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2018 Annual Report Quetzaltenango, Guatemala, C.A.


Development with Dignity

Mission We are a privately-owned voluntary foundation seeking to promote the development of low-income areas in the Republic of Guatemala, especially for those people who live in the rural areas of the highlands, by innovative projects avoiding patriarchy to guarantee a better living standard. All of this under a sustainable development framework with absolute respect for human dignity, culture and traditions.

Vision Eradicating Guatemala’s poverty through strategies based on equality, honesty, freedom, excellence, respect for dignity and democracy.


The Foundation in 2018 2

Working Region

4

Organizational Structure

5

Institutional Challenges

6

Letter from the President

8

Letter from the Executive Director

10

Our beneficiaries

12

Crowdfunding campaign Meet Arlet

40

Life story Achieving a vital dream

42

Life story A challenging road to success

44

Cooperating partners

The results of our programs 14

Education Program

18

Healthcare Program

22

Microcredit Program

26

Handicraft Program

30

Agricultural Program

34

Environmental Program

38

Transversal action Opportunities for all

39

Transversal action Hope Project

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Aid e d B e n e f ic ia ri es

172,883

133,809

39,074

Wo rk Re g ion s

1. Huehuetenango

7. Chimaltenango

10,799

5,551

2. Quiché

8. Retalhuleu

3,039

12,523

3. San Marcos

9. Suchitepéquez

41,599

30,692

4. Totonicapán

10. Sacatepéquez

15,166

29

5. Quetzaltenango

11. Escuintla

50,713

1,039

6. Sololá 1,733

12. Petén

16. El Progreso

20. Chiquimula

13. Alta Verapaz

17. Zacapa

21. Santa Rosa

14. Izabal

18. Guatemala

22. Jutiapa

15. Baja Verapaz

19. Jalapa 2


Guatemala Geographical coverage of FUNDAP The rest of Guatemala

12

Belize

Mexico

13

1

14

2 3

15

4 5 8

6

7

9 11

10

18

17

16 19

21

Honduras

20

22 El Salvador

Central America

3


ASSEMBLY OF DIRECTORS

EXTERNAL AUDIT

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

INTERNAL AUDIT

GENERAL COMPTROLLER COORDINATION AND ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE

EDUCATION

HEALTHCARE

MICROCREDIT

HANDICRAFT

AGRICULTURAL

ENVIRONMENTAL

Scholarships for Girls

Auxiliary Nursing School

Microenterprise Loans

Entrepreneurial & Human Training

Training & Qualification

Forestry Management

Educational Quality

Medical Clinics

Agricultural Loans

Social Organization

Social Organization

Social Organization

ICEFAT

Training for Health Promoters

Infrastructure Loans

Business Management

Agricultural Production

Environmental Education

CIEM

Nutritional Recovery

Village Banking

Leadership Training Certification

Transfer of Technology

Environmental Infrastructure

Connections

Connections

Business School Technical Training

Solidarity & Support

Food Security

Support Services Unit

Support Services Unit

Financial Management

General Secretariat

Financial Management

Institutional File

Treasury

Design & Communication

Risk Prevention

Talent Management

Special Credit Portfolio

Recruitment, Selection & Induction

QA & IT Politics

Human Resource File

Verification & Analysis

Institutional Culture & Training

Information Register Accounting Data acquisition & Processing Information Technology Technological Infrastructure Systems Development Maintenance & Support Database Management

4


T h e ch al l e nge s of o u r i nst it ut i o n

Habit Formation Savings, hygiene, nutrition, reading and studying

Work with Woman Children’s education, autonomy, potential, development and self-esteem

Installed Capacity Qualified staff, local organizations and installed capability

CH ANG E S

Job Generation

Abilities & Skills

Environmental Sustainability

Social Capital

Social Organization

PRO G RAMS Education

Healthcare

Solidarity & Support Handicraft

Agricultural

Microcredit Food Security Environmental

MONITORING AND EVALUATION


L e t t e r f ro m th e P res i d ent

ROBERTO GUTIÉRREZ President of FUNDAP

Emigration is not an option Nearly two million Guatemalans have chosen emigration as a way to procure a better income, they do not, however, find a better quality of life. This is because emigrating means sacrificing the central aspects of life such as living together as a family, living in one’s own culture, leaving behind friendships, and sacrificing the environment that one is accustomed to. It is therefore indeed a sacrifice, because the life they lead in the diaspora is full of discomforts: living -generally- crammed in dangerous slums, with the risk of being caught by immigration police and expelled from their “host” country. This is significant human suffering that does not represent a better standard of living, neither for the emigrants, nor for those who receive those funds, as further explained below.

It is usually argued that the contribution that remittances make to the national economy is fundamental; and it is true, since the almost eleven billion dollars that are sent annually are equivalent to all Guatemalan exports. With these remittances the balance of payments of the State has been balanced, since imports represent twenty-two billion dollars, so that this amount is equal to the sum of exports and remittances (eleven million each, as stated before). The reality of the resources that enter by way of remittances is that they are spent, in more than half, on telephones and trinkets, a good part on construction (poorly designed homes), another part on healthcare, and very little on education 6


and productive activities, which are, by the way, areas that would provide a real improvement in the economic future of the recipients’ families. The few, poorly designed, and badly executed efforts made to date to achieve a better investment of remittances have not been fruitful. In short, for decades, the country has depended on remittances for its macroeconomic stability, but that dependence is very precarious, since emigrants can be expelled due to political changes, in this case the United States of America. In addition, it can also be harmful to families on account of the absence of father figures in many of the households. Faced with the human tragedy of emigration, the Foundation for the Integral Development of SocioEconomic Programs, FUNDAP, prepares young people in technical fields and strategies for job placement or selfemployment, by supporting the creation of sustainable enterprises. This is done in our four technical centers located in Quetzaltenango, San Marcos, Suchitepéquez, and Quiché and in fourteen mobile centers. In these technical centers, training is provided in the

Francisco Roberto Gutiérrez Martínez

Service Area (mechanics, electricity, hairdressing, and other professions), Food Service or Textiles (embroidery, cutting and tailoring, haute couture). Training is also offered for Nursing Aids through the Health Program. In addition to this, Handicraft and Agricultural programs have been added. The remarkable thing about FUNDAP’s initiatives is that the young people who participate in the training, also receive comprehensive training. As a result, the job placement of the graduates of FUNDAP’s technical centers is very high, both in existing and new companies that they organize themselves, for which they receive the support of the entity that provides them with support for their organization, ranging from equipment lending to legal and formal advice. In the following pages you will find the results of our work, which will allow you to get an idea of how these initiatives have a positive effect in mitigating the migration of our Guatemalan citizens, who only need “opportunities.”


L e t t e r f ro m th e E xecutive Di re ct o r

JORGE GÁNDARA Executive Director of FUNDAP

This year’s 2018 report allows us to see the results of the Foundation’s management through our different Programs and Projects, which have been made possible thanks to the delivery and personal commitment of its almost 800 collaborators, the support of our donors who believe in us, and above all the receptivity of our beneficiaries.

make in society? This is asked because of the risk that our efforts are only translated into goal fulfillment and project activities and that we do not see past that. Since reflecting is the synthesis of our actions, we must not lose sight of the journey we are on and what we do in its entirety. During the closure of a Home Electricity course, I asked the students what the most important thing that they learned was, and one of them said, “respect”, the respect with which he was treated and the respect that was required among one another. Recently, in a visit with a girl who is a scholarship recipient for the Scholarship for Girls project, she made the following observation: “The scholarship is very good, but with FUNDAP the most important thing is that I feel sure that there is someone who is continuously watching over me making sure that I am okay, I feel protected.”

A tree that has no roots or is in poor condition falls, so is the Foundation with respect to its Identity, its nature. If we do not take care of our essence, that is, for what and for whom we are working, the Foundation forgets its very purpose and everything becomes corrupted, either in the short or long term, thus losing the professionalism of a job well done. The question that our collaborators always ask us in the results and impact of our work assessment is: What changes do we want to 8


Both examples show us the real identity of the Foundation, what we do for others, and mainly, how we do it. If our initiatives are based on human dignity, in the great value we all have, it is there we will find the strength to continue working towards our hopes and aspirations. I think that, for those of us who are involved in FUNDAP, we should always keep the following in mind, and that in one way or another, that this be embodied in our ideology: • Strengthening of Society. • Be generators of opportunities for the underprivileged. • Strengthening and developing constructive habits in our beneficiaries. • Recognition of women’s work, their role in the family, and in society. • Absolute respect for other people’s way of thinking. • Our priority is the protection of children and young people and the search for opportunities for them.

• Our actions must be aimed at strengthening and generating employment. • Leave communities with production potential so that they are the protagonists of their own development and do not depend on subsidies or misogynistic models. • Clear and transparent accountability for our donor friends, which includes what they expect from us, in terms of sustainability and the long term scope of the initiatives that we start.

All of the above, in addition to always presenting ourselves with our hearts in hand to “see” the needs of others and act accordingly, should prevail throughout all the years that God gives us, in order to continue working on behalf of those less fortunate. That is why, without sparing any effort, performing professional work and providing quality service with a human touch, we will be able to honor the more than 35 years of the Foundation’s work. Thus we will approach those who need us the most, fulfilling in this way the dreams and aspirations of all those who are convinced that, step by step, we can build a more just world and have a solid institution with deep, strong roots.

Jorge Arturo Gándara Gaborit


More information at bit.ly/FUNDAP2018

EDUCATION NATIONWIDE DATA

Education. Primary School. 5% of children between the ages of 7 and 12 drop out of school. Middle School. Only 25% of young people between the ages of 13 and 15 have access to the basic cycle of secondary education. In addition, 7% of students drop out of school. High School. Only 17% of young people between the ages of 16 and 18 have access to the diversified cycle of secondary education, which allows them to go to a university, which is the only path that provides specific training to enter the labor market. FUNDAP INITIATIVES

822 men

3,568 women

are educated in Educational Centers (CIEM), Scholarships for Girls and Cooperative Institutes (ICEFAT’s).

99% of girls assisted

by the Scholarships for Girls program do not drop out. FORESTS FUNDAP INITIATIVES

71.19 hectares reforested. 10


HEALTHCARE NATIONWIDE DATA

Chronic malnutrition. 47% of children under 5 suffer from chronic malnutrition. FUNDAP INITIATIVES

982

669

pregnant women

boys

683 girls

are aided and supported in Nutritional Recovery.

32,045 people are served in FUNDAP’s Medical Clinics.

EMPLOYMENT FUNDAP INITIATIVES

5,097

people specialized in a trade

71

hearing impaired

50,712 jobs created. Jobs generated by beneficiaries 7,613 Dependent jobs 88 Fortified self-employment 42,119 Temporary jobs 799 Contract jobs with benefits 93


MEET ARTLET

Arlet wants to achieve her goals: “graduate, look for work and help mom.”

12


Thanks to your financial help, this young woman got a scholarship to continue studying, covering the necessary expenses, and became a role model for many girls. Arlet will fight for a better future, but she also wants other Guatemalan students to continue their education and not drop out. FUNDAP thanks you for the support received and we hope your donation to the crowdfunding of ‘Scholarships for Girls’ that we have in progress. Remember, this project changes lives.

Collaborate in

bit.ly/DonarFUNDAP


Educat io n P ro g ram

P romote s a ccess, q uali t y, and eq ui t y of for mal and non-formal educatio n, e sp ec i ally for vulnerab le children, young p eop le , and wo men. Develo pmental p ote nti a l and perso nal growth.

14


Program initiatives

Beneficiaries

42,863

26,522 Scholarships for Girls

Cooperative Institutes

Educational Centers

3,007

27

145

150

39

282

95%

2,042

33%

Educational Quality

Business School

Technical Training

772

896

2,030

33

1,325

31%

1,600

girls and young women assisted

integraly supported institutes

parents received training of parents cooperated in order to help the education of the girls.

teachers trained in Pedagogy and educational management

5,200

parents received awareness training

71

schools improved their infrastructure

Departments

16,341

improvement projects implemented students assisted in middle school and high school

small business owners served through IMPULSA and MBA jobs created by assisted companies average increase in sales of assisted companies

young people and adults finished high school people developed technical skills generated income in their entrepreneurial projects

people completed basic and advanced courses people finished their basic training (CEDES) young people trained in ‘Successful entrepreneurship’

Quiché

449

Chimaltenango

202

Sacatepéquez Escuintla

29 109

Totonicapán

7,055

Huehuetenango

1,265

Quetzaltenango

13,537

San Marcos

13,411

Sololá

474

Retalhuleu

1,835

Suchitepéquez

4,497


16


TESTIMONY

A Unique Team Teachers Lissa de León, Lesbi Vicente, Anali Castillo, Lendra Aguilar, Esly Rodas, and Federico Rucún, who work at the ‘Escuela Oficial Rural Mixta’ of the San José Las Delicias community, have assumed the role of ‘Trainer of Trainers’ in their region. The commitment, creativity, and delivery shown characterizes them as a unique team. After the first phase of training provided by FUNDAP from 2016-2017, the second part of the research came last year, sharing FUNDAP’s good practices with teachers from other districts, fulfilling their role as multipliers in teaching and Pedagogical practices. Among them, Lesbi Vicente won the distinguished teacher award at the departmental level. FUNDAP’s commitment to getting things right and finding a genuine interest in learning with each child and group makes this team of teachers a developmental tool in the region.

EDUCATION PROGRAM


Healt h care P ro g ram

P romotes the health of the u n d e rp rivileged, reducing the cau se s of mo rb idi t y and mor tali t y. Always focused o n preventio n and th e qu ali f icatio n of health agents.

18


Program initiatives

Beneficiaries

35,664

27,062

Auxiliary Nursing School

Medical Clinics

77

92%

40

1,053

50%

32,045

Training for Health Promoters

Nutritional Recovery

70,000

1,352

737

60%

291

982

young people accredited alumni received new training to grow in their profession successfully joined the workforce

activities carried out by the volunteers in the different formative tasks new promoters trained to provide primary care volunteers qualified in their second formative year

Departments

8,602

Quiché

of those served were women and children tests conducted for cervical cancer prevention medical consultations provided in 10 clinics, 18% rural

children aged 6 months to 5 years received nutritional supplements and follow up of children improved their nutritional condition of pregnant women improved their eating habits

5

Totonicapán

2,119

Huehuetenango

2,614

Quetzaltenango

15,005

San Marcos Sololá

4,578 65

Retalhuleu

3,292

Suchitepéquez

7,986


20


TESTIMONY

Lesbia Lesbia Argueta is a healthcare volunteer with a very clear work approach, the prevention of cervical cancer in women, whose mortality rate is located in Guatemala as follows: out of every 1,500 cases detected, 700 women die each year. After receiving training in 2016, she became involved in training, counseling, and health promotion in her community. Because of this, Doña Lesbia implements different strategies, such as the development of medical and diagnostic days for gynecological problems, something that in many communities remains a taboo topic. Even though her struggle is never ending and in 2018 two serious cases were identified, the greatest satisfaction for her is that women are receiving the right treatment. Her motto is clear: “a timely diagnosis saves women.”

HEALTHCARE PROGRAM


Micro cre d it P ro g ram

P romote s th e eco nomic develo pment of th e u r ban an d rural areas of s o uthwes tern Gu ate mala, throug h ini tiatives such as g ranti n g c redi ts, training, and co ns ulting e ntre p re n e u rs and small b us iness owners .

22


Program initiatives

Beneficiaries

77,284

69,501

Microenterprise Loans

Infraestructure Loans

1,912

1,840

Agricultural Loans

Village Banking

1,045

127

small business owners received credit to increase their working capital

people received field training

33

trainings for agricultural management

870

in-field technical assistance provided

Departments

7,783

Quiché Chimaltenango Escuintla Totonicapán Huehuetenango Quetzaltenango San Marcos Sololá Retalhuleu Suchitepéquez

women accessed financing for housing construction and / or the purchase of a piece of land

new groups of women supported with microcredits

1,840

current community banks and assets

308

beneficiaries from different departments trained in 6 technical training seminars

1,163 5,324 930 4,745 5,187 16,508 17,240 711 7,343 18,133


24


TESTIMONY

Virginia Virginia Magdalena had skills for embroidering “güipiles” and aprons, and so she started her own business using a FUNDAP credit. The 24-yearold has already been supported by a Communal Bank, supported by her mother who encouraged her to do training as well. Through this united journey, she appreciates the support of the Foundation through different services, such as the advice she received about business issues and technical seminars given in the Technical Center and the ‘Impulsa’ Project, in addition to the free medical consultation services. For Virginia Magdalena, her acceptance into this FUNDAP program was found to be very beneficial in the form of work and personnel, because she also began to build relationships, and this companionship resulted in an increase in the number of clients and increased income. The teamwork developed through her training led to an upward evolution.

MICROCREDIT PROGRAM


Han d icraf t P ro g ram

Su p p or ts organizatio ns in pro mo ting c raf tsman ship, as well as the economic an d soc i al development of ar tisans. Th is p rog ram aims to preser ve the Gu ate m alan cultural identi t y.

26


Beneficiaries Program initiatives

1,297

1,869

Personal and Business Training

Technical, Productive and Business Assistance

326

493

105

5

15

5

Social Organization

Commercial Strengthening

140

578

84

32,446

women received business management training men received business management training organizations progressed in their development improving products and services

women strengthened their organizations through trainings men strengthened their organizations through trainings

15

strong organizations supported promoted local development

Departments

572

QuichĂŠ Chimaltenango TotonicapĂĄn Huehuetenango Quetzaltenango San Marcos SololĂĄ

artisans improved their skills and productive abilities new techniques implemented in craft production improvement instruments implemented

beneficiaries supported in marketing their products work wages generated

19

organizations and producers supported economically thanks to annual sales

228 25 182 18 802 312 302


28


TESTIMONY

Berta Berta Elisa Hernández Batz is 40 years old, a mother of three children, and resides in los Pocitos Village, Sibilia (Quetzaltenango). This community belongs to the ATEDI Association and is dedicated to pedal woven fabric, so in 2018 and thanks to the support of FUNDAP, they were able to strengthen the knowledge and skills in the production of Cobán, a very thin and light fabric. Although she already worked with this material, she needed to improve her skills in the process of thread intone, warping, figure weaving, and squeaking. Her story is that of a woman willing to keep learning in order to improve her work, earn more income, and meet the demand required by the current market. In addition, Berta Elisa is very happy contributing to the better education of her children: “I thank FUNDAP for supporting the Association and those of us who are engaged in weaving.”

HANDICRAFT PROGRAM


Agricu lt u ral P ro g ram

Always re sp ecting the environment, this p rog ram su p p or ts small organized pro ducers , w i th train i n g , technical assistance, so cial org an i zati on, commercialization, and tran sfe r of appro priate techno log ies .

30


Beneficiaries Program initiatives

8,003

11,429

Agricultural Production

Technical Assistance

Social Organization

3,663

311

389

16

2,212

18

729

1,290

1

Technology Transfer

Commercial Strengthening

746

16

1,841

157

34

90

people received technical support in their production families producing coffee became organic export certified beneficiaries established a family garden

people trained in the management of agricultural infrastructure farmers implemented agricultural technology potato farmers were benefited

Departments

3,426

QuichĂŠ TotonicapĂĄn Huehuetenango Quetzaltenango San Marcos

women and young people participated in educational tours members of organizations trained in Open Schools volunteers completed their training

members of organizations were assisted women received productive technical support cooperative was constituted and legalized

potato farmers commercialized 2 profitable crops farmers started growing export products women and young people started livestock businesses

1,194 999 1,660 4,022 3,554


32


TESTIMONY

Odilia Doña Odilia is 28 years old, married, has three children, and lives in the village of Chacaj, Nentón (Huehuetenango). During 2018 she participated in the training course for ‘Voluntary Agricultural Promoters,’ in her own village. There she learned how to make Bokashi, an organic fertilizer for use in growing vegetables and especially corn. Despite the drought suffered in July and August last year, knowing these techniques helped her recover depleted soils and maintain the moisture needed for her crops. As it should be, Ms. Odilia shared her experience with her neighbors in her village through agricultural training activities.

AGRICULTURAL PROGRAM


Environ me nt al P ro g ram

P rovi d e s ser vices for the sus tainab le man age me nt of renewab le natural reso urces, th rou g h man agement and refores tatio n, b as ic e nvi ron me ntal sani tation, s o cial organization, train i n g an d environmental awareness.

34


Beneficiaries Program initiatives

1,433

3,774

2,341

Environmental Education

Social Organization

573

16

13

1

86

19

people trained through 192 technical workshops training events on governance and forest protection forest promoters, agroforestry, and environmental in training

organizations work on the forest and environmental problems organization participates in 7 national networks on renewable resources technical workshops for multi-level entities

Forestry Management

2,034

beneficiaries with management plans on 53.03 hectares

116

work plans in follow-up for 736 people

181

Departments

technical workshops benefiting 204 people

TotonicapĂĄn Huehuetenango Quetzaltenango San Marcos SololĂĄ Retalhuleu SuchitepĂŠquez

128 217 535 2,530 226 53 85


36


TESTIMONY

Darío Darío’s case is that of environmental teaching that is passed on to the next generations. This organic coffee producer at the Magnolia Miramar Community Estate, Colomba (Quetzaltenango), is the father of five young boys. All of whom he has taught to protect nature so that they can live in a healthy environment. This is all thanks to the knowledge that he acquired after carrying out the course of ‘Forest, Agroforestry, and Environmental Promoters’ in his community through FUNDAP. In addition, he was subsequently elected president of the Environmental Committee in his community, where he provided environmental talks, led solid waste management with the school, and the institute of basic education. Students now know how to separate inorganic and organic waste, which is used to produce fertilizer.

ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAM


TRANSVERSAL ACTION

Opportunities for all

For ten years, FUNDAP established educational inclusion as the transversal axis of training. This strategy aims to reduce exclusion, mainly of young people and vulnerable women, in order to identify and meet their diverse needs of learning and follow up.

people pursuing these objectives, carrying the following main actions: (1) awarenesstraining for families or institutions that support People with Down syndrome and the hearing impaired; (2) awareness and vocational guidance for young people and women with different abilities to choose courses according to their interests, this is done in addition to their inclusion in occupational training courses and labor; (3) accompaniment of young people after completing their training to guarantee the use of their occupational skills for their wellbeing.

This work of educational inclusion aims to respond to the state of socioeconomic and labor marginalization that some vulnerable groups suffer in this country, so these actions enhance local development processes, improving their training options and job placement opportunities.

Thanks to all this work, in 2018, 71 hearing impaired young people were assisted as well as 2 with Down syndrome, especially in the Bakery course. In addition to that, 8 young people with hearing impairment started generating income from their educational skills and another group started a microbarber shop.

The true essence of this project, for which the Foundation works, is in the holistic approach that is born from the knowledge of the needs of those served, also from personalized accompaniment and progressive empowerment; an opportunity for all. As of 2018, the four Centers of Technical Business Training of FUNDAP serve young 38


TRANSVERSAL ACTION

Hope project

To meet the basic needs presented by the families in the South West of Guatemala, the Hope Project seeks to reduce risks through immediate attention and timely reference. In these regions many families live in conditions of extreme vulnerability, with food insecurity or life hazards and whom need direct support. In the fight against these problems, the Hope Project has some basic components carried out within its limitations:

Components of Hope Project Emergency care in high risk situations Food provision and nutritional training Improvement in housing conditions The intervention of children so that they continue studying Timely references to access productive projects Sensitization and discovery of productive potential in families Basic health (guarantees the consumption of treated water and basic medicine)

Therefore, and in compliance with these commitments, in 2018 the project reached 35 families made up of 130 people through the Hope Project. Beyond the action itself, this is an effective social service opportunity that is achieved thanks to the collaborators of FUNDAP, who are involved in the identification, design, and holistic support of each case detected. With this combined effort, the Foundation’s teams and families are moving in the same direction to restore the trust of these vulnerable people, improving the path to sustainable development.


Achieving a vital dream

40


BEVERLY BRISEYDA MONTEROS SOLIS

A whole life growing alongside FUNDAP The story of Beverly Monteros was always linked to FUNDAP. Originally from Villa Flores Village, Tejutla municipality, this young woman pushed forward with great effort. At age 19, she is currently studying ‘Fashion design’, but previously culminated courses in ‘tailoring’ and ‘bespoke design’, all were done in the Technical Center of the Foundation.

Beverly says “As a child I wanted to be a kindergarten teacher to teach and train people from my community.” However, her growth took her on different paths. When she was 8 years old and in the third grade, she entered the Project ‘Scholarships for the Girl’, receiving the necessary school help to continue studying and continue being linked to FUNDAP until the 7th grade in a place called ICEFAT, where she received a scholarship again. Family problems made these scholarships key for Beverly. All of this happened before starting with the courses of the Technical Center of San Marcos in order to help economically in her home. The support and protection of her brother, who was waiting for her at the bus stop every night when she was returning from her training, so that she didn’t feel afraid, added to the support from her mother, who had a sewing machine; helped Beverly found her new calling. She started with a ‘Dress making’’ course, where she was benefited with 50% of the costs, she soon invested her profits and bought another

sewing machine that was more modern. She also used the newly acquired knowledge in the ICEFAT to make money with crops and with pig breeding, in addition to performing work such as making shirts, uniforms or blouses, and doing embroidery. The purpose of all this was to actively contribute to her family’s economy. In this process, Beverly discovered her vocation and that’s why she, along with her brother Adoni, started her own workshop fashion design called “La Villa”. This is what she currently does for a living, although in the future she would like to be a dressmaker instructor and help others. She received, from FUNDAP, tools to fight for her goals and now she makes dresses, like the one in the photograph, which was selected for the candidate of the ICEFAT in a beauty pageant contest. Beverly is very grateful for all that this vital growth since childhood with the Foundation has meant, and, as she indicated, “Truly, there are not enough words to express my gratitude for the opportunity that was given to me, now I have a dream to fulfill.”


A challeng ing road to success

42


JUANITA FLORIDALMA SANTOS COTOM

Service and neighborly love, keys to improvement The crossing of the desert of Juanita Floridalma was literal, a trip for thousands of kilometers in order to change her life to settle as a nurse in the prestigious hospital center ‘La Paz’ of Quetzaltenango. At age 35, she is a happy worker in the Guatemalan health sector in a center where she has been for 5 years, but before she had to fight against the macho customs of her youth.

Juanita obtained a scholarship to study until the 9th grade in the convent of nuns ‘Villa de los Niños, Hermana de María’ in Guatemala, and then returned to Quetzaltenango. With the support of her siblings, she wanted to get into the medical field, a dream that she had, but after high school, she had to move to the United States to take care of her three nieces, since one of her sisters who had emigrated died. The road was very hard, long, and difficult, crossing a desert that she almost did not overcome because of dehydration and disorientation. Despite this, Juanita managed get to her destination and take care of her nieces. She started a new life in the United States, although without speaking the language, she had to work cleaning homes and put her dream of working in medicine on hold. There she met her husband and had a daughter, although the pretty love story suffered several setbacks. First, a deportation to Guatemala and subsequently their separation, too many marital problems and a horrible history of personal abuse. Juanita puts it like this, “I had gone through too many difficult circumstances in my life and had the right to be happy, with my daughter and my family.”

So, in this sad and depressing stage, it was her mother who motivated her to resume her studies and, also thanks to a partner, she entered the ‘School of Nursing Aides ‘ with FUNDAP. Here, she discovered one of her passions, to help people, and take care of them. This is, after all, what she had always done, but this time it would be without other problems and focused on her future, focused on growing. Once she finished her studies and graduated as a Nursing Assistant, Juanita was completing an internship at the health post in San Mateo. There she learned with real cases and was growing as a health professional, treating people as they deserve and being a great professional. It’s all a matter of hard work, she said. Juanita believes “in putting forth effort because it leads to achieving goals despite difficulties.” Her five years working in this prestigious medical center only indicates one thing, that there is no desert that cannot be crossed nor personal struggle that cannot be overcome.


Institutional

Private

Academic

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Audited by:

External auditors Klynveld Peat Marwick Goerdeler, S.A.

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Editorial Design

María Tortosa and Adrián Valiente Calmo Agency (Valencia, Spain)

Texts

Jorge Luna Pardo Redactor (Valencia, Spain)

Photography FUNDAP

Review and coordination Brand Identity Comission -FUNDAP Central-

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