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Public Opinion Afro Orchestra: Tribal Tunes FOR MORE UP TO DATE NEWS GO TO BEAT.COM.AU

UPCOMING

AUGUST

JULY

ONTOUR VAKULA [UKR] Friday July 27, Mercat Basement GIRL UNIT [UK], NGUZUNGUZU [USA] Friday July 27, Revolver Upstairs BARE [USA] Friday July 27, Brown Alley MAELSTROM [FRA] Saturday July 28, The Bottom End MIIKE SNOW [SWE] Tuesday July 31, Palace Theatre BRAWTHER [FRA] Friday August 3, Mercat Basement ALVIN RISK [USA] Saturday August 4, Prince Bandroom KATE SIMKO [USA], CHLOE HARRIS [USA] Friday August 10, Brown Alley JONWAYNE [USA], MONO/POLY [USA], KASRA [UK] Friday August 10, Roxanne Parlour HYBRID [UK] Friday August 10, New Guernica HOME BREW [NZ] Friday August 10, The Espy DJ SS [UK], KENNY KEN [UK], SKIBADEE [UK] Friday August 10, Brown Alley PERC [UK] Friday August 17, Brown Alley PHIL REYNOLDS [UK], JAMES LAWSON [UK], SKOL [UK], RIKSTA [NZ] Friday August 17, Room680 CHRIS LAKE [UK] Saturday August 18, Seven THE PHARCYDE [USA] Thursday August 23, The Espy LIQUID STRANGER [SWE] Friday August 24, Brown Alley JOCHEN MILLER [NED], RANK 1 [NED], LEON BOLIER [NED] Saturday August 25, Room680 ALEXKID [FRA] Friday August 31, Revolver I:CUBE [FRA] Friday August 31, Mercat Basement RICK ROSS [USA] Thursday September 6, Festival Hall RED RACK ‘EM [UK] Friday September 7, The Croft Institute JOHN ‘00’ FLEMING [UK] Friday September 7, Brown Alley TIEFSCHWARZ [GER] Friday September 7, New Guernica SASSE [GER] Friday September 7, Mercat Basement OCTAVE ONE [USA] Friday September 14, Mercat Basement ROGER SHAH [GER] Saturday September 15, Room680 HERNAN CATTANEO [ARG], FRITZ KALKBRENNER [GER] Friday September 21, Brown Alley NARI AND MILANI [ITA] Friday September 21, Royal Melbourne Hotel RICK WADE [USA] Friday September 28, The Croft Institute DAS EFX [USA] Friday September 28, Prince Bandroom GIGAMESH [USA] Saturday September 29, Seven PAUL OAKENFOLD [UK] Friday October 5, Festival Hall PARKLIFE: JUSTICE [FRA], PASSION PIT [USA], PLAN B [UK] + MORE Saturday October 6, Sidney Myer Music Bowl ROBERT HOOD [USA] Friday November 9, TBA ECLIPSE: PERFECT STRANGER, OLIVER LIEB, ADAM FREELAND + MORE Saturday November 12 – Friday November 16, TBA SUBB-AN [UK] + MIGUEL CAMPBELL [UK] Sunday November 18, TBA STRAWBERRY FIELDS: JAMES HOLDEN [UK], TYCHO [US] PREFUSE 73 [USA] + MORE Friday November 23 – Sunday November 25, TBA STEREOSONIC: TIESTO [NED], AVICII [SWE], CALVIN HARRIS [UK] + MORE Saturday December 1, Melbourne Showgrounds TERRENCE PARKER [USA] Friday December 21, TBA FALLS FESTIVAL: SBTRKT [UK], COOLIO [USA] + MORE Saturday December 28 – Tuesday January 1, Lorne BIG DAY OUT: THE BLOODY BEETROOTS [ITA], KASKADE [USA], CRYSTAL CASTLES [CAN] + MORE Saturday January 26, Flemington Racecourse

REAL TALK

Every night for the past fortnight I’ve been having a dream where I’m on MSN Messenger and then I’m bombarded with people telling me I need to get off the internet because my grandma needs to use the phone. I’m a little more than scared. Tyson Wray

Subb-an and Miguel Campbell: Bromance

At 24 years of age, Subb-an has managed to fit in enough releases and tours during his career to make people twice his age jealous. Named DJ Magazine’s Best Breakthrough DJ at the end of 2011, the past few years have seen Subb-an go stratospheric throwing down releases on respected imprints Crosstown Rebels, Spectral and his own label One Records. He graduated with a top degree in sound design from Birmingham City University, founded UK underground clubbing institution Below with Adam Shelton and Lee McDonald and will now head Down Under. He’ll be joined by house champion Miguel Campbell, who owns Outcross Records and is signed by Jamie Jones and Lee Foss’ Hot Creations. Catch them at a venue yet to be announced on Sunday November 18.

Shockone: Australian Idol

Don’t you love it when Australian expats start making it big on the international scene? Perthbased drum and bass destroyer Shockone’s is certainly a success story. Engaging his fascination for music in a metal band with Gareth McGrillen and Rob Swire from Pendulum, it was from the ashes of this ill-fated project that the group’s members became international drum and bass experts. Their experimentations found their way into international consciousness, and Shockone’s creations within the genre quickly caught the attention of renowned DJ Friction, who picked him up for Shogun Audio. Last year the producer toured nationally with Karnivool, taking the helm of the latest Dubstep Invasion series, and dropped a number of killer tunes. With an anticipated debut album on the way, he’s returning to play Brown Alley on Friday September 7.

Autism Awareness: Charitable

Seth Sentry: Waitress Singer

Those of you with an eye on the Australian hip hop scene will certainly have heard of Seth Sentry by now. First bursting onto the scene in 2003 after a series of genre-bendingly exciting shows with local hip hop/drum and bass outfit D.S.O.L, he’s worked with fellow Aussie favourites 360 and Pez, and made his way onto Triple J rotation with singles The Waitress Song and Simple Game. He is now set to release his debut album This Was Tomorrow through his own label High Score. To celebrate, an extensive national tour has been announced, and Melbourne can get a taste of his groundbreaking new beats at the Corner Hotel on Saturday September 29.

Do you know how to make a good night out in this city even better? Doing it for a good cause. Then the hangovers and the money spent on door charges and drinks become not a symbol of ill thought-out extravagance, but a representation of generosity. SoundKraft’s events raise awareness through support and donations for a cause – this quarter, autism. They won’t be charging entry at this gig, though there’ll be optional gold coin donation to support organisations helping autistic children. The reward will be a bevy of Melbourne dance music aficionados taking over one of our favourite clubs, with Jewelz, Adam Small, Cosmic Davo, Freaky Frequency and more signed up.

Liquid Stranger: International Affair

DJs and producers often get tagged with the term ‘international’, but it’s not often they truly fulfil that definition. Liquid Stranger, the alias of Martin Staaf, was born and bred in Sweden and is a compelling mix of Latin, Asian, Eastern European and Jamaican dancehall, with over fifty releases to his name that have been taken on by Ministry of Sound, Spirit Zone, Muti Music, and Interchill. As well as having released four full-length albums, Liquid Stranger is certainly one of the industry’s most adventurous and wellestablished acts. He’ll be widening his horizons with an upcoming tour to Australia, playing Brown Alley on Friday August 24.

Hard Kandy: Learn Yourself

As nice as it is to see young upstarts enjoying the Melbourne dance music scene, there comes a time to pay respect to the elder states people of Melbourne’s vast dance music legacy. In a feat of education, Hard Kandy will be back at Billboard and ready to deliver. Don’t bother bringing your notebooks and pens, though - you won’t need them to be schooled in the classics of deep, dark and hardcore rave fodder. For a lesson in hard dance and trance, house and electro, get down to Billboard on Friday August 17.

Gavin Keitel: Milestones

Ebb&flo have made it to their second birthday, marking two years of deep and eclectic sounds at some of the city’s most bumping parties. To celebrate they’re bringing in one of Melbourne’s finest exports Gavin Keitel. As one of the city’s highest achievers, he’s found himself in demand at some of the country’s biggest club nights and parties, with recent residencies at Sunny and Onesixone. Whether Keitel’s exploring the depths of a Sunny set, maintaining a house groove or pushing the German minimal tip, he lets the music do the talking – words even more likely to stir up a frenzy than Fifty Shades of Grey. Catch Gavin Keitel at Loop on Saturday August 11.

Bart B More: Sterosonic Sasse: The Boss

For Moodmusic, it’s all in the name. Traversing a wide variety of genres, including house, techno, electro, and beyond, Moodmusic isn’t so much about tempo and style as it is good quality, moving tunes. Label boss Sasse is set to head down under for his Third Encounter album release tour, exclusive to Melbourne. A DJ with a resume that goes back to the eighties, Sasse’s reputation for being a motivated and passionate self-starter in electronic music is undeniable – from running one of Finland’s first house clubs from 1992 to starting up Moodmusic and nurturing the talents of many other producers. His label has secured releases courtesy of Compuphonic, Spieldtape, Luomo, and sub-labels run with the likes of Ewan Pearson, Henrik Schwarz and others. Joined by fellow Moodmusic signees, Melbournian Mike Buhl and Sydney based Trinity, the mood at the Mercat’s set to be all smiles. Sasse plays the Mercat on Friday September 7.

Quickly rising up the ranks of the Netherlands’ thriving dance music scene, Bart B More comes as the latest addition to the Stereosonic lineup, set to be another surefire winner amongst an already starstudded lineup featuring Tiesto, Laidback Luke, Chuckie and more. First gaining notoriety after BBC Radio 1 superstar Pete Tong decided his productions were worthy of two Essential New Tune titles in 2007, it seems that everybody out there is moved to dance by his beat-driven techno crossed with stadium-sized house and electro. With a discography that now features successful releases on Boys Noize Records, Ministry of Sound, Toolroom and more alongside remixes commissioned by Laidback Luke, the Crookers, Miike Snow and Cee-Lo Green, he’s a sure fit for what will certainly be one of Stereosonic’s biggest years yet.

RESPONSIBLE: Managing Editor: Ronnit Sternfein ronnit@beat.com.au Editor: Tyson Wray tyson@beat.com.au Listings: club/promoter submissions clubguide@beat.com.au - now online at beat.com.au - it’s free! Production: Pat O’Neill art@beat.com.au Typesetting: Rebecca Houlden Cover Design: Pat O’Neill Advertising Senior Sales: ronnit@beat.com.au (03) 8414 9710 Taryn Stenvei taryn@beat.com.au Fashion and Beverages: Tamara Perenic tamara@furstmedia.com.au Ph: 03 8414 9732 Deadlines: Editorial Friday 2PM – absolutely NO exceptions. Club photos Monday 9AM (email only clubpics@beat.com.au). Advertising artwork Monday 12PM. Photographers: Callum Linsell Contributors: Rezo Kezerashvili, Miki McLay, Shane Scott, Simon Traspier, Brian Rotide, The Knowledge, Ellen Devenney, Dan Watt, Aaron Ralston, Birdie, Liam Pieper, Simon Hampson, Chad-Michael Michaelson, Mikolai, Reuben Adams, David Edgley. Publisher: Furst Media, 3 Newton Street Richmond 3121 Ph 03 9428 3600 www.beat.com.au

EDITORIALDEADLINE - 2PM FRIDAYS NO EXCEPTIONS

2.

Melbourne’s original afrobeat outfit The Public Opinion Afro Orchestra have been laying down infectious, Nigerian-inspired beats to Australian dancefloors with a massive ensemble, comprised of anywhere up to 20 musicians handpicked from the Melbourne African, jazz and hip hop scenes. This group is the brainchild of Zvi Belling, Ethan Hill and Tristan Ludowyk – long time friends and collaborators, each with vast and diverse musical backgrounds to draw upon. The result is a seriously fun and original dancefloor experience. After a recent trip to Africa to promote their new single and a recording session with African hip hop stars Tumi and Modenine, the group are armed and ready with a bevy of slick new material. Catch them at the Prince Bandroom on Friday August 31.

UP TO DATE

Feel It: Fevah

For the past 15 years one brand has been pushing the boundaries of underground hard dance all around the globe, namely Fevah. To celebrate such a milestone, they have decided to host their first party in Melbourne. Artists on the night include, Phil Reynolds, James Lawson, SKOL, Riksta, Eamonn Fevah, Danny Gilligan, Craig Jon and heaps more. Expect a real ‘hands in the air’ affair with awesome lasers and visuals, giveaways and two rooms of banging beats. It goes down on Friday August 17 at Room680.

Illy: Double Up

Off the back of his new smash single Heard It All, snowballing emcee Illy has announced a huge national tour. As well as major cities, the tour will be the first chance for fans to hear material from Illy’s soon-to-be-released third album Bring It Back. Illy’s sophomore album The Chase spawned the powerful and well-loved singles Cigarettes, The Chase and the Gold-selling It Can Wait (feat. Owl Eyes). Illy has thrown more fuel on the fire with Heard It All and with a new album on the way, this is just a taste of what’s to come. With his first show already selling out Illy will hit the Corner Hotel for a second performance on Wednesday September 5.

DJ Profile: DJ SKOL

When did you start DJing? I first started DJing in 1981 playing rare groove and soul but I started playing hard dance in 1995. How would you describe your music style? I wouldn’t say I have one style of playing. I like to think I play for the crowd. I’d never play a track I don’t like or enjoy myself and whatever I do play has to be uplifting. What’s the worst thing that’s happened behind the decks? I turned up once and the decks didn’t work and on another occasion there were no decks at all! No booth monitors was another interesting gig. What can people expect from you when you next visit? I only know one way to do what I do - that’s to get the crowd going where I want them to go and once there, give it to them with both barrels with loads and loads of musical attitude. When’s your next gig? At Fevah’s 15th Birthday at Room680 on Friday August 17.


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HOME BREW

“Every day we work on music, I’ll be at home writing songs. We write about what we see, our surroundings at the time and everything around us.”

HOMEGROWN: TAKING OVER Those who believe hip hop is dead need look no further than Home Brew for living proof to the contrary. Consisting of Tom Scott, Lui Gumaka and Harry ‘Haz Beats’ Huavi, the New Zealand trio have become the most talked about musical act in their home country, reaching #1 on the New Zealand album chart with their independently released self-titled debut album. The last time a local hip hop act made such an impact was when

4.

a scrappy newcomer by the name of Scribe made his debut in 2003. Not bad for a crew that has received no mainstream radio play and is accustomed to selling CDs out of car boots. “Making music is what we do every day,” says Huavi, the group’s beatmaker. While the statement would ordinarily be lip service coming from some others it rings true for these dudes. From their recordings to their public and

COVER STORY

on-stage personas Home Brew are authentic. Their laidback, relatable approach, exemplified by brazen lead vocalist Scott, is a major factor in what has made them appeal to a youth audience. This appeal is causing the typical chatter amongst commentators, offering the usual “think of the children” hysteria that accompanies such musical revolutions. Huavi says even some of their more experienced peers showed some resistance. “Older people looked down us like a ‘wait your turn’ kind of thing but at the same time we’ve got good music and everyone wants to hear it.” Despite the madness that has accompanied their rise to prominence little has changed for these three mates. “We take things by the day, normally, I don’t think anything’s changed really,” the hard working producer confirms. “Tom’s from West Auckland and I’m from South Auckland and we linked up on the Internet and we just started [making] music everyday on the Internet. Then people started coming to our shows,” he sums up succinctly. Now in full force, the Home Brew invasion will be hitting The Espy on August 10, aided by local rising star Sky’High. Making their first visit to Australia since their formative days in 2009, Huavi believes that they’ll feel perfectly at home. “I’m looking forward to it, there’s a lot of Kiwis over there.” He also confirms that they’ll perform in all their glory with a full band. Harking back to a more classic sound, Home Brew’s organic use of live instrumentation has earned them many plaudits. The recording process itself starts with the three core members at their studio base as they hash out the beats and lyrics. They then hook up with the instrumentalists, who add their own touch to what has already been laid down. “All of that stuff we leave to those dudes. They’re not pushing us and we’re not there pushing them around. I let them be who they are. I’m not a bass player, I’m not gonna tell a bass player how to play bass.” Ultimately it’s about a mutual understanding and appreciation, says the man known as Haz Beats. “I sit down with them and tell them what I’m going for. The person I’m talking to will be like ‘I can play that, I can play a variation’ and it ends up being a constant loop sort of thing.” The vibrant energy of tracks like Yellow Snot Funk and Radio reflect that unique chemistry. That energy is also reflected in the changes of tone as they go from social commentary to party music. “It all goes together I guess. The partying, the crying, it’s all in there,” Huavi says with a chuckle. “Most of the songs do say ‘you can have fun here’ or ‘at this point it all ends and at this point you’re crying’. It’s like the ups and downs of life.” The 21-track album as a whole is the culmination of three years of hard work and while the acclaim keeps rolling in Huavi and his cohorts are doing what they know best – continuing to hit the studio. “Every day we work on music, I’ll be at home writing songs. We write about what we see, our surroundings at the time and everything around us.” Along with their environment Home Brew also have a unique relationship with their fans. “I got into a fight,” Huavi explains rather calmly, about his recent encounter with what would be considered a ‘fan’. What he leaves out, though, is the fact that this fight received national news coverage in New Zealand, accompanied by pictures of the producer-DJ with a bruised face. For most other groups that would be a sign to take a rest, but not the boys from Home Brew. “I wasn’t going to make it [to our next show] but our manager got me some crutches so I went down there.” Details about the fight spread on their Facebook page before the gig, with many thinking he would not attend. “I was like ‘fuck that shit, I’m going to come see you guys’. They were appreciative of that.”

Bruises and all, seemingly nothing can stop the crew from rocking the crowd. “I was on stage with crutches and a balaclava to cover my black eyes. But then all they wanted to see was my face,” he says with a hearty laugh. “I got to sit down for a few songs at least so it wasn’t too bad on my ankles. At one point I fell over and one of the fans picked me up. I was like ‘Fuck, thanks.’” Maintaining a positive attitude he believes there could even be benefits to having scars. “A friend told me Australian girls like dudes with scars, so I’m hoping the scar heals up real nice for you,” he says with just enough sarcasm. While bruises and black eyes are a badge of honour there’s one thing Huavi is still getting used to: male groupies. “[After gigs] I just get male groupies all the time, I think the girls go home. No girls come up to us, it’s just dudes all the time. They’re like ‘Hey bro, hey bro’ and it’s cool, but can some girls come up and talk to us?” As he goes on to describe the scene it sounds more and more like the makings of an epidemic. “We have female fans but the majority of our fans are muzza dudes elbowing chicks so they can be in the front row. Look at Justin Bieber, he doesn’t have male groupies, he has female groupies. That’s all we want. I mean we love you, keep supporting us, thank you, but at the same time please don’t maul us like we’re a gang. As long as they maul us no girl will come up and talk to us.” Even as they have to keep an eye out for fans both male and female, nothing can affect their passion about getting out and performing. Leading up to the release of their debut album the group embarked on several back-toback shows, driving around New Zealand. “There was a show every night. We’d get to the venue, get an hour’s sleep, soundcheck, whatever and it was like that for a whole month. I’m not complaining but sometimes it’s draining man.” Huavi promises, however, that they will be revved up come their visit to Australia. After their three Aussie shows Home Brew are also looking to wreak their brand of musical havoc in other parts of the globe. “We’ve definitely discussed it. I actually wanted to do Japan but we decided to do Australia first, build it up and then take over the world.” Much of their popularity and success stems from their accessibility when it comes to fans and their hard partying approach to gigs. “Our gigs never used to be like this. We stopped doing regular gigs and started throwing proper parties. That’s what we always try to achieve. We try to make it like a party we would want to go. It’s like a circus, people get to know it and word spreads.” You could consider them the ringmasters of their own movement. “We try to build a following and we’re trying to create a community where everyone comes to party. Outside of Auckland you’ve gotta find the party but we’re always with the party people.” Social media has also played an important role in developing their following, something they clearly work hard on. “I was nothing without the Internet,” Huavi jokes. “Just having that online base where people can interact and buy music, it’s much easier than trying to sell music out of your [car] boot. It’s the same thing but more people can see it online rather [than] you standing around looking stupid outside a shop.” As he sees it they are dealers of audio drugs, giving fans a fix. “We’re always working on stuff and we want them to hear it. It’s like a heroin addict, you give them a free taste and they’ll be back.” You can always count on Home Brew to keep it real. Andrew ‘Hazard’ Hickey Home Brew [NZ] hit The Espy on Friday August 10. Speakeasy is out now.


THE BIG MAG FOR CLUB CULTURE

5.


SATURDAYS AT ONE TWENTY BAR DJ CKass will take you on a musical journey to the retro sounds of the ‘70s and ‘80s, followed by Top 40. One Twenty Bar, 120 Johnston St, Fitzroy

WEDNESDAY25TH COQ ROQ Rocking Wednesdays at Lucky Coq are rotating DJs Lady Noir, Agent 86, Kiti, Mr Thom, Joybot and guests giving you nothing but the best new wave, punk, brit pop, bong rap and hair metal. Coq Roq takes place every Wednesday from 8pm with free pool downstairs from 9pm as well as drink specials. Roq out! Lucky Coq, 179 Chapel St, Windsor

SOUL ARMY With more flavour than a chocolate pizza, the Wednesday Soul Army throws down raw, uncut funk next to smooth soul grooves and rare blue jams. Bring that special lady because when the boys lay down the love it could be the difference between ‘we’re just friends’ to ‘let’s get it on’. PBS stalwarts Vince Peach and Miss Goldie accompany Prequel and Black Diamond Kicks weekly. Free. Bimbo Deluxe, 376 Brunswick St (Cnr Rose St), Fitzroy

WEDNESDAYS AT CO. Don’t have lectures tomorrow? Need a break from writing that last-minute assignment? Or simply just celebrating the end of hump day? Don’t miss Melbourne’s biggest mid-week party night – Wednesdays @ Co.! With free entry and discounted drinks for students all night long! Co., Crown Entertainment Complex, Lvl 3, 8 Whiteman St, Southbank

WEDNESDAYS AT LOUNGE Enter the middle of the week; for some it’s the beginning of the weekend, for others it’s a break from study, for those of us who are travelling, it probably has no real significance (unless you’re wanting to party with the hot European girls from the hostel...because any day is simply another day when you’re travelling). Your midweek stomping ground, featuring DJs Danny Silver, Manchild & Mu-Gen. Free entry. From 10pm. Lounge, 243 Swanston Street, Melbourne

WEDNESDAYS AT THE ORDER Deep, dark, minimal dubstep and drum and bass. Laundry Bar, 50 Johnston Street, Fitzroy

THURSDAY26TH BIMBO THURSDAYS Tigerfunk brings with him his full band of travelling gypsies, hipsters and middle class executives, all of whom are prepared to deliver the most excitement you can have this side of the weekend. Bimbo Deluxe, 376 Brunswick St (Cnr Rose St), Fitzroy

high has emerged from the cosmic energies of the universe and it’s called Wonderlust! As luck would have it you can come and experience the effects of this strange new phenomena every Thursday night at The Carlton! Carlton Club, 193 Bourke Street, Melbourne

FRIDAY27TH

SOUND EMPIRE Get ready for the mega sounds at Sound Empire, Melbourne’s epic new Saturday club night with five places to party! Mega sounds from resident DJs Tate Strauss, Miss Sarah, Nova, Johnny M, Matty G, Dean T, Joe Sofo, Marcus Knight, Dinesh, Chris Ostrom, B-Boogie and Sarah Roberts. Co., Crown Entertainment Complex, Lvl 3, 8 Whiteman St, Southbank

STAR SATURDAYS

BARE For Los Angeles bassline technician Bare, 2010 will be fondly remembered as the year his twisted, face-melting take on dubstep exploded into a worldwide epidemic. The result of a background in rock, West Coast hip hop (as part of the Vital Mindz collective) and aggressive drum and bass help to explain the Bare phenomenon - and with releases forthcoming on Hollow Point Records, Buygore, Licked Beats, Trillbass, Play Me, TLD and Ultragore Recordings and a performance schedule that’s rapidly filling up, things are looking up for the dubstep maestro. Brown Alley, Cnr Lonsdale & King St, Melbourne

CLUB SODA Taking place each and every Saturday night in Melbourne’s CBD on the corner of Lonsdale St and King St, Club Soda plays host to a fresh, new concept – local/national/international DJs weekly, un-paralleled entertainment, performances, and disco tomfoolery. Don’t let the bubbly name fool you, Club Soda is your weekend’s thirst quencher – changing people going out for convenience, whilst not leaving the sour taste of an empty wallet on Sunday morning. Our doors open for you every Saturday at 9.30pm, and stay open until you should go home. Brown Alley, Cnr King & Lonsdale St, CBD

Star Saturdays - smashing it every Saturday! Phil Ross, Scotty Erdos, DJ Ontime, LC, Nick James, Dane Gains, Ryan Hamill, Deja, Phil Isa, Nixon, Azza M, Scotty Nix, DJ Ryza, C Dubb, Alex-J, G-Funk, Dylisco, Achos, Az, Shaggz and guests. Star Bar, 160 Clarendon St, South Melbourne

TEMPERANCE SATURDAYS DJ Marcus Knight & DJ Xander James drop sexy house, dance and drum and bass all night from 8pm. Free entry. Temperance Hotel, 426 Chapel St, South Yarra

TEXTILE Saturdays at Lucky Coq tick all the boxes so start your night early and stay til close! Famous $4 pizzas from 7-9pm (that’s dinner sorted) then from 9pm spread over two levels with DJs playing hip hop, funk, disco, house and electro. Rotating guests on both levels keep the tunes fresh. Free entry. Lucky Coq, 179 Chapel St, Windsor

WEEKEND The brain child of the creative kids at 360 Agency and Seven Nightclub. The Weekend is here to put a smile on your dial every Saturday night. We want you to join the family. Dancing from 10pm weekly. Seven, 52 Albert Rd, South Melbourne

EDEN SATURDAYS Smashing it every week at Melbourne’s hottest looking venue! Top 40 dance, house and R&B 9-3am, then electro from 3am - 5am. DJ Ontime, DJ Ryza, Scotty Erdos and Azza M. $15/$20, free entry after 4am. Eden, 163 Russell St, Melbourne

EUROTRASH HOUSE PARTY Put your hands in the air with some of Melbourne’s best party DJs, including including Mu-Gen, Lace em’ Tight and more. Eurotrash Bar, 18 Corrs Lane, Off Chinatown, Melbourne CBD

EY:EM EY:EM at Lounge features residents Boogs & Who, who will host Melbourne’s top purveyors of club music, showcasing both local and international DJs playing the most upfront club music. With rotating DJs Dave Pham, Sleep D, Bryce Lawrence, Louis McCoy, Caine Sinclair, Glyn Hill & Toby Mackisack. Expect nothing but excellent house music all night long. And remember, clubbing happens in the EY:EM. $10 from 11pm. Lounge, 243 Swanston Street, Melbourne

SATURDAY28TH CLUB SODA Taking place each and every Saturday night in Melbourne’s CBD on the corner of Lonsdale St and King St, Club Soda plays host to a fresh, new concept – local/national/international DJs weekly, un-paralleled entertainment, performances, and disco tomfoolery. Don’t let the bubbly name fool you, Club Soda is your weekend’s thirst quencher – changing people going out for convenience, whilst not leaving the sour taste of an empty wallet on Sunday morning. Our doors open for you every Saturday at 9.30pm, and stay open until you should go home. Brown Alley, Cnr King & Lonsdale St, CBD

EMPIRE

It’s Dubstep, it’s Eurotrash, it’s new, it’s the vibe, it’s Thursdays, it’s weekly and it’s free. So get down to Eurotrash and get your wobble on. Eurotrash Bar, 18 Corrs Lane, Off Chinatown, Melbourne CBD

FIRST FLOOR SATURDAYS It’s house, electro, dub, anthems, disco and funk with guest DJs Genetix, B-Two and Oohee rocking til the break of day. Doors open 10pm with $5 basics til midnight! First Floor, 393 Brunswick St, Fitzroy

Get ready for the mega sounds at Empire, Melbourne’s epic new Saturday club night with 5 places to party! Mega sounds from top acts Chris Fraser, DJ Samrai, House Of Gaga and Femme plus resident DJs Tate Strauss, Miss Sarah, Nova, Johnny M, Matty G, Dean T, Joe Sofo, Marcus Knight, Dinesh, Chris Ostrom, B-Boogie and Sarah Roberts Co., Crown Entertainment Complex, Lvl 3, 8 Whiteman St, Southbank

FREE RANGE FUNK

HOMECOMING

EDEN SATURDAYS

DUBSTEP THURSDAYS

Funk up your Thursday nights with Free Range Funk at the Windsor favourite Lucky Coq. Grab a couch early and enjoy one (or more) of their famous $4 pizzas from 7-11pm. Meanwhile DJs Who, Agent 86, Lewis CanCut and special guests tempt you into the night with their eclectic bag of treats. Setting the mood early is delightful jazz, deep soul, and funk. Later it’s fruity disco, choice house, and hipster dance drops. Free entry every Thursday. Lucky Coq, 179 Chapel St, Windsor

FUN HOUSE Celebrate Thursday night at Co. with club classics and dance floor anthems. Co., Crown Entertainment Complex, Lvl 3, 8 Whiteman St, Southbank

SLOW HOUSE THURSDAYS Slow House Thursdays is just what Brunswick has been missing. Get down to the latest Thursday spot at Noise Bar, find a space with your bros and get into the as DJs Same O, David Bass and James Hurt spin bass laced tunes ‘til the early hours of the morning. Noise Bar, 291 Albert Street, Brunswick

THURSDAYS AT LOUNGE The Black Pancake Club is where disc-jockeys bring in their treasured record collections to share with yaw’ll. Expect undiscovered nuggets, lost gems, far out there covers, moog inspired themes, and a host of other eclectic delicacies and toppings for your black pancakes! Taste makers on rotation include Shags, LA Pocock, Slim Charles, Andras Fox, Richie 1250, Simon Winkler, Danielson, Ms Butt and Mike Gurrieri. Free entry. From 10pm. Lounge, 243 Swanston Street, Melbourne

WONDERLUST Fate, karma, the yin and the yang, the balance between chaos and order or divine intervention? A new spiritual

In the grand tradition of past Saturday nights at the Prince of Wales, it will regain it’s rightful place on the pantheon of Australian dance music playing host to the best and most exciting EDM locally, nationally and internationally. Local residents include Generik, Oskar, Swick, Tranter, M.A.F.I.A., Streetparty DJs and Clip Art, and scheduled guests The Aston Shuffle, Tonite Only, The Swiss, Luke Million, Parachute Youth, Louis La Roche, Alvin Risk and more. In addition, Homecoming has prepared a veritable roster of exciting drinks and cocktails to fuel the fun, including Fresh coconut cocktails, Dr. Pepper, Electric Lemonade, Tecate, Thai-style Buckets and Bubble Cup cocktails. Prince Bandroom, 29 Fitzroy Street, St Kilda

HOT STEP Google Hot Step and you’ll get a bunch of Vietnamese game reviews and Balkanese dances on YouTube. But that’s nothing like what you can expect to find within the confines of Bimbo on a Saturday night. Developing thick and heavy but altogether groovy, enjoy an eclectic mix of fairy floss funk, doom disco and monk movement minimal every week. Free. Bimbo Deluxe, 376 Brunswick St (Cnr Rose St), Fitzroy

PHD’S 10TH BIRTHDAY 10 years is no mean feat in the dance music industry, especially for the party-throwing types, but Pure Hard Dance are a Melbourne institution these days. Since its inception in 2002, the boys and girls behind the name have expanded to become a household name when it came to ravey good times as well as a seriously loved merchandise brand. But it’s always been fundamentally about the spirit of a good party: great music, memories and lifelong friends, a testament to the heydays of the rave scene. To celebrate its ten year track record the crew are throwing special events across the country, with the likes of Soul-T, St Luke, Scott Alert, Master Kaos, Otek, Karpe-DM, Voog and Pazzle and plenty of others on the lineup. The Hi-Fi, 125 Swanston Street, Melbourne

BARE DRUMSTEP: TAKING IT OFF “I still am and always will be a fan and listener of the music,” says the ‘drumstep’ practitioner known simply as Bare from his home base of Los Angeles. “I love the music I make and hear at shows and clubs. It’s not that hard for me to get into that mood, and I feel lucky that I can get to that mindset with ease.” Real name Sean Rodela, the passion is clear in his voice. The enterprising DJ-producer has done damage across several genres with blistering anthems like Lobotomy and the Eazy-E sampling Thugs In The Hood. From dubstep to hip hop and drum n bass, Rodella is clearly a man who doesn’t do anything by half measures. “They all link together at some point. Hip hop has a slower BPM like dubstep. Drum n bass has that tear out aggressive bass similar to the bass in dubstep. I like to bring all elements of music into one while writing.” First hitting the music scene last decade he has proven his ability to adapt and evolve.

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“[My style] has evolved a great deal. I have spent much time in the lab working hard to make new sounds, get a stronger mixdown.”The evolution doesn’t just stop there either. “I see my sound evolving every month for the rest of my life. You can never really know it all, or be ‘the best’. I’m enjoying learning new tricks and techniques.” Fans are sure to hear all that and more as Bare performs his first ever Australian shows, including a slot at Brown Alley this Friday. “I’m very excited this will be my first time ever in Australia.” He will be joined by KPC, who are also making their first visit to Melbourne. It’s been a whirlwind of cities and faces for Rodela over his past two years of steady touring. “Each city and country has their own awesome vibe that makes them unlike any other place in the world. Le Machine at the Moulin Rouge in Paris, France was an unreal show for me.” While some of his counterparts like to record while on the

ESSENTIALS

Stunning new venue in the heart of the city – one BIG Party! We bring you the best Top 40 dance, house & R&B in a state of the art venue you have to see! Eden, 163 Russell St, CBD

EUROTRASH HOUSE PARTY Put your hands in the air with some of Melbourne’s best party DJs, including including Mu-Gen, Lace em’ Tight and more. Eurotrash Bar, 18 Corrs Lane, Off Chinatown, Melbourne CBD

EY:EM EY:EM at Lounge features residents Boogs & Who, who will host Melbourne’s top purveyors of club music, showcasing both local and international DJs playing the most upfront club music. With rotating DJs Dave Pham, Sleep D, Bryce Lawrence, Louis McCoy, Caine Sinclair, Glyn Hill & Toby Mackisack. Expect nothing but excellent house music all night long. And remember, clubbing happens in the EY:EM. $10 from 11pm. Lounge, 243 Swanston Street, Melbourne

veritable roster of exciting drinks and cocktails to fuel the fun, including Fresh coconut cocktails, Dr. Pepper, Electric Lemonade, Tecate, Thai-style Buckets and Bubble Cup cocktails. Prince Bandroom, 29 Fitzroy Street, St Kilda

HOT STEP Google Hot Step and you’ll get a bunch of Vietnamese game reviews and Balkanese dances on YouTube. But that’s nothing like what you can expect to find within the confines of Bimbo on a Saturday night. Developing thick and heavy but altogether groovy, enjoy an eclectic mix of fairy floss funk, doom disco and monk movement minimal every week. Free. Bimbo Deluxe, 376 Brunswick St (Cnr Rose St), Fitzroy

SATURDAYS AT ONE TWENTY BAR DJ CKass will take you on a musical journey to the retro sounds of the ‘70s and ‘80s, followed by Top 40. One Twenty Bar, 120 Johnston St, Fitzroy

STAR SATURDAYS Star Saturdays - smashing it every Saturday! Phil Ross, Scotty Erdos, DJ Ontime, LC, Nick James, Dane Gains, Ryan Hamill, Deja, Phil Isa, Nixon, Azza M, Scotty Nix, DJ Ryza, C Dubb, Alex-J, G-Funk, Dylisco, Achos, Az, Shaggz and guests. Star Bar, 160 Clarendon St, South Melbourne

TEMPERANCE SATURDAYS DJ Marcus Knight & DJ Xander James drop sexy house, dance and drum and bass all night from 8pm. Free entry. Temperance Hotel, 426 Chapel St, South Yarra

TEXTILE Saturdays at Lucky Coq tick all the boxes so start your night early and stay til close! Famous $4 pizzas from 7-9pm (that’s dinner sorted) then from 9pm spread over two levels with DJs playing hip hop, funk, disco, house and electro. Rotating guests on both levels keep the tunes fresh. Free entry. Lucky Coq, 179 Chapel St, Windsor

WEEKEND The brain child of the creative kids at 360 Agency and Seven Nightclub. The Weekend is here to put a smile on your dial every Saturday night. We want you to join the family. Dancing from 10pm weekly. Seven, 52 Albert Rd, South Melbourne

SUNDAY29TH SOUTH SIDE HUSTLE The perfect Sunday soundtrack with DJs Askew, Peter Baker, Booshank, Paz, Miss Butt, Junji, Disco Harry and guests. They will be laying down disco, afro beat and deep house til 3am. For lovers of good music - South Side Hustle. Lucky Coq, 179 Chapel St, Windsor

STAR BAR SUNDAYS The original and still the best Sunday in Melbourne. Star Bar, 160 Clarendon St, South Melbourne

SUNDAE SHAKE Our Signature serve. Each and every Sunday we play host to a self professed vinyl junkie caught between the golden years and boogie wonderland. A mouthful? Perhaps. Phato Amano perfectly sets the mood for an audio-adventure that redefines the dance floor weekly. Our Sunday aficionados Agent 86 and Tigerfunk stir up a full cream shake to the flavour of your liking. Forget everything you thought you knew about losing yourself to the grooves. Bimbo Deluxe, 376 Brunswick St (Cnr Rose St), Fitzroy

MONDAY30TH IBIMBO Have you always wanted to be a DJ but been cruelly cursed with tone deafness and a general inability to version excursion? Well Bimbo Deluxe saves the day once again.. All you need is an iPhone and you’re set. Just download the free ‘remote’ application from the app store, log into the Bimbo DJ wireless network and you choose which song plays next. Bimbo Deluxe, 376 Brunswick St (Cnr Rose St), Fitzroy

TUESDAY31ST BIMBO TUESDAYS

FIRST FLOOR SATURDAYS It’s house, electro, dub, anthems, disco and funk with guest DJs Genetix, B-Two and Oohee rocking til the break of day. Doors open 10pm with $5 basics til midnight! First Floor, 393 Brunswick St, Fitzroy

HOMECOMING In the grand tradition of past Saturday nights at the Prince of Wales, it will regain it’s rightful place on the pantheon of Australian dance music playing host to the best and most exciting EDM locally, nationally and internationally. Local residents include Generik, Oskar, Swick, Tranter, M.A.F.I.A., Streetparty DJs and Clip Art, and scheduled guests The Aston Shuffle, Tonite Only, The Swiss, Luke Million, Parachute Youth, Louis La Roche, Alvin Risk and more. In addition, Homecoming has prepared a

road, using the sights and sounds as inspiration, Rodela prefers a separation. “I do most of my work at the studio here at home. I like to leave the touring process as a sort of air out, breathing time from the production process so I can come back with a clear head.” On the subject of recording the distinctive producer reveals that he has finished up an EP for the Scion AV label, while looking to continue his genre experimentation. “I plan to write more music and push to hop on bigger labels to reach more fans. I am also playing with a few new genres as well. I will be making some electro, 110, trap and moombah. All while still keeping up with what my fans know me for, dubstep and drumstep.” Also known for his collaborations with the likes of Canadian dubstep maestro Datsik and LA hip hop crew Vital Mindz he says, “I will always have time, and would love to continue collab-ing with new artists, as well as ones I already have collaborated with.” Having made in-roads at a time when the electronic scene in the U.S. was still in its formative stages, Rodela has seen things come full circle. “I would go to shows. I wanted to be the one playing the music that I made to the crowds. [That] was a long time ago until my dream came true. My music has really gone a long way since then.” Andrew Hazard Hickey Bare [USA] hits Brown Alley on Friday July 27.

Bimbo Tuesday’s have long been the discerning DJs midweek breath of fresh air. An opportunity to indulge in, and to each parade their individual takes on music. A night where by the weird and wonderful is not frowned upon but rather celebrated. Resident selectors Matt Radovich, Andras Fox and Henry Who draw from a colorful array of sounds that warm your midweek blues. From 8pm, free. Bimbo Deluxe, 376 Brunswick St (Cnr Rose St), Fitzroy

COSMIC PIZZA NHJ and friends host every Tuesday night upstairs at Lucky Coq. Playing uneasy listening, freaked out bass jams, romantic comedy disco, tropi-jazz, soundtracks and shit you won’t hear on the other nights. Lucky Coq, 179 Chapel St, Windsor


MINX GOING GLOBAL: MIXING IT UP Sydney based DJ Minx, aka Rachel Phillips, won EMI’s She Can DJ Competition last September and since then has released her debut compilation, an original EP, DJed at the Grammy and Brit Awards’ after parties and played alongside the likes of David Guetta, Swedish House Mafia and Diplo. 100% chats with the chirpy lass about judging Cleo’s Bachelor Of The Year, interviewing Carl Cox and her plans for the rest of 2012 and beyond. “I was kind of crapping my pants at the start,” Rachel Phillips says down the line from her home in Sydney, speaking of an International Music Summit she recently attended in Ibiza. At the three day conference promoters, DJs, producers, club owners and journalists came together to discuss different areas in the electronic music industry, and Phillips found herself liaising with the likes of Paul Oakenfold, David Guetta, Pete Tong, Diplo and Goldfish and on a panel talking about women rising in the DJ and music world. Initially, she says, it was a little intimidating talking in front of all the big wigs. “Once I got going and the guys started talking and asking questions, everyone got involved and then the crowd started asking questions,” she says. “It was fun. Afterwards I met some people from other countries in Europe who were really keen to book me after they’d seen me speak and what I’m all about.” While in Ibiza for the conference, Phillips did a radio show for Party People on the Austereo network and broadcasted it down under. “I went to the Space opening parties and interviewed Carl Cox after his main set, so that was super cool,” she says excitedly. “I had never really met Carl Cox before so that was a really good thing. I was shitting myself because there were so many journalists around me, everyone was waiting there and

everyone was watching everyone else interview him so I was so intimidated but shit, I quickly sculled the vodka and off I went,” she laughs. It was almost a year ago when Phillips took part in EMI’s She Can DJ Competition and she says it’s “crazy” looking back at everything she’s done since then. “The opportunities since I’ve won have been massive,” she says. Having put out her debut compilation She Can DJ Presents Minx shortly after taking out the competition’s title, Phillips has rejigged one of her original singles Chances, releasing it as EP called Taking Chances. She’s currently working on her debut original record, which she hopes to release next year. “My first single from the album is about to drop in conjunction with this year’s She Can DJ competition,” she says, “So that will come out early September, A Night To Remember.” Taking Chances will be used as the theme song for this year’s She Can DJ Competition and Phillips will take on a mentor roll for the entrants in the competition. “I’m going to see how they all work and interact, so that will be really cool to meet some new girls,” she says. “We didn’t really have a mentor as such with our top 10 but we did have a lot of people come and chat with us, and the guys from EMI are great, they’re there every step of the way anyway. But last year’s top 10 – all of us were already friends anyway; we obviously didn’t know who was in it until we met but we were like ‘Oh, you.’” But the prospect of mentoring the new batch of entrants in the She Can DJ Competition hasn’t been the only thing that’s excited Phillips recently. She had the pleasure of judging this year’s Cleo Bachelor Of The Year which she says was “really hilarious”. “There was a judging lunch with the 25 of us girls and

Z-TRIP CATCHING HIS THIRD WIND: WORLD TRIPPING Zach Sciacca, aka Z-Trip, is returning to Australia with his highly acclaimed live AV show for the first time in two and a half years. In that time he’s kept busy and found a number of inspirations to help him keep pushing musical boundaries. Sciacca isn’t short of laurels to rest on. He has DJed in front of half a million people opening for The Rolling Stones, made the first official remix for Nirvana, been immortalised as a playable character in the video game DJ Hero, headlined festivals like Coachella and helped launch the mash-up movement with his 2001release Uneasy Listening. So it may seem odd that he finds himself “gushing like I’ve got a new girlfriend” when talking about a mixer that he helped design. Except that he describes the Rane Sixty-Two mixer as a major personal accomplishment that has helped re-energise him – and will enhance his upcoming Australian tour. “[The mixer is] a little bit easier for me to navigate, it’s a bit easier for me to pull off things that were impossible to do before. I have a bit more dexterity when I’m playing, and it just makes it fun. It really gave me a third or fourth wind, if you will,” Sciacca says. “I don’t want to speak for everybody but I think there are DJs who could probably relate; when you’re doing your thing and it’s going great, and all of a sudden you get to a point where you’re like, ‘I’m just uninspired’ or ‘I’ve hit a brick wall,’ and all of a sudden something happens that

changes the whole playing field.” Sciacca cites the first case of this being the shift from vinyl to Serato. “A lot of people, myself included, when [Serato] first hit were like ‘Pfft, really? Come on man.’ Until finally you got up and started messing with it and you’re like ‘You know what? This isn’t half bad’,” he says. The second is the emergence of new genres of music in recent years, such as dubstep and Moombahton, which make it easier for him to bridge gaps between tempos and genres. “It’s gotten to be more fun because now it’s also a bit more fluid and there’s plenty more people out there who like all kinds of music. I can hit my reggae, I can hit my dubstep, I can hit my funk, I can hit my house, I can hit my rock, I can hit some ‘70s shit, some ‘60s shit, some psych stuff,” Sciacca says. “I can go wherever I want now, and I’ve got a way to get in and out faster because there’s more on my palette.” He’s been particularly busy over the last year touring with hip hop legend LL Cool J. The pair met up a year ago, when LL was making a cameo appearance in Sciacca’s headlining set at SXSW. Over rehearsals they realised that they worked very well together as a traditional MC and DJ duo. “We bring out the best of each other onstage, like a true DJ and a true MC would do,” he says. LL has been largely absent from music in recent years, preferring to focus on his acting career – until sharing the stage with Sciacca rekindled his interest in music. “When

we got to go through 250 potential bachelors and rate them. It’s not everyday you get asked to rate boys,” she says, laughing. Sitting alongside Jesinta Campbell, Rachel Gilbert and Maude Garrett, Phillips says she didn’t have a favourite of all the potential bachelors. “I didn’t really, it might be quite biased because I actually knew quite a few of them which makes the final night quite fun because we all knew each other. My old housemate was in it and I didn’t realise.” Aiming to score a bunch of European gigs over the coming summer and put her debut original record out soon, Phillips will be venturing overseas later in the year as an ambassador for the She Can DJ Competition, which is going global. But for now, she’s looking forward

to playing Sound Empire at Crown next weekend. “I haven’t played at the Crown for a while, it will be good, interesting,” she says. “[Expect] some progressive house.” But she won’t be taking up the luxury of staying the night at Crown after the gig, unfortunately. “Generally I stay there the night,” she says before suddenly remembering, “actually I can’t, I’m playing a gig out in Geelong on the same night so I’ll be jumping in the car I guess.” Annabel Maclean Minx [AUS] plays Sound Empire at Crown on Saturday July 28.

we linked up I was like ‘Hey man, how come you’re not doing any more music?’ He’s like ‘To be honest, I was just getting bored with it. Music wasn’t really exciting me’,” Sciacca explains. “When we started working together he was like ‘You’ve excited me; you’ve got me excited to do this shit again’.” Sciacca has also been busy working on a new album. It has been in the works, loosely, for a couple of years, but he’s hoping to have it finished and released in late 2012 or early 2013. “[It’s] all across the board musically, kind of like what my sets are; all tempos, all styles, but definitely bass heavy and groove heavy and scratch heavy,” he says. “Basically what I would do as a record.” But for Sciacca, the most exciting recent achievement has been the Rane Sixty-Two mixer. After an earlier mixer Rane designed was not particularly successful, he provided them with feedback on it. “I was very brutally honest with them,” he says. This led to an invitation to help design the new mixer. “It’s everything I ever wanted to put in a mixer. The bottom line for me is, as a DJ, I think any DJ who’s out there who’s been doing it for long enough has always been like ‘Fuck, I just wish this thing could do this’,” Sciacca explains. “I actually got to do that.” He says that Rane took a lot of his advice on board because he explained why each suggestion would help all DJs. “To be able to do put something like that together in a mixer and then have my name on it, it was very validating,” Sciacca says. “It’s the coolest thing I’ve done on a technological tip. I think being in DJ Hero and seeing me as a character in a video game was probably the closest thing, but this is so much more; it’s not about a video game, it’s about the real thing and my name is on it.” Joshua Hayes Z-Trip [USA] plays the Prince Bandroom on Thursday August 9.

KASRA CRITICAL MUSIC: THINKING DEEP One might initially presume that to name a label Critical Music would be a somewhat presumptuous decision, but those with an ear to the underground within drum and bass would today unanimously agree that label owner Kasra Mowlavi has achieved something truly singular with his record label, due to turn ten this year. Created in a front room in north London, the DJ’s wonderfully simplistic vision of a label that played a role in nurturing and developing the talents of the best burgeoning talents that drum and bass had to offer has actualised into a label that certainly is critical listening for fans of the genre and beyond. As a DJ and not a producer, Mowlavi’s beginnings as a label owner are a little unconventional – proving a challenge to establish the label during its humble beginnings. “Yeah, it was at first, it was pretty hard,” he concedes. “All the labels that were around already were established or run by artists themselves, so if you’re an artist, why would you give music to someone you’ve never heard of? It was a long process, spending time with the artists and explaining what I was trying to do with the label and establishing trust. Showing them that sometimes, it’s better if you’re not a producer, so you can concentrate more on running a label. A long process, but rewarding.” Critical has since blossomed into one of the genre’s most forward-thinking and successful outlets – playing host to releases from the likes of Marcus Intalex, Calibre, Breakage, Spectrasoul, Enei and plenty more. These days however, Mowlavi’s approach to the label is a little more anarchistic, with the launch of Modulations alongside

the label expanding beyond the initial focus on 170BPM beats to techno, dubstep and beyond. “It’s quite hard to launch something alongside your label - everyone thinks it’s a sub-label, and the term is something I hate,” he says. “Sub suggests that it’s not good enough to go on the main label. What I try to explain to people is that Modulations is a series that’s just packaged differently - it’s still great music. It’s like if we’d done a compilation album and called it Critical Presents: Modulations. It’s the same thing, but across a series of records that may never end. We’ve had new artists as well as established artists - it’s a way of presenting music in a new and more interesting way, breath[ing] a little life into the genre. The reception has been really good, so I’m pleased about that.” The label’s broadened horizons, as he explains, is the reflection of a scene that is beginning to diversify and fragment, more willing to explore new territory and take risks. “I think more and more these days, the idea of tempo is becoming increasingly irrelevant – you can play more and more in a DJ set now. One of the popular aspects of dubstep, for example, has been that you can go and watch a DJ play techno and house, dubstep, drum and bass – that’s interesting and fun, and that’s rubbed off on everyone, more people are just making what they feel like making. It’s a label – you release what you think is good music. Real labels don’t care about the commercial aspect of things – obviously you need to survive as an entity, but if it’s good, I don’t care what it is, I’m going to put it out.” Even his own forays into production have been coloured by this. Only in the past few years has Mowlavi moved

from exclusively being a DJ into the world of music production, but it’s one that’s presented him with exhilarating challenges. “It’s harder in a way, given my background, yeah,” he says of the move. “The bar’s been set by the artists on the label already and I’ve got this mental hurdle I can’t get over where I write quite a lot of music, but I don’t think it’s good enough, and I’m worried that people will think I’m putting it out because I can. A lot of artists are never really happy with what they do, but I’m getting there – I only put something out if I’m really into it. I’ll be honest, I’m writing a lot more house and techno than I am drum and bass. I enjoy making music, but I don’t put pressure on myself to write anything in particular, I just get in the studio and make noise and see what happens.” Given Critical Music’s rapidly-upcoming tenth birthday, it seems more than fitting that the crew behind it are ready and raring to throw some serious parties to celebrate, and the upcoming Australian tour alongside labelmate FEATURES

Sabre is one of a few planned. Representing the extensive legacy of Critical is a challenge not to be sniffed at, one would assume – pressed for some of the achievements he’s most proud of during that time, Mowlavi has a lot to pick from, but he is surprisingly laidback and humble about it. “I’d say mainly a lot of the things we’ve done with Fabric – doing the residency there, the Fabric CD as well, that was really great, a real honour to do that. The music that’s out as well – the cross section of what I think is really good drum and bass, from Spectrasoul to Enei and breaks. I’m really proud of the catalogue – all of it, really.” Miki McLay Kasra [UK] plays alongside Jonwayne [USA], Mono/Poly [USA] and more on Friday August 10 at Roxanne Parlour.

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URBAN ESSENTIALS WEDNESDAY25TH

COMPRESSION SESSION Reggae at E55 every Wednesday night. Resident selectors play strictly vinyl. Free entry. 8pm. E55, 55 Elizabeth St, Melbourne CBD

THURSDAY26TH MOTOWN THURSDAYS Kick start your weekend with Melbourne’s newest Thursday night! Motown Thursdays caters to all true music lovers. Join us on an eclectic musical journey of soul, funk and disco through to early R&B. A live Soul Band features some of Melbourne’s most talented musicians; Carmen Hendricks, Laurent Soupe, Duncan Kinell and Aaron Mendoza just to name a few. DJs keep the records spinning into the early hours; residents are Reg-e, Lee Davies, Kalepe, Dinesh, Suga, Rubz and Alwin Rafferty. Join us around a big, shiny disco ball or two, for free entry, soulful tunes, drink specials all night and a dance floor full of friends! Fashion Lounge, 121 Flinders Lane, Melbourne

RHYTHM-AL-ISM Start the weekend early with Fusion’s Resident DJs. Music for your funkin’ soul. Special guests every week! Fusion, Crown Entertainment Complex, Lvl 3, 8 Whiteman St, Southbank

FRIDAY27TH FAKTORY This is it. Faktory Fridays are open for business at Melbourne’s home of R&B, Khokolat Bar. Where else? Damion De Silva, Ken Walker, Durmy, K Dee, Simon Sez, Yaths and Jacqui Dusk spinning all night long. Khokolat Bar, Basement, 43 Hardware La, Melbourne

LIKE FRIDAYS Like Fridays at La Di Da serves up R&B and electro house across two rooms giving you a fun filled end to your week. DJs Dinesh, Dir-X, Sef, NYD, Shaun D, Shaggz, Broz and more. La Di Da, 577 Little Bourke St, Melbourne

LIGHT The buzz is Light at RedLove every Friday. Hitting out

that R&B flavour of old, new and everything in between! RedLove Resident DJs Stel, Harvey Yeah, TMC and Ripz on the wheels of steel from 6.30pm. If you don’t know, now you know! Check it! Red Love, Level 1, 401 Swanston Street, Melbourne

THE LOOSE GOOSE The Loose Goose is focused on providing a wonderful array of cocktails and offers a great CBD location to lounge and relax in while overlooking busy Flinders Lane. A small plates menu is available to graze on whilst trying our delicious cocktails from the classics to contemporary, beer on tap and a wide range of beers, wines and spirits. Every Friday evening DJ Jumps of The Cat Empire will take to the decks at the bar spinning his rare afro Latin funk vinyl collected from around the world from 6.30pm until late. Papa Goose Cocktail Bar, 91-93 Flinders Lane, Melbourne

SWEET NOTHING FRIDAYS DJ Marcus Knight and DJ Xander James spin hip hop, R&B and house tunes all night from 8pm. Free entry and early drink specials. Temperance Hotel, 426 Chapel St, South Yarra

THE NICE UP Tom Showtime presents The Nice Up. All flavours of hip hop, ghetto funk and reggae niceness provided. Sailor Jerry nice up the cocktails, Dos Blockos nice up the $5 beers. Fridays done proper. George Lane Bar, 1 George Lane, St Kilda

SATURDAY28TH KHOKOLAT KOATED All new experience, same great location with a fresh koat of Khokolat. Restless Entertainment reloads your favourite Saturday night party. Damion De Silva, K Dee, Jay Sin and weekly guests playing R&B & ol’ skool sounds strictly for the urban elite. Khokolat Bar, Basement, 43 Hardware La, Melbourne

REDLOVE SATURDAYS RedLove Saturdays is all about solid classics from the ‘80s, ‘90s and into the ‘00s! Dropping beats of retro pop, disco classics, old school funk, and certainly some of that old school r&b and house to kick! RedLove Resident DJs Phil, HB Bear and Da Gato bringing down the house every Saturday night. If you’re looking for quality service, music to rock, sumptuous drinks and just a cold hard good time; look no further! Red Love, Level 1, 401 Swanston Street, Melbourne

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URBAN

HIP HOPPING: NO STOPPING It may be his second album, but rapidly-rising Sydney hip hop star Skryptcha considers Mindful to be his definitive work thus far, an album that truly announces his arrival to the world. The opening track Graduation comes stuffed with rollicking instrumental hooks and audacious rhymes, telling the story of where the young MC has been thus far, but also signalling his readiness to play with the big boys. “I’ve done so much already, but I think it’s all been a bit of an apprenticeship,” he says. “I really do feel like now, things have started to come together and feel a lot more complete. I’ve had a lot of ups and downs, but they’ve made me into the person I am now, the artist I am. I feel I’m worthy of being on that top level now as an artist. Above all, that song is really an explanation of all the things that have come together to get me to this point.” Skryptcha’s lyrics ruminate on the state of the world, as well as the place he occupies in it, with uncommon ease and honesty. On tracks like Work Out he lays the practicalities of his life bare, rhyming about the need to work a day job while pursuing a creative path. “I have been doing both for quite a few years now, and I did all throughout this album,” he says. “It’s a lot of work, man! It’s non-stop. You wake up before dawn and you go to work at one job, then you come home and straight away, you start work on the next.” There hasn’t been too much free time in Skryptcha’s life over the last two years or so, but now, with his album coming out, he’s able to pause for a minute and enjoy the fruits of his persistence. “It’s a good feeling to be able to come home with a clear head,” he says, “especially when you have gone through hard times and a lot of work.” Over the last couple of years Skryptcha has seen many of his friends move west to pursue jobs in the mines, and this experience made for one of the album’s more powerful tracks, The Sun. “I’ve got a whole bunch of mates who left chasing that dollar,” he explains. “At the time I wrote that song it was the peak of the mining tax battle. It was something that really struck a chord in me, seeing these few greedy people running the whole country, the CEOs of those big companies taking control of things.” He realised that behind all the politics and money and big business, there is actually a human element – a generation of young people whose lives are changed in all sorts of ways. “I just wanted to tell a bit of a story through the eyes of an average bloke who has gone to work in the mines to make a better future for his family,” he continues. “I was interested in

the way that political row would impact on the average person.” The rich, soulful sound of Mindful comes courtesy of producer Illmind, who produced the album in his Brooklyn studio. Working with him was something of a dream come true for Skryptcha. “There was a very particular sound I was looking for on this album,” he says, “which was a soul sound with a lot of heavy bass, and he’s really the king of that sound, with his crazy bass lines and really nice samples. I hit him up online, and he was happy to work with me, so I managed to plan a trip to see him as part of a visit to the States I did last year, which was awesome. I spent a bit of time with him in Brooklyn. It was really good to build a human relationship and not just be people who knew each other over the Internet.” Skryptcha only had a short time in Brooklyn, but still did his best to soak up all the borough has to offer. “I stayed there for a few nights, in a little hostel kind of thing in the Bushwick Projects,” he says. “From where I was, if you went a few hundred metres up into Bushwick, that maybe wouldn’t be the best place for a little Aussie fella to be, but around where I was, there was a really cool, arty vibe – there were little holein-the-wall bars and restaurants, really cool stuff.” The first night he was there, he went to a gig at the legendary and now defunct hip hop venue Southpaw. “I went along there to see Freddie Gibbs and Big Crit, who are two amazing artists. It was pretty sick just to be a spectator at a gig in Brooklyn.” Skryptcha didn’t get to perform in America while he was there, but hopes to do so in the future, insured by the Stateside success of acts like Bliss n Eso. “They have done big tours throughout the States,” he says, “touring with big US artists playing to big US crowds, not just Aussie expats, and they seem to be pretty positive about the whole thing. I’ve heard them talking about their experiences and they had great times – honestly, it sounds pretty doable. I don’t doubt that people like Bliss n Eso can compete on an international scale – their skills are top class, and as long as you’re bringing skills like that to the rest of the world, you’ll get respect, for sure.” Alasdair Duncan Skryptcha’s [AUS] Mindful is out on Friday July 27 through Obese. He launches it at The Workers Club on Saturday August 4.


THE BIG MAG FOR CLUB CULTURE

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100% Magazine #1330