruled that Intelligent Design was unconstitutional and just a “re-branding of creationism” Creationism is the literal idea that God created life the universe and everything in it by “magic”, out of thin air. So just what is the evidence for

creationism? There isn't any what so ever. The evidence for evolution, however, is overwhelming. It includes the fossil record, genetics, embryology, taxonomy, and the geographical distribution of living (and dead) organisms. So much so that it is considered a scientific fact. The biologist Theodosius Dobzhansky said "Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution"

Intelligent design? We have a recreation centre next to a waste disposal facility Creationism is the rejection of the scientific method as a whole. Its methods reject, theories, hypotheses, techniques, peer review and whole fields of science unless of course when they think science is on their side (which it never is). It is based on religious dogma and scripture and doesn't even

allow the idea that it might be wrong. If we were made by a creator or designer don't you think they would have done a better job? Our teeth rot away, we don't have any fur to keep us warm, our sense of smell is rubbish, our bones are frail, we die from disease, our brains are too small, our adrenaline glands too big. We are born underdeveloped. We have one opening for food and air. We have a recreation area next to a waste disposal facility. But this is nothing compared to our place in space. The earth is on a knife edge between being too cold or too hot. Our sun will die in 5 billion years time and if that isn't bad enough, the Andromeda galaxy is about to crash into our Milky Way in just 2 billion years time, which is tomorrow in the grand scheme of things. Some design, huh? And incidentally, what made the Creator or Designer? The one crumb of comfort I find with this study is size of the people asked, 973 in total, which seems too low for this survey to be very accurate but I do think it’s still troubling. If there is anything that we can learn from this survey is that science

education needs to be improved. We not only have to better teach science but we need to teach people why Creationism isn't science but rather religion. We have to tell people just how science works because I fear many people just don't know, and explain simple scientific simple terms and definitions. You might often hear that both should be taught equally and then let the children decide. Absolutely bloody not! The merits of scientific understanding and knowledge aren't to be decided by those who haven't even ob-

tained the necessary qualifications. If Creationism is to be taught in schools then it should be taught in Religious Studies, as long as its taught comparatively and not dogmatically: to tell children that many different religions, cultures and civilizations have all come up with their own accounts of creation, and not to push for one particular story.

Creationism ignores all scientific evidence


10 OPINION

gairrhydd | OPINION@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

Not out of the woods yet

Despite expectations, the UK remains in recession. This is because we are not doing enough Lauren Cowie Opinion Writer

ulus in the US is much bigger in percentage terms than that in the UK”. This is probably why their schemes are working better than ours. Despite this, the Conservatives still propose to drastically cut public spending if they get in to power at the next election. A policy that I think is, frankly, suicidal.

The UK economy has continued to contract, despite growth in Germany, France and now the US. The UK’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) decreased by 0.4% between July and September. This is the sixth successive quarter to show shrinkage. Alistair Darling has said “We’re not out of the woods yet” but he agrees with Mervin King, Bank of England Governor that “we can expect to see modest growth by the end of the year”. This contrasts with the view of the International Monetary Fund, who say that the UK economy will continue to recess a further 0.2% next year. Both France and Germany have seen growth of 0.3% in the third quarter and America recently announced an annual pace of growth between July and September of 3.5%. The reasons for this recovery have been major government stimuli, strong levels of exports and an increase in consumer spending.

This could drag on a little longer yet

The Conservatives still propose to cut spending. I think this is frankly suicidal For example, President Obama introduced an $8000 tax credit for first time buyers, along with a ‘cash for clunkers’ car scrappage scheme very similar to our own. However Hugh Pym (BBC Chief Economics correspondent) said “the scale of the stim-

"Politicool"

Sam smith & robin morgan

The US has also seen its largest rise in exports since 1996, and according to the latest figures, Germany's exports are up 7%. Since the UK depends on exports for around 17% of its income it would be nice to see some of our figures increasing similarly. Peter Mandelson has said “The outlook for our own economy is also strengthening”. This is because other countries will have enough money to buy things from us again; nothing to do with his government. Or maybe it’s just wishful thinking because Mandy doesn’t want us all to lynch him. Alistair Darling insisted this week “Confidence is beginning to return and we need to keep in place the support the government has been giving to people and to businesses. To remove it now would be utter madness”. I find myself agreeing with him. The £1.75 billion stimulus from the government has certainly softened the blow of this recession. But as Vince Cable said “There are still massive structural problems”. After the UK’s recent crisis of confidence in our own government, I wonder if the IMF are right. I have a feeling this recession could drag on a little longer yet.

The 'lads on the lash' were totally irresponsible Gareth Ludkin Opinion Writer I can’t say that I was very surprised by last week’s front page of gair rhydd. Entitled ‘Lads on The Lash’, the article retold the activities of two rugby clubs that seemed to be devoid of any respectability, or indeed morality. Even if the two incidents in question relate to only a minority of players, the activities of the few reflect badly on the many. Fuelled by alcohol and a wanton disrespect for each other, the immaturity shown by all the rugby players involved was something I found particularly chilling. Students who think that it is in some way respectable to threaten and intimidate each other frankly do not deserve their University place. A little strong perhaps, but the

mentality exhibited by the two rugby clubs involved in these latest incidents is symptomatic, I believe, of a wider problem within the culture of drinking at University, particularly among a number of university sports clubs across the country, many of whom seem intent on regularly drinking to excess. I know this is not true of the vast majority of sports clubs, but there remains that small and ignorant minority that believe that they can do what they want without any consequence. We also know that that these incidents, which resulted in a broken nose, badly bruised cheekbone, two black eyes and the verbal abuse of two girls, will not be an isolated case. Each rugby team will no doubt continue to drink to excess and throw their weight around as if they own the place. A ban from Solus will be little more than water off a ducks back for many of them who will simply continue their activities elsewhere. And what

action will be taken on the players that acted so irresponsibly? With an internal ‘inquiry’ taking place within the clubs, I doubt that anything will actually change or that any consequences will be enforced.

Maybe I am out of touch, but where is the fun in a toilet ban? It is also laughable that the University rugby club believes that “the incidents were down to individuals and not due to a vendetta between the clubs.” It seems bizarre that they believe that there isn’t any ill feeling between the two clubs; “We absolutely refute any claims of anti-feeling towards Cardiff Medics RFC, and we as a rugby club have continually promoted the merg-

ing of both teams under one banner, under the name Cardiff University Rugby Club” stated the Cardiff Uni Rugby team. The incidents mentioned in the article, which included the broken nose, the medic captain being grasped by the throat, and the intimidation of the two girls in Solus, are totally indefensible. They also reflect an endemic culture of pseudo masculinity when out drinking, the more you drink and the rowdier you are, the better you’ll be. Call me old fashioned, but the days of having a few drinks, and having a good time, with the potential byproduct of feeling drunk, seem to have well and truly gone. Fuelled by the excesses of alcohol and the caveman like attitude of players attempting to fit in, or be ‘one of the lads’, I struggle to find myself on the same page as these individuals who seem intent on drinking till they can’t see.

I find it hard to understand quite why the rugby club feel that they “historically” deserve, over any other club in the University, their own area to sing their obnoxious and rude songs. There are many other clubs within the University who are arguably much more deserving of their own area. Perhaps I’m out of touch, maybe a little boring, but where is the fun in enforcing a toilet ban or taking shots of alcohol to the eye. I know this article won’t change a thing, rugby is rugby after all, and the socialising aspect has become part and parcel of the experience. I’m not trying to attack the rugby club in particular but when students act so irresponsibly, and with such a lack of dignity and respect for themselves or others, it shouldn’t be something we just accept as, ‘the way it is.’


COLUMNIST 11

gairrhydd | OPINION@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

e b o T . . . . K N A FR

Judgement days T

he end of the world. Judgement day. The rapture. Call it what you will, the concept is banded about a great deal these days, and especially this week. And it’s not just the oncoming release of the new disaster movie, 2012. This week, the EU is meeting ahead of the Copenhagen summit in December, a meeting which could be vitally important for the state of our planet. The meeting is planned to succeed the Kyoto protocol as a blueprint for battling global warming in the years ahead. To give you some kind of scale, 192 countries will be attending the 11-day meeting. It is literally a meeting of the entire world to discuss the collective future of humanity. I’m sure the release of the disaster film in the weeks running up to the event is no coincidence. After all, how better to influence opinion and boost sales than release a film about the apocalypse? We all know there is nothing cheerier than having someone almost screaming "YOU WILL ALL DIE TOMORROW" in your (now spit covered) face.

Will it really take our annihilation to come up with a way of saving the planet? If you can’t tell, I’m not that fussed about seeing it. For one, I’ve heard the storyline is shit. Secondly, it is another prime example of this fear-spreading culture that I hate so much. The last thing we need ahead of this global meeting is hyperbole and overblown rhetoric about global warming. We all know the dangers, but creating unnecessary fear to provoke action is never the right way to go. If you back a caged animal into a corner, it doesn’t do a Fantastic Mr Fox and ingeniously dig its way out. It’ll just bite your fearmongering face off. For example; last week, Lord Stern made headlines by claiming we all need to become vegetarians in order to prevent a global crisis. It is utterly unrealistic nonsense like this that is exactly what is not needed in the run up to such a crucial summit.

There is a myth that human beings are most inventive when in a crisis. People point out that a large proportion of our most important technological advances come during periods of intense war. Could it be that when we are pushed to the edge of extinction we are forced to be our most innovative? Will it really take our oncoming annihilation for us to come up with a way of saving the planet? Well, no. You know why we come up with so many inventions during periods of war? It is because it takes war for us to invest in the scientific research necessary to come up with such innovations. The reason we came up with the nuclear bomb and the resultant technologies was due to the huge amount of funding and resources given to back up the initial theory, driven by war. That is what we need. Well, not the war part. We’ve all had more than enough of that. We have more than enough knowledge to combat global warming. All we need now is reasoned, intellectual management and smart investment in science to drive forward green technologies. What we don’t need is more Al Gores (though your heart was in the right place, Al) peddling cynical estimates of just when we will all drown,

Great ocean views, but moderate risk of tidal waves already caused will ensure the globe boil or agonisingly choke to death. The EU meeting this week will will warm for decades, as the ice hopefully come to an agreement to melts and methane is released into the provide economic stimuli to devel- atmosphere in a vicious cycle. What oping countries to ensure sustainable we don’t need are politicians, camgrowth. This is a smart move. Every- paigners, and stereotypically cynical, one stop eating meat? Let’s be seri- headline-hunting journalists shouting at us that we are all doomed. We need ous. intelligence, communication and empathy. Let’s hope that that is what we will see from our world leaders come Copenhagen. With President Obama's Nobel Peace Prize under his belt, he will be expected to acheive a great deal in Copenhagen, especially after George Bush's stance towards the environment. He needs to remember though, Besides, analysis of recent data that we are all in this, from Microneshows that we are doing pretty damn sia to China. One last thing. I wasn't too happy well. The recent Catlin Arctic Survey showed that last year the ice was actu- this week to be sat in the pub while a ally thicker than the year before. Even small group of friends were sat around China, who are often vilified for their discussing just how soon the inevitahuge carbon output as a result of eco- ble end to humanity will come. I mean nomic growth, have put in concrete come on, what a depressing state of plans to reduce emissions – and at this existence you have to be in after that conversation. A conversation which, rate, they are succeeding. Much as I love a cheeky protest, we incidentally, solves nothing. Perhaps I need to be reasonable. The calm real- am naive for my optimism. Still, if we ity is this: global warming is inevita- really do only have three years to live, ble. Even if we all stopped producing we might as well try and do something CO2 right now, the changes we have positive with them, right?

What we don't need is people telling us just when we will all drown

How NOT to help people...

We’ve all been there. Trying to cheer up someone close to you. Perhaps they have broken up with someone. Maybe it’s family troubles. Who knows. Lost for words, and bereft of ideas, you utter that immortal cliché, “It could be worse.” When people say it, it’s often followed by something like, "It could be worse; people in Africa are starving." That’s just one example, but I’m going to roll with it. Who exactly does this help? Have you ever heard this said to you, and thought, “Actually, yeah! You’re right! Children in Ethiopia are starving to death every day, and I’m not! Sweet!” I didn’t think so. If you are nodding right now then you sir, are a twat. And do you think it makes the Ethiopians any happier? Do they wake up thinking, “Hey, I’ve got it worse than everyone else. I may be starving to death, but hey, it’s all uphill from here!” Again, I doubt it. We all give advice. It’s something that, when you think about it, is a beautiful thing. Human beings trying to help either other, whether it’s to get something done, achieve that far off dream, or just to get through a tough time. But can we really give advice? That may seem like a silly question, but let me explain. Consider this. A huge number of us these days suffer through parental divorce. It can be an emotionally devastating experience that has untold psychological events for the rest of our lives. Other people grow up with parents who are happily married and, as such, their family problems are based around smaller arguments. Does that mean that the divorce sufferer has a worse life? No. The severity of an experience can only be taken in comparison with everything else we suffer from. People are labelled or seen as ‘spoilt’ when they are seen to have comparatively privileged lives. But why? Surely the answer can only be jealousy. For example, during my childhood, my father heavily abused my mother and my brothers and I. Does that make your troubles any less significant to you? I bloody hope not. Instead, you should try and realise what difficulties people have faced and try and empathise. Whether it’s a tiff with the other half, or something more serious, it all boils down to someone who is hurting inside, and maybe out. Don’t hold what it is against them. Just keep giving that advice.You are helping, even just by being there. You lovely person. Still, do me a favour, and don’t say that it could be worse.


12 FEATURES

gairrhydd | FEATURES@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

Culture clash? International st The first few weeks of student life are always hectic for everyon justing to life in a new country. This week two students share Jordis Lau Features Writer

I love Cardiff. Please forgive me if this is somewhat a blunt introduction. It has only been a month since I left Germany, yet I feel I can already speak of big emotions here. So far, my first weeks in Cardiff have been brilliant; the start was smooth – some might say “easy as pie” – and it has gotten better everyday. I am happy to share my love story, and here is what has happened so far. For a start, let me give you an impression of the place where I normally study: imagine Cardiff twice as big, erase the bay, add some skyscrapers and many museums, and what you get is a city called Frankfurt.

Apple crumble seems to help bridge the cultural differences It's a rather stylish city ruled by bankers and businessmen. In the summer you can sit at the river Main, enjoy a drink and watch the skyline. But even though it is a cool and interesting place to be, Frankfurt is not the ideal place to study; living in town is quite expensive and about 300,000 people commute everyday. It means that you do not get to see many of the students that sit in your lectures outside university, unless you wish to travel for one to two hours to the outer areas of Frankfurt. It goes without saying that you have to search a while to find student life there. I moved from Hamburg to Frankfurt when I was twenty, and starting in Frankfurt was quite tough; no Freshers' Week, no Students' Union, no societies, no area that could compare to Cathays, not even a decent student newspaper! Meeting people sometimes seemed like a struggle, and it took me at least a year to settle in. Don't get me wrong, I figured it out and I learned to like the place. But it was not a light, mutual affection that swiftly united Cardiff and me. Coming to Cardiff was troublefree. I took the plane from Hamburg, arrived at Heathrow, hopped on to the university’s shuttle for international students, hopped off in Cardiff, then a mini bus took me directly to my students’ house. Thanks to the detailed online briefing, I knew roughly what I had to do, so I picked up my student

ID at the union. On the same day, I got my bank letter and opened an account. When I came back to the house that evening, I met the first of my new housemates, Lena. As she leaned towards me to kiss me hello, I reached out to shake hands. She said she was

French, I laughed, and we knew we would be friends. The first day ended with Lena locking herself out of her room, and a nice conversation with the security man about his love for Germany. The following days were about getting to know Cardiff and university life. We attended a security briefing in which we were introduced to the astonishingly large number of ways of setting things on fire. We went on a trip through South Wales, visited the Big Pit and Cosmeston Medieval Village, and basically took part in what was offered by the International Office. They did a really great job! I met a lot of people on these events and did not feel lonely at all. Living in a student house is a new experience. In Germany, I shared a small flat with a friend. Over here, I live in a house together with six girls from France, Malaysia and China. It is not always easy to understand each other, but apple crumble seems to bridge some of the cultural differences. Cardiff to me is a beautiful, compact city. It has most things you would also find in a large city, and I love living close to the sea. If I leave my house, I can walk ten minutes in the left direction towards Queen Street where there are new malls and arcades, which seem to spring up like mushrooms. If I feel like being close to nature, I walk ten minutes in the opposite direction, and find myself in Bute Park. Welsh people are open and helpful. As soon as they learn that I am from Germany, they dig out the bits of German they know. When you get lost in the streets someone will stop and ask if you need help. And if you should accidentally bump into them, they will apologise. People from Germany are usually a little reserved, and need some time to

open up. A bit more heartiness is quite pleasing for a change. The weather has also been friendly so far – even Welsh clouds seem to be nicer than German ones. However, one thing that surprises me is the presence of World War II and the Nazi regime in people’s everyday lives. It is a highly sensitive topic in Germany, and younger generations still try to move on and over-

come the feeling of collective guilt. Contrary to the British, German people do not casually chat or joke about Hitler and World War II. I try to get used to hearing about it more often and I welcome the discussion about it in seminars, but have to criticise a certain lack of accuracy when lecturers blame “The Germans” instead of “The Nazis”. But this is the only thing I could complain about. Let’s focus on happier things then!

My mum would be horrified if I went out like that... I guess the Welsh are just tolerant As I have mentioned earlier, students in Frankfurt might feel a little overwhelmed when they start their studies and are new in town. Unfortunately, some German universities just focus on providing education, whereas spare time activities need to be organised on your own. Most universities have some sports clubs, but for some reason it can be hard to meet friends there. Frankfurt University lacks some kind of spirit, whilst students in Cardiff strongly identify with their university. I was and am still amazed by the number of different societies and sports clubs that make it easy to meet people and make friends. It seems

like there is something for everyone. Writing for a student newspaper was actually one of the major reasons for studying in the UK, so I signed up for gair rhydd. Since I am an Erasmus student, I joined the Erasmus society, and in order to try out something new, I joined the Canoeing Club. People were friendly and encouraging, which made me feel welcome. Going out in Cardiff is definitely an event. The variety of clubs and pubs, the limousines driving through the streets, and the fact that they actually manage to fill all the rooms in Oceana amazes me. What struck my friends and I the most were the short, flashy dresses many girls were wearing. I was freezing only looking at them,

and I am sure my mum would be horrified if I went out like that. In Germany people would point their fingers at me. I guess Welsh people are just very tolerant. Apart from the flashy dress, people seem to love the fancy dress; during Freshers' Week, I saw students dressed as sheep, guys dressed as girls, and three guys running through the streets naked! In Germany, fancy dress parties are not that popular. They exist, but many people find excuses for not dressing up, or at least make sure no

one sees them on the way to the party. On their way back home they probably do not care anymore thanks to German beer. Parties at the Union are great fun; the way back home is short, and falling asleep to the background sound of someone vomiting under your window usually means that it has been a good night. Choosing modules and starting my studies has been a bit chaotic. Back at home, I do a master’s degree in Art History and English Studies. We have nine semesters and choose our courses just before a new semester starts. In Germany, I am a postgraduate whereas in Cardiff I am an undergraduate at the School of European Studies. The module names were released before the timetable, so I chose modules without knowing when they would take place. Furthermore, in Germany we take either a seminar or a lecture on a certain topic. All this confused me a little, and I ended up wondering what made me choose a module about Kant’s Ethics without realising what I was getting myself into. But I have decided to accept this challenge. I am really happy that I came to Cardiff. Getting to know a different system of education, sharing a house with people of different cultures, enjoying general British craziness, and getting a sense of university spirit are experiences I am glad to make. In the first weeks, I have already seen and done many things, but I think there is still a lot more to discover. My friends and I want to go on trips to London, Dublin and Scotland. I have so much to do, that I hardly get to miss home. And if homesickness tries to get the upper hand, it usually can be driven away with a good hot chocolate at the Woody.

FRANKFURT: Basically Cardiff with some skyscrapers


FEATURES 13

gairrhydd | FEATURES@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

udents share their experiences

e, but for international students there is the extra stress of adtheir experiences... Anne Bochow Features Writer “Everything is going to be different to what you are used to.” As I waited to leave at the airport, my father's words came back to me. My father failed to be funny, but I noticed his anxiety about the departure of his one and only beloved daughter. Even after living 500 miles away from my parents for two years, barely visiting my family, he didn't seem too pleased that I had decided to study abroad for 10 months. Before the start of my big trip, I had come home to Berlin for a couple of days and I realised during this time why I'd chosen to leave my parents. Being an only child can be rather irritating, although I guess it's the same in the UK.

I tried to recall the important facts, like all cars drive on the wrong side of the road Anyway, when I boarded my plane I tried to consider all the important facts that would help me 'survive' the first days. I remembered that all cars drive on the 'wrong' side of the road, and I remembered that I shouldn't mix up the terms 'England' and the 'UK.' But a one and a half hour flight isn't that long if you want to recall everything. I was running out of time... I was supposed to meet another girl on the first day after my arrival. We had agreed to meet in front of her halls at 9am, but apparently she was a little bit late. I was waiting and waiting and

waiting. Having grown up in Germany where its normal to inform your buddy when you might be one minute late, I was getting nervous. But Lily was from Georgia so probably had more severe jet lag than me. Maybe she had overslept.

Eventually I couldn't stand waiting any longer so I went to the Security Office to see if I would be allowed in the building. The officer seemed pretty shocked to see a student at this time, but perhaps this was because he had fallen asleep. After letting me in I went up to Lily's flat and knocked on her bedroom. A girl who I did not know opened the door – apparently I was on the wrong floor. I found it quite funny how the girl apologised for her messy appearance nearly as often as I did for waking her up so early. We exchanged stories of our first Cardiff experiences and then I left her to get back to sleep– she had been partying until 3am. Sorry again Amy! When I was outside, I finally realised that I had forgotten to adapt the

different time zone; Germany is one hour ahead of the UK. After that experience I realised the first difference between Germans and British; you guys seem to be more relaxed and don't take everything so seriously. But you are definitely serious about

little bit more – will be spent on going out and clubbing. (I'm glad that my parents dont read gair rhydd!)

At the third pub, a cocktail and four shots seemed like a good idea When I go out in Berlin it's normally only once in a while, and we plan the night at least two weeks in advance before heading to the club. Normally, we gather at about 10 pm in someone's flat and leave around midnight. Nobody is wasted before even entering the club. If we're not having fun, we head to another club. We stay until 5 or 6 am in the morning. The next day I wake up at 4 pm and have a terrible hangover. When I go out in Cardiff I go out twice or three times a week. We don't gather at someone's place because we don't plan to go out, but this doesn't prevent everybody being tipsy when we enter the

a warm dinner. I'm used to having lunch as the main meal of the day, but when my British flatmates caught me eating my usual dinner of slices of bread with butter, meat and cheese, they seemed pretty perplexed that Germans don't have a warm dinner. When my French flatmate, Solene, found out about my eating habits the reaction got even worse; she couldn't believe it. “So you have first bread as a appetizer and then a warm dinner?” “So no warm dinner at all?” A look of pure horror was written all over her face. She even offered me some of her dinner. Maybe some nations have more in common than they ever realise. I also learnt that studying in the UK means you save some money, even though the living expenses are slightly higher than in the rest of Europe. The highly praised punctuality of Germans can be pretty expensive, but here I don't have to text or call my mates when I can't make it on time. But the money I save – and probably a

club. We arrive between 9 and 10 pm, we're having fun, and we stay until 2 am in the morning. The next day I wake up at 10 am and have a terrible hangover. Some things will never change. But being an international student means more than dealing with a different time zone, variant eating and clubbing habits and another currency. I've grown up speaking my mind all the time – Germans are notorious for their honesty. My Mum wasn't always very fond of my behaviour. Especially when, aged seven, I broke the silence of a waiting room with “Mummy, why has this woman such an ugly nose?!” However it’s common in Germany

to be direct. We tend to consider 'showing respect' as a proper way of being polite. 'Respect' assumes that the other person deserves an honest answer, not some 'pretty white lie'. Being sincere demonstrates that we really care about this person. So we set a high value on what people say. I noticed that the British people define politeness in terms of 'friendliness'; smiling, saying phrases such as “how are you” and “see you,” whether they have a real meaning behind them or not. This is a pleasant feeling! I don't have to be afraid to be embarrassed or exposed in public. I feel sheltered. I no longer hear things like, “have you gained weight?” or “I'm sorry, I've heard you lost your job?” However, now I cannot be sure how they really feel and think. It’s much easier for me to handle a situation if I know the truth, even if it’s not pleasant. In some situations I tend to feel insecure, instead of seeing me as the strong and powerful woman that I usually am. Because there are different approaches towards “being friendly”, misunderstandings can easily occur. It’s always just a fine line: an outspoken remark can easily be regarded as slightly disrespectful, even when I

never intended to offend the person. It’s also a matter of your own awareness of this issue; sometimes I still assume that my behaviour is tolerated and accepted in society. It can be difficult to keep in mind that this is another country, another culture, with different common behaviour. Yet this is the best adventure I ever had. In the words of Henry Miller: “Develop interest in life as you see it; in people, things, literature, music - the world is so rich, simply throbbing with rich treasures, beautiful souls and interesting people. Forget yourself.” Explore the world.


14 FEATURES

gairrhydd | FEATURES@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

Diving for treasure

Life's tricky enough without having to pay for your weekly shop. gair rhydd delves deep to find another way: 'Dumpster Diving' Richard Greenan Features Writer

I’m standing on a mattress with a torch in my mouth surveying the large plastic bags surrounding my feet. The mattress is covered with a layer of mushy pears; it sits at the bottom of a large industrial dumpster. I lift the bags one by one, testing their weight. The light ones I put aside, the heavy ones I take and lift over the lip of the dumpster, carefully lowering them to the ground. Having amassed the heavy ones, I boost back over the edge of the dumpster and drop to the ground. Crouching, I untie the bags. One contains six large tubs of coleslaw. One is comprised entirely of cabbages. Another is filled with yoghurts, loose mushrooms and, sadly, broken glass. A fourth is the bread bag, holding today’s discarded French sticks, almond croissants and small ornate rolls coated in black seeds. The fifth is the money bag: two quiches, three packs of tomatoes, grapes, frozen pizzas, and three packs

of Thorntons mini fudge brownies. This is dumpster diving, freeganism, or ‘aggressive recycling’ – the act of entering supermarket bins to retrieve damaged or expired food. For the last month or so I have been largely sustaining myself on ‘dumpstered’ food. Going through the trash is an ageold practice, from the rag and bone man to private detectives to that bloke on Albany road poking about in a skip.

Dumpster diving poses less of a health risk than being at Solus And yet, telling someone about your new hobby (‘Oohh I got a lovely seafood medley from the bin behind Tesco's last night!’) will usually provoke a response of surprise and disgust. Admittedly, our natural reaction to hearing the words ‘climb, ‘into’, and ‘bin’ in conjunction is not a positive one. Picking out and eating your first

CATCH OF THE DAY: Richard caught in the act

found food is, however, very much a case of traversing an irrational hump of distrust. Dumpster diving poses no more of a health risk than, say, rubbing up against an unknown body in Solus, or eating food from City Pizza. We associate bins with dirtiness, but the reality is that supermarket bins are metal containers (sometimes completely spotless metal cages), filled with plastic bags of expired - i.e., still fine for another week - or ‘damaged’ food. Sometimes the packaging is split and food has spilled onto other foods, and it’s down to you whether or not to take the stuff home and clean it off. This gets about as gross as rinsing rogue gravy granules from packs of pasta or selectively removing mouldy tomatoes. That is to say, not very gross. By law, any meat, fish or eggs must be destroyed or made unfit for consumption before being chucked, so you very seldom come across anything truly rancid. Taking the plunge boils down to overcoming a knee-jerk gag response and, perhaps more problematically, overcoming the social inhibition holding us all back from leaping gleefully into the nearest bin. I must admit, I have frozen in embarrassment mid-rifle as a drunken student zombie approaches, then leant against the bin casually, or, if I am already inside, peered furtively over the top like a meerkat. Sometimes it’s best to flip the lid and clamber inside as quickly as possible. Then you can have a rest, get out your torch – an invaluable piece of equipment if you’re stealing in at the dead of night – and examine your winnings out of sight and at your leisure. Dumpster diving is technically outlawed, but the police consistently turn a blind eye due to the complete worthlessness of the food. I have regularly rummaged through bins in direct view of bored looking security guards. Curiously, the other night a police helicopter hovered directly above me for five minutes, shining a light down as I sat on my haunches happily counting oranges next to a dumpster. They were probably up there chuckling into their microphones. It’s even hassle free to target a bin on a busy pedestrian filled road. I find it helps to go about matters in a businesslike way – embrace and enjoy your practice by maybe whistling a gay tune or offering passers by

bread rolls. Witnesses tend to appear bemused or sometimes scared, assuming you’re some hunger-crazed hobo. Dumpster diving is a case of the pros wildly outweighing the cons. Not to mention the obvious financial gains of foraging, reclaiming food can be viewed as a green endeavour. Put simply, food you take from bins is food saved from the landfill site. Probe even further into the bin bag and you uncover some interesting ethical incentives; dumpstering is viewed by some as a fun and tasty way of sticking it to the man. Mind bogglingly, each year supermarkets send £18 billion worth of food to landfill. By retrieving this unnecessary waste dumpsterers are highlighting and tackling the inherent symptoms of our culture of excess. Out of the 17 million tonnes of surplus food dumped on landfills each year, a staggering four million tonnes is actually edible.

'Climb', 'into' and 'bin' rarely provoke a positive reaction The government has made a commitment to reduce the volume of biodegradable waste, including food, from going to landfill by 60% by 2016. Food Not Bombs, a loosely knit group of anti-war collectives who distribute vegetarian and vegan food to those in need, acquire much

of their stuff from supermarket trash. Similarly, the radical Christian group the Jesus Christ i a n s

decrees its members eat only dumpstered food, and this is handed out to the needy too.

It boils down to overcoming the social inhibitions to jump into a bin In interviews the Jesus Christians state they are taking responsibility for the ills of consumerism: ‘It’s not just about making use of the waste from supermarket bins, it’s about a principle far greater and [more] eternal than that - about sharing what we have.’ But I don’t purport to dumpster dive as a way of single handedly bringing down the ugly goliath that is consumer culture. On the contrary, I carefully remove my swatch before going on forays and listen happily to my shiny iPod while frolicking in the bins. Each time I set off on an urban forage I hope no one has discovered and cleaned out my fruitful spot, and all the food I like the look of is taken home and eaten chiefly by me. That is to say, my motives for rummaging through the trash are fundamentally selfish and go directly against the more lofty ‘principles’ of dumpster diving. Having said that, the thought of so much food going to waste each night does pain me. I was determined for this not to turn into a sermon, so will leave it there. Scoff if you will. For more information on Dumpster Diving, visit: h t t p : / / w w w. e m o wa r e . org/dumpster-diving


gairrhydd | FMF@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY SEPTEMBER 28 2009

FIVE MINUTE FUN 27


16 POLITICS

gairrhydd | POLITICS@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

In Gordon Brown we trust

An election is looming. Gordon Brown's on his last legs. Michael Cove tells us why he wouldn't replace him with anyone

A

s there have, once again, been no major political stories of note (unless you think the world is crying out for another article about the BNP on Question Time), let us look instead to the future. The party conference season, in a way marked the start of the general election campaign. Everything is now heading UP to the all-important date – most probably next May or June – when the nation will go to polls. I am going to take up the challenging position (for there are no “problems” in modern politics; only challenges) of defending the current Labour government and arguing that they should remain in office.

There's something deathly in the air around this government How long ago does it seem since Tony Blair strode into Downing Street for the third and final time and welcomed the nation's endorsement as Prime Minister? Since then we have had a change of leader, and witnessed what could fairly be characterised as the long, drawn-out death of Gordon Brown’s premiership (and there is still

over a year yet to run). I say death, for he most surely is fatally wounded (politically). The most recent poll of voting intentions gave the Conservatives 44 per cent whilst Labour was floundering on a measly 27. But you didn’t even need fancy statistics such as those to notice that there is something in the air and to see that the bony, sinister form of the Grim Reaper is standing just behind Gordon Brown (or maybe that’s just Jack Straw). He has staggered from one crisis to another, a seemingly incompetent leader who is incapable of change, presiding over a knackered government that has had its time. The Sun newspaper, for one, has decided that it is time for some fresh, blue, blood in the form of David Cameron’s Conservatives. It is tempting to agree that what Labour needs is a spell in the wilderness, so that it can get its act together and come back in four years time with a stronger leader and some radical new ideas for improving the country. However, this is simply far too important a moment for that sort of thinking. The economic crisis has changed everything. The time for radical policies is now. Also, it is quite likely that Labour would be facing more than one term in opposition. Labour needs to fight this election – hard. It may not

be perfect, but at the very least it is a party whose core values are solidarity and fairness, just what you need at a time of recession. I cannot see how, if Labour won the next general election, Brown would make it to the end of the first term as Prime Minister. If he was unseated, that may provide the opportunity for a fresh start.

Cameron seems too eager to get out the scissors and start slashing The Conservative's response to the recession has merely been to re-sell their plans in shiny new packaging. Before the crash, Cameron’s pitch to the voters was all about ‘Social Responsibility’. What excited him was the idea of power being “pushed down and out” of Whitehall to businesses, communities and “people” (presumably Whitehall is staffed by some sort of alien hybrid with fluorescent tentacles). Then that pesky credit crunch happened, and all of a sudden the state was urgently needed to bail out banks and pour money into the economy. Nevertheless, in his big conference speech earlier in the month he maintained his attack on Labour for their belief that "for every problem there's

a government solution" which had led to a "steady erosion of responsibility". He even went so far as to suggest that too much government intervention had caused the recession (not, as others would say, that the government had if anything done too little in the way of regulation). It could also be suggested that Cameron and his shadow chancellor have seemed a little too eager to get out the scissors and start slashing at the government’s spending plans. Meanwhile, Labour has put the focus on securing jobs in the present and investing in public services, recognising that this recession is not about the budget deficit and numbers: i t ’s

about people. There are, of course, many caveats to this. Brown was in love with the City and left us badly placed to tackle an economic downturn. But it remains the case that the Conservatives have not faced the scrutiny fitting for a supposed government-in-waiting, and with Brown’s recent promise that the economy will pick up by Christmas, Labour may yet manage to make a decent fight of it come the election. I hope this is the case. Gordon Brown is still the person I trust to run the country.

GORDON BROWN: reasons to be cheerful?

Guess who's back. Shady's back Tony Blair plans to make a return to world politics. Oliver Smith explains how and wonders whether we want him back

T

he recent 'yes' vote from our Irish cousins has greenlighted the Lisbon Treaty to continue its unstoppable march towards Brussels, bringing with it a new role to the ever-growing sphere of European bureaucracy: the President of the European Union. Not content to allow the identity of the holder of this position to be haggled over in the EU’s corridors of power, Gordon Brown has decided to throw the UK’s hat into the ring by backing his old friend as a candidate for the post. He re-crafted the Labour Party into 'New Labour' following Peter Mandelson's guidelines. He obediently followed George Bush into two separate invasions in the Middle East, a move that many blame for the ultimate demise of his premiership. But, not content to fade gracefully into the shadows, Tony Blair’s back. After two years out of the public eye acting as the UN envoy to the Middle East, Tony looks set to launch his triumphant return to European politics. But with many people still view-

ing him as the Prime Minister who launched an illegal war in Iraq, there may be some hurdles for him ahead.

As the inquiry into the Iraq war begins, the may be some awkward questions to answer As the Chilcot Inquiry into the Iraq war kicks into gear, with Tony Blair as the chief witness, more awkward questions are going to be asked about his actions as Prime Minister. But, acting as Mr. Blair’s PR puppy dog, David Miliband has already jumped to his defense, downplaying his role in the inquiry as little more than that of a “retired prime minister”. Miliband announced his support for Blair’s candidacy declaring, "It's not a time for shy retiring violets...Europe needs a strong, persuasive, articulate advocate." According to Miliband, "Tony Blair would be good for Europe, and also good for Britain". Both the Conservatives and Lib

Dems have criticized Blair’s candidacy. David Cameron commented that he stood against any form of office that took the "emblems of statehood" and applied them to the EU. Continuing that if there was to be a president of the EU then it shouldn't be in the form of "some all-singing, all-dancing, all-acting president and I think I can see what sort of president Tony Blair would be".

Tony Blair has yet to comment on his candidacy, but it doesn't look like he'll have to say much. Supported by the key players in Europe, his position looks to be a foregone conclusion. But as Gordon Brown heads to Brussels to lobby support for Blair, the Iraq war inquiry will begin. And that might just be enough to cast some shadows on

his candidacy. In the mean time, let's hope we don't get more Tony.

Tony Blair's appointment seems to be a foregone conclusion With Berlusconi attending, Sarkozi as a maybe and ‘still awaiting reply’ from Angela Merkel, Blair’s facebook group of supporters has real potential. So here's the real question: is Tony Blair the “strong, persuasive, articulate” president that we need to represent us in Europe? Or rather will Blair be seen in Europe as the media-man, 'all-singing, all-dancing' but ultimately lacking the conviction to make the hard decisions?

TONY BLAIR: aren't we fed up of him?

What do you think? Have your say at www.gairrhydd.com


POLITICS 17

gairrhydd | POLITICS@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

Diary of a mass-murderer

Simon Lucey tells us about Joseph Kony, a man who rampages across Africa causing untold suffering and death

T

he Lord’s Resistance Army, (LRA) the Central and East African guerrilla force has reportedly migrated to the south of Sudan, prompting allegations of the Sudanese government’s support for the band of warriors that specialise in abducting and terrorising the young. One of the world’s least reported, longest running and bloodiest guerrilla wars can be traced back to one Ugandan called Joseph Kony. For the past 23 years the LRA and the Government of Uganda have been waging a war that has left two million innocent citizens caught in the middle and led to the abduction of an estimated 30,000 children. Reports are however that Kony’s men have given up fighting the loosing battle in Uganda and instead have taken to living off the remote villages of the Democratic Republic of Congo

(DRC) and southern Sudan. Sudan has not seen peace since before the 1970’s. Classed by the UN as the worst humanitarian atrocity of the 21st Century, the genocide in the Darfur region has caused an estimated

Kony is wanted by the International Criminal Court for war crimes 300,000 deaths according to the UN. As hope was beginning to come of an end to the Janjaweed’s fighting in Darfur, Kony’s troops could not have come at a worse time for Sudan. The man responsible, Joseph Kony, is a self-proclaimed prophet, who is said to often talk in tongues. However his squad has been unpopular for the last twenty years and thus struggled to attract new recruits. To counter this

Kony has taken to abducting child attention to the atrocities. However expert bush skills, he is practically soldiers; it is estimated that 90% of Kony has since displayed the interna- impossible to find, and has managed the LRA’s troops were stolen as chil- tional system’s incompetence when it to avoid numerous assassination comes to preventing African suffer- attempts, including an attempt by a dren. team of US trained, Guatemalan Kony is wanted by the International ing. Now that the Ugandan government Special Ops in 2006. None of the Criminal Court (ICC) for war crimes which include numerous mass kill- has managed to overrun Kony’s men, Special Ops returned. With Kony's move to the anarchic ings, notably the slaughter of 600 he has simply drifted into weaker, innocent civilians in the Democratic lawless states, where he can continue Sudan, the prospects for his arrest Republic of Congo last Christmas. to run his terror campaign. With his have never looked slimmer. Kony’s spreads terror by releasing a few survivors from each of his killing sprees with KONY FACTBOX the lower half of their face cut off. This has lead to his forces being known as the “tun Born: 1961 tung,” meaning machete due Nationality: Ugandan to their preferred method for Religious beliefs: Believes he is a prophet of God, and claims to base his actions their killing extravaganzas. on the Ten Commandments. As well as being wanted by Spouse(s): Thought to have over 60 wives. the ICC the US Patriot Act Children: Thought to have 42 children labelled LRA a terrorist organization in 2001, which was Atrocities: Estimated to have killed 50,000 people and abducted 30,000. seen as a big step in drawing

The times are a'changing

Following a report that has condemned Israel's actions towards Palestine Ayushman Jamwal looks at what this means

T

he United Nations Human Rights committee in Geneva last week released a detailed report which highlights the ‘war crimes’ committed by the Israeli Defense Force during Operation Cast Lead. During this operation Israel laid siege to government and administrative institutions in Gaza aiming to cripple the terrorist infrastructure of the Palestinian nationalist organization, Hamas. Drafted by former South African Judge Richard Goldstone, leader of the investigation into the Israeli incursion, the ‘Goldstone report’ draws evidence from the interviews of Palestinian survivors as well as those of anonymous Israeli soldiers from the group, ‘Breaking the Silence’. It

states the use of dense inert metal explosives, white phosphorus shells and human shields of Palestinian civilians by the IDF when it searched and attacked homes, hospitals, mosques and even UN Relief and Works agency structures in Gaza, it also describes the damaging effects of the Israeli blockade on the capacity of the local public sectors, such as health and water to react to devastation of the military sweep. Due the resultant deaths of hundreds of civilians, the report has concluded the IDF’s actions to be ‘crimes against humanity’. The Israeli government has lashed out against the committee, calling the report a biased collection of testimonies against Israel, further pointing out the hypocrisy of the Human Rights committee in placing such

POLITICS COMPETITION!!!

"Muslims will die. They will disappear"

Oh No!!! Rt Hon. Bob Ainsworth MP, Secretary of State for Defence, has escaped from Westminster and is running riot around the Politics section! Can you help me find him? If you spot him, e-mail his location to: politics@gairrhydd.com. The first person to do so will win a fantastic prize. Happy hunting!!

blames when its own member nations like Syria, Pakistan and Somalia, have dismal human rights records. The Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, has also condemned the claims of the report, stating that it makes it difficult for democracies to tackle terrorism. However, the Israeli government’s confident defiance of

The United States is now refusing to support Israel the report’s claims is complicated by certain statements of its officials. The deputy foreign minister, Daniel Ayalon in a recent meeting with US Ambassador to the UN, Susan Rice reportedly told her that Washington

and its allies must ‘ensure’ that the report remains in Geneva and does not reach the UN headquarters. Most importantly, Avigdor Lieberman, the Israeli Foreign minister and kingmaker behind the right wing Netanyahu government’s ascent to power, clearly stated last Thursday in an interview on Israeli radio that it was impossible to achieve ‘comprehensive peace’ between Israel and Palestine conflict and whosoever says it’s possible is ‘spreading illusions’. Ironically, at one end Israel denies war crimes and at the other it rules out peace processes, while illegal Jewish settlement building and military incursions rampantly continue in Palestine. The United States, the global moral authority, has been put in a tight position in regards to reacting to the re-

port’s claims. After recently joining the Human Rights council in Geneva and more importantly President Barack Obama being the latest recipient of the Nobel Prize for Peace, the American administration is refraining from whole heartedly supporting their long standing ally in the Middle East. For now it’s playing a safe game by releasing a statement that it is ‘concerned about some recommendations’ in the Goldstone report. The Israeli government has always parried the accusations from the United Nations, mainly because of Uncle Sam’s support. But what will be interesting to see will be how the Obama administration, post-Nobel prize, reacts to the deeds of its Middle Eastern ally, now that the world looks to it for change in the chaotic global scenario.

Damian Fantato discusses the trial of one of Europe's most brutal leaders: Radovan Karadzic

H

is prosecutors have described him as "the supreme commander" and a "hands-on leader". Radovan Karadzic , one of Europe's most brutal dictators and the former President of Bosnia, has been incriminated by the sound of his own voice. The irony is that he still refuses to turn up at the International Criminal

Tribunal (ICT) as his trial began on Tuesday. The prosecutors have reaveled the existance of wiretaps which prove the scale of Karadzic's evil. Radovan Karadzic sought to create an ethnically segragated Bosnia, free of Muslims and non-Serbs. To achieve this he had 7,000 Muslim men and boys executed in 1995 and beseiged

Sarajevo for 44 months resulting in the death of 10,000 people. He denies all charges made against him. On the wiretraps Karadzic can be heard saying that "Europe can go fuck itself and not come back until the job is finished", proving his contempt for the international community, which later intervened in what became known as the Bosnian War between

1992-95 and was Europe's worst fighting since the Second World War. He also said on the wiretaps that "Sarajevo will be a black cauldron where Muslims will die. They will disappear, that people will disappear from the face of the earth". It seems that the victims who came to the Hague came in vain.


18 LETTERS

gairrhydd | LETTERS@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY OCTOBER 05 2009


LETTERS 19

gairrhydd | LETTERS@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

the Comments from the week’s news, opinion, features and sport at www.gairrhydd.com

Why we must allow prejudice Samyogita... I hear you! But just want to point out that by the same logic, people had every right to experess their opinion about Jan Moir… Harthacanute... And yet another defender of Jan Moir completely misses the crucial point than none of this is about her right to express her bigotry. It is about whether a newspaper, which subscribes to the PCC’s voluntary Code of Conduct, should ever have published it .. and whether, in publishing it, the newspaper is in breach of that code. If you agree to be bound by a set of rules, then you should be held accountable under them. It is as simple as that. Do we let people pick and choose when they can be held to account for breaking the speed limit or damaging another person’s property? And as the previous commenter has noted – Jan Moir has exercised her right to say what she wants, and now the decent majority is exercising their right to point out just what a hateful woman she is. Lianne Wilson... “You don’t get to dismiss some-

one’s opinion purely on the grounds that it is not the same as yours.” Exactly, I’ve been making a similar point over on the ‘back-lash’ thread and I quite agree with you. However, though she does have the right to say it and the newspaper has the right to publish it, that doesn’t mean either of them have the right not to get in trouble for it. Freedom of speech comes with consequences. Now Jan Moir’s been free to have her say, we all get to have our say about her. She can blame it on the eeeeeevil gays all she likes, of course, but Fry and Brooker and everyone else really can’t be blamed for not taking it all that well. Though really, what do you expect from the Mail? Rhys... I think the main problem people have is thinking that they have a right not to be offended, and this is greater that someone else right to free speech. Very well done article fighting for free speech. Seb... This is a terrible article, and I think it’s fair to call that a fact rather than opinion. Opinions are based around uncertainties, personal perspectives for things that cannot be completely verified or proved, things that can ge-

niunely be argued or discussed about. With the headline “Why there was nothing ‘natural’ about Stephen Gately”; despite that being the official ruling by the coroner Jan and her article launch themselves from the safe and open environment of opinion and into the arena of bigotted and baseless inference. A medical professional says this? But he was a GAY man doing GAY things with GAY men and living the GAY lifestyle in GAY marriage and GAYED his way to the GAY sofa and GAILY passed away. Clearly the cause of (GAY) death: THE GAY (p.s. homosexuality is unnatural). We even get some outright lies in the article to support her: ‘Healthy and fit 33-year-old men do not just climb into their pyjamas and go to sleep on the sofa, never to wake up again..’ As Charlie Brooker pointed out (http://c-r-y.org.uk/), yes they do. This is way beyond any measure of opinion and so should have been under the same intense scrutiny of those who talk about the theory of creationism and who claim that Britishness is more to do with your skin colour rather than where you were born and grew up. At that point I feel there is a significant burden of proof required, and without such proof not only should it not be printed anywhere but whoever thought it up should start rethinking what exactly the hell they’re doing. The Daily Mails already tacky-looking mask is slipping even further. Freedom of expression is very

forum

important to protect minority views to allow examination, reflection and development of society but for godsake not everything that people say can be classed as opinion. The article was a pack of lies and distortions to fit an agenda and so should not have any of the same protections offered to it. Bring on the retribution. Emma... Jan Moir's article was a disgusting pack of lies and fabrication. I'm all for free speech but at least express an opinion with the actual facts in mind. But the real reason the article shouldnt have been printed is decency and respect how did she think it would be received the day before his funeral as if his loved ones weren't suffering enough without her hateful, homophobic, philestine opinion! She believes in expressing an opinion, I believe in karma! Adam Troth... I actually read the article before all the hoo-hah kicked off, which probably puts me in a minority here. At the time I thought it was rather distasteful, ill timed and vindictive, but on a par with a lot of the stuff you read in the context of the right-wing tabloid gutter press. “I’m all for free speech, but…” is one of the most overused lines in the history of modern society. Yes, the

article was packed full of distortions, lies and hatred. In a free press however, she has the right to be published, and we have the right to condemn her for being an ill informed hateful cretin. The article may well have been disgusting, disrespectful and full of lies. I think that this does not justify the article’s not being published. Let people make up their own minds. It’s clear what the general consensus is. The one bit I do find a little troubling is Seb’s suggestion that the coroner ruled the death to be natural and therefore we should all just take this as gospel. The official inquest into the death of Princess Diana ruled out any kind of foul play, yet anyone who has passed even a fleeting glance over what actually happened on that tragic night in gay Paris realises what a pack of lies that was.

Professor fakes PhD... or not rohan... Alex, I hope you have deep pockets! Mark Brake did NOT receive £285k in grants – he didn’t get anything. The allegations are part of an ongoing campaign against him by a former colleague who was sacked by Glamorgan for amongst other things harassment so suggest you think about consulting your lawyers before he does!

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20 TAF-OD

gairrhydd | TAFOD@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

‘Hell-co’ yr iaith Gymraeg? Siân Powell

Taf-od Editor Ymddengys fod LCO (‘Legislative Competence Order’) yr iaith Gymraeg wedi ei rwystro unwaith yn rhagor gan y broses hirwyntog o geisio sicrhau mwy o bwerau i’r Cynulliad yma yng Nghaerdydd. Mae siomedigaeth fawr ynglyn â’r broses hon gan mai dim ond pedair LCO sydd wedi eu cytuno ers i’r system gael ei greu fel rhan o’r Ddeddf Llywodraeth Cymru 2006. Mae LCO (neu’r ‘Hell-co’, fel dywed Betsan Powys yn ei blog yn ddiweddar) yn rhoi pwer i’r Cynulliad greu mesur newydd i ddeddfu arno. I’r nifer ohonom sydd methu gwneud pen na chynffon o’r broses, mi wnaf fy ngore i’w esbonio. Yn syml, mae pob LCO yn trosglwyddo pwerau penodol o Senedd y Deyrnas Unedig i’r Cynulliad Cenedlaethol, ond er mwyn sicrhau'r gorchmynion hyn mae’n rhaid cwblhau llawer o gamau. Ar ôl i unrhyw LCO gael ei osod, caiff ei ystyried gan bwyllgor craffu cyn deddfu a chyflwynir adroddiad ar eu canfyddiadau, rhaid i’r canfyddiadau hyn gael eu cymeradwyo gan y Cynulliad a Senedd y Deyrnas

Unedig cyn cael ei groesawu yn swyddogol gan y Frenhines. Gwelwn y problemau yn codi wrth i Senedd y Deyrnas Unedig ystyried yr LCO. Er enghraifft, yn ystod cyfarfod y ‘Welsh Grand Committee’ i drafod LCO’r Iaith Gymraeg (a rhyfedd oedd gweld Uwchbwyllgor o’r fath yn cyfarfod i drafod unrhyw LCO beth bynnag) dangosodd darpar Ysgrifennydd Gwladol Cymru, Cheryl Gillan ei hanwybodaeth a’i hagwedd negyddol tuag at ddatganoli.

Nid oes angen edrych yn bellach na drafft yr LCO ei hun i ddod o hyd i’r dystiolaeth sy’n dangos fod angen mwy o hawliau ar gyfer yr iaith O fewn canllawiau'r system o sicrhau’r LCO, nid oes gan Aelodau Seneddol yr hawl i drafod beth hoffai Llywodraeth y Cynulliad wneud gyda’r hawliau newydd, ond wrth gwrs, nid yw Llundain yn parchu hyn

yn gyson. Felly, wrth i Cheryl Gillan ofyn i weld drafft o’r hyn y bydd y Cynulliad yn ei wneud gyda’r hawliau newydd roedd, yn eiriau Peter Hain yn ‘trampling all over the Assembly’. Felly, beth yn union yw argymhellion LCO’r Iaith Gymraeg? Argymhellion cychwynnol yr LCO oedd hybu a hwyluso’r defnydd o’r iaith Gymraeg gan drin y Gymraeg a’r Saesneg ar sail cydraddoldeb o fewn dyletswyddau yn ymwneud â gwasanaethau i’r cyhoedd. Ar ôl cryn bwysau gan Whitehall, newidiodd termau'r LCO i sicrhau mai dim ond busnesau sydd yn derbyn £400,000 o arian cyhoeddus o fewn blwyddyn ariannol sydd am gael eu cynnwys. Caiff siopau a chwmnïau trydanol a nwy hefyd eu Yr LCO iaith, be fydd y dyfodol?

hepgor o’r rheolau newydd. Nid oes angen edrych yn bellach na drafft yr LCO ei hun i ddod o hyd i’r dystiolaeth sy’n dangos fod angen mwy o hawliau ar gyfer yr iaith. Wrth i mi geisio agor papurau'r LCO ar wefan y Cynulliad yn y Gymraeg, dyma’r neges welais mewn llythrennau bras: "GWNEIR G O R C H MYNION C Y M H W YSEDD DEDDFWRIAETHOL YN SAESNEG YN UNIG. CYFIEITHIAD I’R GYMRAEG ER GWYBODAETH YW HWN AC NID OES IDDO RYM CYFREITHIOL." Yn anffodus, mae’n edrych yn debyg mai dim ond drwy system yr ‘Hell-co’ cawn gydnabyddiaeth deg ar gyfer iaith y nefoedd.


gairrhydd | SCIENCE@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

SCIENCE & ENVIRONMENT 21

A dimmer sun will not help our global warming woes The Sun is the dimmest it has been for half a century but global temperatures have continued to rise. Are solar activity and the climate linked? James Griffiths Reporter NASA data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) suggests that in 2008/9 the Sun was the dimmest it has been for over 50 years. The observed reduction in solar activity runs counter to solar researchers' expectations that the sun’s activity should now be intensifying after a quiet period. The sun’s normal activity cycle builds up to an 11-year maximum, when huge solar flares erupt from the sun’s surface, powered by the sudden release of stored magnetic energy from the Sun’s corona. Solar flares are associated with sunspots, areas of slightly reduced temperature on the sun’s surface which are caused by intense magnetic activity.

The view that a dimmer sun will somehow redress the large temperature increase of recent decades is too simplistic An 11-year minimum in solar activity may have occurred in the latter half of 2008, but in 2009, the Sun’s activity remained very low. Astronomers are debating whether this means that the Sun will go into a prolonged period of minimum activity, or whether is will increase again soon. So why is this important for us down here on Earth? The Sun is ultimately the source of all our energy. Without it there could be no life, and it is the key driver of the Earth’s climate system. Potentially, past decreases in solar activity may have had marked effects on climate over long timescales, although this is the topic of much scientific debate. One of the best-studied periods is the so called Maunder Minimum, lasting from about 1645 to 1715, in which solar astronomers at the time were able to observe very few sunspots, indicating a protracted lapse in solar activity. The Maunder Mini-

mum coincided with the coldest part of a period of Northern Hemisphere cooling known as the 'Little Ice Age’. Whilst this was not a true ice age by climatologist’s definitions, there is scientific and historical evidence that winters, particularly in Northern Europe and North America were bitterly cold, in a period beginning before 1300 and lasting over 600 years. Three minima in temperature occurred, around 1650, 1770 and 1850, separated by slight warming phases. During the Little Ice Age crops failed due to the extreme cold, and many glaciers (particularly in alpine regions) advanced significantly. Historically, there are many accounts of rivers and harbours freezing over in winter time. The decrease in sunspot activity is just one of many potential causes of the low temperatures seen during the Little Ice Age, including an increase in the release of the cooling gas Sulphur Dioxide (SO2) from volcanoes, or by a slowing down or cessation of the ‘Ocean Conveyer’ currents which bring warming waters to higher latitudes from the equator. But this is not the only time that solar activity has been invoked as a dominant influence on climate. In the past few years, the Danish physicist Henrik Svensmark of the Danish Space Research Institute (DSRI) caused widespread controversy by suggesting that the Sun was the dominant control on global warming, challenging the widely-held view that man-made carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are to blame. In 2007, Svensmark published a book called The Chilling Stars, in which he detailed his theory that high–energy cosmic rays (which are actually individual particles) from outer space crash into the high Earth atmosphere and initiate a chain reaction that eventually leads to the creation of tiny ‘condensation nuclei’ in the atmosphere, which then give rise to clouds. Svensmark argued that when solar activity was high, the flow of high energy charged particles from the Sun known as the solar wind; deflected the cosmic rays away from Earth. Therefore, when the solar wind is weaker, more cosmic rays collide with Earth’s atmosphere, more clouds are created, and the Earth is cooled due to a greater reflectance of the sun’s heat by the clouds.

While some researchers have shown a small correlation between the incidence of cosmic rays and increased cloud cover, it fails to address the fact that over the last 30 years, the cosmic ray count has increased along with the average global temperature. If Svensmark’s theory held true, it would predict a temperature decrease in this period. Professor Mike Lockwood of

first researchers to show that the Sun's activity has been gradually decreasing since 1985, yet overall global temperatures have continued to rise. "If you look carefully at the observations, it's pretty clear that the underlying level of the Sun peaked at about 1985 and what we are seeing is a continuation of a downward trend (in solar activity) that's been going on

Global warming suspect? Southampton University has been one of Svensmark’s sternest critics. According to Professor Lockwood, the view that a dimmer sun will somehow redress the large temperature increase of recent decades is too simplistic.

The Sun is ultimately the source of all our energy. Without it there could be no life "I wish the sun was coming to our aid but, unfortunately, the data shows that is not the case," he told the BBC in April. Prof Lockwood was one of the

for a couple of decades. "If the Sun's dimming were to have a cooling effect, we'd have seen it by now." In the face of the evidence, it has thus far been problematic establishing a link between solar activity cycles and Earth’s climate. There is far greater support for the theory that CO2 and other greenhouse gases have a far greater influence in the current period of rapid warming which our planet has experienced. So for any climate change sceptics (if there are still any out there), our nearest star is far down the list of suspects for the current global warming crisis.

Newsbites

Cardiff Cancer Centre Launched Cancer Research UK has opened one of its network of research centres in conjunction with Cardiff University. The centre will bring together researchers and medical experts to look at the best treatments for cancer. The Cardiff Cancer Research UK Centre hopes to specialise in treatments tailored to individual patients with an approach based on understanding the biology of the disease and how it varies from patient to patient. It will focus on bowel, breast and neurological cancers and leukaemia and will work on ways to make sure cancer is detected earlier. The centre will also look at gaining a better understanding of how to prevent cancer. Cancer Research UK will be spending an extra £2 million on research in Cardiff over three years.

Weather alters body clocks Scientists have found new evidence to support the belief that the weather and the seasons shape our body clocks. The research by a team from Edinburgh University used computers to model the workings of the body. The scientists hope that the research will help treat sleep problems. There are also hopes that the research may help scientists develop crops that can cope with climate change. As well as the University of Edinburgh, the study involved scientists from the California Institute of Technology and University of Warwick.

Pig pooh energy A team of Danish scientists has analysed the ways in which pig manure is used to generate electricity and have found that using anaerobic digestion is most efficient. Bacteria breaks down waste material by warming it in an oxygen free area, releasing methane which is then used in gas turbines. The researchers found that although this was the most efficient way to use the manure for energy production, it was not the best option for minimal greenhouse gas emissions. This was thought to be separating solid from the liquid waste, drying the solids and incinerating them.

Eddie Stobart goes green Eddie Stobart has launched a new low carbon rail freight trip across Europe taking containers of refrigerated fruit and vegetables from Valencia in Spain to Dagenham, London. The train then returns to Valencia with empty trains and pallets ready to be refilled with fresh produce. This is the first time refrigerated rail containers will have passed through the Channel tunnel. Edie Stobart say that in one year the weekly rail trip will stop 8600 tonnes of carbon being released into the atmosphere.


22 JOBS & MONEY

gairrhydd | JOBS@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

Live cheap but live well

After lots of digging around, Jobs & Money have found some ingenious ways to save you lots of money Katie Greenway Jobs and Money Editor In the spirit of the credit crunch I have decided to put together a few little tips to help you students save a bit of cash, just by pointing you in a cheaper direction. ASOS: www.asos.com is a great little website where you can shop for clothes, accessories and cosmetics at a much cheaper price than you can in stores. They have fantastic sales and sometimes have free delivery offers. Studentbeans: check out www.studentbeans.co.uk and type in Cardiff to find out where they offer you discounts and special offers on food, drinks and entertainment, including cinema 2 for 1, comedy club shows and offers on haircuts, from salons such as Saks and other well known chains. Don’t forget to use your student

card! You can get 10-20% off in loads of stores such as Topshop and House of Fraser. If you go to Cineworld on a Wednesday, they do a ‘241’ offer for all Orange mobile customers, and you can use your student card at the same time, which means you will get two tickets at student prices. Nationwide: for the future, open a Nationwide current account because they do not charge you a single penny when you use your cards abroad. Be sociable! Start cooking communally. Instead of going out for dinner, have a dinner party at your house and save some money! Go to the union for your nights out! Drinks are ridiculously cheap and you won’t have to put up with any other than your Cardiff University brethren. Join Guy Christian Salon’s Facebook group: they send you updates and offers on colours and cuts pretty

often, and they are a really good salon so I do recommend them. Part-time jobs: it is that time of year again where retailers are all looking for their Christmas temps. The job will normally last from November to January and most stores will be able to fit your working hours around your lectures. Crewe Clothing Co. are looking to fill permanent vacancies for Sales Advisors at the moment so pop down to the Hayes if you are interested. I know these options may be a little more on the uninspired side but we all need to save the pennies, particularly with Christmas coming up. To be honest, you will find that the cheaper things in life are just as, if not more enjoyable than the more expensive things. So save the pennies because at the end of the day, it’ll be an extra

pint at the Woodville in no time.


FEATURES 15


24 LISTINGS

Listen to Listings This week we put the money trouble rants on hold and throw our easily acquired cash at some expensive nights that have emerged. Eddie Izzard is one of the finest comedians around and is back with his new show - Stripped. However, if you like him enough to splash out £30 on seeing him strut about the stage pretending to be spontanious by putting 'errr' into every sentence then the £30 is well worth it. I'll be choosing the much funnier and more interesting comic, Bill Bailey, and save myself a fiver. But there is good news at both ends of the week. First up, Fun Factory has a special guest in the form of Zane Lowe, the TV presenting, festival covering, radio DJ New Zealander. He played last year in the Great Hall for Budweiser, and that would have set you back £10 - so to get to see this modern day legend for nothing is a pretty damn good deal. Let's hope he makes it after the dissappointment of last week with the no-show Kissy Sell Out.

gairrhydd | LISTINGS@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 2nd 2009

YOUR INDEPENDENT LISTINGS GUIDE Monday

2nd November 3OH!3, Millenium Music Hall, £10 You don't get more gangsta than Sean Foreman and Nathaniel Motte. Imagine JJ Fad getting down with Justice, or DMX getting all Depeche Mode on you, and you might have a clue of the kind of sonic blasphemy 3OH!3 is bringing. FUN FACTORY, Solus, FREE You cannot fault FF. Free entry, stupidly cheap drinks and now, special guest DJs this week being Zane Lowe! Kissy Sell Out has been moved to another week so look out for more info on him. THE CHAPMAN FAMILY, Barfly, £6 The Chapman Family play Disco Noir with stonking songs made for the dancefloor! Hitting Cardiff on the Welsh leg of their 'Virgins' tour, this is sure to be a dancefloor distortion.

Tuesday

Wednesday

FUNERAL FOR A FRIEND, Coal Exchange, £12.50 Welsh emo outfit whose debut release was mixed and produced by Joe Gibb, who has also produced Jane's Addiction, Catatonia and Leftfield. A furious live presence has been winning them fans ever since their first releases in 2002, with appearances including a high profile European tour with Iron Maiden.

Beverley Knight, St Davids Hall, £21.50 An awesome voice from this three times MOBO award winner. She's been notching up the hits ever since her classic song 'Flavour Of The Old School' (1995), with more than ten of her songs reaching the Top 40. Her longevity is partly due to her innate talent, but it is also due to her impressive ability to reinvent herself.

JUST DANCE, Clwb, £3 Just Dance is still a great place to be on Tuesdays. With its no nonsense music policy that consists of anything you can dance to, it is full of dancing and colour.

THE LASH, Solus, £3 Wednesdays at the Union are back! Finally the memories of Rubber Duck and Sin Bin have faded away, now that it is one the most successful re-brand Cardiff has ever seen. Societies get cash for every ticket you buy!

3rd November

YOUNG GUNS, Clwb, £5 A six-piece funk band playing red hot 70s & 80s covers from the likes of Wham, Duran Duran, Chic etc.… CHIC BEAT, Revolution, £3 The brightest night of your life is looming, so get out the glowsticks, UV paint and ridiculous fluorescent socks… its Chic Beat.

4th November

CHEAPSKATES, Metros, £6 Expensive to get in, but if you like your metal and cheap drinks, then it is worth the price. It is famous for being a grotty place, but it's sort of why you like it. POPTART, 10 Feet Tall, £3 With 2-4-1 POPtails and cheap POPshots this is a cheaky little night at 10 Feet Tall. Pick up a flyer and get in FREE!

Then, at the end of the week, Barfly, a venue that has been fairly quiet of late, has come up with one the best gigs I have seen on their listings. Barfly is now a stunning venue and has some good drinks offers. So if you haven't spent all your gold on the mega-parties hitting Cardiff this week, get down to this one. As you can see by Barfly's dominance of Sunday we are very excited by it - keep it up Barfly, we have missed you. This week also sees the grand opening of the CAI (not CIA) which has taken over Igconitos on Park Place (just next to the Union). Expect great things from this newcomer in the next few weeks.

Students’ Union, Park Place, 02920 387421 www.cardiffstudents.com ◆ Med Club, Neuadd Meirionydd, Heath Park 02920 744948 ◆ Clwb Ifor Bach ros, Bakers Row 02920 399939 www.clubmetropolitan.com ◆ Dempseys, Castle Street 02920 252024 ◆ Move, 7 Mill Lane 02920 225592 ◆ Jazz, 21 St. Mary Street 02920 387026 www.cafejazzcardiff.com ◆ The Riverbank Hotel, Despenser Street www.riverbankjazz.co.uk ◆ St. David’s Hall, Millennium Centre, Cardiff Bay 0870 0402000 www.wmc.org.uk ◆ The New Theatre, Park Place 02920 878889 www.newtheatrecardiff.co.uk ◆ The Cardiff International Arena, Mary Ann Street 02920 224488 ◆ The Millennium Stadium Can’t miss it. www.millenniumstadium.com ◆ Tiger Tiger


LISTINGS 25

gairrhydd | LISTINGS@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 2nd 2009

Thursday

5th November ALABAMA 3, Coal Exchange, £16 Legendary Brixton collective, best known for the theme tune to the TV show 'Sopranos'. They combine techno beats with country instruments and are a group best sampled live. Y + T, The Globe, £17 Who says classic rockers are an endangered species? Still rocking on 30 years later with David Meniketti in front, Y & T as ready as ever to open fire on audiences all over the world with their contaious brand of heavy rock 'n' roll. Never down for the count for long, the group are reunited once more, and dedicated to bringing more than just a set of golden oldies to their legions of adoring fans. ALABAMA 3, Coal Exchange, £16 With rock and roll blasting out from 10 til 2am, you do have to love your Stone Roses and your Motorhead. If you do, then this is a night designed especially for you. Have your picture taken with any of the cut-out celebs as part of your rock and roll jam fest! CYNT, Clwb Ifor Bach, £3 Hi Rankin and DJ Burns are spinning the wheels of steel at CYNT this week. For only £3 this is a bargain! Massive tunes and a truly great atmosphere, I can't see why anyone would be somewhere other than Clwb on a Thursday (unless they are saving up for the mega-CYNTs!)

Friday

Saturday

6th November

7th November

BILL BAILEY, Millenium Centre, £25 Musical deity and comedic visionary? Bathborn founder member of The Rubber Bishops and one of the top stand-up comedians in Britain today. He was winner of the Best Live Stand Up 1999 Award, and spent six years as team captain on BBC TV's Never Mind the Buzzcocks.

HOSPITALITY, SU, £15 Featuring High Contrast aka Link Barrat, a leading Welsh junglist whose sound has been described as 'the most uplifting drum'n'bass in the universe'. Also appearing is Logistics, a drum & bass producer and former graphic designer from Cambridge, making waves in clubland with his Future Sound Of Cambridge EP and hefty contributions to the Weapons Of Mass Creation LP.

EDDIE IZZARD, CIA, £30 Ebullient, unpredictable and a sincere comic who is just as likely to play a village hall in Scotland as a mainstream venue, 'cos he can! He has been hailed as one of the foremost stand-ups of his generation, taking ideas and situations and extrapolating them into bizarre, tangential, absurd and surreal comic narratives. Eddie's musings have earned him countless awards including two Emmys. HELL'S BENT, Clwb, £4 The legendary alternative gay night is back!!! Clwb hosts the most outrageous party this side of San Francisco. Come out and play!

DESTROY THE DISCO, Glam, £8 Hed Kandi DJ Phil Faversham is part of the line up at Glam this Saturday. Fast becoming one of the places to be (if you like chart topping dance music). £8 is probably a bit too much for most folk though. DANIEL JOHNSON, The Gate, CANCELLED For all those out there that were truly looking forward to this gig, bad times. The performance has been cancelled. I am pretty dissappointed, so I can only imagine how you are feeling.

Sunday

8th November A PLACE TO BURY STRANGERS, Barfly, £6 Hotly tipped New Yorkers fusing the sounds of My Bloody Valentine and the Jesus & Mary Chain to create euphoric synthesized pop with a dark and brooding edge. The image of rock 'n' roll turned inside out: all the ugly viscera spilling out in an excess of anger, ghostly melodies, and crushing noise. JAPANDROIDS, Barfly, £6 Very hotly tipped Vancouver two-piece, Japandroids have set tongues wagging in North America with some of the most explosive and exciting live shows of 2009. Like a halfway house between The Sonics and Mclusky, Japandroids fuse together lo-fi production with punk's spittle-flecked velocity. What marks the band from other guitar/drums duos is their rip-roaring melodies are never compromised by the band’s visceral energy and lo-fi production.

THE APPLES, Cardiff Arts Institute, £3 The Apples are a nine-piece band hailing from Tel Aviv, Jerusalem and Haifa, weaving big band jazz into raw funk rhythm patterns and scratch routines.

(The Welsh Club), 11 Womanby Street 02920 232199 www.clwb.net ◆ Barfly, Kingsway, Tickets: 08709070999 www.barflyclub.com/cardiff ◆ MetIncognito, Park Place 02920 412190 ◆ Liquid, St. Mary Street 02920645464 ◆ The Philharmonic, 76-77 St. Mary Street 02920 230678 ◆ Café The Hayes 02920 878444 www.stdavidshallcardiff.co.uk ◆ Chapter Arts Centre, Market Road, Canton 02920 304400 www.chapter.org ◆ Wales Sherman Theatre, Senghennydd Road 02920 646900 www.shermantheatre.co.uk ◆ The Glee Club, Mermaid Quay 0870 2415093 www.glee.co.uk ◆ Greyfriar's Road 02920 391944 www.tigertiger.co.uk ◆ Tommy’s Bar, Howard Gardens (off Newport Road) 02920 416192 ◆


26 FEATURES

gairrhydd | FEATURES@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY MAY 18 2009


crossword. sudoku.

gairrhydd | FMF@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

FIVE MINUTE FUN 27 EASY

MEDIUM

Across

Down

9. Lethargy (7) 10. Wail (7) 11. A brass musical instrument (7) 12. Wash (7) 13. Act in an official capacity (9) 15. Parental brother (5) 16. Having ceased to exist (7) 19. Baby's room (7) 20. Take as one's own (5) 21. The passing of a law (9) 25. Durations (7) 26. Not later (7) 28. Deceiver (7) 29. Undress (7)

1. Restaurant (6) 2. Reject outright and bluntly (6) 3. Stair (4) 4. Slogan (6) 5. A midday meal (8) 6. Administrative official (10) 7. A crustacean that attaches itself to a ship (8) 8. Gravely (8) 14. Compose (10) 16. Impasse (8) 17. Struggle (8) 18. The funds of a government (8) 22. Order of business (6) 23. One who modifies written material (6) 24. A self-contained weapons platform (6) 27. A thorny flower (4)

Win £50 vouchers for YO! Sushi!

HARD

YO! Sushi, the iconic international Japanese restaurant group, has opened it's first restaurant in Wales at the new St David’s 2 Shopping Centre. For your chance to win a £50 meal voucher at YO! Sushi, answer the following question: How much of a generous discount do students get at YO! Sushi, weekdays 3-6pm? Hint – check out the offers page on www. it or@ ga ir rh ydd.com yosushi.com to find the answer! Se nd yo ur an swers to ed


28 SPORT

gairrhydd | SPORT@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

James Davies speaks to the recently retired cricketer Shane Warne about how he used to spin his magic During his playing days, Shane Warne was without doubt a special cricketer. He was the finest spin bowler of them all with many going as far as declaring him the greatest cricketer to ever play the game. That assessment would accommodate not only his skill as a bowler, but also his gift as an entertainer. From the moment the spin star bemused Mike Gatting, just over 16 years ago with that fizzing first delivery, Warne has dominated the game and frustrated many of those standing at the other end of the wicket with, not only his mesmeric talents as a cricketer but also with his barbaric competitive streak, which has helped him, throughout his career, ruthlessly tear sides apart.

Although the charismatic legend made his name from a number of different turning deliveries, the affable Warne, who has 708 Test wickets to his name, doesn't spin off the field. The straight talking Aussie, who has a very physical presence, spoke frankly and was reluctant to ‘pad away’ any questions preferring, instead, to ‘hit them for six’, saying, “ask whatever you want mate.” Now retired from the international game, you are more likely to catch the leg spinning legend around a poker table than you are on a cricket pitch, as he tries his hand in the professional game. The tanned Aussie explains, “I’ve played poker my whole life. I proba-

"To do that on your first ball when you're nervous and haven't been playng long against Mike Gatting was a fluke" ‘Warney’, as he is known affectionately by his thousands of loyal fans, has basked in the glory of no fewer than seven Ashes series wins, taking an incredible 195 wickets in 36 Ashes tests, leaving many of England’s batsmen bamboozled on more than one occasion. Not only have his outstanding achievements on the field revitalised

the art of leg-spin, but they have made it sexy. Without knowing it, Warne has played a major role in the development of the game. So what is the secret to facing the world’s most successful leg spinner? Shane revealed, “It’s quite simple really. Just watch the hand and how the ball comes out of it, and you’ll know exactly what’s happening.” When Warne, the cigarette-smoking, beer-swilling sportsman, packed in the jet-set life style of an international cricketer two years ago, many found it incomprehensible that he actually even thought about leaving the sport when there was clearly so much more there for us to enjoy. A smiling Shane explains, “A lot of people said you’ll get to an age when you’ll know when it’s time to retire, but I didn’t get that. But then I did and I knew it was my time. It’s better they say to you 'why did you?' than 'why didn’t you?'” The legend, however, really began in England during that famous Test match of 1993 when he bowled Mike Gatting with the ‘ball of the century’. A moment of cricketing history was born, changing his life forever. Shane humbly says, “It was a fluke. To do that on your first ball when you’re nervous and you haven’t been playing for long and you’re playing against England and Mike Gatting, who’s a superb player, to just land it was a fluke.” Shane made spin bowling sexy with that one bowl, and single-handedly transcended the sport. Soon fast bowlers were shoved to one side with legspinners coming to the fore. But what struck me most about this loveable rogue was that he didn’t actually ever dream about being a top class cricketer. Stretched out in his seat, Warne explains, “Being a Victorian it’s all about Aussie Rules Football and I wanted to play Aussie Rules when I was growing up, but I wasn’t good enough.” Astonishingly confessing, “I just played cricket in the summer because most of my buddies did, but I was a batsman not a bowler.” With his blonde hair, sparkling blue eyes and general Aussie beach-bum appearance, he explains: “The bowling didn’t really interest me because I was being whacked around and I

wasn’t very good. It’s tough being a spinner when you’re not that good and it's quite embarrassing as a youngster when you're bowling double bouncers or the ball goes over the fence and they can’t find it.” He explains: “My success has been down to hours and hours of practice. I could always spin the ball, but the accuracy came a lot later.”

"I wanted to play Aussie Rules when I was growing up, but I wasn't good enough" Having reached the pinnacle of sporting success, what advice would Shane, arguably the world’s finest cricketer, give any young aspiring player, who wanted to emulate all he has achieved? Having taken a sip from his now cold cup of coffee, the affable star muses, “I think what you have to do first of all is be very passionate about

what you do. You have to try and learn the best way you can, and be prepared that everything’s not going to be easy. There’s going to be a lot of hard work because there’s no easy way. There’s no short cut there’s not anything like that. You just have to practice really hard, and try and learn by the tough knocks, and try and become better every time and improve, and always try and become the best player you can.” So were those rumours true that Warne, the man who had been at the forefront of England's downfall on so many occasions, was really going to come and coach the Three Lions? With a wry smile and after another brief chuckle, Shane says teasingly, “I wouldn’t rule anything out.” Although Warne's life has been plagued by scandal and controversy both on and off the field, that is all part of the legend, and he will forever be remembered for torturing batsmen with his flight, guile, spin and mystery, all factors which mean England can breathe a sigh of relief that they will never have to face him in the Ashes ever again.

PHOTO: JAMES DAVIES

Bowling Warney

bly started as a 12 or 13-year-old with matchsticks. But I’ve only really been playing tournaments in the last three years, but I’ve really developed a passion for it.” Throughout his illustrious cricketing career, Shane was very good at playing mind games against his opposition, forever at the forefront of sledging, but has he ever tried dropping a few choice insults at the table? After a brief chuckle, Shane said: “Well, a few of the Yanks at the World Series all thought they were ‘Eddie the Expert’. They thought they knew exactly everything about every hand, so occasionally there was a bit of sledging going on, but most of the time it was all pretty relaxed and I'd just go about my business and keep my mouth shut. I don’t really say much.” Adding with his mischievous schoolboy look, “Give me another year or so…” Shane, who was born in Ferntree Gully, Australia, begins to talk about his childhood, making the room come alive. He says, with no sense of regret, “I used to get the cane a lot for misbehaving. At school, I wasn’t the sharpest tool in the box so if I didn’t understand, I would act the fool. I would then have to go down and see the principle who would practice his golf swing with six of the finest.” Jokily adding, “I must have enjoyed it because I kept on going back.”

James with Shane Warne: A striking resemblance

Why are prices at the student gym so high? Camille Lavoix Sports Writer In these first days back at university, the gym is full again and healthy resolution still intact. But the returning athletes might have noticed the 30% price increase of the casual ‘pay as you play’ gym entry.

A 3% rise was normally recorded each year but this time it went from £1.20 to £2, just to let off some steam at the Sport Centre. So why do we have to pay more for exactly the same service as last year? Official answer: “The entry fee was compared with other fitness providers”. There are many ways to set prices, but comparing with ‘competitors’ doesn’t seem to be the best option to

maintain appropriate fees for students. It reeks of business mentality to try and make further profit when Sport and Exercise is a department of the university and is subsidised by it, so why is such an increase needed? Let’s just hope the additional profit isn’t added to the salary of some head of department. Moreover, comparing is always a hazy process; the data, if there is

some, can be analyzed and translated in countless conclusions. Bristol University, for example, displays the same membership fees (£150) for the gym, but offer access to the swimming pool and many other advantages. Another drawback was detected this year at the gym, the flexibility offered last year, thanks to the 3 months membership, is no longer available. Instead of £40 a semester, the

sportsperson now has no choice but to take the £150 membership covering access to the gym and the fitness classes for the year and bear the additional cost without consistent explanation being given. Regarding novelties, new cardio vascular equipment will be installed over the Christmas period, but nothing seems to link this new service to the rise in price.


THE WORD ON - SPORT 29 TOP FIVE... Alex Winter gives his word on what lies ahead Stadiums for the £450m London 2012 Olympic Stadium 1. gairrhydd | SPORT@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

Under 1000 days until the 2012 Olympic games in London and everything appears to be moving as swiftly as the new trains from Stratford to King’s Cross. With many projects ahead of schedule and the budget just clinging to the coat tails of projected figures, but a few burning issues remain. The most pertinent of these surrounds the use of the Olympic stadium after the games are completed, and demands to leave a sporting legacy on the UK. The initial intention was for a reduced 25,000-capacity stadium to remain for athletics, but it seems that wish has been washed away under a tide of recession; such are the concerns for the regular use of such a facility. A flagship athletics stadium is exactly what British athletics needs; a beacon to which all athletes can strive to compete in – much like footballers hold a career-long passion to play at Wembley. A modern venue that demonstrates that Britain is prepared to invest in the future of athletics. Current venues – Crystal Palace and the Alexander stadium in Birmingham in particular – are dated and in need of refreshment. The Olympic stadium can provide the much needed upgrade and provide further encouragement for international athletes to come and compete in events in the UK, as well as inciting the British public to turn out for athletics events and reverse waning attendances. The National Championships, London and British Grand Prix events could all be held in the Olympic stadium, and such a high-class venue could lure the lucrative Golden League series to a London leg. If Britain shows commitment to providing appropriate facilities, athletics can raise its profile and boost the future development of talent in this country, but this opportunity could be lost if organisers are

View from inside

One of the world's most famous and prestigious football stadiums, Madrid's el Bernabeu was named as a UEFA Elite Stadium in 2007 and is set to host the UEFA Champions League final in 2010

2.

With a capacity of 98,000, Barcelona's Camp Nou is one of the largest stadiums in Europe. When filled wih Barca fans, the Cathedral of Catalan identity is electric.

3.

OLYMPIC STADIUM: Making the East End look good blinded by financial concerns. Attention has moved to finding a permanent tenant for the Olympic stadium, with several football and rugby clubs being approached with a view to taking on the stadium after the games. But all the clubs have been concerned about the logistics of transforming an athletics venue into an arena best suited for football or rugby; supporters continually bemoan the likes of Paris’ Stade de France for being too removed from the action. The oval nature of the Olympic stadium has led to county cricket clubs being approached, with the possibility of staging Twenty20 matches in the stadium’s original 80,000 capacity; ambitious plans, born out of the popularity of the recent Twenty20 World Cup in England, to attempt to rival the likes of the Melbourne Cricket Ground where up to 100,000 supporters can turn out for Australian matches. Retaining 80,000 seats could be a workable option. It could provide an innovative venue for cricket, a flagship athletics venue, and crucially remain available for future events. One finds it bizarre that such a venue would be deconstructed and the possibility of staging future major events would be lost, such as the World Championships, the 2018 football world cup and 2015 rugby world cup. However, the desire for legacy may be over-ruled by the desire to save money.

The Olympics minister, Tessa Jowell, is insistent that the stadium shall become a 25,000-seat athletics venue and declared; “we do not need another football stadium” at the Beyond Sport summit in central London, contradicting the words of the Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, who claimed it would be “foolish” to rule the Olympic stadium out of contention for a 2018 football venue; Jowell, however, is determined to honour the pledge to provide a Grand Prix athletics stadium for Britain and Keith Mills, the vice-chairman of 2012, said maintaining 80,000 seats was “not economically viable”.

A flagship athletics stadium is what British athletics needs; a beacon to which all athletes can strive to compete in Indeed, economic concerns would be the primary case for reducing the 80,000 capacity; keeping such a large venue for the possibility of a World Championship in ten years time is certainly a gamble, and, as Tessa Jowell mentions, there are enough football grounds to satisfy the bid for the 2018

world cup. Another option is being investigated by the Olympic Park Legacy Company (OPLC): reducing the stadium to 50,000. This would, prima facie, tick all the boxes: a large enough capacity for 2018 and other major events, and a manageable size to maintain for athletics. Could a good old British compromise be the answer? Exactly what the OPLC are trying to weigh up. Currently, the proposed reduction to 25,000 seats involves the complete removal of the upper parts of the stadium, leaving just the lower bowl. In order to double this, significant construction work would have to be undertaken at significant cost and could produce a stadium both too large and too small – the International Association of Athletics Federations declared their preference for upwards of 60,000 seats for a World Championship, and tenants such as Wasps and Saracens rugby clubs would never entertain the idea of hiring a 50,000 capacity ground week in, week out. The Olympic bid book stated the intention to create a lasting legacy for athletics in the UK, and the masterplan for a 25,000-seater stadium was essential to those aims, but it remains to be seen whether that plan will be persisted with, or whether the OPLC will recommend finding the bravery to seek more ambitious goals in the future.

Munich's Allianz Arena is the first stadium in the world that has a full change colour outside. Not only have the architects designed a stunning exterior, they have also succeeded in building in some atmosphere too.

4. Built for the 2008 Beijing Olympics, the $423 million Bird's Nest stadium is the world's largest steel structure. Visually stunning and with a capacity of 91,000 the Bird's Nest is by far one of the Worlds greatest stadiums.

5.

It may not be one of the biggest stadiums in the world but when 80,000 Welsh suuporters belt out a passionate Land of my Fathers, the atmosphere in the Millennium is unbeatable.


30 SPORT - THE WARM UP

gairrhydd | SPORT@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

Previews in brief

Adam Horne predicts the toppling of Boxing's biggest ever Heavyweight champion in Saturday's big fight

World Series Baseball

“David ran quickly toward the battle line to meet him. Reaching into his bag and taking out a stone, he slung it and struck the Philistine on the forehead. The stone sank into his forehead, and he fell facedown on the ground. So David triumphed over the Philistine with a sling and a stone; without a sword in his hand he struck down the Philistine and killed him.” We all know the age old story of David and Goliath; however the upcoming meeting between David Haye and Nikolai Valuev on November 7 seems destined to modernize the tale. Valuev is out to rewrite ancient history, and rest assured David Haye is going into the ring without a trusty sling on his arm. If small is to triumph over big once again, then Haye is certainly going to need to out-skill the Russian beast. With the World Heavyweight title on the line I aim to sum up just how Haye can defeat Valuev, whilst reminding readers that the Russian man mountain is more than just a pretty face.

So the Major League Baseball season is over. That can only mean one thing. The coming of the World series that this year sees the Philadelphia Phillies return to the best-of-seven playoff. For those of you who may be hazy on your baseball knowledge, the bestof-seven series works like this. It pits the two league champions against each other, in this case the Phillies and the Yankees. The first team to win 4 matches wins the series, hence bestof-seven.

The first match has already taken place with the Phillies beating the Yankees 6-1, a surprise outcome for some. The next match is to take place on Tuesday night at the Yankees stadium where they will no doubt be looking to level the series. The Yankees are back in the World Series after a 6 year wait and this could well be their year. They’ve had a bad start but they also have a pretty fearsome lineup and I believe they will hit back on Tuesday night. It promises to be a tight series whatever the case.

Liverpool vs Lyon Crunch time for Liverpool in Europe when they once again meet Lyon on Wednesday. Lyon got the better of Liverpool two weeks ago at Anfield, and will be brimming with confidence going into this game on their home turf. Liverpool sit 3rd in the group table below Lyon, who are on 9 points, and Fiorentina, who are on 6. Assuming Fiorentina take all 3 points against minnows Debrecen on Wednesday they will also have 9 points. If Liverpool were to lose against Lyon, Lyon would be on 12 points, with qualification guaranteed. This would also leave Liverpool trailing on a measly 3 points meaning Fiorentina need only to gain a point from their final two games to qualify. Liverpool need maximum points from their final three games if they are to qualify. Fernando Torres has recovered from injury and appears back in full swing after his weekend goal against Manchester United. However, fears still loom over Steven Gerrard. If he is not fit to face Lyon that will be a massive blow to Benitez. Expect Benitez to field an attack minded side, looking to score goals and break down the Lyon defence who showed their worth at Anfield. For me, this has to go down as a Lyon victory, which will no doubt lead to Liverpool failing to qualify for the final 16.

Judging from Valuev's size, sticks and stone are unlikely to break his bones... and it seems words are likely to have little effect either Both fighters come into this fight on the back of superb form. Haye, 28, has lost only once in 23 fights, whilst Valuev, 36, has, even more impressively only lost once in 52 fights of which included 34 knockouts whilst never being knocked down himself. Clearly Haye faces a daunting task. Or does he? Valuev is well known for his lack of technical ability when it comes to boxing. He’s slow, almost clumsy, and often leaves himself open to big hits. This must surely be David Hayes’ dream fight. He, in total contrast to Valuev is lightning quick,

nifty, energetic, and technically superior to the Russian. If he is to beat Valuev he will need to take advantage of these skills in Nuremburg on the 7th. Haye clearly believes he has what it takes to out maneuver the modern day Goliath. "He doesn't have the technical ability to beat someone as fast and as experienced as me". He continued by suggesting that “He's an ugly type of fighter, he tries to lean on you, tries to brawl and comes out with a really hairy chest that gets matted and is disgusting." That’s right. No boxing match is complete without the over-dramatic, showcase spectacle of trash talking and there’s been no shortage of that. Haye not only pokes fun at Valuev’s hairy chest, a man wig that even Austin powers would be proud of, but has also called him a ‘circus freak’ and suggested that “he doesn’t smell too sweet" "I've talked to a few guys that have been in the ring with him and they say that's the first thing they notice, just the stench…Hopefully he runs a cold tap over himself or someone hoses him down outside before he comes in." No doubt Haye will be hoping someone introduces Valuev to some ‘Right Guard’ before the two meet to introduce fists to each others faces on Saturday night. Not that this childish, yet hugely entertaining taunting seems to have unnerved the Russian at all. He has simply labeled Haye as "another idiot". "Haye's behaviour is very strange and not normal at all," he said. "I think one German phrase sums it up well: '1,000 volts, but no light',” he remarked. Judging from his size, sticks and stones are unlikely to break his bones and it seems words will have little effect either. The towering Russian stands nine inches taller than David Haye, and weights approximately 90 pounds more than the Englishman. Beating him will be no easy task because, beside the fact that I’m pretty sure he has a pelvis fused somewhere onto his face, he is in fact a great boxer. His statistics stand up on their own. One loss in 52 fights including 34 knockouts. He’s clearly a heavy hitter,

BEST PALS: The pair haven't quite mastered rock, paper scissors yet capable of putting opponents out of fights before the final bell. After hearing that he’s never been knocked down my confidence in Haye plummeted quicker than Southampton FC in the football leagues. Here we have a man who is used to fighting opponents a lot smaller than himself, who is, as far as I can tell, impossible to knock down, and who has some outstanding statistics behind him.

"I've talked to a few guys that have been in the ring with him and they say that's the first thing they notice... just the stench" The only way I can possibly see Haye winning is by a points decision, which would of course require him to go the full distance against Valuev. I’m going to go out on a limb and suggest that this will happen. Haye has been training incredibly hard and will be prepared for the power and brute force Valuev will bring to the

ring. He will, however, have the speed and technical skills to duck and dive the Russian’s shots, whilst no doubt getting in a few hits himself. I don’t honestly see Haye knocking the Russian out, but his superior boxing skills could well see him gaining a majority verdict should he go the distance. Someone has to knock this guy down one day. I don’t believe Haye will be the one to do it, but if he can stay off the canvas, I can see him stealing the majority verdict.

How you can watch: Sky Sports Box Office Saturday November 7 Coverage starts at: 20:00

D. Haye vs N. Valuev: The Editors make their predictions

CHAMPION: Valuev with his belt

Lucy Morgan: The height and weight difference between these two is ridiculous, so realisticly I don't see how David Haye can win. However, Valuev lacks technical ability and, when up against the fast-paced skill of Haye, this fight may not be as clear cut as it first seems. Valuev may have a pretty impressive history, having lost only one fight in the last 34, but he has to be beaten at some stage and why can't Haye be the one to acheive this? It's about time someone stuck up for the little people in the world!

Adam Horne: I’m rooting for David Haye. He’s quick, technically superior and is capable of taking hits. He’s been training against a 6ft 7 fighter and will be prepared for a tough fight against a tall opponent. I think this one will go the distance. Haye to win with an eventual majority verdict. The Englishman’s corner will be hoping he can replace the stench of Valuev’s chest wig with the sweet smell of victory. Valuev won’t give up his title easily, but should he fail, he could always take up a career as a Rocky Dennis impersonator.

Robbie Wells: I'm 6ft 6 so i have to stick up for the fellow giants in this world. The fact that Valuev has never been knocked down is a massive factor in my decision. He is obviously too big, and too powerful for other boxers to handle, which is exactly how he has managed to retain his title and exactly why he will retain his title on Saturday night. Haye may be quick, energetic, and technically sound, but he's also short...and short people never win.


IMG - SPORT 31

gairrhydd | SPORT@GAIRRHYDD.COM MONDAY NOVEMBER 02 2009

IMG NETBALL STANDINGS IMG NETBALL

DIVISION A

P

W

D

L

Diff

Pts

1

CARBS A

3

3

0

0

+80

9

2

Psychology A

3

3

0

0

+43

9

3

Cardiff B

3

2

0

1

+8

6

4

English A

3

2

0

1

+3

6

5

Pharmacy B

3

1

0

2

-28

3

6

JOMEC

3

1

0

2

-39

3

7

SOCSI B

3

0

0

3

-27

0

8

Politics

3

0

0

3

--40

0

IMG NETBALL

DIVISION B P

W

D

L

Diff

Pts

1

Engin Loco

3

3

0

0

+36

9

2

Economics

2

2

0

0

+46

6

3

Law B

3

2

0

1

+19

6

4

Cardiff Jets A

3

2

0

1

+2

6

5

Medics B

1

0

0

1

-7

0

6

Gym Gym

2

0

0

2

-25

0

7

Christian Union

2

0

0

2

-26

0

8

Navy Netball

2

0

0

2

--45

0

IMG NETBALL

DIVISION C

Pharmacy find last minute cure Alex Gill Sports Writer JOMEC FC 3 - 3 Pharm AC JOMEC FC went into last Sunday’s game against Pharm AC hoping for their first points of the season, and after leading for the duration of the match were disappointed to only leave with one point. The journalists after a poor season last year were probably the underdogs going into this match. However they went ahead early on with a scrappy goal from first year Sam Tegeltija, but pharmacy showed their strength and soon pulled one back ten minutes later from a corner, after a mistake in the

Jomec penalty area. Jomec regrouped and took full advantage of the strong wind advantage as high balls over the top caused trouble for the pharmacy back line. After 40 minutes of scrappy and aggressive play from both teams, Nick Fletcher put Jomec into the lead going into half time. Pharmacy came all out second half to try and grab an equalizer, set pieces and corners saw Jomec pegged back, but it wasn’t until well into the second half that Andrew Kings grabbed his first ever goal for pharmacy. His quality strike coming off the post into the back of the net put pharmacy back level for the second time in the game. You would think pharmacy would have the momentum after scoring an equalizer but Jomec didn’t give up and

with 10 minutes to go Jeromy kynaston smashed home a superb strike into the top right hand corner of the goal. Jomec could have been blamed for being complacent but with all their substitutes used and injured players having to hold onto the final whistle, Pharmacy piled on the pressure and in the last moments of the game with 5 minutes left got the equalizer they needed with a beautiful finish from forward Daniel Hay. The goal got pharmacy their second point of the season after a well fort match. With a muddy pitch, challenges flying in from all directions and hard work all round, a draw was probably a fair result. Both teams now need to refocus and look ahead to their games on Wednesday.

IMG FOOTBALL STANDINGS IMG FOOTBALL

Group A W

D

L

Diff

Pts

1

MOMED

3

2

1

0

+8

7

2

Engin Auto

3

2

0

1

+7

6

3

EarthSoc

3

2

0

1

+4

6

4

Economics FC

3

1

2

0

+3

5

5

Pharm AC

3

1

2

0

+3

5

P

6

Magnificent XI

3

1

0

2

-6

3

7

JOMEC FC

3

0

1

2

-7

1

8

Philosophy FC

3

0

0

3

--12

0

IMG FOOTBALL 1

Sporting Lesbians

Group B P

W

D

L

Diff

Pts

3

3

0

0

+7

9

2

Law A

3

3

0

0

+5

9

3

Chemistry

3

2

0

1

+1

6

4

AFC Cathays

3

2

0

1

0

6

5

AFC History

3

1

0

2

+6

3

6

SAWSA

3

1

0

2

+2

3

7

Law B

3

0

0

3

-6

0

8

Cardiff Crusader

3

0

0

3

--16

0

IMG FOOTBALL

Group C P

W

D

L

Diff

Pts

1

Samba Tigers

2

2

0

0

+10

6

2

Gym Gym

2

2

0

0

+9

6

3

Psycho Athletico

2

2

0

0

+6

6

P

W

D

L

Diff

Pts

1

Pharmacy A

2

2

0

0

+29

6

2

SOCSI A

2

2

0

0

+9

6

3

Carbs B

2

2

0

0

+6

6

4

Medics A

2

1

0

1

+7

3

4

5

Psychology B

2

1

0

1

-7

3

5

Sub-Standard Liege

2

1

0

1

0

3

KAY FC

2

1

0

1

-3

3

6

Bioscience

2

0

0

2

-6

0

6

Opsoccer

2

0

0

2

-7

0

7

Engin Auto

2

0

0

2

-13

0

7

SOCSI FC

2

0

0

2

-7

0

8

Economics B

2

0

0

2

--25

0

8

EUROS FC

2

0

0

2

--8

0

IMG NETBALL

DIVISION D

IMG FOOTBALL

Group D

P

W

D

L

Diff

Pts

P

W

D

L

Diff

Pts

1

LAW A

2

2

0

0

+38

6

1

CARBS

2

2

0

0

+19

6

2

Cardiff A

2

2

0

0

+33

6

2

Inter-me-nan

2

2

0

0

+5

6

3

English B

2

1

0

1

+4

3

3

KLAW FC

2

1

1

0

+3

4

4

Cardiff Jets B

2

1

0

1

-5

3

4

Real Ale Madrid

2

1

1

0

+2

4

5

SAWSA

2

1

0

1

-6

3

5

Engin FC

2

1

0

1

+9

3

6

EarthSoc

2

1

0

1

-13

3

6

J-Unit

2

0

0

2

-6

0

7

History

2

0

0

2

-20

0

7

Myg Myg

2

0

0

2

-12

0

8

Dentistry

2

0

0

2

--31

0

8

AFC Time Team

2

0

0

2

--20

0

UPCOMING FIXTURES

UPCOMING FIXTURES

DIVISION A

GROUP A

JOMEC SOCSI B English A

Psycho A

V V V V

Cardiff B

MOMED FC

Politics

EarthSoc

Pharmacy B

Engin Auto

Carbs A

Pharm AC

DIVISION B Economics Law B Engin Loco Gym Gym

V V V V

C. Union Medics B Jets A Navy

Economics SOCSI A Psycho B

V V V V

SAWSA Law A History

V V V V

Philosophy given something to think about as MOMED seal vital win

AFC History

Pharmacy A

MOMED 3 - 0 Philosophy

Bioscience

With the top and bottom of Group A of the IMG doing battle at Pontcana, many predicted a thrashing for Philosophy at the hands of current IMG Champions MOMED. However this turned out to be far from the case despite the eventual 3-0 score line. MOMED again started strongly and had a number of early chances, especially to Pete Barry and Olly Jones. In spite of this early pressure, they started to become frustrated with the lack of an early goal and Philosophy came back into the game. A slip by MOMED centre back Cameron Anderson allowed the nippy Philosophy striker in on goal and only a fantastic sliding challenge by the

Engin Auto CARBS B

DIVISION D EarthSoc

GROUP B

Alex Bywater Sports Writer

DIVISION C Medics A

WET SPELLS AHEAD: IMG last year was riddled with rain...a sign of things to come?

English B Dentistry Jets B Cardiff A

out of position Mike O’Brien stopped MOMED going behind. The remainder of the first half continued with MOMED on top. However, similar to their previous game against Economics, they struggled to find that vital final ball and those chances that were created were missed, despite an outrageous bicycle kick attempt by Tim Moody. As a result, the teams went into half time equal. The second half started with both teams looking for the opening goal. The MOMED defence was solid and Philosophy never really looked like breaking them down. Indeed MOMED keeper Adam Horne was almost redundant in the second half. An inspired substitution saw Mark Hatnean come on at the hour stage and immediately make the breakthrough with his first touch. A cross from the left saw Hatnean at the far post finish expertly.

The breakthrough enabled MOMED to relax and play better football. Consequently they dominated the rest of the game and only looked like scoring more due to some sloppy Philosophy defending. Man of the match Jon Dovey added a second soon after with another calm and classy finish. MOMED could have added more goals and came close when an outrageous thirty yard shot from Olly Jones struck the crossbar. Jones eventually got the goal that he deserved with a simple tap in as MOMED began playing some good passing football. It was notable how the level of importance improved dramatically once MOMED started playing good passing football. The final whistle blew early after an extraordinary collision at the back for Philosophy when two players went for the same ball resulting in comic scenes all round.

Chemistry Law B Sporting Lesbians

V V V V

JOMEC FC

V V V V

SAWSA

V V V V

SOCSI

V V V V

Carbs

Philosophy Economics Magnificent XI

Cathays Crusaders Law A

GROUP C Samba Tiger Liege Opsoccer EUROS FC

KAY FC Gym Gym Psycho At.

GROUP D KLAW FC Real Ale J-Unit Engin FC

Inter Time Team Myg Myg


Sport gairrhydd

PHOTO: KATHARINA JOITE

INSIDE: Interview with Shane Warne, Boxing Preview and The Word On...The Future For London's Olympic Stadium

Cardiff 1sts leave medics nursing wounds Gethin Thomas Sports Writer

Cardiff Uni Men's 23 - 3 Cardiff Medics A crowd of around 500 students travelled to Cardiff University Playing Fields on Wednesday to watch the much-anticipated BUCS Premier League fixture between Cardiff University Men's and Medics squads. The game started brightly for the Men’s team with a sweeping backs move from a very impressive and dominant scrum saw the ball moved to powerhouse wing, Ross Waddell, to score at the pavilion end of the pitch. Constant pressure from the

Cardiff team saw fresher Waddell going over for his second try from exactly the same move ten minutes later. The Men’s team were the dominant force in the first half but with so much riding on this game and nerves clearly prevalent they failed to capitalise on their dominance and territory. Consistently the Men’s team knocked on after getting outside their men and spurned three further chances to add to the score line. The second half started in the same vein as the first, consistent pressure from the Men's saw fresher Mike Jones scoring his first try for his club after great work from his pack. Further scores came from the trusty boot of fly half Cerith Rees. The final score was 23 – 3 and captain and second year Medical stu-

dent Nick Huntley was ecstatic with the victory: "I’m very proud of all the boys who were lucky enough to get on the field today and of the boys who didn’t. They all played a very important part in the victory today. We're a very tight knit group who were hurting after throwing the game away last Wednesday. We know we're getting better each week and I’m very thankful, after stepping in as Captain for Schroff today, with the win." The Men’s coaches were happy that the game was played in a great spirit and, obviously, with the win. However there were frustrations with their young charges and, armed with the statistics video analyst Simon Norris had presented to the coaches, in particular the possession and territory stats which were 85% in the Men’s favour, it was clear that

this could and indeed should have been a much larger victory. “Given the dominance achieved today our completion rate was well down on what we expect from this group, this is not a flippant comment, we would expect a far bigger score line from such dominance. We will revisit the video and look at our deficiencies to put them right for next week’s game. If we are going to play and develop to the undoubted potential of this team, we must take advantage of the possession we had today.” That said, things do look bright for the future, not one player on the field today has played for two seasons, all have at least two years left at Cardiff University. If they keep improving at this rate they could develop into a real force in this league. The Men’s

second team is putting real pressure on their first team squad; under the captaincy of Rhys Jenkins there is a feeling that they could gain promotion this year. Jordan Wood was singled out Man of the Match with the Men's Coach stating that, “Jordan was tireless today, his option taking was second to none, he was big and strong and displayed a maturity to his game beyond his 20 years of age”. Medics captain Sion Crabtree was selected as the pick of the Medics. The Men are in action again on Saturday at Llanrumney in the second round of the SWALEC competition entertaining Abercwmboi, the Seconds play Taffs Well Seconds in the East District Cup. Your support would be much appreciated.

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gair rhydd - Issue 907