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ISSUE 192 / 2019

F R E E

Lonely Hearts Club


WWW.BOYMODE.NET @ITSBOYMODE


Left: Bree wears The Brown Eyed Girl Dress Right: Bree wears The Heat of The Moment Top & Edelweiss Shorts


CONTENTS

All Out

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14

18

22

28

36

40

46

The Scoop Fashion News A New Tread with JD Sports My Way with Thandi Phoenix The Fundamentals of Caring Feature Racing Stripes Editorial Tough Luck Editorial Spotlight On Designer Profiles Beauty Book Hair and Beauty

PUBLISHER

ADIDAS ORIGINALS POLAR FLEECE SWEATSHIRT $130 FROM JD SPORTS RELIQUIA EARRINGS $149 AND TRINITY BRACELETS $249 Full shoot credits on page 14

Furst Media Pty Ltd. Mycelium Studios Factory 1/10-12 Moreland Road Brunswick East VIC furstmedia.com.au MANAGING EDITOR Giulia Brugliera giulia@furstmedia.com.au

From the Team Hi friends, We’ve now hit deep spring, a time of new beginnings. And while our budding editorial team continues to set course, this issue also marks a new beginning for us. Right now much of the fashion industry is turning towards Spring Racing – and all the pomp, festivity and style that comes with it. This year, instead, we’ve chosen to turn away. The closest we’ll come to racing coverage is our Racing Stripes editorial on page 28, bringing together a vibrant clash of animal prints, faux fur and vegan leather. We also turn the spotlight on accessories that will join your celebrations with zeal, while still enduring past spring (page 24).

DIGITAL EDITOR Sasha Gattermayr sasha@furstmedia.com.au

Elsewhere in this issue, we speak with four trailblazing women making waves in the music scene. Nicole Millar and Jaguar Jonze talk life as a woman in the industry today (page 14), Thandi Phoenix highlights those groundbreakers before her (page 18) and metal vocalist Karina Utomo opens up about how she developed her thick skin (page 20). We also explore the concept of compassion fatigue (page 22) and consider men’s fashion through a softer lens (page 36). Until next time, The FJ team xx

SALES & CREATIVE CAMPAIGNS Sophie Hodges sophie@furstmedia.com.au EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Maeve Kerr-Crowley ADVERTISING Giulia Brugliera giulia@furstmedia.com.au Sasha Gattermayr sasha@furstmedia.com.au Sophie Hodges sophie@furstmedia.com.au DESIGN LEAD & DIGITAL Ruby Furst ruby@furstmedia.com.au GRAPHIC DESIGN Nina De Pietro DISTRIBUTION distribution@furstmedia.com.au EDITORIAL INTERNS

COVER

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Christina Karras, Ruby Staley, Anthony Graetz, Tess Macallan, Indah Dwyer, Mariah Papadopoulos, Jasmine Wallis

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DESIGN INTERNS

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Izak Stevens, Sophia Temporali

Photographer – Tasha Tylee Model – Riley at People Agency Full shoot credits on page 36

© 2019 FURST MEDIA PTY LTD. No part may be reproduced without the consent of the copyright holder.

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denadaco.com


NEWS

The Scoop

Powerhouse Museum To celebrate its new exhibition Jenny Kee and Linda Jackson: Step into Paradise, Powerhouse Museum is running a series of free fashion talks. Bringing together curators, artists, academics, activists and editors, the panels will dive into Sydney’s rich artistic history. Discussion will centre around creative culture, Sydney in the ’70s, the interplay of fashion and identity, and the legacy of two of the most influential artists in Australian fashion. The talks are free and include after-hours viewings of the exhibition. MAAS.MUSEUM

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Oakley

Best Jumpers

Vans

Oakley has released a capsule collection that is going to make you re-think your feelings towards the brand. It is stepping firmly into the fashion arena with the Definition capsule. The new release stretches the brand’s technology all the way to streetwear, breathing new life into its functional eyewear and apparel. Modular frames are delivered in ’90s silhouettes and neon colours, while new hoodies, jackets and vests are grounded in street culture. Definition is now available online and from select Oakley flagships.

Founded last year by Australian designer Dylan Best, Best Jumpers is known for its elevated and cool casual wear. The brand has now dropped the next instalment of its Spring/Summer collection, all designed and made in Melbourne with comfort in mind. It offers a variety of sporty silhouettes, including the lightweight nylon Tech Pant, a cropped update on the classic tracksuit bottom. It also introduces woven khaki shorts to the line, as well as the brand’s first women’s-only garment, a jumper dress available in forest green or mint.

Vans has garnered a reputation for its skaterstyle shoes that have the enigmatic ability to make any outfit cool. And unlike other kicks that rely on limited edition drops and designer collabs, Vans silhouettes continue to endure. Now’s a good time to turn back to the classics, like the retro checkerboard Vans Classic Slip-On. Pick up a pair in Platypus stores and online.

OAKLEY.COM/EN-AU

BESTJUMPERS.COM.AU

PLATYPUSSHOES.COM.AU


NEWS

Festival X We’re edging closer to the arrival of the inaugural Festival X. From November 29 the day-long summer festival will be touring the east coast, with a lineup of names that begin with headliners Steve Aoki and Calvin Harris and extend to local talents like Anna Lunoe. It’s the brainchild of three partners from leading entertainment groups Hardware, Onelove and Live Nation who have all come together to create something big. Festival X will span multiple genres across multiple stages, with Armin van Buuren, Lil Pump, Trippie Redd, Thandi Phoenix, Giuseppe Ottaviani, Kaz James and Alison Wonderland also on the bill. FESTIVALX.COM.AU

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Denada

Kester Black

H&M

Trust women to take something as great as ice cream and make it even greater. Denada was cooked up by three entrepreneurs from WA, delivering a range of natural ice cream with less than one gram of sugar per serve. The female-run startup offers the taste and texture of ‘real’ ice cream, while also making it a diabetic- and ketofriendly treat. Four classic flavours of vanilla, double choc, peanut butter and mint chip are now available in health food stores, independent grocers and Coles supermarkets nationally.

Vegan beauty favourite Kester Black is expanding its turf from your nails to your lips, introducing a debut line of liquid lipsticks. The collection, dubbed Hyperreal, features six wearable shades ranging from versatile nudes to deeper tones and pops of colour. Like the brand’s range of nail polish, these lipsticks are vegan, cruelty-free and ethically produced. To ensure the formula is kind to your lips, it’s packed with restorative, moisturising ingredients like prickly pear extract, olus oil and passionflower oil.

H&M is entering spring with the launch of a new Conscious Collection. This season’s iteration is inspired by modern romantic designs, featuring sweeping hemlines and billowed sleeves across coordinated separates and floaty dresses. Colours centre on earthy, neutral tones and are paired with delicate floral prints to accentuate the finer details. As with each Conscious Collection, this drop is made from materials like 100 per cent organic cotton, Tencel and recycled polyester. Now available in H&M stores across the country.

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KESTERBLACK.COM

HM.COM/AU


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NEWS

The Australian Ballet The Australian Ballet has announced its 2020 season, ringing in David McAllister’s 20th and final year as artistic director. To send him out with a bang, the year will bring a number of new works and revivals, opening with an adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s The Happy Prince. The season also includes a collaboration with British choreographer Wayne McGregor, a fresh iteration of Anna Karenina, a trio of landmark works dubbed Molto and the 1900s slapstick Harlequinade. AUSTRALIANBALLET.COM.AU

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Dr. Martens

Pandora

Nixon

For six decades, Dr. Martens has been the shoe of choice for the young and resilient. For its latest campaign, Tough As You, Dr. Martens is highlighting the people who wear Docs and the kinds of adversity they fight against every day. Take Karina Utomo, vocalist for extreme metal band, High Tension, who has been announced as a new Australian ambassador for the campaign. Having lived through political violence and plenty of personal setbacks, Karina is as tough as they come.

We’ve teamed up with Pandora for a new series we’re calling Charming People. To celebrate the release of the brand’s new Pandora Me collection — a series of charms, studs and carriers designed to help you to tell your personal story — we interviewed four local creatives about finding and expressing their true selves. These inspiring interviews with Charlotte Frimpong, Savannah Anand-Sobti, Tabatha Turner and Ruth Dradi will be dropping online on FJ throughout the month.

Nixon has released a new watch designed for the most passionate of beachgoers. The Siren Milanese features a custom woven-look band, stainless steel case back, chronograph and countdown timer. It’s also water-resistant, so you don’t need to worry about it in the waves. The kicker, however, is the inbuilt tide functionality to let you know the best time to hit the beach. The Siren Milanese is available in three colourways – gold, rose gold and black.

DRMARTENS.COM.AU

AU.PANDORA.NET

NIXON.COM/AU


A New Tread Being a woman in a man’s world isn’t as tough as it used to be, but we’ve still got a way to go. You only need to ask a woman in the music industry for evidence on how much you have to hustle. PHOTOGRAPHER – KAITLYN BOSNJAK STYLIST – ISABELLA MAMAS HAIR & MAKEUP – VIC ANDERSON TALENT – JAGUAR JONZE AND NICOLE MILLAR MADE IN PARTNERSHIP WITH JD SPORTS

NIKE AIR MAX 98 WOMEN’S $180 FROM JD SPORTS

Better yet, we’ve asked them for you. In partnership with JD Sports, we invited local musicians Jaguar Jonze and Nicole Millar to sit together and talk in-depth about their own experiences in the industry. What resulted was a candid conversation around breaking barriers, proving others wrong and finding your place in a space traditionally dominated by men. Jaguar Jonze: How did you get into the industry? Nicole Millar: Just by being a hustler. When I was younger, I would always message everyone on SoundCloud like, “Hello, hello, I want to be a singer.” And it worked. Maybe it’s not the way to do it anymore. JJ: No way, I totally think that’s the way to do it. NM: Well, it’s how I did it. But it finally became a job rather than just a hobby through Peking Duk. They messaged me on Instagram and we had two sessions, and then it all just rambled from there. What was it like for you? JJ: I got into the industry really late. I didn’t grow up doing music at all. I was doing engineering and my really close friend passed away. When that happened, I just walked past this garage sale in Melbourne and thought, “I’m going to buy this guitar and learn to play.” But I ended up writing songs, which was something I’d never done, and from there I found my passion. I knew I had to hustle after that, because most people who work in the music industry have grown up doing it and I only started when I was 21.

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NM: Do you ever feed from sadness when you write songs? JJ: Yeah, a lot of the time. All of my songs are pretty dark and sombre. NM: I don’t know how to write a happy song. It’s just too cheesy. JJ: I do this ironic thing where I write sad songs and put upbeat drums behind them. Then people think, “Yeah, I’m grooving,” and I’m like, “Tricked you, it’s a sad song!” While I’m thinking about that, what does success mean to you? NM: I’m such an anxious person with music and if I’m thinking about all the things I want to do and achieve, I get so overwhelmed. I’ve ticked off all these things already, and I can afford my lifestyle and not work another job, but you always want more. I don’t think I ever want to be a huge, Justin Bieber-level celebrity, because that’s intense. But for me, success would be being able to sustain this for the rest of my life. How about you? JJ: I’m not at that sustainable level yet, but that’s what I want. NM: Oh, it took me so long. JJ: Exactly. But I’m a visual artist too, so all I do now is visual art and music. It’s a struggle, but success for me is the same, just doing this for the rest of my life.


JAGUAR AND NICOLE WEAR ADIDAS ORIGINALS LOCK UP BODYSUIT $50 FROM JD SPORTS

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W

JD-SPORTS.COM.AU @JDSPORTSAU /JDSPORTSAUSTRALIA

NM: It’s nice that we’re on the same page. We’re not saying, “I want to be Beyoncé.” JJ: “I want to be Celine Dion!” I mean, I do. NM: I wouldn’t complain. JJ: Do you see music as a male-dominated industry right now? NM: To be honest, I think it’s a really good time for female, non-binary and LGBTQI+ artists. We’re all having a big moment. But in other areas backstage there’s always a lot of guys. JJ: My sound engineer is female, and even over email and on the phone people always say ‘he’. I’m like, “You mean she.” So she’s definitely in a space that’s male-dominated. As an artist, I feel like there’s more space for us now and for people of colour, but I still think the industry is an old boys’ club. Although, those power plays within the old structure are coming to light and starting to break down with the #MeToo movement. NM: It’s definitely better now. When I first started, I felt like I had to dress down everything I did just so people would believe I wrote my own songs. My old manager was very much like, “Wear baggy T-shirts, don’t show any of your body, don’t post too many selfies.” With pop music, as well, there’s always this stigma that you don’t write your own songs and you’re just this plastic, bubbly girl. JJ: How does that affect the way you navigate the industry? NM: Back then I used to care so much about hiding myself, but it just doesn’t bother me anymore. I used to have only older men working around me as managers and the like, who were trying to shape and control what I did. But I got rid of them all (laughs). JJ: That’s it. When you first enter the industry it’s so daunting and you’re trying to grab hold of all these opportunities from people who are probably trying to take advantage of you. Then, as you carve out your own space, you start letting go of the people who don’t serve you, or are detrimental to your career.

NICOLE WEARS NIKE TRAINING INDY BRA $39.99 FROM JD SPORTS, DION LEE TOP $270, CAMILLA AND MARC PANTS $450, NIKE AIR MAX 98 WOMEN’S $180 FROM JD SPORTS, RELIQUIA NECKLACES $169 AND TRINITY BRACELETS $249 TOP: NIKE AIR MAX 720 WOMEN’S $200 FROM JD SPORTS

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NM: You want the opportunities so you’re going to say yes. But then you realise that you’re actually the boss of these people, and they work for you. JJ: What are your plans for the future? NM: Well, my immediate plans are to get a coffee. But otherwise, I got a bit lost in the industry at the beginning because I’m really easygoing and I’d be like, “Yes, yes, yes.” Even though I like my songs, I haven’t been as honest in previous interviews when someone asks, “What’s different about your new song?” and I’d say, “Oh this is so true to me.” I’ve just been writing for a year, and I’m going to put things out, bang, bang, bang. JJ: Oh, some bangers? NM: Bang, bang, bang, bangers. That’s it. What about you? JJ: I just released a single, so just letting that one run. Also working on another single and an EP, and spending the rest of the year touring with Lime Cordiale and Ali Barter. And bang, bang, bang, bangers and mash. To celebrate women in male-dominated spaces like Nicole and Jaguar, JD Sports is hosting a month-long series of activations and events. The retailer has invited Nike, ASICS, adidas Originals and PUMA to each take over a temporary site in Sydney for a week, showcasing and highlighting their own women’s offerings. The JD Women’s Space will be open in Pitt Street Mall every weekend throughout October. Dates and opening times will be released across the JD Sports social channels.

JAGUAR WEARS ADIDAS ORIGINALS A2K FITTED CROPPED TOP $50 FROM JD SPORTS, VINTAGE BLAZER, CAMILLA AND MARC PANTS $450, NIKE AIR MAX 720 WOMEN’S $200 FROM JD SPORTS, RELIQUIA WRAPPING EARRING $189

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MUSIC

My Way INTERVIEW BY ELIZA SHOLLY

It’s a special kind of sonic evolution that emerges when you reflect on your favourite albums. Especially if you’re someone that creates music for a living, it’s a personal epiphany to discover an artistic arc that’s been there all along, slowly burbling in the background.

It’s the same with books, memories, the way we tell stories. All these different outlets reflect you and your position in the world, and with it comes some introspection about your character and taste. For Australian soul singer, Thandi Phoenix, good taste comes from being both inspired and reflective. “There are so many female vocalists in that realm that I connected to; Aretha Franklin, Nina Simone,” lists Thandi. “But I’m influenced most by the music that touches me. I was constantly making my way through different genres to find my sound, and I still am.”  Thandi’s favourite albums reflect her connection to other women of colour, honest art, and a musical tradition that honours live performance. Each album is connected to an emotion or a revelation about her identity, and paints an intimate portrait of an instrumentalist who is consistently determined to evolve.   Here she shares those that have shaped her person and her music, starting where all good musical discoveries start — with the Spice Girls. SPICE GIRLS: SPICEWORLD, 1997

“Spiceworld is the first album I remember learning all the words to. I still have vivid memories of me and my best friend making up routines and dancing on tables to these songs when we were kids. It was probably the first sense of joy I got from music. As a mixed-race child in Australia, having Scary Spice as a musical role model was really amazing. She had a stage and a platform, and she also had brown skin and curly hair. For a girl of my age to have someone in mainstream music to relate to was really cool. And you know, girl power, having fun, those kinds of messages were really powerful to hear.”

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about music, if you can listen to a song and think, ‘Oh shit, I’m not alone, they’re going through this as well.’” ALICIA KEYS: AS I AM, 2007

“Obviously Alicia Keys needs no introduction. Her voice is so raspy and textured, it gives me goosebumps. That and her incredible pianoplaying. So many of the songs on this album are love songs, but she just has this way of taking each track and making it about so much more. There are also some iconic producer and performance collaborations, the one with John Mayer specifically. Seeing a powerful woman of colour giving it her all was really formative for me.”

AMY WINEHOUSE: FRANK, 2003

DISCLOSURE: SETTLE, 2013

“Around the time I started listening to Frank was actually when I picked up a guitar for the first time. I remember going out and buying the music book just so I could learn how to play the songs. Amy taught me how to play, really. She was such a character. Everything she goes through she just lays out there, and I really connected to that kind of honesty. I think it’s really one of the best things

“When I first started creating music, having a soul background meant that I always produced and performed with live instruments. Hearing Settle was a turning point for me musically, because the production was so strong. Every single song is such a tune; you hear them and all you want to do is dance and move. They’re hypnotic, infectious and you get stuck in the groove. I remember seeing

them on tour at The Forum in Melbourne and my mind was blown, witnessing how much everyone got into it and how they were transported was incredible. It was so different to a soul show. This album really inspired me to move in a new direction, into more of the electronic genre. It’s timeless.” RUDIMENTAL: HOME, 2013

“Again, hearing this album initially was quite a new sound for me, but Home is just something special. When I saw them live on this tour, I remember standing in the crowd, watching Gorgon City open for them and thinking ‘I want to be the before act for Rudimental.’ Call it manifestation, but after that I was chosen as their main support act on their 2015 and 2016 tours. Then we released ‘My Way’ together in 2018. If you think about it, there are soulful elements in their music; they have so much heart in what they do.” Thandi Phoenix is playing at Festival X in Sydney on November 30 and Melbourne on December 1. Tickets are now on sale. FESTIVALX.COM.AU


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MUSIC

Sonic Shift WORDS BY MAEVE KERR-CROWLEY

Heavy metal vocalist, Karina Utomo is no stranger to adversity. Growing up between Canberra and a Jakarta in the midst of political turmoil, she was made to regularly adapt to ensure she fit in. Within this shifting context, Karina developed a resilience that has seen her named as an ambassador for Dr. Martens’ Tough As You campaign. “I think there’s a strong correlation with places in the world that have a dark or bloody history and a thriving metal scene,” says Karina. Moving to Canberra at the age of eight then back to Jakarta, her formative years coincided with a corrupt and tumultuous political regime. Her adolescence was coloured by the kind of tension and crisis that most of her Australian peers would never experience. “When I grew up, it was under the Suharto regime [and] artists were creating music to break free from not having any freedom of speech,” she explains. “Like punk, a lot of people rely on having a metal scene to rebel, especially in a place like Indonesia.” Perhaps it’s this that ignited her love for heavy metal, or perhaps it was her need to find a community. As she was made to move back and forth across countries during her childhood, Karina was forced also to adapt across cultures. Growing up in this state of flux wasn’t helpful in laying down roots, but it did help her learn resilience from an early age. “I had to assimilate really quickly to stop the teasing, and I had to be very aware of my environment […] to blend in,” she says.

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Maybe the rebellion was there right from the beginning, but we all know that trying to fit in can make you stand out more. Karina joined a punk band when she was 16 and started writing songs, productively working out her inevitable teen angst. It wasn’t until she went to her first heavy metal show that she became devoted to the genre. “I was blown away [and] felt compelled to do more with my own voice, and learn how to sing in an abrasive way,” she recalls. While a glimpse of the hardcore scene lit a fire within her, many people told her she should give up singing altogether. “Perhaps they were trying to give me constructive criticism and, in retrospect, I was probably a pretty shit singer,” she says. “[But] no one’s going to try something for the first time and be a virtuoso. There has to be room to be shit, to then get better.” At the time she didn’t take any of it on board, instead letting the criticism spur her on further and with more determination. Maybe that’s what she means when says, “Setbacks are basically giving you more time to prepare, they’re a good thing.” She goes on to cite a fierce lineage of trailblazing women who each chipped at the

music industry’s glass ceiling. It’s these who Karina credits as inspiration, pointing particularly to legendary female, trans and non-binary artists who have made space for themselves in the metal scene. “There have always been women in music, and they did all the hard work so I could do what I do right now and not have the same issues they faced,” she says. Karina’s vision for the future sees these kinds of diverse voices – the ones who have had to fight the hardest to get to where they are now – taking over the industry and making themselves heard. “I’m really hoping for an extreme sonic shift so that more diverse voices and narratives can truly be embraced. It’s time to step aside and let different voices take over.” Karina joins Dr. Martens’ Tough As You campaign, celebrating those who have pushed back, dug their heels in or made a change in the face of adversity. Alongside her is South African actor Nakhane Touré, Vietnamese tattoo artist Sarah Lu, UK indie-rock frontman Blaine Harrison and podcast collective Sistren.

DRMARTENS.COM.AU


@CHELSEACUTLER SINGER / SONGWRITER

Made for We.

CHELSEA CUTLER & THE SIREN MILANESE


FEATURE

The Fundamentals of Caring WORDS BY RUBY STALEY ILLUSTRATION BY TWYLAMAE

I’m fresh out of compassion, does that make me a terrible person?

As I watched the words “the beginning of a mass extinction” tumble out of Greta Thunberg’s mouth during her UN Climate Action Summit speech, I braced for the familiar feelings of dread to hit. But instead, I exited the video before she even finished speaking. That day, images of Greta virtually haunted me, staring back as I flicked through Instagram Story after Story. She was willing me to click, to care, to do something. But although her speech was objectively moving, both in its content and execution (so much so that a multitude of middle-aged white men reacted with immature ridicule), I felt largely unmoved. And while I sympathised for the young girl who was risking her childhood for the cause, my sympathy felt like an obligation. It felt hollow and strained, like forcing a laugh in a moment of awkwardness. I know I should care and, cognitively, I do. But at this point, I also feel as if I’ve exhausted all my compassion. With good news stories few and far between, my ability to summon an emotional reaction to a crisis is reducing at an alarming rate.  Instead, I am finding strange comfort in turning to watching hours of vapid makeup tutorials on YouTube. I’m not alone either. Turns out this need to disconnect is a real thing, shared by an increasing number of people. Aptly named ‘compassion fatigue’, the phenomenon is characterised by feeling burnt out, or even traumatised, as a result of absorbing the emotional stress of others. The condition has existed long before click bait and shock-fuelled journalism, but now it feels more relevant than ever. The term was originally coined in 1992 by writer Carla Joinson, after researching emergency department nurses and the exhaustion commonly experienced by caregivers. Similar to vicarious trauma, compassion fatigue is often born from witnessing others in anguish. However, it more closely refers to a slow emotional and physical erosion, occurring over time when an individual

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isn’t given the space to refuel and regenerate from their empathy. Minor symptoms of the condition include being easily startled, extreme tiredness and experiencing feelings of anxiety. These can then develop into more serious cardiac problems, depression and a decreased sense of purpose. We also know that such feelings of stress, anxiety and hopelessness have been found to reduce our levels of empathy. The result of it all is that, in short, being scared into action is hardly the most effective way to enact positive change. But the sensationalised journalism and horror stories persist, as do the social media warriors’ calls to action. So in the midst of this, I’m making it a priority to prevent and treat my own emotional burnout. Historically, caregivers were prescribed tailored self-care and self-preservation techniques to lessen the burden of their second-hand trauma. These guidelines, used to prevent or treat compassion fatigue, encompass physical, psychological and social commitments. Maintaining a healthy diet and sleeping habits, as well as building a strong social support network are important.

Making time for meditation and relaxation is also admittedly significant, but it’s not the whole picture. So, although the pseudo-‘self-care’ narrative pushed by social media can be useful, it’s also somewhat misguided when compared to clinical strategies. Because slapping on a face mask might feel good momentarily, but what you’re avoiding will inevitably find a way to re-enter your consciousness before the clay sets.  A more useful response has been prescribed by compassion fatigue specialist, Françoise Mathieu M.Ed., who in 2007 compiled a list of often-cited tips to transform “Compassion Fatigue into Compassion Satisfaction”. Although these steps are targeted towards those who are professional caregivers, I found them easy to adapt to my own rehabilitation practices. First and foremost, Mathieu recommends taking stock of what’s on your plate and from that, balancing your workload to allow some time for yourself every day. Yes, every day. For me, this might mean putting time aside time to go for a therapeutic run, particularly when my schedule starts piling up. Learning to ask for help and saying no when necessary are also important features of Mathieu’s recommendations — techniques most of us probably need to incorporate into our day-to-day. Mathieu also recommends we prioritise the causes most important to us, and be selective with the information channels we choose to digest. For me, this means unfollowing the social media accounts that consistently spew negative rhetoric. This will, I hope, allow me to better preserve my emotional energy and channel it where it is most useful. Rather than mindlessly re-sharing photos of Greta and adding to the noise of the world, I’ll be selective with my compassion and react with outrage when it’s constructive. I’ll fight and yell and protest as I have done before, but with a conscious ferocity. And when I can’t, when I’m too exhausted by the ‘stuff’ that takes up space in my mind, I’ll try not to punish myself.


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POPPY LISSIMAN CHALICE BAG IN MINT $195 POPPYLISSIMAN.COM

CLAC CLAC ROSINA EARRINGS $49 CLACCLACDESIGN.COM

JACK LONDON CORTEZ BLAZER $199 SHOP.JACKLONDON.COM.AU


alixyang.com

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JESS ALIZZI Limited edition 2019


RACING STRIPES

PHOTOGRAPHER – SEUNG ROK BAEK STYLIST – MILLIE SYKES STYLIST’S ASSISTANT – ERICA BONALDI HAIR AND MAKEUP – TRACY TERASHIMA MODELS – MAYA AT PRISCILLAS MODEL MANAGEMENT AND KATYA AT CHIC MANAGEMENT

DOUBLE RAINBOUU SLIP DRESS $249, H BRAND RUBY JACKET IN LIGHT BLUE FOX FAUX $199 CONVERSE CHUCK TAYLOR ALL STAR SNEAKERS $160 UNDERGROUND SUNDAE EARRING $295

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H BRAND HARLOW JACKET IN TEAL FOX FAUX $330, BESS OFFICIAL SCARF $240, MARA & MINE SHOES POA, STYLIST’S OWN STOCKINGS


PATRICK KELLY JACKET $675 FROM CARA MIA VINTAGE, VALET STUDIO EARRINGS $119, JEFFREY CAMPBELL ANGELIC-B SHOES IN CHEETAH $215, STYLIST’S OWN GLOVES


H BRAND ARIA JACKET IN RED FOX FAUX $330, BESS OFFICIAL SCARF $240, MARA & MINE SHOES POA, STYLIST’S OWN STOCKINGS


KATE SYLVESTER ZEBRA JUMPER $169, JEFFREY CAMPEBLL FLORA SHOE IN PURPLE ZEBRA COMBO $195


KATE SYLVESTER AMELIA DRESS IN BLACK GOLD $299


KATE SYLVESTER AMELIA DRESS IN POPPY PINK $299


Tough Luck

PHOTOGRAPHER – TASHA TYLEE PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANT – KATHERINE FUNG STYLIST – JAM BAYLON STYLIST’S ASSISTANT – PIXIE MCELROY GROOMING – ROB POVEY USING GLOSSIER AND DAVINES MODEL – RILEY AT PEOPLE AGENCY SHOT AT SUNSTUDIOS MELBOURNE

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OPPOSITE PAGE ANNA QUAN SHIRT $300, STYLIST’S OWN TURTLENECK, ARNSDORF CALDER JEANS $380, VALET GEO HAIR CLIPS $55, MODEL’S OWN BOOTS

OPPOSITE PAGE CALVIN KLEIN MONOGRAM TURTLENECK $119

THIS PAGE ELWOOD FRUIT RESORT SHIRT $89.99, VENROY UNLINED

BLAZER $200, TED BAKER THAIEL SEMI PLAIN TROUSER $219 STUSSY ITALIC SOCKS $19.95 FOR 3, BARED TAN MERCURY LOAFERS $289

THIS PAGE LONELY LUNA TEE $170, INCU COLLECTION REINA POLO (WORN UNDERNEATH) $180, ARNSDORF ODETTE SKIRT $470, VALET MARITZA EARRINGS $119


COS MEN’S TROUSERS $135 TOMMY JEANS RETRO STRIPE SHIRT $119


VENROY POPLIN UNLINED BLAZER $200 VENROY POPLINE PLEAT CHINO $120 BARED SCANDIUM LOAFER IN MUSHROOM SUEDE $289 STUSSY ITALIC SOCKS $19.95 FOR 3


DESIGNER PROFILES

Spotlight On

Boy Mode

Palm Noosa

At the heart of Melbourne label Boy Mode is a desire to redefine the way we think about gender. Its range of androgynous menswear utilises exclusive textiles and unconventional but practical silhouettes to create something magical. The brand’s latest collection, for example, is an outsider’s love letter to Japan, inspired by Rei Kawakubo and the anime series Zoids. This intersection of tradition and pop culture results in an offering heavy on monochrome prints and crisp construction.

Noosa is a haven of quintessential Australian beach culture, which makes it a great place to create breezy, sun-kissed fashion. Clothing and jewellery label Palm Noosa was founded as an ode to the area’s ocean-meets-urban culture. Expect easy, feminine silhouettes in silk, cotton or linen textiles. The label’s exclusive and playful prints are designed locally on the Sunshine Coast, with the latest collection featuring polka dots, palm leaves and lobsters. PALMNOOSA.COM.AU

BOYMODE.NET

Tilda It’s not often you hear of a designer who is inspired by a passion for geological formations or the ancient art of wax casting. Matilda Cole, however, is that designer. Her new collection titled Made of Stone draws on both these themes, using rough textures to evoke rocky terrains and desert landscapes. Tilda’s rings, necklaces and earrings are each cast in wax before metal, making her background in fine art and silversmithing evident in every design. Matilda handcrafts the line locally in Melbourne from recycled gold and silver metals, with the range available to shop now. TILDAJEWELS.COM

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BY REBECCA CORDOMA

second swim                           


DESIGNER PROFILES

Hudstarduds

Harbinger

Based in Melbourne, Hudstarduds locally manufactures aprons that would look just as good in your wardrobe, if that were a thing. The brand has over 67 years’ experience designing aprons that combine the best craftsmanship with the highest quality denim, canvas and leather materials. Hudstarduds aprons are created with durability and longevity in mind, meaning they are heavily sought-after by baristas, chefs, hairdressers and tattooists across the country. There’s also the option to collaborate with branding experts, who can print and embroider depending on your needs. For more, follow @hudstarduds on Instagram or visit the website.

Melbourne menswear label Harbinger was started largely out of necessity, after its founders struggled to find well-designed shirts for a reasonable price. Its debut range takes a classic approach to design, drawing on the Western-inspired style of men like Paul Newman and John Wayne. Durable workwear silhouettes are updated with clever contemporary design details like pearlescent buttons and pointed, Wild West-style yokes. The brand aims to start strong with this first collection, creating menswear that will last for seasons to come. HARBINGERCLOTHING.COM.AU

HUDSTARDUDS.COM

Toffee Picture a satchel, a briefcase and a backpack all in one. It sounds clunky, but the designers at Australian label Toffee have made it look as sleek as possible. Made from genuine leather, the Combi bag has multiple rings to thread straps, to easily adjust how you carry it. A back pocket snugly fits a phone and there are compartments to eliminate digging through your tote. Right now, you can nab 20% off the Combi bag online with the code COMBI20. TOFFEECASES.COM

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threads www.gamminthreads.com


GROOMING

Barber Shop

King Brown Pomade

Milkman

Drawing inspiration from styles of the past, King Brown Pomade presents a classic approach to modern grooming. With a focus on quality and tradition, its selection of pomades are carefully produced to create a timeless look. The brand is proudly Australian-owned and manufactured, delivering oil, wax, and water-based formulas that allow for easy application and versatility in styling. You’ll also find a grooming spray to add texture or volume, and a range of old-style combs to help perfect your look.

Milkman is dedicated to facial hair, no matter what decade it seems stuck in. We’re talking everything from 1900s handlebars to ’80s chevrons to ’00s soul patches. The beard- and moustache-loving brand makes both shaving and haircare products, manufacturing it all here in Australia. Its range of beard oils, shampoos, wax, balms, soap-free shaving gels and after shave serums are heavy on locally-sourced, nourishing botanicals to keep your hair and skin as healthy as possible. You’ll also find all the tools of the trade including razors, scissors and combs.

KINGBROWNPOMADE.COM

MILKMANAUSTRALIA.COM

Modern Pirate In a sector dominated by big business, Modern Pirate is all about injecting a bit of life and culture back into men’s grooming. Products and packaging are heavily inspired by barbering, tattoo and surf cultures, translating their freeand-easy spirit into the realm of personal style. Sea salt-infused products provide an accessible beachy look, while different pomades let you control your hair’s texture and finish. You’ll also find soap, shampoo, conditioner and beard serums to round out your routine. MODERNPIRATE.COM.AU

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HAIR & BEAUTY

Beauty Book

Donna Sheridan

Salon Gabrielle

Melbourne-based hair stylist, Donna Sheridan, is working to create a greener and more relaxed salon experience. Located in Fitzroy, her brick studio creates natural, everyday hair with a focus on personal style. Donna’s stylists each have over a decade of cutting and styling experience, using Kevin Murphy products that are naturally derived and bottled in 100 per cent recycled ocean plastic. The salon is also a partner of Sustainable Salons, recycling hair clippings, applicators, foils and tubes in an effort to reduce its carbon footprint and create zero waste.

Hair stylist Gabrielle Roccuzzo’s decade-long career has seen her backstage at NYFW, working for La Perla, Zimmermann and Christian Siriano. Renowned for her fresh perspective on techniques and trends, she now runs her own salon in Melbourne’s Moonee Ponds. Gabrielle is best known for her flawless balayage technique and soft waves, which have gained her recognition from celebrities and industry professionals alike. Bookings can be made online for cuts, styling and colour treatments, as well as event styling.

DONNASHERIDANHAIR.COM 71 KERR STREET, FITZROY VIC

SALONGABRIELLE.COM.AU 6/7 ASPEN STREET, MOONEE PONDS VIC

Kyrabela Kyrabela offers a luxurious beauty experience in the comfort of your own home, saving you both money and a trip to the salon. Seven days a week, the team is available for at-home appointments across hair styling, makeup and spray tans. You can schedule either one service per visit or multiple simultaneously, as well as booking group packages for weddings or formal season. Kyrabela will be expanding in the near future to cover at-home manicures and pedicures for the full experience. KYRABELA.COM MELBOURNE VIC

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REVIEWS

Look & Listen WITH SASHA GATTERMAYR AND ELIZA SHOLLY

Smashed Avocado

The Water Dancer

Year of the Monkey

NICOLE HADDOW

TA-NEHISI COATES

PATTI SMITH

The housing market is like this mythical beast that feels distant and unconquerable to those who aren’t in it. Nicole Haddow knows that pain and is determined not to let others fall into the same trap, thinking they’ll never be able to make it work. Here, she tells her story from debt to homeowner in just a few years. Supported by case studies of couples, families and solo buyers from all different kinds of financial backgrounds, Haddow decodes the financial jargon around the Australian housing market and maps out the many pathways available to first-home buyers. While tiny homes and investment properties probably aren’t viable for most people, the creative options she discovers do an interesting job of myth-busting the traditional home-buying narrative. Of course, it’s not always possible for everyone to buy a house. But if nothing else, Smashed Avocado offers clever ways to tailor your saving targets to meet your lifestyle.

Patti Smith’s third memoir was written in 2015 as she wanders from Santa Cruz to Arizona and back. She sleeps in motels and as she spends her days writing, reading and remembering, she comes to terms with the death of a friend, and disillusionment with her country. She meets strangers in cafes, stays with Sam Shepard and dreams of Uluru, all while trying to connect disparate thoughts into a narrative she can understand. Her writing blends truth with poetry and weaves her photographs through words to create a piece of writing that bleeds with wonder and melancholy. It’s a search for meaning in the artist’s twilight years, and feels still and transient all at once. She traverses grief as much as terrain during her solo meandering, and though nothing will be better than her debut, Just Kids, this is a stirring, sad meditation on loss in all its forms.

Charli

The Return

Is He Real?

CHARLI XCX

SAMPA THE GREAT

IDK

Everyone from my 13-year-old cousin to my most musically-inclined friend agrees: there’s just something about Charli XCX. And while her magic marketing equation is truly something to be studied, since listening to Charli, I’m inclined to believe it’s her nostalgic-pop ballads that have cemented her as an icon of 21st century music. After a turbulent start, which included multiple song leaks and a subsequent scrap, Charli is the third studio release from pop’s British princess. Recorded in Los Angeles, the 15-song tracklist boasts no less than 13 features. Songs are driven almost entirely by her dominant flow, underpinned by the instinctive pop melodies that made this girl so goddamn famous. Each and every track on Charli emerges as a candid, confident piece of introspection, where it’s clear that multi-faceted writing comes first.

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Ta-Nehisi Coates is probably the most lauded writer in America today, for good reason. His first novel is the story of Hiram, a male slave on a Virginia plantation who plans an escape to the free North. When he discovers he possesses a mysterious elemental power, he becomes a vital asset to the underground railroad network and the project to free enslaved Southerners. The writing is dream-like and magical but the violence is brutal, and at the novel’s heart is Hiram’s search for his lost family more than his own freedom. Coates illuminates America’s fraught history with racial division in a way that connects deeply and disturbingly with its present, and draws on the most traumatic torture of slavery: the separation of families. It is an ambitious and technical piece of writing and though beautiful, is not a light read. For lovers of Colson Whitehead, James Baldwin and Toni Morrison.

Zambia-born, Botswana-raised, Melbourne-based Sampa Tembo is Australia’s most exciting kaleidoscopic talent, and never has that been more obvious than now. The Return affirms she truly is Great by name, and by nature. Lyrically, the 19-track album plays like a bottomless sojourn into heritage and home. What starts as a crisis of identity and exile slowly moves into feelings of optimism. Buoyant tracks like ‘Final Form’ and ‘Leading Us Home’ keep the mood afloat, heard best when Sampa’s intimidatingly hard flow appears alongside the likes of Alien, Blue Lab Beats, Boadi, Jace XL, Krown, Lori and Silentjay. With nods to jazz, boom bap, gospel, R&B and hip-hop, Sampa truly flips world music on its head. Pair this with seamless production and a hint of nostalgia, and you’ll be convinced of the power of this epic debut album.

“In honour of Beyoncé’s birthday, I wanted to give her this gift. My debut album.” And just like that, Maryland rapper IDK gave fans what they had waited two years for: Is He Real. Bey nods aside, nothing about IDK has ever been revolutionary. His musical prowess, while predictable in parts, has resulted in a fairly balanced catalogue of tracks. And while Is He Real certainly benefits from his velvety flow and head-bop production, all in all it feels risk-averse. From the moment you press play on opener ‘Cloud Blu’, strap in for a journey of high highs — the sexy strings on ‘Alone’ and a heroic Pusha T feature on ‘Porno’ — followed by some pretty low lows. Admittedly, however, Is He Real does do transitions well. Each track dances from one to the next so effortlessly, that when it eventually does end, you find yourself missing it.


SOCIAL

Out & About JD Women’s Space Media Launch JD Sports is hosting a series of activations at a new Women’s Space next to its Pitt Street Mall store. Each weekend throughout October, a new brand will showcase the latest and greatest from its women’s ranges. The retailer kicked off a month of brand takeovers with a media launch, welcoming Nike into the temporary space and launching the new Air Force 1 Shadow. ASICS, adidas Originals and PUMA are all set to follow, with shoppers able to unlock exclusive product on-site. Keep your eye on JD Sports’ socials for more.

PHOTOGRAPHER: ZARA MUTTI

JD-SPORTS.COM.AU

Stockists ADIDAS ORIGINALS BARED BESS OFFICIAL CALVIN KLEIN CAMILLA AND MARC CARA MIA VINTAGE CONVERSE COS DION LEE DOUBLE RAINBOUU

jd-sports.com.au bared.com.au bess.studio calvinklein.com.au camillaandmarc.com caramiavintage.com converse.com.au cosstores.com dionlee.com doublerainbouu.com

ELLIS BROOKLYN ELWOOD H BRAND JEFFREY CAMPBELL KATE SYLVESTER LAURA MERCIER MARA & MINE NIKE P.S.S RELIQUIA

mecca.com.au elwood.com.au hbrand.com.au jeffreycampbellshoes.com katesylvester.com mecca.com.au maraandmine.com nike.com postsole.com reliquiajewellery.com

Find us on Instagram @fashionjournalmagazine

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RESPIRO SANCIA STUSSY TED BAKER TOMMY JEANS UNDERGROUND SUNDAE VALET STUDIO VENROY Z X ZANEROBE

valetstudio.com sancia.com.au stussy.com.au tedbaker.com au.tommy.com undergroundsundae.com valetstudio.com venroy.com.au target.com.au


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