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L o c a l G o o d N e w s S i n c e 1 9 97 YEAR 19 • ISSUE 226 • MAY 2016

Frontporchfredericksburg.com


contents

closeups 6

8

29

Frenchman’s Corner

18

history’s stories.: white oak museum our heritage: how far we have come

19

renew: total body exercises

For botherhood & duty ...brian mcenany

20

companions: holistic medicine for our furry friends

21

mind your mind: chosing your therapist

Catherine Jennings ...President of the Board

22

Senior Care: blaze a trail

23

wellness: falling short of the mark emancipated patients: diet & your immune system

Volunteer for a lifetime ...Don Barry Dixon

24

art in the ‘burg: artistic flirtations...beverley bley

25

stories of fredericksburg: maura scheider

26

a night on broadwy

27

fxbg music scene: ffpa chamber music festival

28

first friday openings poetryman: holiday concert

30

fredericksburg sketches

31

from my porch: be your brother’s keeper wings celebrates two decades

8

porch talk 3

frenchman’s corner: Chocolate emergencies

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

5

on the trails:: mountain bike enthusiasts

7

downtown buzz: thunder, james & george

9

Mental Wellness: Small steps, big results

11

on the farm: asparagus tips

12

Vino: mothers day wine choices

13

season’s bounty: oeuf by any name

14

Cooking with Kyle...black beans cocktails mom could love

15

20 years of dedication to local food

16-17

Calendar of events

Chocolate emergencies

29

...And more! 3

10

The enchanted world of beverley coates

21

mothers day tribute @ellwood manor

30

the art of recovery Cover By Beverley Coates

By A. J. Wright Spring is here and we’re all thinking about shaping up. Part of the success is treating oneself to small rewards after a good workout. This is what I find when I visit Frenchman’s Corner. Nothing here is “over the top” in terms of quantity—it is all about the quality. There are beautiful Neuhaus Chocolates from Belgium: one of the highest quality chocolatiers in the world. They have an amazing sense of seasonality in their chocolates (as witnessed most recently at Easter). Now that it is May, I stopped in again to see what was new. Taking pride of place at the top shelf of one of her cases is a new collection of craft beer chocolate truffles. The selection includes, among others, Widmer Brother’s Brewing @ Hefeweizen (a beer reduction with ivory and dark chocolate ganache). The proprietor mentioned that they are nonalcoholic due to the cooking process and have a deep rich flavor. On display as well are charming truffles with such unique flavors as Porcini & Chili Bacon. They also offer an exquisite array desserts displayed in their own

special case evocative of a Parisian café. Ghyslain, a French Canadian pastry chef creates these delights for Frenchman’s Corner. (He also creates the chocolate sculptures on display in the shop!) To accompany all of these treats is a full coffee bar featuring espressos, lattes, etc. On my last visit, I had an opportunity to meet the owner, Tamara Villegas, and speak with her about her philosophy and passion. I asked her what brought her into this trade? She replied, “I was a backyard pastry chef and geared toward pastry. I wanted to combine my interest in pastry with my interest in confectionary. Creating these items makes me really happy. I enjoy baking and selling.” Upon asking what sets her shop apart, she immediately replied, “We’re a family business, very personal, and very serious about fulfilling your needs. We are owner-operated and offer exceptional service.” Of course, everyone has their favorite sweet indulgence, and among the hundreds of choices at Frenchman’s Corner, I had to know her favorite flavor

and why. Tamara said, “First, dark chocolate—it has less sugar and is better for your health. Second— coffee, it compliments fruit as well as nuts, as well as candied violets. You can’t find that everywhere.” Regarding future plans for the shop she would like to expand to accommodate a dessert bar to serve fresh soufflé, among other delights, so that her customers can experience the soufflé rise and fall as they dive into the warm dessert. And finally, I wondered what was her inspiration to open the shop. She said, “I love to make people happy. I like to introduce something that will make someone happy. I believe in serving the best products possible, and I am ready for all chocolate emergencies!”

If you haven’t yet, I urge you to visit the Frenchman’s Corner, at 817 Caroline Street, Downtown A.J. Wright is a health enthusiast, private curator, and an event planner based in Chicago. She loves the charm and hospitality that Fredericksburg offers.

Snead’s Asparagus Farm Support Local Green Space & Local Farmers

NOW IN! Fresh Cut Aspara gus

10 mi. S.E. of downtown on right side of Rt. 17 Open 9-5 5 Daily 540/371-9 9328

E AT LO C A L CSA MEMBERSHIPS STILL AVAILABLE AT BRAEHEAD & SNEAD FARM STAFFORD SOLD OUT. JOIN THE GROWING COMMUNITY OF FAMILIES WHO EAT LOCAL!

For Snead’s Farm CSA Information, Benefits, Tips & Application: www.sneadsfarm.com/csa

Enjoy Snead Farm Produce at Sunken Well Tavern, LaPetite Auberge, Bistro Bethem, J Brian’s, Vivify, Kybecca, Castigllias , Olde Town Butcher, Spencer Devon Brewing & Kickshaws Downtown Market 2

May 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

3


contents

closeups 6

8

29

Frenchman’s Corner

18

history’s stories.: white oak museum our heritage: how far we have come

19

renew: total body exercises

For botherhood & duty ...brian mcenany

20

companions: holistic medicine for our furry friends

21

mind your mind: chosing your therapist

Catherine Jennings ...President of the Board

22

Senior Care: blaze a trail

23

wellness: falling short of the mark emancipated patients: diet & your immune system

Volunteer for a lifetime ...Don Barry Dixon

24

art in the ‘burg: artistic flirtations...beverley bley

25

stories of fredericksburg: maura scheider

26

a night on broadwy

27

fxbg music scene: ffpa chamber music festival

28

first friday openings poetryman: holiday concert

30

fredericksburg sketches

31

from my porch: be your brother’s keeper wings celebrates two decades

8

porch talk 3

frenchman’s corner: Chocolate emergencies

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

5

on the trails:: mountain bike enthusiasts

7

downtown buzz: thunder, james & george

9

Mental Wellness: Small steps, big results

11

on the farm: asparagus tips

12

Vino: mothers day wine choices

13

season’s bounty: oeuf by any name

14

Cooking with Kyle...black beans cocktails mom could love

15

20 years of dedication to local food

16-17

Calendar of events

Chocolate emergencies

29

...And more! 3

10

The enchanted world of beverley coates

21

mothers day tribute @ellwood manor

30

the art of recovery Cover By Beverley Coates

By A. J. Wright Spring is here and we’re all thinking about shaping up. Part of the success is treating oneself to small rewards after a good workout. This is what I find when I visit Frenchman’s Corner. Nothing here is “over the top” in terms of quantity—it is all about the quality. There are beautiful Neuhaus Chocolates from Belgium: one of the highest quality chocolatiers in the world. They have an amazing sense of seasonality in their chocolates (as witnessed most recently at Easter). Now that it is May, I stopped in again to see what was new. Taking pride of place at the top shelf of one of her cases is a new collection of craft beer chocolate truffles. The selection includes, among others, Widmer Brother’s Brewing @ Hefeweizen (a beer reduction with ivory and dark chocolate ganache). The proprietor mentioned that they are nonalcoholic due to the cooking process and have a deep rich flavor. On display as well are charming truffles with such unique flavors as Porcini & Chili Bacon. They also offer an exquisite array desserts displayed in their own

special case evocative of a Parisian café. Ghyslain, a French Canadian pastry chef creates these delights for Frenchman’s Corner. (He also creates the chocolate sculptures on display in the shop!) To accompany all of these treats is a full coffee bar featuring espressos, lattes, etc. On my last visit, I had an opportunity to meet the owner, Tamara Villegas, and speak with her about her philosophy and passion. I asked her what brought her into this trade? She replied, “I was a backyard pastry chef and geared toward pastry. I wanted to combine my interest in pastry with my interest in confectionary. Creating these items makes me really happy. I enjoy baking and selling.” Upon asking what sets her shop apart, she immediately replied, “We’re a family business, very personal, and very serious about fulfilling your needs. We are owner-operated and offer exceptional service.” Of course, everyone has their favorite sweet indulgence, and among the hundreds of choices at Frenchman’s Corner, I had to know her favorite flavor

and why. Tamara said, “First, dark chocolate—it has less sugar and is better for your health. Second— coffee, it compliments fruit as well as nuts, as well as candied violets. You can’t find that everywhere.” Regarding future plans for the shop she would like to expand to accommodate a dessert bar to serve fresh soufflé, among other delights, so that her customers can experience the soufflé rise and fall as they dive into the warm dessert. And finally, I wondered what was her inspiration to open the shop. She said, “I love to make people happy. I like to introduce something that will make someone happy. I believe in serving the best products possible, and I am ready for all chocolate emergencies!”

If you haven’t yet, I urge you to visit the Frenchman’s Corner, at 817 Caroline Street, Downtown A.J. Wright is a health enthusiast, private curator, and an event planner based in Chicago. She loves the charm and hospitality that Fredericksburg offers.

Snead’s Asparagus Farm Support Local Green Space & Local Farmers

NOW IN! Fresh Cut Aspara gus

10 mi. S.E. of downtown on right side of Rt. 17 Open 9-5 5 Daily 540/371-9 9328

E AT LO C A L CSA MEMBERSHIPS STILL AVAILABLE AT BRAEHEAD & SNEAD FARM STAFFORD SOLD OUT. JOIN THE GROWING COMMUNITY OF FAMILIES WHO EAT LOCAL!

For Snead’s Farm CSA Information, Benefits, Tips & Application: www.sneadsfarm.com/csa

Enjoy Snead Farm Produce at Sunken Well Tavern, LaPetite Auberge, Bistro Bethem, J Brian’s, Vivify, Kybecca, Castigllias , Olde Town Butcher, Spencer Devon Brewing & Kickshaws Downtown Market 2

May 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

3


Alexis Mary Grogan Guest Porch Editorial Contributing Writers & Artists Marily Ayers A.E.Bayne Kevin Brown Collette Caprara Beverley Coates Helen Conley Beth Costantino Tom Conway Dan Czajka Barbara Deal Christina Ferber Frank Fratoe Joan M. Geisler Ann Glave Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Emily Hollinsworth Karl Karch Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Bob Lookabill Jo Loving Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Gabe Pons Ryan Poe M.L. Powers Scott Richards Suzanne Scherr Emily Taggert Schricker Casey Alan Shaw Emmett Snead Meg Sneed Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Christine Thompson Dawn Whitmore A.J. Wright

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2016 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

ON THE PORCH pride & remembrance

May 2016

FXBG Area Mountain bike enthusiasts By Kevin Brown

BY alexis mary grogan The past few weeks I had been cleaning out some old stuff to make room for new stuff, we all like new stuff. In the process of this cleaning, I found some old files of my grandfathers. It was all of his WWII files and various different battles he fought in and medals that he was honored with for his service. Edward T. Grogan, served five years in the Europe Theatre, earning five battle stars, which include Ardennes and Normandy. I knew my grandpa as a kind, generous man, who played with me everyday and taught me so much. I did not fully appreciate his loyalty and selfless service to his country until now. It makes you think a little bit, there are thousands of other soldiers that have served our country, many of them from small towns and communities such as ours. Memorial Day is a day to remember those who have given their lives to keep our country safe, we remember our fallen warriors who gave the ultimate sacrifice. We do not honor war itself, for “war is the feast of death”, writes Jim Cooper. But rather, we honor those who served with honor when duty called them into battle. We always think to ourselves Memorial Day means the beginning of summer and for kids “yes no more school!” but we need to remember those who have given us this day to celebrate, we must also educate our young ones on what the day represents, you can take them to the Fredericksburg Area War memorial which sits on an island flanked by Liberty, Barton and George Street. Our soldiers are not the only ones to be remembered during this month, our mothers are also to be honored, while soldiers uphold our rights, moms harness their freedom to raise today’s babies to become tomorrows most accountable among us – teachers, public servants, financial shakers, and parents.

These are tough and tireless jobs. We always hear about those who have messed up in their professions, but not about who have succeeded. In these difficult times, they are faced with unenviable tasks. Teachers work under budget constraints and standardized testing deadlines. Public servants are challenged to compromise and reach consensus but not at the loss of efficacy. Financial experts must balance their profits with their compassions. Parents travel bumpy roads over cultural berms en route to guiding their children’s independence. Amidst all of the battles and struggles we face on a daily basis, no matter if you’re a soldier, teacher, financial expert, public servant, or a parent, we all come together for good reasons. We give and give back. We debate and we celebrate. We honor and we question. We hold vigils and we hold each other accountable. Its like making a quilt, we take pieces of each other, our love compassion and emotion and sew it all together as one piece of fabric, but I’m not going to call it fabric, I’m going to call it community. Most of the time in this place called “F’burg”, it’s clearly for the better. We most often come together and accomplish great things for the right reasons. Memorial Day is a day of remembrance, to remember those who have given their lives. Mother’s Day is a day of celebration, to celebrate the nurturing and love given to their children to make them the soldiers we have today and I don’t just mean the soldiers that fight wars and keep our country safe, no, we are all soldiers, we are soldiers of society. As we know the world can be a

messages

Best event and info provider for the area - hands down! We love the Front Porch. Donald DeBinsky,Fat Kat Records

It's great to know he's (Keith Lebor, February 2016, "New Owner of Olde Towne Butcher Locaally Focused") is carrying on the tradition of sourcing locally and sustainably…it is why we always buy our sausages from them. Meg Sneed Go Team Zen (“Zen Farm”, April, 2016) Cita Strauss

4

On the Trails

Front porch fredericksburg

Lovely Article! (“The Scenter of Town, April, 2016). Loved It! Bob Whittingham Thank you again for a great issue in March. I am so glad you allow the Songwriters' Showcase to be part of your mission to keep the community spirit alive in Fredericksburg. Thanks again!, "Lou" Gramann

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

complex and sometimes cruel place. So to the soldiers that have given their lives for our country I honor you, and to the mothers who have brought up other soldiers, who have become the teachers, public servants, financial experts and parents. I celebrate you. With that I say, Happy Memorial Day to the fallen, thank you for keeping our country safe and giving us the freedom we have today, as well as Happy Mother’s Day to the wonderful mothers who have brought up the ones who have gone out in the world and done great and honorable things, and for the mothers with young ones, keep up the good fight. There is a lot to look forward to this month, from Mother’s Day and the Historic Half Marathon, to the subdued Memorial remembrance. We hope you’ll come together to give and partake. And with good reason we invite you to enjoy this month’s issue of local good news, from cover to cover. ~AMG

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

Riding a mountain bike on our off-road Fredericksburg area trails is the one of the best ways to stay in shape, reduce stress, and experience wonderful aspects of nature you probably didn’t know existed. And it allows you to meet some REALLY awesome people! This month, we turn to Rob Maple of the Fredericksburg Area Mountain Bike Enthusiasts (FAMBE) for some expert advice about this popular recreational activity. “My wife and I have been riding mountain bikes for over fifteen years, with countless “date nights” spent on two wheels. Fourteen years ago, I carried an engagement ring in my baggy shorts pocket on a most memorable ride at the Lodi Farm trails. Thank you Laura for saying “Yes!”

So what is this group called FAMBE? We are a collective of Fredericksburg area mountain biking and general outdoor enthusiasts who share similar interests in advocating,

Wonderful Spring Cover (April, 2016) Elizabeth Woodford

Dear Virginia and Staff, What a lovely article entitled "Hope" by Carl Karch (April, 2016) mentioning Rob. I had been in contact with Rob a number of years ago when I was with Brush Strokes Gallery. He would help me in my ignorance about how to publicize the art etc. I am so glad that you are continuing this important news source. Thank you for all that you do. Bev Bley

PUT IT TOGETHER ALL IN YOUR ORBIT

introducing, maintaining, and using our local trail systems. FAMBE was created in 2011 with an initial focus of sharing free maps of our trails, starting with the Quarry Trail map (downloaded close to 2,000 times), while seeking to reach out and introduce other riders to our local trails. Five years later, there are over 1,800 people dialed into our FAMBE community, with daily interaction via social media and a periodic newsletter. FAMBE facilitates group rides and destination bike rides for all skill levels, from beginner to expert, male and female, and for all ages. Any group member can post their scheduled rides on our Facebook page, specifically when and where they are riding, so other riders can come join them. With a casual atmosphere, this allows users to team up and experience the roots, rocks, and drops as they wish. We also promote and coordinate a New Year’s Day ride, a Super Bowl ride, Take Your Kid Mountain Biking Days, Yoga & Bike days, and support regional riding events and other organizations’ epic events. To help keep our trails in topriding condition, we team up with other organizations to provide local and regional trail maintenance support. We have spent countless hours building bridges, digging, and lugging chain saws to cut out fallen trees and debris. All are welcome to participate in our trail work days that are advertised on our Facebook page and website (www.fambe.org). The main advice provided to all new riders is have fun, be safe, know your limits, and know that you might fall down. Have an “I Can” attitude. All riders should have a certified safe mountain biking helmet and a properly tuned and functioning bike. We have some great shops in our area with superb technicians, so it’s well worth the investment to turn to these local bike experts for their support. Fredericksburg and our surrounding area provide numerous mountain bike trails with options such as the Quarry Trails, Mott’s Run Reservoir, and Lodi Farm. The most important investment our community can make in our off-road trails is to avoid using them after inclement weather, lend a helping hand on a scheduled work day, or simply picking up sticks off the trail on your own time. Lastly, please be courteous to all

trail users by practicing good trail etiquette, and just being a good steward of the land.” Thanks Rob, for helping us get involved by creating this community; let’s go shred!

Kevin Brown shares up-to-date local trail news and photos as administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" Facebook Group

Highlighting Local People, Places & Events Since 1997

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

5


Alexis Mary Grogan Guest Porch Editorial Contributing Writers & Artists Marily Ayers A.E.Bayne Kevin Brown Collette Caprara Beverley Coates Helen Conley Beth Costantino Tom Conway Dan Czajka Barbara Deal Christina Ferber Frank Fratoe Joan M. Geisler Ann Glave Alexis Grogan Ralph “Tuffy”Hicks Emily Hollinsworth Karl Karch Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Bob Lookabill Jo Loving Vanessa Moncure Patrick Neustatter Gabe Pons Ryan Poe M.L. Powers Scott Richards Suzanne Scherr Emily Taggert Schricker Casey Alan Shaw Emmett Snead Meg Sneed Georgia Strentz James Kyle Synder Christine Thompson Dawn Whitmore A.J. Wright

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Ad Sales: E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2016 Olde Towne Publishing Co. All rights reserved.

ON THE PORCH pride & remembrance

May 2016

FXBG Area Mountain bike enthusiasts By Kevin Brown

BY alexis mary grogan The past few weeks I had been cleaning out some old stuff to make room for new stuff, we all like new stuff. In the process of this cleaning, I found some old files of my grandfathers. It was all of his WWII files and various different battles he fought in and medals that he was honored with for his service. Edward T. Grogan, served five years in the Europe Theatre, earning five battle stars, which include Ardennes and Normandy. I knew my grandpa as a kind, generous man, who played with me everyday and taught me so much. I did not fully appreciate his loyalty and selfless service to his country until now. It makes you think a little bit, there are thousands of other soldiers that have served our country, many of them from small towns and communities such as ours. Memorial Day is a day to remember those who have given their lives to keep our country safe, we remember our fallen warriors who gave the ultimate sacrifice. We do not honor war itself, for “war is the feast of death”, writes Jim Cooper. But rather, we honor those who served with honor when duty called them into battle. We always think to ourselves Memorial Day means the beginning of summer and for kids “yes no more school!” but we need to remember those who have given us this day to celebrate, we must also educate our young ones on what the day represents, you can take them to the Fredericksburg Area War memorial which sits on an island flanked by Liberty, Barton and George Street. Our soldiers are not the only ones to be remembered during this month, our mothers are also to be honored, while soldiers uphold our rights, moms harness their freedom to raise today’s babies to become tomorrows most accountable among us – teachers, public servants, financial shakers, and parents.

These are tough and tireless jobs. We always hear about those who have messed up in their professions, but not about who have succeeded. In these difficult times, they are faced with unenviable tasks. Teachers work under budget constraints and standardized testing deadlines. Public servants are challenged to compromise and reach consensus but not at the loss of efficacy. Financial experts must balance their profits with their compassions. Parents travel bumpy roads over cultural berms en route to guiding their children’s independence. Amidst all of the battles and struggles we face on a daily basis, no matter if you’re a soldier, teacher, financial expert, public servant, or a parent, we all come together for good reasons. We give and give back. We debate and we celebrate. We honor and we question. We hold vigils and we hold each other accountable. Its like making a quilt, we take pieces of each other, our love compassion and emotion and sew it all together as one piece of fabric, but I’m not going to call it fabric, I’m going to call it community. Most of the time in this place called “F’burg”, it’s clearly for the better. We most often come together and accomplish great things for the right reasons. Memorial Day is a day of remembrance, to remember those who have given their lives. Mother’s Day is a day of celebration, to celebrate the nurturing and love given to their children to make them the soldiers we have today and I don’t just mean the soldiers that fight wars and keep our country safe, no, we are all soldiers, we are soldiers of society. As we know the world can be a

messages

Best event and info provider for the area - hands down! We love the Front Porch. Donald DeBinsky,Fat Kat Records

It's great to know he's (Keith Lebor, February 2016, "New Owner of Olde Towne Butcher Locaally Focused") is carrying on the tradition of sourcing locally and sustainably…it is why we always buy our sausages from them. Meg Sneed Go Team Zen (“Zen Farm”, April, 2016) Cita Strauss

4

On the Trails

Front porch fredericksburg

Lovely Article! (“The Scenter of Town, April, 2016). Loved It! Bob Whittingham Thank you again for a great issue in March. I am so glad you allow the Songwriters' Showcase to be part of your mission to keep the community spirit alive in Fredericksburg. Thanks again!, "Lou" Gramann

Own The Movie A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

complex and sometimes cruel place. So to the soldiers that have given their lives for our country I honor you, and to the mothers who have brought up other soldiers, who have become the teachers, public servants, financial experts and parents. I celebrate you. With that I say, Happy Memorial Day to the fallen, thank you for keeping our country safe and giving us the freedom we have today, as well as Happy Mother’s Day to the wonderful mothers who have brought up the ones who have gone out in the world and done great and honorable things, and for the mothers with young ones, keep up the good fight. There is a lot to look forward to this month, from Mother’s Day and the Historic Half Marathon, to the subdued Memorial remembrance. We hope you’ll come together to give and partake. And with good reason we invite you to enjoy this month’s issue of local good news, from cover to cover. ~AMG

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

Riding a mountain bike on our off-road Fredericksburg area trails is the one of the best ways to stay in shape, reduce stress, and experience wonderful aspects of nature you probably didn’t know existed. And it allows you to meet some REALLY awesome people! This month, we turn to Rob Maple of the Fredericksburg Area Mountain Bike Enthusiasts (FAMBE) for some expert advice about this popular recreational activity. “My wife and I have been riding mountain bikes for over fifteen years, with countless “date nights” spent on two wheels. Fourteen years ago, I carried an engagement ring in my baggy shorts pocket on a most memorable ride at the Lodi Farm trails. Thank you Laura for saying “Yes!”

So what is this group called FAMBE? We are a collective of Fredericksburg area mountain biking and general outdoor enthusiasts who share similar interests in advocating,

Wonderful Spring Cover (April, 2016) Elizabeth Woodford

Dear Virginia and Staff, What a lovely article entitled "Hope" by Carl Karch (April, 2016) mentioning Rob. I had been in contact with Rob a number of years ago when I was with Brush Strokes Gallery. He would help me in my ignorance about how to publicize the art etc. I am so glad that you are continuing this important news source. Thank you for all that you do. Bev Bley

PUT IT TOGETHER ALL IN YOUR ORBIT

introducing, maintaining, and using our local trail systems. FAMBE was created in 2011 with an initial focus of sharing free maps of our trails, starting with the Quarry Trail map (downloaded close to 2,000 times), while seeking to reach out and introduce other riders to our local trails. Five years later, there are over 1,800 people dialed into our FAMBE community, with daily interaction via social media and a periodic newsletter. FAMBE facilitates group rides and destination bike rides for all skill levels, from beginner to expert, male and female, and for all ages. Any group member can post their scheduled rides on our Facebook page, specifically when and where they are riding, so other riders can come join them. With a casual atmosphere, this allows users to team up and experience the roots, rocks, and drops as they wish. We also promote and coordinate a New Year’s Day ride, a Super Bowl ride, Take Your Kid Mountain Biking Days, Yoga & Bike days, and support regional riding events and other organizations’ epic events. To help keep our trails in topriding condition, we team up with other organizations to provide local and regional trail maintenance support. We have spent countless hours building bridges, digging, and lugging chain saws to cut out fallen trees and debris. All are welcome to participate in our trail work days that are advertised on our Facebook page and website (www.fambe.org). The main advice provided to all new riders is have fun, be safe, know your limits, and know that you might fall down. Have an “I Can” attitude. All riders should have a certified safe mountain biking helmet and a properly tuned and functioning bike. We have some great shops in our area with superb technicians, so it’s well worth the investment to turn to these local bike experts for their support. Fredericksburg and our surrounding area provide numerous mountain bike trails with options such as the Quarry Trails, Mott’s Run Reservoir, and Lodi Farm. The most important investment our community can make in our off-road trails is to avoid using them after inclement weather, lend a helping hand on a scheduled work day, or simply picking up sticks off the trail on your own time. Lastly, please be courteous to all

trail users by practicing good trail etiquette, and just being a good steward of the land.” Thanks Rob, for helping us get involved by creating this community; let’s go shred!

Kevin Brown shares up-to-date local trail news and photos as administrator of the "On the Fredericksburg Va Trails" Facebook Group

Highlighting Local People, Places & Events Since 1997

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

5


Downtown Buzz

FOR BROTHERHOOD AND DUTY Brian Mcenany’s engaging civil war novel

forecast: thunder, george & james on the horizon

By A.E. Bayne

The battles of Fredericksburg and Chancelorsville are well-documented historical events, studied for over a century by historians and armchair Civil War enthusiasts alike. However, rarely are these stories written with such a deep appreciation for the human story as they are in Brian R. McEnany’s For Brotherhood and Duty, recent winner of the 2015 NYMAS/Eugene Feit Award in Civil War Studies. With a heavy reliance on primary source documentation from the archives at West Point, military records from the National Archives and documentation and interviews with experts at area battlefields, McEnany crafts a book that is both historically accurate and highly engaging. Written in two parts, For Brotherhood and Duty follows West

Point’s graduating class of 1862 as they end their training at the academy and enter the Civil War. McEnany gives voice to the stories of twelve of the twenty-eight cadets who graduated and four of their exclassmates who had resigned from West Point and became part of the Confederate army. He uses the handwritten letters of Cadet Tully McCrea of Ohio, a prolific writer, to set the scenes of life and war that play out on the battlefield. McCrea’s descriptions infuse even factual evidence that McEnany plied from the pages of archival history with an element of humanity: After dark on December 10, several of Eagan’s classmates moved forward to Stafford Heights. Their gunners wrapped cloths around the trace chains to deaden any sounds during movement. Finally the officers quietly passed the word. The horses snorted great clouds of steam into the night air as they pulled the heavy cannons down the icy roads through two inches of fresh snow. The four artillery group commanders led their batteries into positions along the heights above the river. By 11 p.m. four miles of Stafford Heights were lined with 147 cannons. (McEnany, 161) McEnany tells For Brotherhood and Duty chronologically, so each year the war changed he was visiting different battlefields and talking with experts about the battles. While in the Fredericksburg region, McEnany sought local historian Frank O’Reilly for information about the battles of Fredericksburg (December of 1862) and Chancellorsville (April of 1863), as well as delving into each site’s archive of primary and secondary source materials. Of his research, McEnany says, “I’m a firm believer that you don’t

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair

understand the history unless you walk the battlefields. The official reports on both the Union and Confederate sides are written in Victorian language, and none of them ever said that they retreated or that they lost the battle. After about a year in the war, the people became taskmasters at understanding the tactical advantages of certain features of the terrain. For instance, you can’t see the battlefield in Fredericksburg because the development completely covers the fields in front of Marye’s Heights. I found that going up on top of the hill looking back down you get a better understanding of it.” McEnany graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1962, and it was his own class’ reunion that inspired him to research the young men that graduated one hundred years prior during such a pivotal time in U.S. history. As a retired lieutenant colonel and research analyst, McEnany offers a uniquely adept perspective of these young men’s experiences during battle. Brian R. McEnany is scheduling book signings for the spring in our area, including one at Agora Downtwon Coffee

By Ann Glave

Introducing Benchmark ...The Distinctive Wedding Rings. Shop where For Brotherhood and Duty will be available for purchase soon. Read a full interview with McEnany about the process of writing his book in the spring 2016 edition of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review.

A.E. Bayne is a writer, visual artist, and educator living in Fredericksburg. She is the publisher and editor for Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review.

The Frenchman’s Corner is a premier Chocolate Shop in Fredericksburg. Serving only the best Belgian chocolates available, The Frenchman’s Corner is located on Caroline Street in the heart of downtown Fredericksburg. After you step in, the scent of chocolate immediately hits you and you feel as if you are in a whole other world. We have something for everyone; enjoy handmade chocolates, truffles, fudge, coffee, hot chocolate, and we even have sugar-ffree and gluten-ffree chocolates! Come in for great chocolates we are positive you will come back for the amazing service. We don’t just sell chocolate, we sell an experience. Come see us! 817 Caroline Street 540.899.7655

200 William Street Downtown Fredericksburg 540.373.4421 Mon-Fri: 9:30-6 Sat: 9:30-5 CrownJewelersFredericksburg.com

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop 371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill thefredericksburglamp.com

May is bringing thunder, George Washington and James Monroe to Downtown. It’s with partnerships that noise and sightings are occurring. Two examples are the Marine Corps Historic Half Marathon and the Caroline Street Water line Improvement Project. Historic Half Marine The Marathon will host 12,000 runners and over 20,000 spectators, families, and friends the weekend of May 13. The Healthy Lifestyle Expo, a kickoff to Marathon weekend, is held at the Fredericksburg Expo and Conference Center. Runners will visit the Expo Center to pick up their race bib and participant shirt. Fredericksburg VA Main Street is partnering with the Marine Corps Historic Half Marathon committee, The Economic Development & Tourism Office (EDT) and Fredericksburg Area Association of Realtors (FAAR) to provide runners and guests with information about our Downtown Businesses and local resources and to cheer on runners on race day to demonstrate our community spirit. Race Weekend brings three benefits for Downtown businesses: 1) It Introduces a new audience to Downtown Fredericksburg and represents our city as a destination, get-away spot beyond race day. 2) It encourages the use of Downtown Businesses by runners and guests during race weekend. 3) It demonstrates a sense of community among Downtown Businesses and residents. New this year! Concierge Services! With the help of FAAR, the Visitor’s Center and volunteers, the trolley stops and the Expo will be staffed ready to answer

questions, make reservations, and promote Downtown overall. The trolley will run from the Expo Center to 3 locations Downtown. Stops include Visitor’s Center, Hurkamp Park and Goolricks Pharmacy. Shuttles will run from 11am to 10pm on Saturday, May 14. If you have any interest in volunteering for the concierge services, please contact Kim McClellan at kmcclellan@faarmembers.com.

Thunder Alley! This year’s runners are going to head home from race weekend talking about an even more memorable part of the 13.1 mile course – one that gets their blood pumping without making their hamstrings ache. Make this a new tradition for you and your team on Sunday, May 15 at 7am. Come out and 1000 blocks of cheer on racers in the 700-1 Caroline. There will be NOISE, awesome give-a-ways, contests, music, free coffee and doughnuts, and more! Thunder will be rolling in bright and early on Sunday

morning! Another great example of collaboration is the Caroline Street Water Line Improvement Project. Working with the Economic Development and Tourism office, the Department of Public Works, Historic Fredericksburg Foundation Inc. , Central Rappahannock Heritage Center and the Central Rappahannock Regional Library has resulted in graphics, flags and a promotional plan. Recent sightings have been reported on the 1000 block of Caroline Street of George Washington and James Monroe. To encourage visits on the blocks under construction, a Find George and James Contest has been created. Locate George and James and enter to win a weekly drawing of gift certificates or downtown gift cards. Where will they be next? A social media campaign promoting the historic and educational facts of the block and information about the Department of Public Works project is underway with the help of the Central Rappahannock Regional Library Headquarters. Check updates on our facebook page, Fredericksburg Downtown. For FAQ about the project, visit t h e www.fredericksburgmainstreet.org home page. The quote “a rising tide can lift all ships” ties in perfectly with these examples as Main Street encourages collaboration among the diverse organizations as we work together toward the reality of a vibrant downtown.

Ann Glave is the Director of Fredericksburg Main Street

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let s Make It Happen!

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9:30-6; Sat 9:30-5 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com

6

May 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

SUZY STONE

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us!

Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

7


Downtown Buzz

FOR BROTHERHOOD AND DUTY Brian Mcenany’s engaging civil war novel

forecast: thunder, george & james on the horizon

By A.E. Bayne

The battles of Fredericksburg and Chancelorsville are well-documented historical events, studied for over a century by historians and armchair Civil War enthusiasts alike. However, rarely are these stories written with such a deep appreciation for the human story as they are in Brian R. McEnany’s For Brotherhood and Duty, recent winner of the 2015 NYMAS/Eugene Feit Award in Civil War Studies. With a heavy reliance on primary source documentation from the archives at West Point, military records from the National Archives and documentation and interviews with experts at area battlefields, McEnany crafts a book that is both historically accurate and highly engaging. Written in two parts, For Brotherhood and Duty follows West

Point’s graduating class of 1862 as they end their training at the academy and enter the Civil War. McEnany gives voice to the stories of twelve of the twenty-eight cadets who graduated and four of their exclassmates who had resigned from West Point and became part of the Confederate army. He uses the handwritten letters of Cadet Tully McCrea of Ohio, a prolific writer, to set the scenes of life and war that play out on the battlefield. McCrea’s descriptions infuse even factual evidence that McEnany plied from the pages of archival history with an element of humanity: After dark on December 10, several of Eagan’s classmates moved forward to Stafford Heights. Their gunners wrapped cloths around the trace chains to deaden any sounds during movement. Finally the officers quietly passed the word. The horses snorted great clouds of steam into the night air as they pulled the heavy cannons down the icy roads through two inches of fresh snow. The four artillery group commanders led their batteries into positions along the heights above the river. By 11 p.m. four miles of Stafford Heights were lined with 147 cannons. (McEnany, 161) McEnany tells For Brotherhood and Duty chronologically, so each year the war changed he was visiting different battlefields and talking with experts about the battles. While in the Fredericksburg region, McEnany sought local historian Frank O’Reilly for information about the battles of Fredericksburg (December of 1862) and Chancellorsville (April of 1863), as well as delving into each site’s archive of primary and secondary source materials. Of his research, McEnany says, “I’m a firm believer that you don’t

Your Hometown Jeweler Since 1940

On-Premise Jewelry Repair

understand the history unless you walk the battlefields. The official reports on both the Union and Confederate sides are written in Victorian language, and none of them ever said that they retreated or that they lost the battle. After about a year in the war, the people became taskmasters at understanding the tactical advantages of certain features of the terrain. For instance, you can’t see the battlefield in Fredericksburg because the development completely covers the fields in front of Marye’s Heights. I found that going up on top of the hill looking back down you get a better understanding of it.” McEnany graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1962, and it was his own class’ reunion that inspired him to research the young men that graduated one hundred years prior during such a pivotal time in U.S. history. As a retired lieutenant colonel and research analyst, McEnany offers a uniquely adept perspective of these young men’s experiences during battle. Brian R. McEnany is scheduling book signings for the spring in our area, including one at Agora Downtwon Coffee

By Ann Glave

Introducing Benchmark ...The Distinctive Wedding Rings. Shop where For Brotherhood and Duty will be available for purchase soon. Read a full interview with McEnany about the process of writing his book in the spring 2016 edition of Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review.

A.E. Bayne is a writer, visual artist, and educator living in Fredericksburg. She is the publisher and editor for Fredericksburg Literary and Art Review.

The Frenchman’s Corner is a premier Chocolate Shop in Fredericksburg. Serving only the best Belgian chocolates available, The Frenchman’s Corner is located on Caroline Street in the heart of downtown Fredericksburg. After you step in, the scent of chocolate immediately hits you and you feel as if you are in a whole other world. We have something for everyone; enjoy handmade chocolates, truffles, fudge, coffee, hot chocolate, and we even have sugar-ffree and gluten-ffree chocolates! Come in for great chocolates we are positive you will come back for the amazing service. We don’t just sell chocolate, we sell an experience. Come see us! 817 Caroline Street 540.899.7655

200 William Street Downtown Fredericksburg 540.373.4421 Mon-Fri: 9:30-6 Sat: 9:30-5 CrownJewelersFredericksburg.com

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop 371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill thefredericksburglamp.com

May is bringing thunder, George Washington and James Monroe to Downtown. It’s with partnerships that noise and sightings are occurring. Two examples are the Marine Corps Historic Half Marathon and the Caroline Street Water line Improvement Project. Historic Half Marine The Marathon will host 12,000 runners and over 20,000 spectators, families, and friends the weekend of May 13. The Healthy Lifestyle Expo, a kickoff to Marathon weekend, is held at the Fredericksburg Expo and Conference Center. Runners will visit the Expo Center to pick up their race bib and participant shirt. Fredericksburg VA Main Street is partnering with the Marine Corps Historic Half Marathon committee, The Economic Development & Tourism Office (EDT) and Fredericksburg Area Association of Realtors (FAAR) to provide runners and guests with information about our Downtown Businesses and local resources and to cheer on runners on race day to demonstrate our community spirit. Race Weekend brings three benefits for Downtown businesses: 1) It Introduces a new audience to Downtown Fredericksburg and represents our city as a destination, get-away spot beyond race day. 2) It encourages the use of Downtown Businesses by runners and guests during race weekend. 3) It demonstrates a sense of community among Downtown Businesses and residents. New this year! Concierge Services! With the help of FAAR, the Visitor’s Center and volunteers, the trolley stops and the Expo will be staffed ready to answer

questions, make reservations, and promote Downtown overall. The trolley will run from the Expo Center to 3 locations Downtown. Stops include Visitor’s Center, Hurkamp Park and Goolricks Pharmacy. Shuttles will run from 11am to 10pm on Saturday, May 14. If you have any interest in volunteering for the concierge services, please contact Kim McClellan at kmcclellan@faarmembers.com.

Thunder Alley! This year’s runners are going to head home from race weekend talking about an even more memorable part of the 13.1 mile course – one that gets their blood pumping without making their hamstrings ache. Make this a new tradition for you and your team on Sunday, May 15 at 7am. Come out and 1000 blocks of cheer on racers in the 700-1 Caroline. There will be NOISE, awesome give-a-ways, contests, music, free coffee and doughnuts, and more! Thunder will be rolling in bright and early on Sunday

morning! Another great example of collaboration is the Caroline Street Water Line Improvement Project. Working with the Economic Development and Tourism office, the Department of Public Works, Historic Fredericksburg Foundation Inc. , Central Rappahannock Heritage Center and the Central Rappahannock Regional Library has resulted in graphics, flags and a promotional plan. Recent sightings have been reported on the 1000 block of Caroline Street of George Washington and James Monroe. To encourage visits on the blocks under construction, a Find George and James Contest has been created. Locate George and James and enter to win a weekly drawing of gift certificates or downtown gift cards. Where will they be next? A social media campaign promoting the historic and educational facts of the block and information about the Department of Public Works project is underway with the help of the Central Rappahannock Regional Library Headquarters. Check updates on our facebook page, Fredericksburg Downtown. For FAQ about the project, visit t h e www.fredericksburgmainstreet.org home page. The quote “a rising tide can lift all ships” ties in perfectly with these examples as Main Street encourages collaboration among the diverse organizations as we work together toward the reality of a vibrant downtown.

Ann Glave is the Director of Fredericksburg Main Street

Large or Small, I Sell Them All! Dreaming of Fabulous City Living? Let s Make It Happen!

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

Large Selection of ESTATE JEWELRY

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9:30-6; Sat 9:30-5 jewelboxfredericksburgva.webs.com jewelbox14k@yahoo.com

6

May 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

SUZY STONE

We Have All Your Gardening Needs Since 1929 Come Shop With Us!

Mobile:540.847.0630 Office: 540-898-2900 suzystone22@gmail.com C21redwood.com front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

7


Catherine Jennings

Mental Wellness

President of the board

Small Steps yields big results

By M.L.Powers

Catherine Jennings is President of the Board for the Fredericksburg Counseling Services (FCS), one of two free mental health clinics in Virginia. The clinic services uninsured and low income individuals who have few options for receiving professional counseling and who could benefit from other services the clinic provides. They have been operating since 1962, and have built a network of programs dealing with mental health issues. They partner with the Rappahannock Area Community Services Board, Rappahannock Council Against Sexual Assault, Empowerhouse, the Moss Free Clinic, Mary Washington Hospice, and Hope House. One important program that sets them apart is the clinic, viewed as a premier training site for graduate and post graduate students from colleges in the area. They work under the supervision of Diann Kellison, staff director and a licensed clinical social worker; Marci Bartley, executive director for the past 15 years, and Anise Broadus, program manager. This area of the clinic has expanded from 3-5 students in 2000 to 56 students in 2015. The clinic also collaborated with Spotsylvania Middle schools to build the “The Transition and Healthy Coping Program,” which replaced the “More than Sad” program, used to address issues of depression and teen suicide for 6th and 8th graders. The new program will also teach coping skills for bullying, self harm, and building self-confidence. FCS is sustained by fund raising, and grants

8

May 2016

By Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy through the VA Association of Free and Charitable Clinics, the Mary Washington Healthcare Fund, The Community Foundation, Fredericksburg Savings Charitable Fund, and others. They are in contact with legislators, but as yet have received no federal funding. This causes a precarious balance and one where Catherine’s expertise comes into play. Catherine sat down and walked me through the beginnings of her life a volunteer and fund raiser. She has been involved in fundraising for 25 years. Her strong roots to the Fredericksburg community were apparent in how she talked about the mission of the clinic. She was raised in Caroline County, and went on to Lynchburg College where she earned a degree in European History and Philosophy. Later, she moved to Fredericksburg and is married to Davy Jennings. Together they own a video production company, BonAventure Video and Creative Group, which has always enjoyed working with non-profits that enhance the quality of life in our community. Prior to FCS, she served on the board of the Fredericksburg Regional SPCA for 7 years, raising funds for their new facility. Catherine talked about the need for mental health counseling. We needn’t go further than today’s news to see there is a dire need for this service. Her ideas on charitable giving and volunteerism were well put, in that everyone gives on their level. Everyone has a story, and how and why we give of ourselves is part of these stories. The three big descriptors of giving in her words are work, wisdom, or wealth. Any and all are acceptable ways to give back to a community. In February, they held a fund raiser at the Hospitality House in the ‘burg, called Sweet Side of Life. Boy, did it look sweet! Beside great food and music, it looked like there were lots of hip folks and even Hugh Heffner and some bunnies in attendance. This event raised over $15,000. It takes a lot of volunteers to run a profitable event, but the cause is a worthwhile one.

Mary Lynn Powers, a frequent contributor to FP, is also a tireless volunteer in the FXBG community.

Front porch fredericksburg

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Jewell Wolterman 1320 Central Park Blvd, Ste 200, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com

garnering the Walk's first-ever title sponsor--the Family Preservation Services (FPS) of Virginia, part of Pathways Human Services, a division of Molina Healthcare. The event also includes gold, silver and bronze sponsors. According to FPS Regional Director Janine Sewell, MHAF is a valued partner that provides mental health/mental wellness support to the individuals and families in the region. "The support from individuals, businesses, organizations and every single donation-large or small-means so much to MHAF and its mission to provide education, advocacy and service to individuals with mental health needs," said Girard. "MHAF exists to improve the lives of people with mental health problems, and 93 cents of every dollar received is funneled Face painting is a popular activity at Mental Health directly back to the people in the America of Fredericksburg's (MHAF) Walk for community who face mental Mental Wellness in downtown Fredericksburg. health challenges." Some push baby strollers. Others Each month, more than 300 walk their four-legged friends. Many people are connected with resources and congregate for teams representing treatment services through MHAF's organizations and businesses. Several HelpLine, which is the only free mental stroll with families. Still others enjoy the health information and referral service in brisk walk alone. All of them rally for a the region. More than 2,000 local high cause-to raise money for Mental Health school students received suicide America of Fredericksburg's (MHAF) 9th prevention training through MHAF in Annual Walk for Mental Wellness at 2015. MHAF provides isolated, elderly Hurkamp Park in Fredericksburg, May 14. citizens with free, weekly, in-home visits by With a choice of a one or three- trained volunteers through its Senior mile walk through historic downtown Visitors Program. In addition, it organizes Fredericksburg, the event includes warm- support groups and provides education up exercises, face painting, vendor booths and advocacy for individuals with mental and refreshments supplied by area health issues. Founded in 1955 by local businesses, live music with Acoustic Onion citizens, MHAF is the oldest nonprofit and a silent auction with more than 50 501© (3) charitable organization that items, such as artwork, a week's stay at a addresses all aspects of mental health and luxurious house on the Potomac River, spa mental illness. treatments and dining at fine restaurants. Registration begins at 9 a.m., and the "The Walk is so much fun for Walk starts at 10 a.m. at Hurkamp adults and children that it's become a Park in Fredericksburg, May 14. tradition for the people of the For more information about the Walk, community," said Executive Director Rita Girard, who was selected to head MHAF online registration and sponsorships, visit mhafred.org/walk, last August. "MHAF is an integral mental email: mhafdir@mhafreed.org or health resource that doesn't charge fees ritagirard@mhafred.org or bill for reimbursement for its many or call (540) 371-2 2704. services in the Rappahannock region, and it's important for the community to support it." Girard is responsible for the Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy is a public achievement of the organization's relations specialist for the American philosophy, mission, strategic plan and Traffic Safety Services Association in annual goals and objectives. With a Fredericksburg. She is also a staff writer background in leadership roles, for Mid-Atlantic Events magazine. fundraising events and volunteer recruitment, she's been successful in

Helping You Heal Naturally

The Way Your Body Was Meant To Dr. Jason Sneed, D.O. 540-322-5040 www.odomedicine.com

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

9


Catherine Jennings

Mental Wellness

President of the board

Small Steps yields big results

By M.L.Powers

Catherine Jennings is President of the Board for the Fredericksburg Counseling Services (FCS), one of two free mental health clinics in Virginia. The clinic services uninsured and low income individuals who have few options for receiving professional counseling and who could benefit from other services the clinic provides. They have been operating since 1962, and have built a network of programs dealing with mental health issues. They partner with the Rappahannock Area Community Services Board, Rappahannock Council Against Sexual Assault, Empowerhouse, the Moss Free Clinic, Mary Washington Hospice, and Hope House. One important program that sets them apart is the clinic, viewed as a premier training site for graduate and post graduate students from colleges in the area. They work under the supervision of Diann Kellison, staff director and a licensed clinical social worker; Marci Bartley, executive director for the past 15 years, and Anise Broadus, program manager. This area of the clinic has expanded from 3-5 students in 2000 to 56 students in 2015. The clinic also collaborated with Spotsylvania Middle schools to build the “The Transition and Healthy Coping Program,” which replaced the “More than Sad” program, used to address issues of depression and teen suicide for 6th and 8th graders. The new program will also teach coping skills for bullying, self harm, and building self-confidence. FCS is sustained by fund raising, and grants

8

May 2016

By Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy through the VA Association of Free and Charitable Clinics, the Mary Washington Healthcare Fund, The Community Foundation, Fredericksburg Savings Charitable Fund, and others. They are in contact with legislators, but as yet have received no federal funding. This causes a precarious balance and one where Catherine’s expertise comes into play. Catherine sat down and walked me through the beginnings of her life a volunteer and fund raiser. She has been involved in fundraising for 25 years. Her strong roots to the Fredericksburg community were apparent in how she talked about the mission of the clinic. She was raised in Caroline County, and went on to Lynchburg College where she earned a degree in European History and Philosophy. Later, she moved to Fredericksburg and is married to Davy Jennings. Together they own a video production company, BonAventure Video and Creative Group, which has always enjoyed working with non-profits that enhance the quality of life in our community. Prior to FCS, she served on the board of the Fredericksburg Regional SPCA for 7 years, raising funds for their new facility. Catherine talked about the need for mental health counseling. We needn’t go further than today’s news to see there is a dire need for this service. Her ideas on charitable giving and volunteerism were well put, in that everyone gives on their level. Everyone has a story, and how and why we give of ourselves is part of these stories. The three big descriptors of giving in her words are work, wisdom, or wealth. Any and all are acceptable ways to give back to a community. In February, they held a fund raiser at the Hospitality House in the ‘burg, called Sweet Side of Life. Boy, did it look sweet! Beside great food and music, it looked like there were lots of hip folks and even Hugh Heffner and some bunnies in attendance. This event raised over $15,000. It takes a lot of volunteers to run a profitable event, but the cause is a worthwhile one.

Mary Lynn Powers, a frequent contributor to FP, is also a tireless volunteer in the FXBG community.

Front porch fredericksburg

Where Customer Service and Title Insurance Become One

Jewell Wolterman 1320 Central Park Blvd, Ste 200, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540-907-0574 www.elitetitleva.com jwolterman@elitetitleva.com

garnering the Walk's first-ever title sponsor--the Family Preservation Services (FPS) of Virginia, part of Pathways Human Services, a division of Molina Healthcare. The event also includes gold, silver and bronze sponsors. According to FPS Regional Director Janine Sewell, MHAF is a valued partner that provides mental health/mental wellness support to the individuals and families in the region. "The support from individuals, businesses, organizations and every single donation-large or small-means so much to MHAF and its mission to provide education, advocacy and service to individuals with mental health needs," said Girard. "MHAF exists to improve the lives of people with mental health problems, and 93 cents of every dollar received is funneled Face painting is a popular activity at Mental Health directly back to the people in the America of Fredericksburg's (MHAF) Walk for community who face mental Mental Wellness in downtown Fredericksburg. health challenges." Some push baby strollers. Others Each month, more than 300 walk their four-legged friends. Many people are connected with resources and congregate for teams representing treatment services through MHAF's organizations and businesses. Several HelpLine, which is the only free mental stroll with families. Still others enjoy the health information and referral service in brisk walk alone. All of them rally for a the region. More than 2,000 local high cause-to raise money for Mental Health school students received suicide America of Fredericksburg's (MHAF) 9th prevention training through MHAF in Annual Walk for Mental Wellness at 2015. MHAF provides isolated, elderly Hurkamp Park in Fredericksburg, May 14. citizens with free, weekly, in-home visits by With a choice of a one or three- trained volunteers through its Senior mile walk through historic downtown Visitors Program. In addition, it organizes Fredericksburg, the event includes warm- support groups and provides education up exercises, face painting, vendor booths and advocacy for individuals with mental and refreshments supplied by area health issues. Founded in 1955 by local businesses, live music with Acoustic Onion citizens, MHAF is the oldest nonprofit and a silent auction with more than 50 501© (3) charitable organization that items, such as artwork, a week's stay at a addresses all aspects of mental health and luxurious house on the Potomac River, spa mental illness. treatments and dining at fine restaurants. Registration begins at 9 a.m., and the "The Walk is so much fun for Walk starts at 10 a.m. at Hurkamp adults and children that it's become a Park in Fredericksburg, May 14. tradition for the people of the For more information about the Walk, community," said Executive Director Rita Girard, who was selected to head MHAF online registration and sponsorships, visit mhafred.org/walk, last August. "MHAF is an integral mental email: mhafdir@mhafreed.org or health resource that doesn't charge fees ritagirard@mhafred.org or bill for reimbursement for its many or call (540) 371-2 2704. services in the Rappahannock region, and it's important for the community to support it." Girard is responsible for the Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy is a public achievement of the organization's relations specialist for the American philosophy, mission, strategic plan and Traffic Safety Services Association in annual goals and objectives. With a Fredericksburg. She is also a staff writer background in leadership roles, for Mid-Atlantic Events magazine. fundraising events and volunteer recruitment, she's been successful in

Helping You Heal Naturally

The Way Your Body Was Meant To Dr. Jason Sneed, D.O. 540-322-5040 www.odomedicine.com

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

9


The Enchanted World of Beverley Coates By collette caprara

“Talking a Blue Streak” For anyone who has felt a little gloomy after viewing Edward Hopper’s painting “Nighthawks” depicting of a nearly empty diner on a lonely night, Bev Coates has created the perfect antidote— her painting of the “2400 Diner,” featured on the cover of this issue of the Front Porch. Bev’s “Diner” is vibrant with light and color with the sun cascading on a cluster of folks basking on the front steps. Like all the artworks in Beverley’s hallmark style, this depiction of a favorite local scene lifts the spirit and brightens the heart. “I think the atmosphere of my paintings has something to do with my ‘second career’ as wedding florist and coordinator,” Coates said, “For 30 years, I did 60 to 80 weddings a year. I just loved the glow and vitality of fresh flowers. That feeling stayed with me and I think that it influences the way I see the world. There are so many heavy things in our world every day that could weigh us down, I hope that my art provides a threshold to escape for a moment into a realm that rejuvenates us.”

“Coral Geraniums”” While Beverley does paint several local sites and buildings each year, the vast majority of her artwork depicts a spectrum of floral arrangements. Though she is well-acquainted with the structure

10

May 2016

and forms of a plethora of plants and flowers, Coates does not aim to paint reproductions of actual arrangements, but draws on elements from her mental library of images as inspiration for an original sketch of her subjects. “Creating representational art opens the door for me to depict a subject as I wish, though the images are always recognizable,” she said. In her college days, a teacher recognized Beverley’s artistic talent and encouraged her to major and art, but Beverley stayed on course with her plan to earn a teaching degree and went on to teach high school vocational classes. Nevertheless, she was enthralled with the watercolor assignments she did in that studio class. “I had the greatest fun doing those watercolor paintings,” she said, “I tried

Front porch fredericksburg

Asparagus Tips By emmett snead

at

“Self Portrait”, Beverley Coates

first group to participate in his weekly workshop at the Dorothy Hart Community Center—sessions which she continues to enjoy to this day. “It’s so invigorating to be a part of that workshop. Though some folks have moved on we’ve been together for so long that the group has the camaraderie of a family—with a goal of creating art. And the most important thing I have learned from Johnny is how to appreciate other people’s work. Even our critique sessions are always encouraging as they provide advice on strengthening elements of our painting.” As a founding member of Brush Strokes Gallery and the owner of the 810 Weekend Gallery Beverley says that she has seen that the larger arts community of Fredericksburg exhibits that same attitude of mutual support. “One artist embraces another with open arms,” she said “Princess Anne Strret Midsummer” “and, through the years the Front Porch has so consistently other mediums but nothing was ever as supported the arts in Fredericksburg, exciting as those assignments. It was just fun to see what happened with those highlighting events and artists that are part of what has become such a vibrant paints.” Years later, when she and thriving arts scene.” was taking a recertification course at her alma mater, Mary Washington College, her studies included art sessions with adjunct professor Johnny Johnson and that latent spark of a love of painting was brought to life again. “Some students were trying so hard to understand the principles of a technique but I was just having fun. I’ll always remember Johnny saying, ‘I’m going to make an art teacher of you someday—but that prediction never came true.” Years later, Johnny Johnson again tapped Beverley’s painterly muse when, in the mid-90s she became a member of the

On the Farm

Spring Cleaning Sale May 7 - 17

374-0443 www.shopwhittingham.com 1021 Caroline Street

THE TWO most common questions I get about asparagus: Why is my asparagus so skinny and poor? How do you grow asparagus? I grow asparagus by first selecting a well-drained area away from trees. Next I. take a soil sample (get information on how and where to send sample at the local library or Virginia Tech Extension office). Third, I apply the recommended amendments to the soil and plow in. Then I open a furrow approximately 8 inches deep. In addition to soil sample recommendations, per ioo feet of row, apply 20 pounds of 5-15-20 plus trace elements (tobacco-type fertilizer), 30 pounds of gypsum (contains large amounts of sulfur and calcium), and 30 pounds of dolomite limestone (contains large amount of m.agnesium) on the bottom of the furrow. Work it into the

ground with a hoe fork before placing the asparagus roots into the furrow. Asparagus is a salt-tolerant plant. Once the fertilizer is worked into the ground with a hoe fork, no salt damage from the fertilizer should occur to the asparagus roots. This is your last chance to apply nutrients directly into the root zone for the life of the asparagus roots, and that should be at least 15 years. With this extra fertility available in the root zone, your soil should support "high density" asparagus. I lay the roots in the furrow one on top of the other, like dominos, with the crowns 7 inches apart. I don't spread the roots out or apart, but you can if you like. One long single row is best because you can mow the weeds off on either side of the asparagus right up to where the stalks

come up out of the ground without injuring the asparagus. Drive the lawnmower in the direction that would expel the cuttings away from the row of asparagus. Asparagus shoots are very tender, and the force of the cuttings hitting the asparagus will make them grow crooked. Some people like crooked politicians, but no one likes crooked asparagus. Also, a single row allows for better air circulation, helping to minimize disease. A single row also-results in better yields because of more sunlight per plant. And more asparagus in the row competes more effectively with the weeds within the row of asparagus along with manual weeding. When people say their asparagus is skinny, I ask them if they planted it near trees. Nine times out of io they say yes. By "near trees," I mean close enough to either be shaded by the trees during the day or to have roots that reach the asparagus bed.

Remember, an asparagus bed should last at least 15 years, so look around, and if you see trees, imagine how big they'll be in 15 years. Asparagus cannot compete against trees for sunlight, moisture or nutrients in the soil. My grandfather would dig a trench a foot deep below where the asparagus was to be planted and fill it with well rotted cow manure mixed with dolomitic lime and gypsum. You may do this if you like (or if you want organic fertilizer). I find it to be too much squeeze for the juice. Using commercial fertilizer, especially with five or seven different trace elements, is much more effective. I do not sell roots. That - would be like selling the goose that lays the golden egg. I recommend buying the roots and other supplies from Roxbury Mills. Emmett Snead operates Snead's Farm 10 mi. S.E. of downtown on right side of Rt. 17 . Contact him at 540/371-9328

Collette Caprara is a local writer and artist.

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

11


The Enchanted World of Beverley Coates By collette caprara

“Talking a Blue Streak” For anyone who has felt a little gloomy after viewing Edward Hopper’s painting “Nighthawks” depicting of a nearly empty diner on a lonely night, Bev Coates has created the perfect antidote— her painting of the “2400 Diner,” featured on the cover of this issue of the Front Porch. Bev’s “Diner” is vibrant with light and color with the sun cascading on a cluster of folks basking on the front steps. Like all the artworks in Beverley’s hallmark style, this depiction of a favorite local scene lifts the spirit and brightens the heart. “I think the atmosphere of my paintings has something to do with my ‘second career’ as wedding florist and coordinator,” Coates said, “For 30 years, I did 60 to 80 weddings a year. I just loved the glow and vitality of fresh flowers. That feeling stayed with me and I think that it influences the way I see the world. There are so many heavy things in our world every day that could weigh us down, I hope that my art provides a threshold to escape for a moment into a realm that rejuvenates us.”

“Coral Geraniums”” While Beverley does paint several local sites and buildings each year, the vast majority of her artwork depicts a spectrum of floral arrangements. Though she is well-acquainted with the structure

10

May 2016

and forms of a plethora of plants and flowers, Coates does not aim to paint reproductions of actual arrangements, but draws on elements from her mental library of images as inspiration for an original sketch of her subjects. “Creating representational art opens the door for me to depict a subject as I wish, though the images are always recognizable,” she said. In her college days, a teacher recognized Beverley’s artistic talent and encouraged her to major and art, but Beverley stayed on course with her plan to earn a teaching degree and went on to teach high school vocational classes. Nevertheless, she was enthralled with the watercolor assignments she did in that studio class. “I had the greatest fun doing those watercolor paintings,” she said, “I tried

Front porch fredericksburg

Asparagus Tips By emmett snead

at

“Self Portrait”, Beverley Coates

first group to participate in his weekly workshop at the Dorothy Hart Community Center—sessions which she continues to enjoy to this day. “It’s so invigorating to be a part of that workshop. Though some folks have moved on we’ve been together for so long that the group has the camaraderie of a family—with a goal of creating art. And the most important thing I have learned from Johnny is how to appreciate other people’s work. Even our critique sessions are always encouraging as they provide advice on strengthening elements of our painting.” As a founding member of Brush Strokes Gallery and the owner of the 810 Weekend Gallery Beverley says that she has seen that the larger arts community of Fredericksburg exhibits that same attitude of mutual support. “One artist embraces another with open arms,” she said “Princess Anne Strret Midsummer” “and, through the years the Front Porch has so consistently other mediums but nothing was ever as supported the arts in Fredericksburg, exciting as those assignments. It was just fun to see what happened with those highlighting events and artists that are part of what has become such a vibrant paints.” Years later, when she and thriving arts scene.” was taking a recertification course at her alma mater, Mary Washington College, her studies included art sessions with adjunct professor Johnny Johnson and that latent spark of a love of painting was brought to life again. “Some students were trying so hard to understand the principles of a technique but I was just having fun. I’ll always remember Johnny saying, ‘I’m going to make an art teacher of you someday—but that prediction never came true.” Years later, Johnny Johnson again tapped Beverley’s painterly muse when, in the mid-90s she became a member of the

On the Farm

Spring Cleaning Sale May 7 - 17

374-0443 www.shopwhittingham.com 1021 Caroline Street

THE TWO most common questions I get about asparagus: Why is my asparagus so skinny and poor? How do you grow asparagus? I grow asparagus by first selecting a well-drained area away from trees. Next I. take a soil sample (get information on how and where to send sample at the local library or Virginia Tech Extension office). Third, I apply the recommended amendments to the soil and plow in. Then I open a furrow approximately 8 inches deep. In addition to soil sample recommendations, per ioo feet of row, apply 20 pounds of 5-15-20 plus trace elements (tobacco-type fertilizer), 30 pounds of gypsum (contains large amounts of sulfur and calcium), and 30 pounds of dolomite limestone (contains large amount of m.agnesium) on the bottom of the furrow. Work it into the

ground with a hoe fork before placing the asparagus roots into the furrow. Asparagus is a salt-tolerant plant. Once the fertilizer is worked into the ground with a hoe fork, no salt damage from the fertilizer should occur to the asparagus roots. This is your last chance to apply nutrients directly into the root zone for the life of the asparagus roots, and that should be at least 15 years. With this extra fertility available in the root zone, your soil should support "high density" asparagus. I lay the roots in the furrow one on top of the other, like dominos, with the crowns 7 inches apart. I don't spread the roots out or apart, but you can if you like. One long single row is best because you can mow the weeds off on either side of the asparagus right up to where the stalks

come up out of the ground without injuring the asparagus. Drive the lawnmower in the direction that would expel the cuttings away from the row of asparagus. Asparagus shoots are very tender, and the force of the cuttings hitting the asparagus will make them grow crooked. Some people like crooked politicians, but no one likes crooked asparagus. Also, a single row allows for better air circulation, helping to minimize disease. A single row also-results in better yields because of more sunlight per plant. And more asparagus in the row competes more effectively with the weeds within the row of asparagus along with manual weeding. When people say their asparagus is skinny, I ask them if they planted it near trees. Nine times out of io they say yes. By "near trees," I mean close enough to either be shaded by the trees during the day or to have roots that reach the asparagus bed.

Remember, an asparagus bed should last at least 15 years, so look around, and if you see trees, imagine how big they'll be in 15 years. Asparagus cannot compete against trees for sunlight, moisture or nutrients in the soil. My grandfather would dig a trench a foot deep below where the asparagus was to be planted and fill it with well rotted cow manure mixed with dolomitic lime and gypsum. You may do this if you like (or if you want organic fertilizer). I find it to be too much squeeze for the juice. Using commercial fertilizer, especially with five or seven different trace elements, is much more effective. I do not sell roots. That - would be like selling the goose that lays the golden egg. I recommend buying the roots and other supplies from Roxbury Mills. Emmett Snead operates Snead's Farm 10 mi. S.E. of downtown on right side of Rt. 17 . Contact him at 540/371-9328

Collette Caprara is a local writer and artist.

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

11


Vino Dine in Casual Elegance Enjoy a wide variety of Northern Italian, French, Cuban, & Creole Specialties in the Historic Chimney’s Open 7 days a week Monday to Saturday 11 am to 10pm International Sunday Brunch 9am to 3pm Dinner from 3pm to 9pm Bar Open All Day Take Out Available 623 Caroline Street Fredericksburg VA 22401 Tel (540) 368-1 1107 Fax (540) 368-1 1108

12

May 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

mother’s day wine choices

By Scott Richards I used to work for a linen service in Northern Virginia, covering the DC market. May was the month we dreaded the most. Mother's Day occurs in May. Mother's Day is the busiest day for most restaurants, and definitely busy for those in the linen industry, trying to meet the demand of everyone wining and dining Mom. Now that I am out of that business, I can enjoy this holiday a little more. It sets the tone for the rest of the month and determines whether some of us will end up in the Dog House or not. For those Moms who like to enjoy wine, this is a perfect time to show some class, and it does not have to be overly fancy. There are three different schools of thought as to what wines will please our Moms this year. Of course, it depends on Mom. 1) When picking out a wine do not get hung up on the year and terroir and other such things. I know that sounds strange coming from a wine person, but so be it. Think bubbles, particularly if you are making brunch, or a mid afternoon meal. An Italian Prosecco is very nice and will not break the bank. To spice things up a bit, add pureed fruit for a Bellini. Another thought is to have blueberries or some such fruit in the flute prior to pouring the Prosecco. This great with brunch foods like waffles, french toast, or my favorite, a frittata. 2) The Côte de Rhone area of France is known for lovely wines other than Châteauneuf du Pape. Most people just like to say it. A good Rosé, made principally from Granache and Syrah wines, is not only a color that will appeal to Mom's feminine side (pink), but it also is a wine that has a high compatibility with many and varied foods. The first time I tried a Rosé, I had a hickory smoked pork loin. My immediate thought was the taste of the wine would be lost. I could not have been farther from the truth. It stood well with the strong flavor of the pork. A Rosé can be either off dry or somewhat sweet, but should not be like some of the simple syrup wines on the market today. This wine goes well with oysters or cheeses as well as an entrée, and looks good in a wine glass. 3) A Petite Verdot or a Barbera goes well with the bold, gutsy Mom who wants nothing of the bubbles and light colors. Better yet, pour her a red blend such as a Chianti to go with the Italian

meal being prepared. Chianti is made of Sangiovese, a lovely, earthy wine. The next step up is the Super Tuscan, with Sangiovese, Merlot Cabernet and Sauvignon. These wines are a natural with the meals being served after lunch, not only offering character, but a little muscle as well. For those with other plans for Mother's Day, or those who have found themselves in the Dog House, do not serve these wines only at this holiday. Good wines and a nice meal make for a happy Mom, and we all know how important that can be. Cheers! Scott Richards is owner of Loch Haven Vineyards, and a free lance writer Read his blog at fromthevine.wordpress.com or Contact him at bgmeadowswine@yahoo.com

Open M-F at 6am Open Sat & Sun at 7 am Serve breakfast, lunch and dinner $5.00 Weekday lunch Specials

620 Caroline Street

Season’s Bounty

an oeuf by any other name

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105

By vanessa moncure

Is still an egg….no matter what language. The coming of Spring, nature’s annual renewal, use the egg as its most potent symbol. If you can purchase fresh eggs at the farmer’s market, make sure you use a large-graded egg for all baked recipes. Extra-large and jumbo-graded are larger and heavier and often have a double yolk. Most cookbook recipes call for large size in baking - size is not as critical in an omelet or frittata. MOTHER’S DAY BROILED BREAKFAST Preheat oven broiler and place top rack nearest to heat. Toast two English muffins and place on baking sheet. Heat four slices of Canadian bacon and place on muffin, then a slice of tomato, slices of hard-boiled egg, ¼ c. each prepared Bearnaise sauce, then slice of swiss cheese. Broil until cheese is browned and bubbly, turn off broiler and place baking sheet on bottom rack - close oven door and allow them to heat through about five minutes sprinkle with finely chopped chives and serve along with a fruit cup - great for a Mother’s Day breakfast tray! CURRIED EGG SALAD Chop the whites of six hard-boiled eggs, then coarsely crumble the yolks. Mix together two spring onions, sliced on the diagonal, ½ tsp.salt, black pepper, 1 tsp. or more curry powder, 1 tsp. lemon juice and ? c.mayonnaise. Fold mixture into eggs and serve on cocktail-size pumpernickel bread slices. UNIVERSITY CLUB SPRING SPECIAL This is some old recipe tucked in a 1940s Southern cookbook. Please don't ask me what University, or what Club or why it’s a Spring Special, but it's a really good Dagwood-style sandwich. Millennials, Google Dagwood. I can't do everything!

Begin with one large sliced seeded rye bread.Spread with a mixture of equal parts Rouquefort cheese, French’s mustard and mayonnaise. Place atop thin slices of Swiss cheese, baked Virginia Ham, chicken, long slice of Romaine lettuce. Cover with 1000 Island dressing (about ½ c). Garnish with 2 slices tomatoes, 2sliced hard boiled eggs, 2 long dill pickle strips, another slice of rye bread, then pimiento stuffed olives on frilled toothpicks to hold the concoction together.

www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

SPRING EGG SALAD Chop whites of six hard boiled eggs, then coarsely crumble the yolks. Mix together just enough mayonnaise, Dijon mustard, S&P, chopped fresh dill and chopped fresh spring onion to bind the eggs. Stir in plenty of blanched and chilled asparagus tips. Serve over Boston lettuce. SPRING SALAD Layer in order: Thaw 2 10-oz. pkgs. Frozen green peas and drain. Slice 6-8 hard-boiled eggs. Crumble 8 slices crisp thick-sliced bacon. Mix into 1c. sour cream S&P, garlic powder, ¼ c. chopped spring onions. Refrigerate several hours before gently folding together and serving on a bed of spring lettuces. Garnish with edible pea sprouts if desired. TRADITIONAL DEVILED EGGS Mash together hard-boiled eggs with enough mayonnaise, yellow mustard,S&P, and 1 tsp. Cider vinegar per 6 eggs to bind. Serve on white loaf bread, with the crusts removed. Poppy seeds may be added if desired.

Serving Breakfast Sandwiches 10am ~ 11:30am Lunch 10am ~ 4pm Open Monday ~ Saturday 10am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline corner of Caroline & George Streets

S ammy T’ s DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG’S

Happy OEUFs to you!

Serving Great Food Since 1981

Vanessa Moncure has more cookbooks and recipes than the Library of Congress, and shares with FP readers each month in this space.

Home of the “Camper Special” & the Best Burger in Town 801 Caroline Street

(540) 371-2008

Try Our Self-Serve Yogurt open 11:30 am Daily Still Owned by the Emory Family front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

13


Vino Dine in Casual Elegance Enjoy a wide variety of Northern Italian, French, Cuban, & Creole Specialties in the Historic Chimney’s Open 7 days a week Monday to Saturday 11 am to 10pm International Sunday Brunch 9am to 3pm Dinner from 3pm to 9pm Bar Open All Day Take Out Available 623 Caroline Street Fredericksburg VA 22401 Tel (540) 368-1 1107 Fax (540) 368-1 1108

12

May 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

mother’s day wine choices

By Scott Richards I used to work for a linen service in Northern Virginia, covering the DC market. May was the month we dreaded the most. Mother's Day occurs in May. Mother's Day is the busiest day for most restaurants, and definitely busy for those in the linen industry, trying to meet the demand of everyone wining and dining Mom. Now that I am out of that business, I can enjoy this holiday a little more. It sets the tone for the rest of the month and determines whether some of us will end up in the Dog House or not. For those Moms who like to enjoy wine, this is a perfect time to show some class, and it does not have to be overly fancy. There are three different schools of thought as to what wines will please our Moms this year. Of course, it depends on Mom. 1) When picking out a wine do not get hung up on the year and terroir and other such things. I know that sounds strange coming from a wine person, but so be it. Think bubbles, particularly if you are making brunch, or a mid afternoon meal. An Italian Prosecco is very nice and will not break the bank. To spice things up a bit, add pureed fruit for a Bellini. Another thought is to have blueberries or some such fruit in the flute prior to pouring the Prosecco. This great with brunch foods like waffles, french toast, or my favorite, a frittata. 2) The Côte de Rhone area of France is known for lovely wines other than Châteauneuf du Pape. Most people just like to say it. A good Rosé, made principally from Granache and Syrah wines, is not only a color that will appeal to Mom's feminine side (pink), but it also is a wine that has a high compatibility with many and varied foods. The first time I tried a Rosé, I had a hickory smoked pork loin. My immediate thought was the taste of the wine would be lost. I could not have been farther from the truth. It stood well with the strong flavor of the pork. A Rosé can be either off dry or somewhat sweet, but should not be like some of the simple syrup wines on the market today. This wine goes well with oysters or cheeses as well as an entrée, and looks good in a wine glass. 3) A Petite Verdot or a Barbera goes well with the bold, gutsy Mom who wants nothing of the bubbles and light colors. Better yet, pour her a red blend such as a Chianti to go with the Italian

meal being prepared. Chianti is made of Sangiovese, a lovely, earthy wine. The next step up is the Super Tuscan, with Sangiovese, Merlot Cabernet and Sauvignon. These wines are a natural with the meals being served after lunch, not only offering character, but a little muscle as well. For those with other plans for Mother's Day, or those who have found themselves in the Dog House, do not serve these wines only at this holiday. Good wines and a nice meal make for a happy Mom, and we all know how important that can be. Cheers! Scott Richards is owner of Loch Haven Vineyards, and a free lance writer Read his blog at fromthevine.wordpress.com or Contact him at bgmeadowswine@yahoo.com

Open M-F at 6am Open Sat & Sun at 7 am Serve breakfast, lunch and dinner $5.00 Weekday lunch Specials

620 Caroline Street

Season’s Bounty

an oeuf by any other name

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Streets Downtown Fredericksburg 540.370.4105

By vanessa moncure

Is still an egg….no matter what language. The coming of Spring, nature’s annual renewal, use the egg as its most potent symbol. If you can purchase fresh eggs at the farmer’s market, make sure you use a large-graded egg for all baked recipes. Extra-large and jumbo-graded are larger and heavier and often have a double yolk. Most cookbook recipes call for large size in baking - size is not as critical in an omelet or frittata. MOTHER’S DAY BROILED BREAKFAST Preheat oven broiler and place top rack nearest to heat. Toast two English muffins and place on baking sheet. Heat four slices of Canadian bacon and place on muffin, then a slice of tomato, slices of hard-boiled egg, ¼ c. each prepared Bearnaise sauce, then slice of swiss cheese. Broil until cheese is browned and bubbly, turn off broiler and place baking sheet on bottom rack - close oven door and allow them to heat through about five minutes sprinkle with finely chopped chives and serve along with a fruit cup - great for a Mother’s Day breakfast tray! CURRIED EGG SALAD Chop the whites of six hard-boiled eggs, then coarsely crumble the yolks. Mix together two spring onions, sliced on the diagonal, ½ tsp.salt, black pepper, 1 tsp. or more curry powder, 1 tsp. lemon juice and ? c.mayonnaise. Fold mixture into eggs and serve on cocktail-size pumpernickel bread slices. UNIVERSITY CLUB SPRING SPECIAL This is some old recipe tucked in a 1940s Southern cookbook. Please don't ask me what University, or what Club or why it’s a Spring Special, but it's a really good Dagwood-style sandwich. Millennials, Google Dagwood. I can't do everything!

Begin with one large sliced seeded rye bread.Spread with a mixture of equal parts Rouquefort cheese, French’s mustard and mayonnaise. Place atop thin slices of Swiss cheese, baked Virginia Ham, chicken, long slice of Romaine lettuce. Cover with 1000 Island dressing (about ½ c). Garnish with 2 slices tomatoes, 2sliced hard boiled eggs, 2 long dill pickle strips, another slice of rye bread, then pimiento stuffed olives on frilled toothpicks to hold the concoction together.

www.oldetownebutcher.com Hours Monday - Saturday, 9am to 9pm; Sunday, 11am to 6pm Keith Lebor Proprietor

SPRING EGG SALAD Chop whites of six hard boiled eggs, then coarsely crumble the yolks. Mix together just enough mayonnaise, Dijon mustard, S&P, chopped fresh dill and chopped fresh spring onion to bind the eggs. Stir in plenty of blanched and chilled asparagus tips. Serve over Boston lettuce. SPRING SALAD Layer in order: Thaw 2 10-oz. pkgs. Frozen green peas and drain. Slice 6-8 hard-boiled eggs. Crumble 8 slices crisp thick-sliced bacon. Mix into 1c. sour cream S&P, garlic powder, ¼ c. chopped spring onions. Refrigerate several hours before gently folding together and serving on a bed of spring lettuces. Garnish with edible pea sprouts if desired. TRADITIONAL DEVILED EGGS Mash together hard-boiled eggs with enough mayonnaise, yellow mustard,S&P, and 1 tsp. Cider vinegar per 6 eggs to bind. Serve on white loaf bread, with the crusts removed. Poppy seeds may be added if desired.

Serving Breakfast Sandwiches 10am ~ 11:30am Lunch 10am ~ 4pm Open Monday ~ Saturday 10am - 4pm 540.371.2233 www.thevirginiadeli.com 826 Caroline corner of Caroline & George Streets

S ammy T’ s DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG’S

Happy OEUFs to you!

Serving Great Food Since 1981

Vanessa Moncure has more cookbooks and recipes than the Library of Congress, and shares with FP readers each month in this space.

Home of the “Camper Special” & the Best Burger in Town 801 Caroline Street

(540) 371-2008

Try Our Self-Serve Yogurt open 11:30 am Daily Still Owned by the Emory Family front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

13


Cooking With Kyle black beans by james kyle snyder

Cocktails Mom Could Love

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St.

Mother's Day is all about brunch. While Mimosas and Bloody Marys are the standard beverages for the meal, your mom deserves something really special on her day. .Fix a cocktail that's refreshing, fruity and delicious..

Fredericksburg, VA

MOTHER'S BLUSH 2 Fresh strawberries, cut in half 3 oz Lillet Rosé 1 oz Sparkling wine Garnish: Orange twist Tall Glass In a tall glass, gently muddle the strawberries. Add the Lillet Rose, fill with ice and top with the sparkling wine. Stir, and garnish with an orange twist.

GRAND L'ORANGE

Far too often, we ignore the simplest foods as viable options when we make our decisions about what we are going to eat. History has shown us that the simplest foods can provide us the best nutrition. Modern medicine has taught us that it is important to get the majority of that nutrition from vegetables. We are one of the top 10 fattest nations in the world boasting a population that is 68%+ overweight or obese with half (34%) weighing in on the obese side. What can be done? Nancy Farrell, dietician, suggest most at least half of a plate should be vegetables. But what about proteins? There are many great tasting vegetable proteins that are easy to prepare and tasty too. One cup of cooked black beans yields 15 g of fiber and 39 grams of protein! That is more than half of the 59g of daily protein suggested for adult males. But what about the side effects of beans? First, if you have a healthy gut, beans should have little to no unpleasant effect. The problem is we continue to abuse our guts with processed foods and too many carbohydrates. When we finally eat a vegetable, our bodies do not know what to do with it. Also, the way the beans are prepared matters. A good soaking overnight will remove most of the gas producing enzymes. Here at home, we prepare large batches of beans and freeze them for later use. It is the easiest way to avoid the processed canned goods and still have an inexpensive, healthy alternative. The following process is a general guideline. Larger beans take longer just as smaller beans cook quicker. The best parts about dried beans are they are inexpensive, easy to store, simple to prepare, and taste

14

May 2016

great! We add our ready-to-eat treats to soups, salads, mix with chicken and jalapeños as a dip, or just use them as a side. If you have them ready, beans can be added to almost any meal. It is just as easy to make a variety while the oven is on so use two Dutch ovens. First, sort the beans and rinse them to remove stones and dirt. Next, soak them over-night the night before you want to cook them. We usually do a pound-and-a-half (about a quart of dried beans) at a time. Simply put the beans in a 3-quart bowl, cover with ample water (use 1 part beans to 2 parts water) and stir in a heaping TBS of salt. Let it sit out at room temperature overnight. In the morning, preheat the over to 325, rinse the beans again, put them in the Dutch oven, and cover them with one inch of water. Put the Dutch oven on the stovetop and turn it on high to get it to a boil more quickly. I am careful to not over season quantity of flavors not intensity of salt. I know I love an onion in beans, regardless of the dish, so I'll peel and ring a yellow onion and add that to the pot. I also stir in 1 tsp additional salt and 1 TBS ground black pepper. Flavor as you like. Once the beans begin to boil slightly, lid the pot and put into the oven for 75 minutes. Check for doneness. If they are crunchy, cook a little longer. Most beans do not take more than 90 minutes. Once again, in an effort to stay healthy, simple home-cooked treats win the day! Experiment with the flavors until you find your favorite simple, easy, and delicious favorite. Be well! Kyle treats us to simple, easy & delicious recipes each month.

Front porch fredericksburg

2 oz Grand Monarch Orange Liqueur 3 oz Orange Juice Club soda to top Despite all the orange, the club soda lightens the drink up enough to make an almost infused-water type of cocktail.

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

BLUSHING LADY 2 ounces vodka 1 ounce PAMA Pomegranate Liqueur 1 ounce pink grapefruit juice Lemon wedge for garnish Coarse sugar for rimming Rub a wedge of lemon around the rim of a cocktail glass and dip the glass into a plate of coarse sugar. Set it aside. Pour the remaining ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake and strain into the prepared glass.(looks stunning when served in a sugar-rimmed glass) Garnish with a lemon wedge.

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

The Sunken Well Tavern

Front Porch Fredericksburg

The General Store

Restaurant

Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

FXBG A REA CSA 20 years of dedication to local food

By meg sneed If a focus on eating fresh, local food seems like a recent fad – I’d like to introduce you to the Fredericksburg Area CSA Project (FACSAP); they’ve been bringing local, organic food and farmers to our community for twenty years now! Founded in 1997, back when community supported agriculture (CSA) programs were a relatively unheard of concept in our area, FACSAP founding members organized Fredericksburg’s first CSA with the intention of uniting the Fredericksburg community and its own, local, organic farmers. The idea was simple – support our farmers while making access to their foods easier for the rest of us. And it worked! Twenty years later, FACSAP is celebrating its 20th anniversary harvest with the same dedication to local, organic foods and farmers that it began with – and has expanded its reach within the community to include a variety of local, organic or Certified Naturally Grown farms producing everything from produce and poultry to soap and honey. This diversity of farms may, in fact, be the key to the Fredericksburg Area CSA Project’s success. While most CSA’s in the area are single farms programs, FACSAP is run by a board of volunteer organizers which includes both members and farmers, who are committed to supporting a variety of farms in the area (including some urban farms right in Downtown Fredericksburg!). This allows them to provide their members with shares that include an average of 10-12 different types of produce as well as other organic items like soap, honey, and the best apple juice you’ve ever tasted. It also means that if one farmer has a smaller harvest than anticipated, they can fill in with more produce from another farm instead – keeping an average share size of ¾ bushel throughout much of the season. Additionally, the Fredericksburg CSA Project strives to provide their members with access to other organic items, such as poultry, eggs, and bulk produce purchases, which are not a regular part of the CSA shares but may be purchased from the same organic, local farmers who provide some of the produce – making it a one stop shop for many members to obtain most of their groceries for the week. One of FACSAP’s long-time members, who has been participating with the CSA from the very first harvest, said “It has been consistently the best source

of local organic produce we can find, other than growing it ourselves. Because it is a multi-farm CSA, each week we receive an abundant variety of produce, and throughout the season, we receive special items such as local natural raw honey, local biologically grown apple juice and apple cider vinegar, and natural handmade soap made especially for FACSAP members. It is hard to imagine life without this precious food source for our family.” While focusing on food purity, Fredericksburg Area CSA Project also takes the community part of the CSA program just as seriously. FACSAP doesn’t want their members to just know good food – they want them to know the farmers who grew it, as well as each other. Each season kicks off with a member meeting which brings together their farmers and members (90 households on average, as many members split a single share), which strengthens the connections between those who grow and those who enjoy that season’s harvest. The weekly pick up at Hurkamp Park, “harvest bar” style, along with periodic potlucks in the park provide even more opportunities for community. And, in celebration of their 20th harvest, the Fredericksburg Area CSA Project has taken a long-planned step further in celebrating both their food and their community by partnering with Catholic Charities to create their first CSA Share Scholarship Fund. This effort, supported by member donations, will allow the CSA to donate an additional two shares of produce to Catholic Charities to be distributed to Fredericksburg families in need of assistance. Regardless of if you are a born again foodie, or just a fan of the ’burg and the strength of its communities, Fredericksburg Area CSA Project is definitely one Fredericksburg’s best kept secrets that’s worth checking out! Meg is the practice manager at Old Dominion Osteopathic Medicine, community outreach coordinator for Fredericksburg Area CSA Project, a mom of 3 kids, & an ardent lover of all foods local, natural, and un-messed-with.

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

15


Cooking With Kyle black beans by james kyle snyder

Cocktails Mom Could Love

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St.

Mother's Day is all about brunch. While Mimosas and Bloody Marys are the standard beverages for the meal, your mom deserves something really special on her day. .Fix a cocktail that's refreshing, fruity and delicious..

Fredericksburg, VA

MOTHER'S BLUSH 2 Fresh strawberries, cut in half 3 oz Lillet Rosé 1 oz Sparkling wine Garnish: Orange twist Tall Glass In a tall glass, gently muddle the strawberries. Add the Lillet Rose, fill with ice and top with the sparkling wine. Stir, and garnish with an orange twist.

GRAND L'ORANGE

Far too often, we ignore the simplest foods as viable options when we make our decisions about what we are going to eat. History has shown us that the simplest foods can provide us the best nutrition. Modern medicine has taught us that it is important to get the majority of that nutrition from vegetables. We are one of the top 10 fattest nations in the world boasting a population that is 68%+ overweight or obese with half (34%) weighing in on the obese side. What can be done? Nancy Farrell, dietician, suggest most at least half of a plate should be vegetables. But what about proteins? There are many great tasting vegetable proteins that are easy to prepare and tasty too. One cup of cooked black beans yields 15 g of fiber and 39 grams of protein! That is more than half of the 59g of daily protein suggested for adult males. But what about the side effects of beans? First, if you have a healthy gut, beans should have little to no unpleasant effect. The problem is we continue to abuse our guts with processed foods and too many carbohydrates. When we finally eat a vegetable, our bodies do not know what to do with it. Also, the way the beans are prepared matters. A good soaking overnight will remove most of the gas producing enzymes. Here at home, we prepare large batches of beans and freeze them for later use. It is the easiest way to avoid the processed canned goods and still have an inexpensive, healthy alternative. The following process is a general guideline. Larger beans take longer just as smaller beans cook quicker. The best parts about dried beans are they are inexpensive, easy to store, simple to prepare, and taste

14

May 2016

great! We add our ready-to-eat treats to soups, salads, mix with chicken and jalapeños as a dip, or just use them as a side. If you have them ready, beans can be added to almost any meal. It is just as easy to make a variety while the oven is on so use two Dutch ovens. First, sort the beans and rinse them to remove stones and dirt. Next, soak them over-night the night before you want to cook them. We usually do a pound-and-a-half (about a quart of dried beans) at a time. Simply put the beans in a 3-quart bowl, cover with ample water (use 1 part beans to 2 parts water) and stir in a heaping TBS of salt. Let it sit out at room temperature overnight. In the morning, preheat the over to 325, rinse the beans again, put them in the Dutch oven, and cover them with one inch of water. Put the Dutch oven on the stovetop and turn it on high to get it to a boil more quickly. I am careful to not over season quantity of flavors not intensity of salt. I know I love an onion in beans, regardless of the dish, so I'll peel and ring a yellow onion and add that to the pot. I also stir in 1 tsp additional salt and 1 TBS ground black pepper. Flavor as you like. Once the beans begin to boil slightly, lid the pot and put into the oven for 75 minutes. Check for doneness. If they are crunchy, cook a little longer. Most beans do not take more than 90 minutes. Once again, in an effort to stay healthy, simple home-cooked treats win the day! Experiment with the flavors until you find your favorite simple, easy, and delicious favorite. Be well! Kyle treats us to simple, easy & delicious recipes each month.

Front porch fredericksburg

2 oz Grand Monarch Orange Liqueur 3 oz Orange Juice Club soda to top Despite all the orange, the club soda lightens the drink up enough to make an almost infused-water type of cocktail.

Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm Sun 11am - 9pm Bar open until 2am everyday

BLUSHING LADY 2 ounces vodka 1 ounce PAMA Pomegranate Liqueur 1 ounce pink grapefruit juice Lemon wedge for garnish Coarse sugar for rimming Rub a wedge of lemon around the rim of a cocktail glass and dip the glass into a plate of coarse sugar. Set it aside. Pour the remaining ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake and strain into the prepared glass.(looks stunning when served in a sugar-rimmed glass) Garnish with a lemon wedge.

Locally Owned Irish Pub and Restaurant

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 soupntaco@yahoo.com

200 Hanover St. ~ 373-0738

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

The Sunken Well Tavern

Front Porch Fredericksburg

The General Store

Restaurant

Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

Eat Well Drink Well Live Well 720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911

FXBG A REA CSA 20 years of dedication to local food

By meg sneed If a focus on eating fresh, local food seems like a recent fad – I’d like to introduce you to the Fredericksburg Area CSA Project (FACSAP); they’ve been bringing local, organic food and farmers to our community for twenty years now! Founded in 1997, back when community supported agriculture (CSA) programs were a relatively unheard of concept in our area, FACSAP founding members organized Fredericksburg’s first CSA with the intention of uniting the Fredericksburg community and its own, local, organic farmers. The idea was simple – support our farmers while making access to their foods easier for the rest of us. And it worked! Twenty years later, FACSAP is celebrating its 20th anniversary harvest with the same dedication to local, organic foods and farmers that it began with – and has expanded its reach within the community to include a variety of local, organic or Certified Naturally Grown farms producing everything from produce and poultry to soap and honey. This diversity of farms may, in fact, be the key to the Fredericksburg Area CSA Project’s success. While most CSA’s in the area are single farms programs, FACSAP is run by a board of volunteer organizers which includes both members and farmers, who are committed to supporting a variety of farms in the area (including some urban farms right in Downtown Fredericksburg!). This allows them to provide their members with shares that include an average of 10-12 different types of produce as well as other organic items like soap, honey, and the best apple juice you’ve ever tasted. It also means that if one farmer has a smaller harvest than anticipated, they can fill in with more produce from another farm instead – keeping an average share size of ¾ bushel throughout much of the season. Additionally, the Fredericksburg CSA Project strives to provide their members with access to other organic items, such as poultry, eggs, and bulk produce purchases, which are not a regular part of the CSA shares but may be purchased from the same organic, local farmers who provide some of the produce – making it a one stop shop for many members to obtain most of their groceries for the week. One of FACSAP’s long-time members, who has been participating with the CSA from the very first harvest, said “It has been consistently the best source

of local organic produce we can find, other than growing it ourselves. Because it is a multi-farm CSA, each week we receive an abundant variety of produce, and throughout the season, we receive special items such as local natural raw honey, local biologically grown apple juice and apple cider vinegar, and natural handmade soap made especially for FACSAP members. It is hard to imagine life without this precious food source for our family.” While focusing on food purity, Fredericksburg Area CSA Project also takes the community part of the CSA program just as seriously. FACSAP doesn’t want their members to just know good food – they want them to know the farmers who grew it, as well as each other. Each season kicks off with a member meeting which brings together their farmers and members (90 households on average, as many members split a single share), which strengthens the connections between those who grow and those who enjoy that season’s harvest. The weekly pick up at Hurkamp Park, “harvest bar” style, along with periodic potlucks in the park provide even more opportunities for community. And, in celebration of their 20th harvest, the Fredericksburg Area CSA Project has taken a long-planned step further in celebrating both their food and their community by partnering with Catholic Charities to create their first CSA Share Scholarship Fund. This effort, supported by member donations, will allow the CSA to donate an additional two shares of produce to Catholic Charities to be distributed to Fredericksburg families in need of assistance. Regardless of if you are a born again foodie, or just a fan of the ’burg and the strength of its communities, Fredericksburg Area CSA Project is definitely one Fredericksburg’s best kept secrets that’s worth checking out! Meg is the practice manager at Old Dominion Osteopathic Medicine, community outreach coordinator for Fredericksburg Area CSA Project, a mom of 3 kids, & an ardent lover of all foods local, natural, and un-messed-with.

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

15


may 2016…Honor Thy Mother and Our Vets Sunday, May 1

Friends of Chatham May Day Garden Party and Art Auction@ Federal Hill, May 1 @ 2:00 pm Pieces of art created by the local artists that participated in Friends of Chatham's Plein Air event will be auctioned. www.friendsofchatham.org Book Signing at the Mary Washington House, 1200 Charles St, Noon-4PM. Author, Jami Borek, who penned Patriots and Poisons, Amanda's Secret and Amelia's Dream will be signing books. FREE Spring Tea at the Mary Washington House, 1pm Enjoy tea and dessert in the garden, Also Children's Tea Party Program includes refreshments, a lesson in tea etiquette and painting a tea item souvenir to be picked up the following week. Parents are welcome to stay or leave their child for the program. It is limited to 20 children. $

Tuesday, May 3

Picnic in the Park a FREE Concert series in Hurkamp Park, presented by FXBG Parks & Rec. 11:30 -1:30pm" Bring a picnic lunch, a blanket, and come relax with the kiddos. Grateful Dead Night with The Brokedown Boys @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage, @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, May 4

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, May 5

Veteran film lecturer Gary Olsen gives a fascinating lecture on Italian film director Federico Fellini, whose films went from neorealism all the way to fantasy CRRL Hdqtr, 6:30pm. FREE Laura Shepherd Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar

First Friday, May 6

12th Annual "The Art of Recovery" Exhibit @ Ponshop Studio and Gallery, 712 Caroline St, 59pm, presented by Rappahannock Area

CALENDAR of events

Community Services Board (RACSB). The exhibit features original artwork of adults with mental illness The exhibit coincides with National Mental Health Month and will be on display locally through May 29, 2016.. There will be spoken word, poetry, and live music in the gallery's back courtyard at 7:30 p.m. Art Show at Jackson Street Lofts, 615 Jackson Street. Cheryl Crane-Hunter former Stafford county art teacher, now Topsail Island artist will exhibit artwork entitled,"Called by the Sea". The show will open at 5:30 and end at 10 pm. Opening Reception for "Imaginings" at Art First Gallery, 824 Caroline St, 6-9pm. New works by local artist Sheryl Crowell feature the imaginative use of recycled and whimsical materials. Chris Young at Celebrate Virginia After Hours! @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours, 6:30 pm. located at the new Marks and Harrison Amphitheater, 8030 Gordon W. Shelton Blvd. Fredericksburg. www.CelebrateVirginiaAfterHours.com "Sunrise to Sunset", art by Sarah Flinn @Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline St., Beginning with the sunrise in the east and ending with a sunset in the west, Sarah depicts lighthouses & boats, local farm scenes, & well-known Fxbg landmarks in soft oil colors. .Opening Reception 6-9pm 810 Weekend Gallery will celebrate First Friday from 6-8:30 pm. Stop by to see new works by Beverley Coates (watercolors), Penny A Parrish (photography) and Lynn Abbott (acrylics and oils). The Gallery open from 10-5 daily. Mother & Son Canoe Float & Campfire, 6:158:30pm What better way to end the week and begin your Mother's Day weekend than doing something fun outdoors with your son! Enjoy a paddle around the lake then come sit by the campfire. We'll enjoy s'mores, a few active songs, and other surprises. Perfect for moms of any age and their sons. All equipment provided. Preregistration required fredericksburgva.gov/parksandrecreation. 540372-1086

Saturday, May 7

10th Annual Sunken Well Race To The Top @ The Sunken Well Tavern, All proceeds go to Fredericksburg SPCA. Call The Sunken Well Tavern for details. 540-370-0911 James Madison Garden Club Annual Spring Plant and Bake Sale @ St. John's Episcopal Church, 9403 Kings Hwy, King George, 9-12pm. In addition to hardy plants dug from local gardens, the club will be selling spring bedding plants, annuals, perennials, veggies, herbs & shrubs. Intensive Drawing Workshops w/Maria Motz @ Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts, 813 Sophia St, 1-4pm Rappahannock Choral Society, Inc. Spring 2016 Concert@ Chancellor High School, 8pm. Rappahannock Choral Society (RCS) presents Music from the Movies featuring wonderful songs from the first "talkies" through the great screen adaptations of Broadway musicals to Disney, Elvis and even Alfred Hitchcock!

Sunday, May 8

Happy Mothers Day Blugrass Jam @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm Rappahannock Choral Society, Inc. Spring 2016 Concert@ Chancellor High School, 8pm. Rappahannock Choral Society (RCS) presents Music from the Movies featuring wonderful songs from the first "talkies" through the great screen adaptations of Broadway musicals to Disney, Elvis and even Alfred Hitchcock

Tuesday, May 10

Picnic in the Park a FREE Concert series in Hurkamp Park, presented by FXBG Parks & Rec. 11:30 -1:30pm" Bring a picnic lunch, a blanket, and come relax with the kiddos. Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, May 11

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, May 12

FXBG Parks & Rec Children's Art Show, Local young artist got their creative juices flowing. Join us for this amazing display of talents from K- 12th grade. Dorothy Hart Community Center, 408 Canal St.

FXBG Parks & Rec Children's Art Show, Local young artist got their creative juices flowing. Join us for this amazing display of talents from K- 12th grade. Dorothy Hart Community Center, 408 Canal St.

Mitchell Brothers Blues, Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar

Walk for Mental Illness, Hurkamp Park, 10am. Mhafred.org/walk; 371-2704

Artist's Opening Reception featuring Gabe Pons @ Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage, 7-9pm. Light Complimentary Hors d'Ourves and Cash Bar.

18th Annual Senior Citizens Prom @ North Stafford High School, -6pm. Free food, fun and friends. Music by the North Stafford Jazz Band and Jazzy Ladies. Info 540-300-1987

Friday, May 13

Fredericksburg Area Iris Society Spring Flower Show @ Fredericksburg Hospitality House, Central Park, 2801 Plank Rd, 2-5pm.An amazing array of irises grown not just locally but by iris societies from Maryland, North Carolina, West Virginia, DC, and Virginia. Irises will be judged and awarded ribbons. FXBG Parks & Rec Children's Art Show, Local young artist got their creative juices flowing. Join us for this amazing display of talents from K- 12th grade. Dorothy Hart Community Center, 408 Canal St. Billy Currington at Celebrate Virginia After Hours! located at the new Marks and Harrison Amphitheater, 8030 Gordon W. Shelton Blvd., Platinum-selling, Grammy, ACM and CMA nominated artist brings his Summer Forever Tour to the Marks and Harrison Amphitheater . 5:30pm. www.CelebrateVirginiaAfterHours.com, or by phone at 804-423-1911.

Saturday, May 14

Eagles, Beetles, and Wild Edibles @ Friends of the Rappahanoock, Join Friends of the Rappahannock (FOR) on a nature walk with Joella and Michael Killian of the University of Mary Washington's Department of Biological Sciences, 9:30pm-12 noon. For more information call (540) 3733448.www.riverfriends.org. Living in the Garden Symposium: Gardens, Big and Small, Old and New @ Lee Hall, UMW, 8:30-3:30pm, Topics include The Joy of Gardening, Renovating Mature and Frequently Neglected Gardens, Plant Growth, and a walking tour of the trees and shrubs of the university campus.

Stafford County Public Schools Film Festival @ Mountain View High School, 6-8pm Admission is a donation with all money from admission given to benefit Hope House. Student produced films and concessions will be sold. Support SCPS student films. Fredericksburg Community Concert Band in association with the Salvation Army Women's Auxiliary is performing a concert at 7pm at Massaponax High School. "Spring Fling" will include performances of Aaron Copland's "Appalachian Spring" and "March of the Cute Little Wood Sprites" by P.D.Q. Bach. Info: fredericksburgcommunityband.com. Adventure Brewing 2nd Anniversary Celebration, Noon-10pm, Breweries, Food Trucks, Bands, 33 Perchwood Drive. As part of the celebration we will be releasing our second anniversary beer a Rye Barleywine aged in bourbon barrels

Sunday, May 15

MARINE CORPS HISTORIC HALF MARATHON AND SEMPER 5IVE 2016. Join "Thunder Alley" on Caroline St to cheer on the runners….the loudest mile of the historic half! Fredericksburg Area Iris Society Garden Tours: 11 am-4 pm. These garden feature a variety of irises and other plants and flowers. FREE and open to public. To obtain a list of gardens, directions, and ]information, contact Lois Rose (540-582-5799) (LOWY222@aol.com); or Doug Chyz 540-6596202, dougchyz50@verizon.net, for more info

Saturday, May 21 Blugrass Jam @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Tuesday, May 17

Picnic in the Park a FREE Concert series in Hurkamp Park, presented by FXBG Parks & Rec. 11:30 -1:30pm" Bring a picnic lunch, a blanket, and come relax with the kiddos. Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, May 18

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com Fredericksburg Festival for the Performing Arts 29th Annual Chamber Music Festival @ Trinity Episcopal Church,825 College Ave., 7pm. Tickets fredfest.org, , 540-374-5040, Fred. Visitors Center

Thursday, May 19

Rob Williams, Alt Country Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar Fredericksburg Festival for the Performing Arts 29th Annual Chamber Music Festival @ Trinity Episcopal Church,825 College Ave., 7pm. Tickets fredfest.org, , 540-374-5040, Fred. Visitors Center

Friday, May 20

Fredericksburg Festival for the Performing Arts 29th Annual Chamber Music Festival @ Trinity Episcopal Church,825 College Ave., 7pm. Tickets fredfest.org, , 540-374-5040, Fred. Visitors Center Karen Jonas @ La Petite Auberge Lounge, 8-10pm.. No Cover Chase Rice at Celebrate Virginia After Hours! @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours!,After located at the new Marks and Harrison Amphitheater, 8030 Gordon W. Shelton Blvd. 5:30 pm. www.CelebrateVirginiaAfterHours.com, or by phone at 804-423-1911.

Mother and Dolly Tea at the Rising Sun Tavern., 1304 Caroline St. Bring your American Girl Doll and enjoy a Tea Party! Info (540) 371-1494, office@washingtonheritagemuseums.org

Sunday, May 22

Blugrass Jam @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Tuesday, May 24

Picnic in the Park a FREE Concert series in Hurkamp Park, presented by FXBG Parks & Rec. 11:30 -1:30pm" Bring a picnic lunch, a blanket, and come relax with the kiddos. Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, May 25

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, May 26

Drew Hutchinson, Jazz, Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar

Sunday, May29

Blugrass Jam @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Monday, May 30

Memorial Day...Hug A Vet

Tuesday, May 31

Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

If you are reading this 226th issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 19th year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for June 2016 issue is May 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service

2869 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

“Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!”

540-8 899-6 6787 16

May 2016

fortemusicstudios.com Front porch fredericksburg

(540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service”

Front Porch on

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

17


may 2016…Honor Thy Mother and Our Vets Sunday, May 1

Friends of Chatham May Day Garden Party and Art Auction@ Federal Hill, May 1 @ 2:00 pm Pieces of art created by the local artists that participated in Friends of Chatham's Plein Air event will be auctioned. www.friendsofchatham.org Book Signing at the Mary Washington House, 1200 Charles St, Noon-4PM. Author, Jami Borek, who penned Patriots and Poisons, Amanda's Secret and Amelia's Dream will be signing books. FREE Spring Tea at the Mary Washington House, 1pm Enjoy tea and dessert in the garden, Also Children's Tea Party Program includes refreshments, a lesson in tea etiquette and painting a tea item souvenir to be picked up the following week. Parents are welcome to stay or leave their child for the program. It is limited to 20 children. $

Tuesday, May 3

Picnic in the Park a FREE Concert series in Hurkamp Park, presented by FXBG Parks & Rec. 11:30 -1:30pm" Bring a picnic lunch, a blanket, and come relax with the kiddos. Grateful Dead Night with The Brokedown Boys @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage, @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, May 4

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, May 5

Veteran film lecturer Gary Olsen gives a fascinating lecture on Italian film director Federico Fellini, whose films went from neorealism all the way to fantasy CRRL Hdqtr, 6:30pm. FREE Laura Shepherd Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar

First Friday, May 6

12th Annual "The Art of Recovery" Exhibit @ Ponshop Studio and Gallery, 712 Caroline St, 59pm, presented by Rappahannock Area

CALENDAR of events

Community Services Board (RACSB). The exhibit features original artwork of adults with mental illness The exhibit coincides with National Mental Health Month and will be on display locally through May 29, 2016.. There will be spoken word, poetry, and live music in the gallery's back courtyard at 7:30 p.m. Art Show at Jackson Street Lofts, 615 Jackson Street. Cheryl Crane-Hunter former Stafford county art teacher, now Topsail Island artist will exhibit artwork entitled,"Called by the Sea". The show will open at 5:30 and end at 10 pm. Opening Reception for "Imaginings" at Art First Gallery, 824 Caroline St, 6-9pm. New works by local artist Sheryl Crowell feature the imaginative use of recycled and whimsical materials. Chris Young at Celebrate Virginia After Hours! @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours, 6:30 pm. located at the new Marks and Harrison Amphitheater, 8030 Gordon W. Shelton Blvd. Fredericksburg. www.CelebrateVirginiaAfterHours.com "Sunrise to Sunset", art by Sarah Flinn @Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline St., Beginning with the sunrise in the east and ending with a sunset in the west, Sarah depicts lighthouses & boats, local farm scenes, & well-known Fxbg landmarks in soft oil colors. .Opening Reception 6-9pm 810 Weekend Gallery will celebrate First Friday from 6-8:30 pm. Stop by to see new works by Beverley Coates (watercolors), Penny A Parrish (photography) and Lynn Abbott (acrylics and oils). The Gallery open from 10-5 daily. Mother & Son Canoe Float & Campfire, 6:158:30pm What better way to end the week and begin your Mother's Day weekend than doing something fun outdoors with your son! Enjoy a paddle around the lake then come sit by the campfire. We'll enjoy s'mores, a few active songs, and other surprises. Perfect for moms of any age and their sons. All equipment provided. Preregistration required fredericksburgva.gov/parksandrecreation. 540372-1086

Saturday, May 7

10th Annual Sunken Well Race To The Top @ The Sunken Well Tavern, All proceeds go to Fredericksburg SPCA. Call The Sunken Well Tavern for details. 540-370-0911 James Madison Garden Club Annual Spring Plant and Bake Sale @ St. John's Episcopal Church, 9403 Kings Hwy, King George, 9-12pm. In addition to hardy plants dug from local gardens, the club will be selling spring bedding plants, annuals, perennials, veggies, herbs & shrubs. Intensive Drawing Workshops w/Maria Motz @ Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts, 813 Sophia St, 1-4pm Rappahannock Choral Society, Inc. Spring 2016 Concert@ Chancellor High School, 8pm. Rappahannock Choral Society (RCS) presents Music from the Movies featuring wonderful songs from the first "talkies" through the great screen adaptations of Broadway musicals to Disney, Elvis and even Alfred Hitchcock!

Sunday, May 8

Happy Mothers Day Blugrass Jam @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm Rappahannock Choral Society, Inc. Spring 2016 Concert@ Chancellor High School, 8pm. Rappahannock Choral Society (RCS) presents Music from the Movies featuring wonderful songs from the first "talkies" through the great screen adaptations of Broadway musicals to Disney, Elvis and even Alfred Hitchcock

Tuesday, May 10

Picnic in the Park a FREE Concert series in Hurkamp Park, presented by FXBG Parks & Rec. 11:30 -1:30pm" Bring a picnic lunch, a blanket, and come relax with the kiddos. Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, May 11

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, May 12

FXBG Parks & Rec Children's Art Show, Local young artist got their creative juices flowing. Join us for this amazing display of talents from K- 12th grade. Dorothy Hart Community Center, 408 Canal St.

FXBG Parks & Rec Children's Art Show, Local young artist got their creative juices flowing. Join us for this amazing display of talents from K- 12th grade. Dorothy Hart Community Center, 408 Canal St.

Mitchell Brothers Blues, Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar

Walk for Mental Illness, Hurkamp Park, 10am. Mhafred.org/walk; 371-2704

Artist's Opening Reception featuring Gabe Pons @ Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage, 7-9pm. Light Complimentary Hors d'Ourves and Cash Bar.

18th Annual Senior Citizens Prom @ North Stafford High School, -6pm. Free food, fun and friends. Music by the North Stafford Jazz Band and Jazzy Ladies. Info 540-300-1987

Friday, May 13

Fredericksburg Area Iris Society Spring Flower Show @ Fredericksburg Hospitality House, Central Park, 2801 Plank Rd, 2-5pm.An amazing array of irises grown not just locally but by iris societies from Maryland, North Carolina, West Virginia, DC, and Virginia. Irises will be judged and awarded ribbons. FXBG Parks & Rec Children's Art Show, Local young artist got their creative juices flowing. Join us for this amazing display of talents from K- 12th grade. Dorothy Hart Community Center, 408 Canal St. Billy Currington at Celebrate Virginia After Hours! located at the new Marks and Harrison Amphitheater, 8030 Gordon W. Shelton Blvd., Platinum-selling, Grammy, ACM and CMA nominated artist brings his Summer Forever Tour to the Marks and Harrison Amphitheater . 5:30pm. www.CelebrateVirginiaAfterHours.com, or by phone at 804-423-1911.

Saturday, May 14

Eagles, Beetles, and Wild Edibles @ Friends of the Rappahanoock, Join Friends of the Rappahannock (FOR) on a nature walk with Joella and Michael Killian of the University of Mary Washington's Department of Biological Sciences, 9:30pm-12 noon. For more information call (540) 3733448.www.riverfriends.org. Living in the Garden Symposium: Gardens, Big and Small, Old and New @ Lee Hall, UMW, 8:30-3:30pm, Topics include The Joy of Gardening, Renovating Mature and Frequently Neglected Gardens, Plant Growth, and a walking tour of the trees and shrubs of the university campus.

Stafford County Public Schools Film Festival @ Mountain View High School, 6-8pm Admission is a donation with all money from admission given to benefit Hope House. Student produced films and concessions will be sold. Support SCPS student films. Fredericksburg Community Concert Band in association with the Salvation Army Women's Auxiliary is performing a concert at 7pm at Massaponax High School. "Spring Fling" will include performances of Aaron Copland's "Appalachian Spring" and "March of the Cute Little Wood Sprites" by P.D.Q. Bach. Info: fredericksburgcommunityband.com. Adventure Brewing 2nd Anniversary Celebration, Noon-10pm, Breweries, Food Trucks, Bands, 33 Perchwood Drive. As part of the celebration we will be releasing our second anniversary beer a Rye Barleywine aged in bourbon barrels

Sunday, May 15

MARINE CORPS HISTORIC HALF MARATHON AND SEMPER 5IVE 2016. Join "Thunder Alley" on Caroline St to cheer on the runners….the loudest mile of the historic half! Fredericksburg Area Iris Society Garden Tours: 11 am-4 pm. These garden feature a variety of irises and other plants and flowers. FREE and open to public. To obtain a list of gardens, directions, and ]information, contact Lois Rose (540-582-5799) (LOWY222@aol.com); or Doug Chyz 540-6596202, dougchyz50@verizon.net, for more info

Saturday, May 21 Blugrass Jam @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Tuesday, May 17

Picnic in the Park a FREE Concert series in Hurkamp Park, presented by FXBG Parks & Rec. 11:30 -1:30pm" Bring a picnic lunch, a blanket, and come relax with the kiddos. Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, May 18

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com Fredericksburg Festival for the Performing Arts 29th Annual Chamber Music Festival @ Trinity Episcopal Church,825 College Ave., 7pm. Tickets fredfest.org, , 540-374-5040, Fred. Visitors Center

Thursday, May 19

Rob Williams, Alt Country Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar Fredericksburg Festival for the Performing Arts 29th Annual Chamber Music Festival @ Trinity Episcopal Church,825 College Ave., 7pm. Tickets fredfest.org, , 540-374-5040, Fred. Visitors Center

Friday, May 20

Fredericksburg Festival for the Performing Arts 29th Annual Chamber Music Festival @ Trinity Episcopal Church,825 College Ave., 7pm. Tickets fredfest.org, , 540-374-5040, Fred. Visitors Center Karen Jonas @ La Petite Auberge Lounge, 8-10pm.. No Cover Chase Rice at Celebrate Virginia After Hours! @ Celebrate Virginia After Hours!,After located at the new Marks and Harrison Amphitheater, 8030 Gordon W. Shelton Blvd. 5:30 pm. www.CelebrateVirginiaAfterHours.com, or by phone at 804-423-1911.

Mother and Dolly Tea at the Rising Sun Tavern., 1304 Caroline St. Bring your American Girl Doll and enjoy a Tea Party! Info (540) 371-1494, office@washingtonheritagemuseums.org

Sunday, May 22

Blugrass Jam @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Tuesday, May 24

Picnic in the Park a FREE Concert series in Hurkamp Park, presented by FXBG Parks & Rec. 11:30 -1:30pm" Bring a picnic lunch, a blanket, and come relax with the kiddos. Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

Wednesday, May 25

Live Music @LaPetite Auberge, 311 William St, 8midnight. . No cover. lapetiteaubergefred.com

Thursday, May 26

Drew Hutchinson, Jazz, Live Music at 7:30 Kenmore Inn. featuring drink specials at the copper top bar

Sunday, May29

Blugrass Jam @ The Sunken Well Tavern, 720 Littlepage @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Monday, May 30

Memorial Day...Hug A Vet

Tuesday, May 31

Music Tuesdays @Bistro Bethem309 William St. 711pm. Join us for Join us for ½ Drinks & pizzas.

If you are reading this 226th issue of FPF, thank an advertiser as we celebrate our 19th year of continuous publication! If you are an advertiser, list your events. Deadline for June 2016 issue is May 20th. To submit events go to frontporchfredericksburg.com/submit

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service

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540-8 899-6 6787 16

May 2016

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Front Porch on

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

17


history’s stories

WHITE OAK MUSEUM By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks It was a sunny summer day in 1962 as 9 year old D. P. Newton was looking at a Union infantry button he had just dug in a Civil War camp. He was thinking that it had been 100 years since it was last touched by the soldier who was camped in Stafford County. D. P. did not realize that he was starting a journey that he would dedicate most of his life. Back in the 1950’s1960’s there were only a few individuals interested in walking the fields and woods searching for items that the soldiers lost or left behind. There are accounts of individuals as far back as the 1870’s who picked up relics on the battlefield, the more famous being Dr. Johnson whose collection was donated to the Fredericksburg Museum many years ago. He told me many fascinating stories before he died about walking the trenches and picking up relics with skeletons still in the trenches.

It was not until the metal detector came along that more people became interested in searching the areas where the soldier spent many months camped. D. P. and his father kept their efforts in Stafford County, where over 140,000 Union soldiers camped. The Union and Confederate armies during the winter months instead of using tents, built huts. They would dig a hole approximately four feet wide and eight feet long with a depth of eighteen inches. They would build a log hut around the opening with a fireplace at the end. From the caved in depressions in the ground, D. P has records where he dug out more than 1,000 of these hut sites finding bottles and other artifacts. D. P. and his father unlike many relic hunters never sold any of the artifacts excavated over the past fifty years. After the death of his father at the age of 94 in 1998, D.P. decided to open a museum with the help of his wife Bonnie, his mother and others, the Old White Oak School building was converted into a Museum. His mother helped him operate the Museum until her death in her nineties a few years ago. The Museum is unusual and unique that it is dedicated to the soldiers and their daily lives while camped in Stafford County. Along with the thousands of artifacts in the museum there is a Research Center with hundreds of letters, diaries and maps of the camp sites. D. P. is normally on site as the Curator and will assist you with any questions. Best private Civil War Museum dedicated to the Soldier and Relic Hunter in the United States in my opinion. (Hrs. 105 Wed.- Sun.) Without the relic hunters over the past five decades and individuals like D. P. Newton there would be no areas where the soldiers camped saved or this wonderful Museum in existence, nor any need for any Archeologists as there would be no places to excavate. Take the short trip down 218 and visit the White Oak Museum a place you will want to visit again. Dedicate to the memory of FRANK E. BROOKS II, AND ANTHONY SOUZIS Tuffy Hicks brings local history to life each month in FP

Central Rappahannock

HERITAGE CENTER Volunteers needed to process historical documents and aid researchers. Training provided. Phone 540-373-3704 or email crhc@verizon.net Open to the public for scholarly research

The Heritage Center 18

May 2016

Maury Commons

900 Barton St

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg

OUR HERITAGE How far we have come By Emily Taggert Schricker A Look Back for Historic Preservation Month Fredericksburg is a city steeped in history, but as residents and visitors to downtown, we often take our historic backdrop for granted. Rows of historic townhouses line Caroline Street, a 1910 brick train station buzzes with daily activity, restaurant row presents an array of food choices—it was not always this way in downtown Fredericksburg. Following the post-WWII boom, the city and surrounding counties grew steadily, but the growing pains included a negative impact on downtown Fredericksburg. In 1964, I-95 reached Fredericksburg, and travelers navigating the East Coast zoomed past without a single stoplight or view of the, now hidden, history. As happened across America, the increase in new residents outside downtown, along with the draw of the highway, also encouraged the development of shopping malls. With the opening of the Spotsylvania Mall in 1980 came the departure of large department stores from Caroline and William streets— including J.C. Penney’s, Sears, and Leggetts. This migration led to vacant buildings and desolate streets. It was no longer the “it” place to be; that title now went to the modern mall and its novel amenities. The Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc. (HFFI), founded in 1955, didn’t lose faith in Fredericksburg’s history or the historic buildings that made it so unique. They encourage the city to respect and support the history that had attracted tourists since the early days of U.S. Route 1. In response to the lower property values in downtown, entrepreneurs grasped the opportunity and began purchasing buildings to renovate them. HFFI also purchased real estate, restored the buildings, and sold them with easements in place to ensure their continued preservation. During a different time of historic tax credits and a market that allowed for this type of investment, HFFI had the opportunity to

Lewis Store pre 1996 Renovation make a direct impact on preservation in downtown Fredericksburg. The voice of HFFI was heard throughout downtown—whether they owned the property or not. Speaking up about buildings, such as the train station, the organization encouraged the City Council and local government to remember the history that had engaged visitors for decades. Revitalizing “Main Street” has been a non-stop process since the mass exodus from downtown 35+ years ago, and it is only when we look back at where we’ve been that we can see the victories we have won. Now, with the added resources of the city’s new Main Street organization, preservationists continue to work tirelessly to keep the historic buildings in good repair and earn a market share despite the draw of nearby malls. Equipped with the clear view of hindsight, Fredericksburg can see what a treasure downtown is and how we must all work together to preserve it. HFFI is excited to be celebrating Historic Preservation Month this May. A Preservation Walking Tour on May 21 will showcase some of the city’s preservation successes. Watch the HFFI blog at HFFI.org for in-d depth articles, including more on the preservation of the Fredericksburg train station by Olivia Blackwell.

Renew

total body exercises by Joan M. Geisler The old adage that strength comes in numbers can apply to our exercising also. The number of times we exercise during the week, the number of exercises we perform and the number of times we perform them. Exercising does not have to be complicated. Choose exercises that can be performed though out our everyday activities. Here are 4 total body exercises that you can do in your home. They do not need to be done all at once. Do a few throughout your day as you move from room to room.

In the kitchen Pushups – This is the good ol’ standard of strength. This is why the military does them and coaches use them to punish the recalcitrant athletes. They use every muscle in the body, even glutes, legs and especially the core. Whenever you are preparing food, do pushups against the wall or countertop. While the water is boiling, do pushups. While the microwave is going, do pushups. While the coffee is brewing, do pushups. By the end of the day you will have amassed quite a few pushups.

Emily Taggart Schricker is currently the Director of Operations at HFFI after serving as President, Secretary, and Vintage Route 1 Event Coordinator. In living room Squats – We spend adequate amount of time in this room reading and watching TV. If you are reading, at the end of every chapter stand up the sit down 10 times without using your hands to push yourself up out of the chair. Add some calve raises too. If you are watching TV, at every commercial stand up, reach for the ceiling and stand on your tippy toes then sit down and repeat until the show resumes. During that 30 minute show, you will have worked every muscle. Sitting at the kitchen tableBreathe deeply- Using our full lung capacity is not often performed. This is why many older people develop pneumonia in the hospital. They do not

do activities that cause them to breathe deeply and heavily so their breathing is generally shallow and weak. They will not have the lung strength to push that fluid out of their lungs if they are in a hospital bed for any extended time. So in a chair at the kitchen/dining room table sit up nice and straight. Take a deep breathe like you are filling up a water glass. Breathe pushing your belly out as you inhale so you get to the bottom of your lungs. Do not let your chest rise. Hold the breath for a count of 5 and exhale slowly. Practice that while you are reading this article. It is enormously relaxing and clears your head. Breathing deeply often sends life giving oxygen to the brain. Next time you feel tired and sluggish don’t reach for coffee, soda or a sweet treat. Shut your eyes, and take 10 slow deep breaths and give your body the oxygen/energy it is craving. Your blood sugar will thank you.

Bedroom With a great big bed for support this is a great place to stretch. Stand nice and tall and try to touch the ceiling with the top of your head. Stand on tip toes and lift hands over head. Stretch your back and decompress your spine. Wave your arms back and forth like a blowing palm tree. We live much of our lives sideways, getting into the car, stepping around items on the floor or people in front of us. With your arms extended over your head, see how close you can get to parallel to the floor. Sway back and forth 10 times. Stretch your rib cage, your armpits and hips. Can you bend sideways and touch the top of your bed? Four simple and easy to perform exercises that fit neatly into your everyday life. Keep your body moving so it will move with strength and dignity to the finish line of life. Joan Geisler is a personal trainer and certified nutrition counselor contact her at joangeisler@gmail.com

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

19


history’s stories

WHITE OAK MUSEUM By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks It was a sunny summer day in 1962 as 9 year old D. P. Newton was looking at a Union infantry button he had just dug in a Civil War camp. He was thinking that it had been 100 years since it was last touched by the soldier who was camped in Stafford County. D. P. did not realize that he was starting a journey that he would dedicate most of his life. Back in the 1950’s1960’s there were only a few individuals interested in walking the fields and woods searching for items that the soldiers lost or left behind. There are accounts of individuals as far back as the 1870’s who picked up relics on the battlefield, the more famous being Dr. Johnson whose collection was donated to the Fredericksburg Museum many years ago. He told me many fascinating stories before he died about walking the trenches and picking up relics with skeletons still in the trenches.

It was not until the metal detector came along that more people became interested in searching the areas where the soldier spent many months camped. D. P. and his father kept their efforts in Stafford County, where over 140,000 Union soldiers camped. The Union and Confederate armies during the winter months instead of using tents, built huts. They would dig a hole approximately four feet wide and eight feet long with a depth of eighteen inches. They would build a log hut around the opening with a fireplace at the end. From the caved in depressions in the ground, D. P has records where he dug out more than 1,000 of these hut sites finding bottles and other artifacts. D. P. and his father unlike many relic hunters never sold any of the artifacts excavated over the past fifty years. After the death of his father at the age of 94 in 1998, D.P. decided to open a museum with the help of his wife Bonnie, his mother and others, the Old White Oak School building was converted into a Museum. His mother helped him operate the Museum until her death in her nineties a few years ago. The Museum is unusual and unique that it is dedicated to the soldiers and their daily lives while camped in Stafford County. Along with the thousands of artifacts in the museum there is a Research Center with hundreds of letters, diaries and maps of the camp sites. D. P. is normally on site as the Curator and will assist you with any questions. Best private Civil War Museum dedicated to the Soldier and Relic Hunter in the United States in my opinion. (Hrs. 105 Wed.- Sun.) Without the relic hunters over the past five decades and individuals like D. P. Newton there would be no areas where the soldiers camped saved or this wonderful Museum in existence, nor any need for any Archeologists as there would be no places to excavate. Take the short trip down 218 and visit the White Oak Museum a place you will want to visit again. Dedicate to the memory of FRANK E. BROOKS II, AND ANTHONY SOUZIS Tuffy Hicks brings local history to life each month in FP

Central Rappahannock

HERITAGE CENTER Volunteers needed to process historical documents and aid researchers. Training provided. Phone 540-373-3704 or email crhc@verizon.net Open to the public for scholarly research

The Heritage Center 18

May 2016

Maury Commons

900 Barton St

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg

OUR HERITAGE How far we have come By Emily Taggert Schricker A Look Back for Historic Preservation Month Fredericksburg is a city steeped in history, but as residents and visitors to downtown, we often take our historic backdrop for granted. Rows of historic townhouses line Caroline Street, a 1910 brick train station buzzes with daily activity, restaurant row presents an array of food choices—it was not always this way in downtown Fredericksburg. Following the post-WWII boom, the city and surrounding counties grew steadily, but the growing pains included a negative impact on downtown Fredericksburg. In 1964, I-95 reached Fredericksburg, and travelers navigating the East Coast zoomed past without a single stoplight or view of the, now hidden, history. As happened across America, the increase in new residents outside downtown, along with the draw of the highway, also encouraged the development of shopping malls. With the opening of the Spotsylvania Mall in 1980 came the departure of large department stores from Caroline and William streets— including J.C. Penney’s, Sears, and Leggetts. This migration led to vacant buildings and desolate streets. It was no longer the “it” place to be; that title now went to the modern mall and its novel amenities. The Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc. (HFFI), founded in 1955, didn’t lose faith in Fredericksburg’s history or the historic buildings that made it so unique. They encourage the city to respect and support the history that had attracted tourists since the early days of U.S. Route 1. In response to the lower property values in downtown, entrepreneurs grasped the opportunity and began purchasing buildings to renovate them. HFFI also purchased real estate, restored the buildings, and sold them with easements in place to ensure their continued preservation. During a different time of historic tax credits and a market that allowed for this type of investment, HFFI had the opportunity to

Lewis Store pre 1996 Renovation make a direct impact on preservation in downtown Fredericksburg. The voice of HFFI was heard throughout downtown—whether they owned the property or not. Speaking up about buildings, such as the train station, the organization encouraged the City Council and local government to remember the history that had engaged visitors for decades. Revitalizing “Main Street” has been a non-stop process since the mass exodus from downtown 35+ years ago, and it is only when we look back at where we’ve been that we can see the victories we have won. Now, with the added resources of the city’s new Main Street organization, preservationists continue to work tirelessly to keep the historic buildings in good repair and earn a market share despite the draw of nearby malls. Equipped with the clear view of hindsight, Fredericksburg can see what a treasure downtown is and how we must all work together to preserve it. HFFI is excited to be celebrating Historic Preservation Month this May. A Preservation Walking Tour on May 21 will showcase some of the city’s preservation successes. Watch the HFFI blog at HFFI.org for in-d depth articles, including more on the preservation of the Fredericksburg train station by Olivia Blackwell.

Renew

total body exercises by Joan M. Geisler The old adage that strength comes in numbers can apply to our exercising also. The number of times we exercise during the week, the number of exercises we perform and the number of times we perform them. Exercising does not have to be complicated. Choose exercises that can be performed though out our everyday activities. Here are 4 total body exercises that you can do in your home. They do not need to be done all at once. Do a few throughout your day as you move from room to room.

In the kitchen Pushups – This is the good ol’ standard of strength. This is why the military does them and coaches use them to punish the recalcitrant athletes. They use every muscle in the body, even glutes, legs and especially the core. Whenever you are preparing food, do pushups against the wall or countertop. While the water is boiling, do pushups. While the microwave is going, do pushups. While the coffee is brewing, do pushups. By the end of the day you will have amassed quite a few pushups.

Emily Taggart Schricker is currently the Director of Operations at HFFI after serving as President, Secretary, and Vintage Route 1 Event Coordinator. In living room Squats – We spend adequate amount of time in this room reading and watching TV. If you are reading, at the end of every chapter stand up the sit down 10 times without using your hands to push yourself up out of the chair. Add some calve raises too. If you are watching TV, at every commercial stand up, reach for the ceiling and stand on your tippy toes then sit down and repeat until the show resumes. During that 30 minute show, you will have worked every muscle. Sitting at the kitchen tableBreathe deeply- Using our full lung capacity is not often performed. This is why many older people develop pneumonia in the hospital. They do not

do activities that cause them to breathe deeply and heavily so their breathing is generally shallow and weak. They will not have the lung strength to push that fluid out of their lungs if they are in a hospital bed for any extended time. So in a chair at the kitchen/dining room table sit up nice and straight. Take a deep breathe like you are filling up a water glass. Breathe pushing your belly out as you inhale so you get to the bottom of your lungs. Do not let your chest rise. Hold the breath for a count of 5 and exhale slowly. Practice that while you are reading this article. It is enormously relaxing and clears your head. Breathing deeply often sends life giving oxygen to the brain. Next time you feel tired and sluggish don’t reach for coffee, soda or a sweet treat. Shut your eyes, and take 10 slow deep breaths and give your body the oxygen/energy it is craving. Your blood sugar will thank you.

Bedroom With a great big bed for support this is a great place to stretch. Stand nice and tall and try to touch the ceiling with the top of your head. Stand on tip toes and lift hands over head. Stretch your back and decompress your spine. Wave your arms back and forth like a blowing palm tree. We live much of our lives sideways, getting into the car, stepping around items on the floor or people in front of us. With your arms extended over your head, see how close you can get to parallel to the floor. Sway back and forth 10 times. Stretch your rib cage, your armpits and hips. Can you bend sideways and touch the top of your bed? Four simple and easy to perform exercises that fit neatly into your everyday life. Keep your body moving so it will move with strength and dignity to the finish line of life. Joan Geisler is a personal trainer and certified nutrition counselor contact her at joangeisler@gmail.com

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

19


Companions

ANIMAL RITES, USA A Personal Service

holistic medicine for our furry friends

Our pets are our family, and many, if not all of us will do whatever it takes to keep them happy and healthy. Victoria Farthing, owner of the Animal Wellness Center at Concord Farm agrees, and has adapted her veterinary clinic offerings to include holistic methods, along with conventional veterinary practices. “When we first opened in 1990, we were what you might call a traditional practice, but I soon found that the chronic issues and problems I was seeing weren’t getting solved,” says Farthing. “It got so frustrating that I started looking for other answers and encountered integrative modalities that did work.” In 2000, Farthing began training in holistic techniques to add to her practice. First she trained in veterinary chiropractic, and then added acupuncture, herbal medicine, and Eden Energy Medicine. “It was controversial at the time, but more and more people were getting discouraged with problems that didn’t have a cure or couldn’t be described in medical terms very well. I wanted to find

Old Town’s Greatest Tour

Farthing mentions that the animal-h human bond is an integral part of the pet’s wellness. Many times she has found that an emotional issue with the owner can show up in the animal. She looks at the balance in the relationship between the owner and the pet, and gives homework and techniques to help that relationship, as well as the wellness of the animal. “It’s an endless process of learning new ways to heal each individual patient and I enjoy it tremendously. I’ve had a lot of help and support from coworkers and family on this incredible journey and am grateful for every minute of it,” says Farthing. The Animal Wellness Center at Concord Farm is located at 2971 Mountain View Rd in Stafford. To find out more, call 540-752-5835 or visit www.facebook.com/AWCConcordFarm.

Christina Ferber writes about all the hidden treasures in FXBG each month for FP

Mind Your Mind choosing a therapist

at ellwood manor

By christina ferber ways to maintain these animals’ quality of life and help them regain a sense of balance,” she says. “The fun part and joy of it is when you solve the puzzle, and see animals run inside because they can’t wait for their a c u p u n c t u r e treatment.” She tested each new process herself and on her family before adopting it in her practice. Farthing’s focus is on animal wellness, especially in regard to overvaccination, over medication, and poor nutrition. She notes that the amount of chemicals that are in our environment hit animals the hardest because they are so small. Much of the chronic ailments she sees can be traced back to the amount of toxins that they are exposed to. By using acupuncture and herbal supplements, along with other methods, Farthing is able to help pull out those toxins. She also focuses on core vaccines, not optional ones that are for issues that an animal will probably never encounter. Nutrition concerns can result from inferior quality food and over-processing, so she also educates clients on the best way to feed their animals. “There are a lot of things that people can do to maximize their pet’s health and it’s profound to see the difference that simple changes can make. I try to guide people so their animals can be the best that they can be,” she says. “I also focus on preventive medicine. If you can help balance the energy and boost the immune system, there is less disease and illness.”

Mother’s Day Tribute

By Barbara Deal

by Bob Lookabill Noted Civil War living historian Patrick Dunigan, will be portraying General Gouverneur Kemble Warren, who commanded the 5th Corps of the Union Army of Potomac. Warren established his headquarters at Ellwood during the Battle of the Wilderness. Mr. Dunigan, from Pemberton, N.J., has been a living historian for 30 years. Additionally, he is a member of the Officers for the Union, Civilians of Gettysburg and the Union Patriotic League. He also is a Civil War dancer and teaches dance to elementary school children in Lumberton, N.J. The house will be open from 10:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. and Friends of Wilderness Battlefield volunteer interpreters will be available to talk with visitors and answer questions. Light refreshments will be provided throughout the day. Event is free and open to the

“When it’s time to say “Good-bye” Cremation & Bereavement Service Serving the Area since 2003 info@animalritesusa.com animalritesusa.com 540-361-7487 Ellwood Manor is a circa 1790 house within Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park. The family cemetery contains the grave of Confederate General "Stonewall" Jackson's amputated arm from the Battle of Chancellorsville, and the house was a Federal headquarters during the Battle of the Wilderness. Much of the Battle of the WIldreness was fought on the plantation itself. On Sunday May 8th , join us as we read aloud from letters written by Civil War soldiers to their mothers, wives, and grandmothers as a special Mother’s Day tribute.at Ellwood Manor Readings will take place at 11:00 A.M. and 2:00 P.M. Visitors can enjoy live Civil War era music played by Evergreen Shade, who will perform between the reading of the letters and again after the 2:00 P.M. reading.

public. Special Mother’s Day Tribute Sunday, May 8 10am - 5pm Ellwood Manor is located off of Hwy 20, about .7 of a mile from the intersection of Rt. 3 and Hwy 20. Ellwood Manor is owned by the National Park Service. Friends of Wilderness Battlefield is pleased to steward the property in partnership with the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park. For more information or directions, please visit us at www.fowb.org. Bob Lookabill is the Vice President of the Friends of the Wildreness Board and is chair of the Ellwood Committee. Contact him at ellwood@fowb.org, or 540-972-5668 Photo by Dale Brown

Have you decided that things are overwhelming that you might want to talk to some body outside of your circle of support, and well worries and stresses? Overall, it’s best to find a professional licensed by Virginia State Board of Health Professions whose responsibility is insuring safety for the public and credentialing... . Mental health professionals, (clinical psychologists LCPs, clinical social workers LCSWs, and professional counselors LPCs, psychiatrists) have completed lengthy intense graduate studies in psychotherapy, including specific training in internships/residencies /fellowships plus 2 years of close professional supervision of sessions during class work and post graduation. Once licensed, they are required to complete 20-30+ hours, either annually or biannually to renew licenses. This keeps us up to date on new therapies, research, and laws. Most also require an ethics course, to maintain a standard of care acceptable and appropriate to the profession and requirements at the state level and sometimes national. Beyond that, identify personal needs, issues, or concerns. Does your needs within the scope of mental health, ( panic attacks and anxieties, depression, suicidal, substance abuse or something more serious or longstanding). Are you coping with a new or old stress? Are your worried about a child, a spouse or family member? Are you concerned about a child’s academics and resultant symptoms? Check to see if the clinician has noted a particular expertise or training that matches your issue. In terms of selecting a professional to help you, there are characteristics of a professional’s expertise and orientation that are relevant to your own needs and thoughts about what you want from a psychotherapist or psychiatrist. Psychotherapists assess and treat with talking and homework assignments

that can be curative. Some b e l i e v e medication concerns are predominant. Your regular family physician is a beginning p o i n t . Psychiatrists help with medication and mental health concerns. Truth is, you will have to consult health insurance for benefits (read: pays for all or part of the cost) for your mental health, or some companies use the term “behavioral health”. Sometimes, there is a list of professionals for whom the insurance company has approved or paneled for coverage for the help that you need. Should you not have insurance, some agencies, including Fredericksburg Counseling Services, the Moss Clinic, and Pastoral care often is offered without charge. Select and make an appointment. It may not be over yet. Meet with the person. See if you feel comfortable enough to self disclose. Look at the office environment. Sometimes this reveals some significant features of the provider that is relevant. Stay if you do. Start over if not. Also, remember crises and desperation need immediate attention. Talk of suicide or troublesome behaviors ( self harm of any sort or other sudden outof-character actions) must be addressed quickly. You may be their only source to avoid a worse outcome for their suffering. Call Snowden or Spotsy Regional hospital or your other local hospital or RACSB 540-373-6876 . Barbara Deal MA, LCSW is a psychotherapist at Mental Health Resources, ( 540 ) 899-9826

35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings Fredericksburgtrolley.com 20

May 2016

540-898-0737

Front porch fredericksburg

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890

S HOP

FOR

G OOD ~ 806 C AR OLINE S T. F REDERICKSB UR G front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

21


Companions

ANIMAL RITES, USA A Personal Service

holistic medicine for our furry friends

Our pets are our family, and many, if not all of us will do whatever it takes to keep them happy and healthy. Victoria Farthing, owner of the Animal Wellness Center at Concord Farm agrees, and has adapted her veterinary clinic offerings to include holistic methods, along with conventional veterinary practices. “When we first opened in 1990, we were what you might call a traditional practice, but I soon found that the chronic issues and problems I was seeing weren’t getting solved,” says Farthing. “It got so frustrating that I started looking for other answers and encountered integrative modalities that did work.” In 2000, Farthing began training in holistic techniques to add to her practice. First she trained in veterinary chiropractic, and then added acupuncture, herbal medicine, and Eden Energy Medicine. “It was controversial at the time, but more and more people were getting discouraged with problems that didn’t have a cure or couldn’t be described in medical terms very well. I wanted to find

Old Town’s Greatest Tour

Farthing mentions that the animal-h human bond is an integral part of the pet’s wellness. Many times she has found that an emotional issue with the owner can show up in the animal. She looks at the balance in the relationship between the owner and the pet, and gives homework and techniques to help that relationship, as well as the wellness of the animal. “It’s an endless process of learning new ways to heal each individual patient and I enjoy it tremendously. I’ve had a lot of help and support from coworkers and family on this incredible journey and am grateful for every minute of it,” says Farthing. The Animal Wellness Center at Concord Farm is located at 2971 Mountain View Rd in Stafford. To find out more, call 540-752-5835 or visit www.facebook.com/AWCConcordFarm.

Christina Ferber writes about all the hidden treasures in FXBG each month for FP

Mind Your Mind choosing a therapist

at ellwood manor

By christina ferber ways to maintain these animals’ quality of life and help them regain a sense of balance,” she says. “The fun part and joy of it is when you solve the puzzle, and see animals run inside because they can’t wait for their a c u p u n c t u r e treatment.” She tested each new process herself and on her family before adopting it in her practice. Farthing’s focus is on animal wellness, especially in regard to overvaccination, over medication, and poor nutrition. She notes that the amount of chemicals that are in our environment hit animals the hardest because they are so small. Much of the chronic ailments she sees can be traced back to the amount of toxins that they are exposed to. By using acupuncture and herbal supplements, along with other methods, Farthing is able to help pull out those toxins. She also focuses on core vaccines, not optional ones that are for issues that an animal will probably never encounter. Nutrition concerns can result from inferior quality food and over-processing, so she also educates clients on the best way to feed their animals. “There are a lot of things that people can do to maximize their pet’s health and it’s profound to see the difference that simple changes can make. I try to guide people so their animals can be the best that they can be,” she says. “I also focus on preventive medicine. If you can help balance the energy and boost the immune system, there is less disease and illness.”

Mother’s Day Tribute

By Barbara Deal

by Bob Lookabill Noted Civil War living historian Patrick Dunigan, will be portraying General Gouverneur Kemble Warren, who commanded the 5th Corps of the Union Army of Potomac. Warren established his headquarters at Ellwood during the Battle of the Wilderness. Mr. Dunigan, from Pemberton, N.J., has been a living historian for 30 years. Additionally, he is a member of the Officers for the Union, Civilians of Gettysburg and the Union Patriotic League. He also is a Civil War dancer and teaches dance to elementary school children in Lumberton, N.J. The house will be open from 10:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. and Friends of Wilderness Battlefield volunteer interpreters will be available to talk with visitors and answer questions. Light refreshments will be provided throughout the day. Event is free and open to the

“When it’s time to say “Good-bye” Cremation & Bereavement Service Serving the Area since 2003 info@animalritesusa.com animalritesusa.com 540-361-7487 Ellwood Manor is a circa 1790 house within Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park. The family cemetery contains the grave of Confederate General "Stonewall" Jackson's amputated arm from the Battle of Chancellorsville, and the house was a Federal headquarters during the Battle of the Wilderness. Much of the Battle of the WIldreness was fought on the plantation itself. On Sunday May 8th , join us as we read aloud from letters written by Civil War soldiers to their mothers, wives, and grandmothers as a special Mother’s Day tribute.at Ellwood Manor Readings will take place at 11:00 A.M. and 2:00 P.M. Visitors can enjoy live Civil War era music played by Evergreen Shade, who will perform between the reading of the letters and again after the 2:00 P.M. reading.

public. Special Mother’s Day Tribute Sunday, May 8 10am - 5pm Ellwood Manor is located off of Hwy 20, about .7 of a mile from the intersection of Rt. 3 and Hwy 20. Ellwood Manor is owned by the National Park Service. Friends of Wilderness Battlefield is pleased to steward the property in partnership with the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park. For more information or directions, please visit us at www.fowb.org. Bob Lookabill is the Vice President of the Friends of the Wildreness Board and is chair of the Ellwood Committee. Contact him at ellwood@fowb.org, or 540-972-5668 Photo by Dale Brown

Have you decided that things are overwhelming that you might want to talk to some body outside of your circle of support, and well worries and stresses? Overall, it’s best to find a professional licensed by Virginia State Board of Health Professions whose responsibility is insuring safety for the public and credentialing... . Mental health professionals, (clinical psychologists LCPs, clinical social workers LCSWs, and professional counselors LPCs, psychiatrists) have completed lengthy intense graduate studies in psychotherapy, including specific training in internships/residencies /fellowships plus 2 years of close professional supervision of sessions during class work and post graduation. Once licensed, they are required to complete 20-30+ hours, either annually or biannually to renew licenses. This keeps us up to date on new therapies, research, and laws. Most also require an ethics course, to maintain a standard of care acceptable and appropriate to the profession and requirements at the state level and sometimes national. Beyond that, identify personal needs, issues, or concerns. Does your needs within the scope of mental health, ( panic attacks and anxieties, depression, suicidal, substance abuse or something more serious or longstanding). Are you coping with a new or old stress? Are your worried about a child, a spouse or family member? Are you concerned about a child’s academics and resultant symptoms? Check to see if the clinician has noted a particular expertise or training that matches your issue. In terms of selecting a professional to help you, there are characteristics of a professional’s expertise and orientation that are relevant to your own needs and thoughts about what you want from a psychotherapist or psychiatrist. Psychotherapists assess and treat with talking and homework assignments

that can be curative. Some b e l i e v e medication concerns are predominant. Your regular family physician is a beginning p o i n t . Psychiatrists help with medication and mental health concerns. Truth is, you will have to consult health insurance for benefits (read: pays for all or part of the cost) for your mental health, or some companies use the term “behavioral health”. Sometimes, there is a list of professionals for whom the insurance company has approved or paneled for coverage for the help that you need. Should you not have insurance, some agencies, including Fredericksburg Counseling Services, the Moss Clinic, and Pastoral care often is offered without charge. Select and make an appointment. It may not be over yet. Meet with the person. See if you feel comfortable enough to self disclose. Look at the office environment. Sometimes this reveals some significant features of the provider that is relevant. Stay if you do. Start over if not. Also, remember crises and desperation need immediate attention. Talk of suicide or troublesome behaviors ( self harm of any sort or other sudden outof-character actions) must be addressed quickly. You may be their only source to avoid a worse outcome for their suffering. Call Snowden or Spotsy Regional hospital or your other local hospital or RACSB 540-373-6876 . Barbara Deal MA, LCSW is a psychotherapist at Mental Health Resources, ( 540 ) 899-9826

35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings Fredericksburgtrolley.com 20

May 2016

540-898-0737

Front porch fredericksburg

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890

S HOP

FOR

G OOD ~ 806 C AR OLINE S T. F REDERICKSB UR G front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

21


Senior Care blaze a trail By Karl Karch

Since 1963 May has been designated Older Americans Month (OAM). The goal of OAM is to raise awareness about important issues facing older adults and to highlight ways they are advocating for themselves, their peers, and their communities. This year’s theme, “Blaze a Trail”, was selected to recognize ways older adults are shaping our nation and reinventing themselves through new work and new passions, engaging their communities, and blazing a trail of positive impact on the lives of people of all ages. Many of the Silent Generation, those born from 1925-1945, are blazing trails through giving their time and expertise volunteering in the community, and focusing on wellness by walking the many trails and joining fitness clubs. However, the cohort most noted for blazing trails ever since they were born are the Baby Boomers (BBs), those born from 1946 – 1964. Because of their size, BBs have defined every era in which they have lived. A common analogy often ascribed to BBs is that they advance through the years like a “pig in a python”. The 60s is the most notable era that defined BBs: Woodstock, hippies, Vietnam War, civil rights, women’s liberation (bra burners), sexual freedom, and drugs. They became Yuppies, changed home size, and created sprawling suburbs. As a generation, BBs were looked at as the “want it now” so “work hard and get it all” generation and they have also been criticized for being a selfish and materialistic demographic. However, many baby boomers are now part of the sandwich generation; sandwiched between their adult children and elderly parents. With advances in technology and health care, they have elderly parents living longer with increasing needs and are now

22

May 2016

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

giving back as the primary family caregivers. Since 2011, an average of 10,000 BBs are turning 65 every day. First year BBs are now turning 70 and will redefine old age in America, just as they made their mark on teen culture, young adult life, and middle age. These older adults are now blazing the “little blue pill”, skincare, and cosmetic surgery trail. One of the really growing areas includes continuing education. I remember during my earlier work life hearing fellow employees nearing retirement say: “I don’t know what I will do when I retire. My work is my life.” During those years, there were discussions about how companies should prepare people for “life after work”. I don’t hear that today. Communities are realizing that there are vast resources among our retirees and those communities are creating a purpose-in-life for retires. One problem volunteers experience is knowing what opportunities are available. That’s why I am particularly impressed with our Rappahannock United Way (RUW) whose website is a repository for volunteer opportunities in the Greater Fredericksburg VA region (www.ruwvolunteer.org) ; RUW states: “At United Way we make volunteering fun, easy and accessible to individuals and groups alike”. So, if you are looking for another purpose in your life or another trail to blaze, check out the RUW website. The volunteer benefits, but society also benefits because there is a greater sense of accomplishment, pride, and commitment to our community. Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

Emancipated Patients diet and your immune system

Wellness falling shory of the mark

by patrick neustatter, MD Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

US Army Program Analyst Mitzi Champion was overweight, fatigued, suffering from joint pains, attention deficit, depression, acne, sleep apnea, and told she was pre-diabetic with a fatty liver. Until she came across ‘One Hundred Days of Real Food.’ Jill Harrington told a meeting of Op her story the Fredericksburg Food Co-O of how she was diagnosed with lupus, had joint pains, a rash on her face, no energy, was depressed and “a mess.” Until a friend gave her a book to read about the connection between illness and diet. Both Fredericksburg area natives cured themselves by changing what they ate. “I thought my joint pains were caused by running and had stopped. But after I changed my diet, I had so much energy I had to run” says Champion. She has since become a Nutritional Therapist Practitioner to spread the word. Within a month of changing over to an all natural food diet, “I got rid of all my symptoms, I felt great” and has done for the 12 years since, says Harrington, who went on to write The Lupus Recovery Diet. So as a doctor, how do I explain this? Are these women crazy? Were their symptoms all just psychosomatic? Is this just a placebo effect (I’ve often thought that people making a radical change to their diet must have a profound placebo effect)? Was it coincidence? To bring about this kind of a cure you have to go to a doctor and take medicines – don’t you? I am of course being facetious. There is a perfectly rational explanation for how these enterprising women have cured themselves. Diet and Your Immune System “It is becoming increasingly clear that chronic inflammation is the root cause of many serious illnesses” says Dr. Andrew Weil, that bushy bearded guru of everything alternative and complimentary

in the medical world. Things like heart disease, many cancers, Alzheimer’s. And of course lupus, along with many other diseases is a so called “autoimmune” disease where inflammation can be caused by the immune system going awry and attacking the bodies own tissues. There is a postulated mechanism in the form of “nutrigenomics” noted Mitzi Champion, when we met at Eileen’s for me to hear her story and have coffee (which incidentally contains polyphenols that are claimed to have an antinflammatory effect). “Nutrigenomics” is one of a series of “-omics” (pharmacogenomics, proteomics, epigenomics). In this case concerning how your specific genotype may react to, or with, certain foods, to benefit or harm your health. And which thus may allow development of a personalized, anti-inflammatory diet to cater to these particular genetic quirks. There is more and more being realized and written about the role of inflammation, and anti-inflammatory diets. But “if you’re looking for an eating plan that closely follows the tenets of antiinflammatory eating, consider the Mediterranean diet, which is high in fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains, fish, and healthy oils” notes the Harvard website (www.health.harvard.edu/stayinghealthy/foods-that-fight-inflammation) which also gives more detailed advice. NOTE: The Fredericksburg Food Co-op is trying to set up a co-op in the ‘burg to sell health promoting foods, and is passionately seeking new participants – go to www.fredericksburgfoodcoop.com if you are interested in joining. Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Director of the Moss Free Clinic. He is interested in stories of emancipated patients/people and would like to hear any stories of this kind from any readers. Contact him at pneustatter@aol.com

Medical and technological advances over the last few decades have dramatically increased the scope of health services available to the public. These advances have increased both the burden placed on the healthcare system and the demand for caregivers. Unfortunately, there has been a steady decline in health workers over the past several decades, coinciding with several notable events that have further strained the health care system. The Paraprofessional Healthcare Institute estimates that 1.1 million directcare workers will be required by 2020 to keep pace with the United States’ health demands. It is important to note that this figure does not include the additional support, administrative, and logistics staff required to effectively deliver services. Moreover, more than one third of current caregivers in the U.S. will reach retirement age in the next ten years, with an inadequate number of new caregivers available to replace them. While health worker availability has been decreasing, chronic diseases, including heart disease and obesity, have been on the rise. The World Health Organization defines chronic disease as health ailments of long duration (greater than 3 months) which progress slowly, largely as a result of unhealthy habits. The National Health Council found that although these diseases are largely preventable, they account for more than 70% of death and disability in the U.S. Furthermore, a study by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation reported that patients with a chronic disease use medical services with more than twice the frequency of those without a chronic condition. Compounding the issue further, the baby boomer generation will add approximately 3 million retirees to the population each year until 2035 according to the American Hospital Association. As if

By dan czajka

the sheer numbers were not alarming enough, geriatric patients typically account for more chronic and serious health conditions than their younger counterparts. In other words, the expansive health care needs of the aging population will overwhelm an already stressed system. Despite the daunting challenges ahead, there remains hope for long-term success through individual and institutional changes. Prevention of disease and disability is essential to alleviate some of the pressures being placed on the health system. Individually adopting healthy behaviors, such as eating well, exercising regularly, and getting examined by your primary care physician annually go a long way. These activities have been shown to significantly reduce the risk of chronic disease and slow the detrimental effects of aging. In addition, annual check-ups increase the likelihood of detecting serious health conditions early, improving beneficial treatment outcomes. Institutionally, incentive programs should be implemented to attract and retain health workers. An Association of American Medical Colleges report found that medical school attendance has remained flat over the last three decades, with the cost of schooling cited as the primary deterrent. Successful incentive programs have offered loan forgiveness and health career advancement opportunities beyond schooling. These opportunities strengthen the health system at all levels and offer sustainability through career development. Although there is no single solution to health workforce shortages, we must act now to weather the coming storm. Dan Czajka is the Community Development Manager for the Fredericksburg Area HIV & AIDS Support Services and can be contacted at (540) 371-7532 or www.fahass.org.

The Natural Path

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~Quantitative Fluid Analysis ~VoiceBio Analysis ~ionSpa Foot Detox ~Zyto Bioscan Compass Natural Products for Health & Wellness Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

23


Senior Care blaze a trail By Karl Karch

Since 1963 May has been designated Older Americans Month (OAM). The goal of OAM is to raise awareness about important issues facing older adults and to highlight ways they are advocating for themselves, their peers, and their communities. This year’s theme, “Blaze a Trail”, was selected to recognize ways older adults are shaping our nation and reinventing themselves through new work and new passions, engaging their communities, and blazing a trail of positive impact on the lives of people of all ages. Many of the Silent Generation, those born from 1925-1945, are blazing trails through giving their time and expertise volunteering in the community, and focusing on wellness by walking the many trails and joining fitness clubs. However, the cohort most noted for blazing trails ever since they were born are the Baby Boomers (BBs), those born from 1946 – 1964. Because of their size, BBs have defined every era in which they have lived. A common analogy often ascribed to BBs is that they advance through the years like a “pig in a python”. The 60s is the most notable era that defined BBs: Woodstock, hippies, Vietnam War, civil rights, women’s liberation (bra burners), sexual freedom, and drugs. They became Yuppies, changed home size, and created sprawling suburbs. As a generation, BBs were looked at as the “want it now” so “work hard and get it all” generation and they have also been criticized for being a selfish and materialistic demographic. However, many baby boomers are now part of the sandwich generation; sandwiched between their adult children and elderly parents. With advances in technology and health care, they have elderly parents living longer with increasing needs and are now

22

May 2016

Lexi Grogan’s Pet Sitting Service “Your pet becomes my pet while in my care, and I care a lot!” - Lexi (540-903-0437; lexig0892@gmail.com) On facebook as “lexi grogan’s pet sitting service” Prices: Dogs - $15 per canine per visit Cats - $12 per feline per visit

giving back as the primary family caregivers. Since 2011, an average of 10,000 BBs are turning 65 every day. First year BBs are now turning 70 and will redefine old age in America, just as they made their mark on teen culture, young adult life, and middle age. These older adults are now blazing the “little blue pill”, skincare, and cosmetic surgery trail. One of the really growing areas includes continuing education. I remember during my earlier work life hearing fellow employees nearing retirement say: “I don’t know what I will do when I retire. My work is my life.” During those years, there were discussions about how companies should prepare people for “life after work”. I don’t hear that today. Communities are realizing that there are vast resources among our retirees and those communities are creating a purpose-in-life for retires. One problem volunteers experience is knowing what opportunities are available. That’s why I am particularly impressed with our Rappahannock United Way (RUW) whose website is a repository for volunteer opportunities in the Greater Fredericksburg VA region (www.ruwvolunteer.org) ; RUW states: “At United Way we make volunteering fun, easy and accessible to individuals and groups alike”. So, if you are looking for another purpose in your life or another trail to blaze, check out the RUW website. The volunteer benefits, but society also benefits because there is a greater sense of accomplishment, pride, and commitment to our community. Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services in the Fredericksburg and Culpeper region.

Front porch fredericksburg

Emancipated Patients diet and your immune system

Wellness falling shory of the mark

by patrick neustatter, MD Better value, more love for your pet than if you kennel board him!

US Army Program Analyst Mitzi Champion was overweight, fatigued, suffering from joint pains, attention deficit, depression, acne, sleep apnea, and told she was pre-diabetic with a fatty liver. Until she came across ‘One Hundred Days of Real Food.’ Jill Harrington told a meeting of Op her story the Fredericksburg Food Co-O of how she was diagnosed with lupus, had joint pains, a rash on her face, no energy, was depressed and “a mess.” Until a friend gave her a book to read about the connection between illness and diet. Both Fredericksburg area natives cured themselves by changing what they ate. “I thought my joint pains were caused by running and had stopped. But after I changed my diet, I had so much energy I had to run” says Champion. She has since become a Nutritional Therapist Practitioner to spread the word. Within a month of changing over to an all natural food diet, “I got rid of all my symptoms, I felt great” and has done for the 12 years since, says Harrington, who went on to write The Lupus Recovery Diet. So as a doctor, how do I explain this? Are these women crazy? Were their symptoms all just psychosomatic? Is this just a placebo effect (I’ve often thought that people making a radical change to their diet must have a profound placebo effect)? Was it coincidence? To bring about this kind of a cure you have to go to a doctor and take medicines – don’t you? I am of course being facetious. There is a perfectly rational explanation for how these enterprising women have cured themselves. Diet and Your Immune System “It is becoming increasingly clear that chronic inflammation is the root cause of many serious illnesses” says Dr. Andrew Weil, that bushy bearded guru of everything alternative and complimentary

in the medical world. Things like heart disease, many cancers, Alzheimer’s. And of course lupus, along with many other diseases is a so called “autoimmune” disease where inflammation can be caused by the immune system going awry and attacking the bodies own tissues. There is a postulated mechanism in the form of “nutrigenomics” noted Mitzi Champion, when we met at Eileen’s for me to hear her story and have coffee (which incidentally contains polyphenols that are claimed to have an antinflammatory effect). “Nutrigenomics” is one of a series of “-omics” (pharmacogenomics, proteomics, epigenomics). In this case concerning how your specific genotype may react to, or with, certain foods, to benefit or harm your health. And which thus may allow development of a personalized, anti-inflammatory diet to cater to these particular genetic quirks. There is more and more being realized and written about the role of inflammation, and anti-inflammatory diets. But “if you’re looking for an eating plan that closely follows the tenets of antiinflammatory eating, consider the Mediterranean diet, which is high in fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains, fish, and healthy oils” notes the Harvard website (www.health.harvard.edu/stayinghealthy/foods-that-fight-inflammation) which also gives more detailed advice. NOTE: The Fredericksburg Food Co-op is trying to set up a co-op in the ‘burg to sell health promoting foods, and is passionately seeking new participants – go to www.fredericksburgfoodcoop.com if you are interested in joining. Patrick Neustatter is the Medical Director of the Moss Free Clinic. He is interested in stories of emancipated patients/people and would like to hear any stories of this kind from any readers. Contact him at pneustatter@aol.com

Medical and technological advances over the last few decades have dramatically increased the scope of health services available to the public. These advances have increased both the burden placed on the healthcare system and the demand for caregivers. Unfortunately, there has been a steady decline in health workers over the past several decades, coinciding with several notable events that have further strained the health care system. The Paraprofessional Healthcare Institute estimates that 1.1 million directcare workers will be required by 2020 to keep pace with the United States’ health demands. It is important to note that this figure does not include the additional support, administrative, and logistics staff required to effectively deliver services. Moreover, more than one third of current caregivers in the U.S. will reach retirement age in the next ten years, with an inadequate number of new caregivers available to replace them. While health worker availability has been decreasing, chronic diseases, including heart disease and obesity, have been on the rise. The World Health Organization defines chronic disease as health ailments of long duration (greater than 3 months) which progress slowly, largely as a result of unhealthy habits. The National Health Council found that although these diseases are largely preventable, they account for more than 70% of death and disability in the U.S. Furthermore, a study by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation reported that patients with a chronic disease use medical services with more than twice the frequency of those without a chronic condition. Compounding the issue further, the baby boomer generation will add approximately 3 million retirees to the population each year until 2035 according to the American Hospital Association. As if

By dan czajka

the sheer numbers were not alarming enough, geriatric patients typically account for more chronic and serious health conditions than their younger counterparts. In other words, the expansive health care needs of the aging population will overwhelm an already stressed system. Despite the daunting challenges ahead, there remains hope for long-term success through individual and institutional changes. Prevention of disease and disability is essential to alleviate some of the pressures being placed on the health system. Individually adopting healthy behaviors, such as eating well, exercising regularly, and getting examined by your primary care physician annually go a long way. These activities have been shown to significantly reduce the risk of chronic disease and slow the detrimental effects of aging. In addition, annual check-ups increase the likelihood of detecting serious health conditions early, improving beneficial treatment outcomes. Institutionally, incentive programs should be implemented to attract and retain health workers. An Association of American Medical Colleges report found that medical school attendance has remained flat over the last three decades, with the cost of schooling cited as the primary deterrent. Successful incentive programs have offered loan forgiveness and health career advancement opportunities beyond schooling. These opportunities strengthen the health system at all levels and offer sustainability through career development. Although there is no single solution to health workforce shortages, we must act now to weather the coming storm. Dan Czajka is the Community Development Manager for the Fredericksburg Area HIV & AIDS Support Services and can be contacted at (540) 371-7532 or www.fahass.org.

The Natural Path

It’s always more fun in the Scenter of Town!

Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~Quantitative Fluid Analysis ~VoiceBio Analysis ~ionSpa Foot Detox ~Zyto Bioscan Compass Natural Products for Health & Wellness Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

Essential Oils Liquid Herbs Reiki Reflexology Aromatherapy Custom Blending Aroma-Therapeutic Massage Harmonic Resonance Therapy Products ~ Services ~ Classes 907 Charles Street, Downtown thescenteroftown.com front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

23


Art in the Burg artistic flirtations

Stories

of fredericksburg

by ryan poe can tell or feel comfortable telling.”

swimming and pollywogs. “This idealic atmosphere inspired me to appreciate my surroundings. But, it took a number of years before I actually started my art education. Prior to this, I raised a family, traveled, and pursued a bachelor's degree and then a master's degree in health and wellness.” “It has been twenty years and much education, mistakes, experimentation, rejection, and acceptance into the art world. I love the challenges, creative process, being with other artists, and bringing joy to others through artistic expression.” Sheryl has won awards, been in

“Poppy FIeld” multiple juried exhibitions and has paintings displayed in private and corporate collections nationally and internationally. She coordinates the gallery at Mary Washington Hospital The show runs from May 1 through May 27 with an opening reception on May 6 from 6-8:30 pm. at 813 Sophia St..

24

May 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

Maura Scheider is the creator and curator of Tell, a monthly storytelling event. We were recently talking, as parents are wont to do, about our kids and how they have changed our perspectives. “I’ve recently been thinking about parenthood as a story and how I’m at the very beginning of it and there’s a huge arch ahead of me. It’s really hard to see the story when you’re in the story. You know that you do stuff. You know that stuff happens.” I could totally relate. I don’t blame my kids, but it does seem suspicious that the exponential decline in my social adventures coincided with their arrival. “A really good story, whether it’s something that you’re writing down, or telling somebody at Tell, or telling friends at a party, should have a beginning, a middle, and an end. I feel like we’ve got a beginning and a middle. There’s not a resolution. Because once you’ve figured the kid out, figured out how to deal with them, and reached a milestone then they change. They’ve got some new challenge.”

“Rock, Paper” “Artistic Flirtations” works created by award-winning local artist, Beverly Bley, will be featured in the Member’s Gallery (lower floor) at the Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts for the month of May “Growing up in New England, long winters were filled with ice skating, skiing, and sledding; summers with hiking,

Tell recently celebrated its sixth anniversary with a Karaoke-themed show. Maura typically opens each show with a story of her own.

“Wake Up”

“I’ve been struggling for at least the last year at Tell. Every month it’s like, ‘what has happened to me?’ Because I’ve already exhausted all of my ‘history’ stories. I’ve tapped that well. There’s nothing really left in my past that I either

“This month I was going to tell a story about Matt, and sing our first dance song. And then the day before Zach was like, ‘I can’t find that song. I’ve looked everywhere. I can’t find it.’ It was Good Man by Josh Ritter which surprisingly is not a popular karaoke tune. We had nine tellers so I was like, ‘I’m just not going to tell.’ I felt such relief. But since it was karaoke I decided I would still sing and so Matt agreed to sing Under Pressure with me. Then he started freaking out all day about it. But he’s really good at that song. We sing it a lot together. So we were practicing in the car. And then we get to Tell. I decided we would sing last. It would be the closer.” “The show was awesome. The stories were amazing. The singing was so fun and good. Then it started to slowly dawn on me that I am not a good singer. I’m realizing this as I’m preparing to sing. I get up there and sing and I am really awful. I am disabused completely of the notion that I can sing. But that audience is the best place to do that and everyone was so excited and with me. It was great.” Tell is held the second Saturday of every month at LibertyTown Arts. Each show has a theme and participants tell true stories in front of a live audience. You can visit tellfredericksburg.com for more information. And if you have a Story of Fredericksburg, email storyfburg@gmail.com.

Ryan Poe is a father, husband, son, and brother living in Fredericksburg. He brings us "snippets" of real 'Burg folks each month in FP. Photo by Ryan Poe

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

25


Art in the Burg artistic flirtations

Stories

of fredericksburg

by ryan poe can tell or feel comfortable telling.”

swimming and pollywogs. “This idealic atmosphere inspired me to appreciate my surroundings. But, it took a number of years before I actually started my art education. Prior to this, I raised a family, traveled, and pursued a bachelor's degree and then a master's degree in health and wellness.” “It has been twenty years and much education, mistakes, experimentation, rejection, and acceptance into the art world. I love the challenges, creative process, being with other artists, and bringing joy to others through artistic expression.” Sheryl has won awards, been in

“Poppy FIeld” multiple juried exhibitions and has paintings displayed in private and corporate collections nationally and internationally. She coordinates the gallery at Mary Washington Hospital The show runs from May 1 through May 27 with an opening reception on May 6 from 6-8:30 pm. at 813 Sophia St..

24

May 2016

Front porch fredericksburg

Maura Scheider is the creator and curator of Tell, a monthly storytelling event. We were recently talking, as parents are wont to do, about our kids and how they have changed our perspectives. “I’ve recently been thinking about parenthood as a story and how I’m at the very beginning of it and there’s a huge arch ahead of me. It’s really hard to see the story when you’re in the story. You know that you do stuff. You know that stuff happens.” I could totally relate. I don’t blame my kids, but it does seem suspicious that the exponential decline in my social adventures coincided with their arrival. “A really good story, whether it’s something that you’re writing down, or telling somebody at Tell, or telling friends at a party, should have a beginning, a middle, and an end. I feel like we’ve got a beginning and a middle. There’s not a resolution. Because once you’ve figured the kid out, figured out how to deal with them, and reached a milestone then they change. They’ve got some new challenge.”

“Rock, Paper” “Artistic Flirtations” works created by award-winning local artist, Beverly Bley, will be featured in the Member’s Gallery (lower floor) at the Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts for the month of May “Growing up in New England, long winters were filled with ice skating, skiing, and sledding; summers with hiking,

Tell recently celebrated its sixth anniversary with a Karaoke-themed show. Maura typically opens each show with a story of her own.

“Wake Up”

“I’ve been struggling for at least the last year at Tell. Every month it’s like, ‘what has happened to me?’ Because I’ve already exhausted all of my ‘history’ stories. I’ve tapped that well. There’s nothing really left in my past that I either

“This month I was going to tell a story about Matt, and sing our first dance song. And then the day before Zach was like, ‘I can’t find that song. I’ve looked everywhere. I can’t find it.’ It was Good Man by Josh Ritter which surprisingly is not a popular karaoke tune. We had nine tellers so I was like, ‘I’m just not going to tell.’ I felt such relief. But since it was karaoke I decided I would still sing and so Matt agreed to sing Under Pressure with me. Then he started freaking out all day about it. But he’s really good at that song. We sing it a lot together. So we were practicing in the car. And then we get to Tell. I decided we would sing last. It would be the closer.” “The show was awesome. The stories were amazing. The singing was so fun and good. Then it started to slowly dawn on me that I am not a good singer. I’m realizing this as I’m preparing to sing. I get up there and sing and I am really awful. I am disabused completely of the notion that I can sing. But that audience is the best place to do that and everyone was so excited and with me. It was great.” Tell is held the second Saturday of every month at LibertyTown Arts. Each show has a theme and participants tell true stories in front of a live audience. You can visit tellfredericksburg.com for more information. And if you have a Story of Fredericksburg, email storyfburg@gmail.com.

Ryan Poe is a father, husband, son, and brother living in Fredericksburg. He brings us "snippets" of real 'Burg folks each month in FP. Photo by Ryan Poe

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

25


A Night on Broadway

FXBG Music Scene

watch the stars shine june 4

FFPA Chamber Music Festival

By lenora kruk-mullanaphy musical talents,” said Eveler. “The audience will be entertained by the school’s singers with some of the best songs from Broadway. This event is one of the most anticipated each year, and it’s an opportunity to support the students and the music department’s many activities.” Spend an evening watching the Eveler said stars shine during the Stafford High numerous Stafford High School Fine Arts Department’s 9th Annual School students who’ve Lexi Swager (left) and Colleen Kleveno, currently SHS “A Night on Broadway” on Saturday, June participated in the event seniors, perform at the 2015 Show School last June 4, 2016. The school’s auditorium will previously have continued “I give my time to this event, glitter with lights as it’s transformed into to study music in college. They’ve because I have the best job in the world,” New York City’s famed Broadway, and attended prestigious schools, such as said Eveler. “I get to make music—playing students will take center stage performing Indiana University, the Peabody and singing—all day, every day and get some of theater’s most cherished songs. Conservatory, Westminster Choir College, paid to do it. I like to work with the Chorus students will students to get a great product like ‘A perform solos, duets, Night on Broadway,’ and I enjoy the trios and ensembles with journey we take on the way to that songs such as Bonnie and product.” Clyde’s “This World Will The evening will include the Remember Us;” choice of dinner and show or show only. Cinderella’s “Stepsister’s The dinner, which includes antipasto, an Lament;” Hairspray’s assortment of pasta dishes, bread and “Mama, I’m a Big Girl dessert, begins at 5:30 p.m. The show Now;” the Phantom of begins at 7 p.m. Tickets for dinner and the Opera’s “Think of the show are $20 for adults and $17 for Me;” and South Pacific’s children, students and senior citizens. “Nothing Like a Dame.” Begun in 2008, Stafford Senior High School students take center stage at the Tickets for the show only are $10 for the annual “A Night on 2015 “A Night on Broadway at Stafford High School last June adults and $7 for children, students and senior citizens. Dinner and show tickets Broadway” was suggested must be pre-p purchased by emailing by former Stafford High School chorus James Madison University and Catholic evelerja@staffordschools.net. Show-o only student Rebecca Whitely, who had a University. Eveler said former students tickets can be purchased at the door. relative in another school that held a have been successful with musical careers, Proceeds from the evening will similar program each year. Stafford High including Madeline Lovegrove, who School Choral Director Joe Eveler thought performs in a children’s theater benefit the high school’s music program. it was a great idea that would work well production in a touring company, and Stafford High School is located at 63 Zachary Bullock, who can be seen in off- Indians Lane in Falmouth, Va. with his students. Since then, the school has held the event each spring. “The annual ‘A Night on Broadway’ is a chance for Stafford High School choir students to showcase their

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop 371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill thefredericksburglamp.com 26

May 2016

Broadway productions in New York. Several students are currently pursuing degrees in musical theater.

rs avo g l F 30 untin o &C

A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

Front porch fredericksburg

Price Match Parking Garage Christian Collectibles Gift shop Jewelry Kitchen Ware Books Crafts Supplies Antiques 611 Caroline Street 540.371.1333 LordAndLillys@gmail.com facebook.com/lordlillys www.lordlilly.com

Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy is a public relations specialist and events writer.

Own The Movie

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

by Beth Constantino

empowerhouseva.org

Lem

ona

de

Mon-Sat: 10a-6p; Sun: 1-5p 810 Caroline Sr. #104 ~ 540.899.3714 www.juspopn.com

Fredericksburg Festival for the Performing Arts will hold its 29th Annual Chamber Music Festival on May 17th, 19th and 20th. The three evenings of unique performances bring the world class music of the Muir Quartet to the Fredericksburg community. This year's featured artists will be Michele Levin, piano, Bayla Keyes, violin, Steven Ansell, Jojatu, cello, William viola, Mihael Sharenberg, horn, Peter Zazofsky, violin, Daniel Foster, viola, James Demler, baritone, Carol Wincenc, flute, Robert Sheena, English horn, and Kathleen Reynolds, bassoon. FFPA's artistic director, Michael Reynolds will be unable to perform this season but will in attendance as always to guide this ensemble of amazing performers. "It didn't take me long, after coming to Fredericksburg the first time in 1987, to realize what a special community this, not only from its cultural vitality, but also the warmth and easy friendships that we as musicians have enjoyed with FFPA's fabulous Board and amazingly generous supporters. Coming back for my 29th consecutive year, and preparing for our 30th anniversary celebration, I (and all the other artists) are so grateful for our musical family here.", comments Michael Reynolds, Artistic Director. FFPA holds a Young Artist Competition each January and the winners of the competition each perform at the Chamber Festival. This year's winners Melissa Snell, viola, first place instrumental, Trevor White, baritone, first place vocal, Philip Lambert, piano, second place, and Connor Skelly, violin, third place will each perform. FFPA has a

mission to bring the performing arts to this community. A special goal is to grow new audiences from our youth. Tickets are affordable for families and student tickets are always free. The event is anticipated by the Fredericksburg community each year as the performances are high quality and always entertaining. Dr. Angus Muir, FFPA's board president shared, "It is very unusual to have a chamber festival last 29 years. It must have something to do with the enthusiasm of the Fredericksburg community! It is wonderful to have world class chamber music here without traveling to DC or Richmond." The three night events will take place at Trinity Episcopal Church at 825 College Avenue. They begin at 7:00 pm. Fredericksburg Festival for the Performing Arts welcomes its returning musicians, its community of music lovers and new faces to this annual special event.

Annual Chamber Music Festival May 17th & 20th Trinity Episcopal Church For tickets: fredfest.org Fredericksburg Visitor Center 540-3 374-5 5040

Beth Constantino FFPA Office Administrator

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

27


A Night on Broadway

FXBG Music Scene

watch the stars shine june 4

FFPA Chamber Music Festival

By lenora kruk-mullanaphy musical talents,” said Eveler. “The audience will be entertained by the school’s singers with some of the best songs from Broadway. This event is one of the most anticipated each year, and it’s an opportunity to support the students and the music department’s many activities.” Spend an evening watching the Eveler said stars shine during the Stafford High numerous Stafford High School Fine Arts Department’s 9th Annual School students who’ve Lexi Swager (left) and Colleen Kleveno, currently SHS “A Night on Broadway” on Saturday, June participated in the event seniors, perform at the 2015 Show School last June 4, 2016. The school’s auditorium will previously have continued “I give my time to this event, glitter with lights as it’s transformed into to study music in college. They’ve because I have the best job in the world,” New York City’s famed Broadway, and attended prestigious schools, such as said Eveler. “I get to make music—playing students will take center stage performing Indiana University, the Peabody and singing—all day, every day and get some of theater’s most cherished songs. Conservatory, Westminster Choir College, paid to do it. I like to work with the Chorus students will students to get a great product like ‘A perform solos, duets, Night on Broadway,’ and I enjoy the trios and ensembles with journey we take on the way to that songs such as Bonnie and product.” Clyde’s “This World Will The evening will include the Remember Us;” choice of dinner and show or show only. Cinderella’s “Stepsister’s The dinner, which includes antipasto, an Lament;” Hairspray’s assortment of pasta dishes, bread and “Mama, I’m a Big Girl dessert, begins at 5:30 p.m. The show Now;” the Phantom of begins at 7 p.m. Tickets for dinner and the Opera’s “Think of the show are $20 for adults and $17 for Me;” and South Pacific’s children, students and senior citizens. “Nothing Like a Dame.” Begun in 2008, Stafford Senior High School students take center stage at the Tickets for the show only are $10 for the annual “A Night on 2015 “A Night on Broadway at Stafford High School last June adults and $7 for children, students and senior citizens. Dinner and show tickets Broadway” was suggested must be pre-p purchased by emailing by former Stafford High School chorus James Madison University and Catholic evelerja@staffordschools.net. Show-o only student Rebecca Whitely, who had a University. Eveler said former students tickets can be purchased at the door. relative in another school that held a have been successful with musical careers, Proceeds from the evening will similar program each year. Stafford High including Madeline Lovegrove, who School Choral Director Joe Eveler thought performs in a children’s theater benefit the high school’s music program. it was a great idea that would work well production in a touring company, and Stafford High School is located at 63 Zachary Bullock, who can be seen in off- Indians Lane in Falmouth, Va. with his students. Since then, the school has held the event each spring. “The annual ‘A Night on Broadway’ is a chance for Stafford High School choir students to showcase their

THE

FREDERICKSBURG LAMP Only Available At

The Copper Shop 371-4455 1707R Princess Anne

Behind Silk Mill thefredericksburglamp.com 26

May 2016

Broadway productions in New York. Several students are currently pursuing degrees in musical theater.

rs avo g l F 30 untin o &C

A 40-minute film with aerial and underwater photography that tells the story of the Rappahannock River from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay.

Front porch fredericksburg

Price Match Parking Garage Christian Collectibles Gift shop Jewelry Kitchen Ware Books Crafts Supplies Antiques 611 Caroline Street 540.371.1333 LordAndLillys@gmail.com facebook.com/lordlillys www.lordlilly.com

Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy is a public relations specialist and events writer.

Own The Movie

DVD $14.95; Members $11.96 www.riverfriends.org 540-373-3448 3219 Fall Hill Ave.

by Beth Constantino

empowerhouseva.org

Lem

ona

de

Mon-Sat: 10a-6p; Sun: 1-5p 810 Caroline Sr. #104 ~ 540.899.3714 www.juspopn.com

Fredericksburg Festival for the Performing Arts will hold its 29th Annual Chamber Music Festival on May 17th, 19th and 20th. The three evenings of unique performances bring the world class music of the Muir Quartet to the Fredericksburg community. This year's featured artists will be Michele Levin, piano, Bayla Keyes, violin, Steven Ansell, Jojatu, cello, William viola, Mihael Sharenberg, horn, Peter Zazofsky, violin, Daniel Foster, viola, James Demler, baritone, Carol Wincenc, flute, Robert Sheena, English horn, and Kathleen Reynolds, bassoon. FFPA's artistic director, Michael Reynolds will be unable to perform this season but will in attendance as always to guide this ensemble of amazing performers. "It didn't take me long, after coming to Fredericksburg the first time in 1987, to realize what a special community this, not only from its cultural vitality, but also the warmth and easy friendships that we as musicians have enjoyed with FFPA's fabulous Board and amazingly generous supporters. Coming back for my 29th consecutive year, and preparing for our 30th anniversary celebration, I (and all the other artists) are so grateful for our musical family here.", comments Michael Reynolds, Artistic Director. FFPA holds a Young Artist Competition each January and the winners of the competition each perform at the Chamber Festival. This year's winners Melissa Snell, viola, first place instrumental, Trevor White, baritone, first place vocal, Philip Lambert, piano, second place, and Connor Skelly, violin, third place will each perform. FFPA has a

mission to bring the performing arts to this community. A special goal is to grow new audiences from our youth. Tickets are affordable for families and student tickets are always free. The event is anticipated by the Fredericksburg community each year as the performances are high quality and always entertaining. Dr. Angus Muir, FFPA's board president shared, "It is very unusual to have a chamber festival last 29 years. It must have something to do with the enthusiasm of the Fredericksburg community! It is wonderful to have world class chamber music here without traveling to DC or Richmond." The three night events will take place at Trinity Episcopal Church at 825 College Avenue. They begin at 7:00 pm. Fredericksburg Festival for the Performing Arts welcomes its returning musicians, its community of music lovers and new faces to this annual special event.

Annual Chamber Music Festival May 17th & 20th Trinity Episcopal Church For tickets: fredfest.org Fredericksburg Visitor Center 540-3 374-5 5040

Beth Constantino FFPA Office Administrator

front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

27


First Friday Openings May 6 Brush Strokes Gallery 824 Caroline Street

I join the crowd outdoors

Art First Gallery 824 Caroline Street

“Morning Fog”, Lynn Abbott Opening Reception: First Friday, May 6, 2016 from 6 pm to 9 pm For additional information about Sheryl and the show, please visit www.artfirstgallery.com or call 540-3717107. ~ Suzanne Scherr

Sarah Flinn presents art inspired by America’s landscapes and coastal waterways in her show entitled “Sunrise to Sunset” this May. Beginning with the sunrise in the east and ending with a sunset in the west, Sarah depicts lighthouses and boats, local farm scenes, and well-known Fredericksburg landmarks in soft oil colors. Art has long been a passion for Sara. Of her artistic journey, she says, "I always wanted to be an artist." But Sara did more than dream. While living in Oregon in 1987, she started with watercolor. In time, however, she changed to oil paint--now her preferred medium for her iconic landscapes of familiar Virginia and Blue Ridge locales. Her compositions enjoy ongoing popularity, and her paintings of Carl's Ice Cream and other Fredericksburg haunts continue to delight and inspire locals and visitors alike. Sara first explored oil painting in Alabama. During her sojourn there, she both studied and exhibited. Fortunately for gallery guests as well as her fans, she now calls Fredericksburg her home.

“Puffin”, Sheryl Crowell Versatile local artist Sheryl Crowell marks her fifteenth year at Art First Gallery with new works featuring the imaginative use of recycled and whimsical materials. Best known for her sensitive and subtle manipulation of acrylic paint in images of archetypal women and children, in this show, Sheryl considered all media as fair game. She playfully incorporates metallic thread; beads; plastic bread tags; dried orchid petals, and rhinestones. Her intuitive use of unlikely materials generates a creative series of "party animals". Sheryl studied art at the University of Mary Washington. Her work has been featured at libraries in North Stafford, Fredericksburg and Bowling Green. She's also participated in group shows in local restaurants and libraries. This is her seventh solo show at Art First. Show on display through May 30.

Something to Think About

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties

28

May 2016

for a Memorial Day concert When the choir first begins to sing our National Anthem accompanied by a songsparrow who thrills his fervent chant as three dogs bark gruffly at strange sights and people standing up with hats doffed.

FXBG’ERS he volunteered for a lifetime by georgia Lee Strentz

Then the orchestra proudly renders patriotic tunes like Grand Old Flag, Over There and America the Beautiful until kids excited among us are asked to parade around to the Colonel Bogey March while I pray this serves as their one brief deployment.

810 Weekend Gallery 810 Caroline Street

Give a Child

M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

- By Frank Fratoe

Holiday Concert At Mary Washington Hospital

Sarah's art will be on display through May 29, 2016.Friday reception: May 6, 2016 from 6-9 p.m. ~Norma Woodward

“LightHouse”, Sarah Flinn

THE POETRY MAN

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

Front porch fredericksburg

810 Weekend Gallery will celebrate First Friday on May 6 from 68:30 pm. Stop by to see new works by Beverley Coates (watercolors), Penny A Parrish (photography) and Lynn Abbott (acrylics and oils). The Gallery open from 10-5 daily. An artist is on site every Saturday.

Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He wrote this poem as a tribute to the artists of Fredericksburg

Sophia Street Studios 1104 Sophia Street Come see our new wall pockets, bud vases, mini planters and more! First Friday Reception, 6-9pm.

Supporting Local Artists Since 1997

Some people are unforgettable, Don Barry Dixon was one of those people. Don was born at the base in Quantico, Virginia, where his father was a U.S.Marine. His parents moved to Fredericksburg after WW2, where he went through first grade, then to school in Stafford, where he was a standout athlete in football and track. Then on to college in TN, where he earned his BS and MA.degrees. He received his EDS degree from the University of Virginia in 1982. Luckily for future generations of school children and citizens in Stafford, Don resettled there with his new bride, also a teacher and people person, Barbara. They had two outstanding children, daughter Donna, who is a teacher and mom to Don's grandson Ben and son Chad, who is dad to his other grandson Ayden. He then began his volunteering for a lifetime, as both parent, teacher, principal and just plain citizen. Don started volunteering through his children's athletic programs. Their soccer team had no coach and since he had never played, he read a book. .So typical of Don, always up for a challenge, new skills, new information, leading, and helping everyone. Baseball was next, volunteering with Stafford Parks. Don Dixon was a presence, he changed things, volunteering when he saw a need, often volunteering where no one else would tread. He truly made this world a better place, as many youth he coached

now carry his value system into our world today. His volunteering carried on into the classrooms of the schools where he worked, lastly as principal of Drew Middle School in Stafford until his retirement i 1999. Don Dixon was the first Stafford County principal to receive the Washington Post Distinguished Educational Leadership Award. In 2006 the Donald B. Dixon-Lyle Ray Smith Middle School was named in his honor. Julie Bove, a teacher's aide in Stafford tells me that while Don was at Drew Middle school, he volunteered to make breakfast weekly for Lynne Rawlings students in her special needs classroom, his specialty being Monkey bread. He said a room full of happy kids eating his monkey bread, made his day. The list goes on, Don volunteering information to a rapt audience of growing impressionable kids with "Responsible Hunting" being the subject, which he knew well being an avid, responsible bird hunter. Don volunteered to sit on the floor of a social studies class pretending to be sitting with camels in a faraway desert country, looking weird (but happy) with an Arabic shawl around his shoulders. He volunteered to transport fish raised in a classroom and helped put them in the Rappahannock River for Shad Day. Don volunteered with the Knights of Pythias for many years and was an advocate for activities that benefited families and children. He assisted with planning and preparation for the annual children's Christmas party at the lodge. He organized the Pythias family day picnic each summer. Don was in charge of the Knights of Pythias program that gave $1,000 scholarships to a graduating senior in each of our area high schools. He coordinated this with high school guidance counselors and lodge members. These scholarships are now named in his honor. Donald Barry Dixon, Fredericksburger, volunteer, extraordinary human being, citizen, husband, father, grandfather, educator, and friend, you are tremendously missed in your hometown.

Georgia Lee Strenz loves living in an old cottage in the ‘Burg near her grandchildren and their mom

COMING MAY 2016 at fredericksburgwriters.com front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

29


First Friday Openings May 6 Brush Strokes Gallery 824 Caroline Street

I join the crowd outdoors

Art First Gallery 824 Caroline Street

“Morning Fog”, Lynn Abbott Opening Reception: First Friday, May 6, 2016 from 6 pm to 9 pm For additional information about Sheryl and the show, please visit www.artfirstgallery.com or call 540-3717107. ~ Suzanne Scherr

Sarah Flinn presents art inspired by America’s landscapes and coastal waterways in her show entitled “Sunrise to Sunset” this May. Beginning with the sunrise in the east and ending with a sunset in the west, Sarah depicts lighthouses and boats, local farm scenes, and well-known Fredericksburg landmarks in soft oil colors. Art has long been a passion for Sara. Of her artistic journey, she says, "I always wanted to be an artist." But Sara did more than dream. While living in Oregon in 1987, she started with watercolor. In time, however, she changed to oil paint--now her preferred medium for her iconic landscapes of familiar Virginia and Blue Ridge locales. Her compositions enjoy ongoing popularity, and her paintings of Carl's Ice Cream and other Fredericksburg haunts continue to delight and inspire locals and visitors alike. Sara first explored oil painting in Alabama. During her sojourn there, she both studied and exhibited. Fortunately for gallery guests as well as her fans, she now calls Fredericksburg her home.

“Puffin”, Sheryl Crowell Versatile local artist Sheryl Crowell marks her fifteenth year at Art First Gallery with new works featuring the imaginative use of recycled and whimsical materials. Best known for her sensitive and subtle manipulation of acrylic paint in images of archetypal women and children, in this show, Sheryl considered all media as fair game. She playfully incorporates metallic thread; beads; plastic bread tags; dried orchid petals, and rhinestones. Her intuitive use of unlikely materials generates a creative series of "party animals". Sheryl studied art at the University of Mary Washington. Her work has been featured at libraries in North Stafford, Fredericksburg and Bowling Green. She's also participated in group shows in local restaurants and libraries. This is her seventh solo show at Art First. Show on display through May 30.

Something to Think About

Books, Games, Amusing Novelties

28

May 2016

for a Memorial Day concert When the choir first begins to sing our National Anthem accompanied by a songsparrow who thrills his fervent chant as three dogs bark gruffly at strange sights and people standing up with hats doffed.

FXBG’ERS he volunteered for a lifetime by georgia Lee Strentz

Then the orchestra proudly renders patriotic tunes like Grand Old Flag, Over There and America the Beautiful until kids excited among us are asked to parade around to the Colonel Bogey March while I pray this serves as their one brief deployment.

810 Weekend Gallery 810 Caroline Street

Give a Child

M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

- By Frank Fratoe

Holiday Concert At Mary Washington Hospital

Sarah's art will be on display through May 29, 2016.Friday reception: May 6, 2016 from 6-9 p.m. ~Norma Woodward

“LightHouse”, Sarah Flinn

THE POETRY MAN

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

Front porch fredericksburg

810 Weekend Gallery will celebrate First Friday on May 6 from 68:30 pm. Stop by to see new works by Beverley Coates (watercolors), Penny A Parrish (photography) and Lynn Abbott (acrylics and oils). The Gallery open from 10-5 daily. An artist is on site every Saturday.

Frank Fratoe lives & writes in the city. He wrote this poem as a tribute to the artists of Fredericksburg

Sophia Street Studios 1104 Sophia Street Come see our new wall pockets, bud vases, mini planters and more! First Friday Reception, 6-9pm.

Supporting Local Artists Since 1997

Some people are unforgettable, Don Barry Dixon was one of those people. Don was born at the base in Quantico, Virginia, where his father was a U.S.Marine. His parents moved to Fredericksburg after WW2, where he went through first grade, then to school in Stafford, where he was a standout athlete in football and track. Then on to college in TN, where he earned his BS and MA.degrees. He received his EDS degree from the University of Virginia in 1982. Luckily for future generations of school children and citizens in Stafford, Don resettled there with his new bride, also a teacher and people person, Barbara. They had two outstanding children, daughter Donna, who is a teacher and mom to Don's grandson Ben and son Chad, who is dad to his other grandson Ayden. He then began his volunteering for a lifetime, as both parent, teacher, principal and just plain citizen. Don started volunteering through his children's athletic programs. Their soccer team had no coach and since he had never played, he read a book. .So typical of Don, always up for a challenge, new skills, new information, leading, and helping everyone. Baseball was next, volunteering with Stafford Parks. Don Dixon was a presence, he changed things, volunteering when he saw a need, often volunteering where no one else would tread. He truly made this world a better place, as many youth he coached

now carry his value system into our world today. His volunteering carried on into the classrooms of the schools where he worked, lastly as principal of Drew Middle School in Stafford until his retirement i 1999. Don Dixon was the first Stafford County principal to receive the Washington Post Distinguished Educational Leadership Award. In 2006 the Donald B. Dixon-Lyle Ray Smith Middle School was named in his honor. Julie Bove, a teacher's aide in Stafford tells me that while Don was at Drew Middle school, he volunteered to make breakfast weekly for Lynne Rawlings students in her special needs classroom, his specialty being Monkey bread. He said a room full of happy kids eating his monkey bread, made his day. The list goes on, Don volunteering information to a rapt audience of growing impressionable kids with "Responsible Hunting" being the subject, which he knew well being an avid, responsible bird hunter. Don volunteered to sit on the floor of a social studies class pretending to be sitting with camels in a faraway desert country, looking weird (but happy) with an Arabic shawl around his shoulders. He volunteered to transport fish raised in a classroom and helped put them in the Rappahannock River for Shad Day. Don volunteered with the Knights of Pythias for many years and was an advocate for activities that benefited families and children. He assisted with planning and preparation for the annual children's Christmas party at the lodge. He organized the Pythias family day picnic each summer. Don was in charge of the Knights of Pythias program that gave $1,000 scholarships to a graduating senior in each of our area high schools. He coordinated this with high school guidance counselors and lodge members. These scholarships are now named in his honor. Donald Barry Dixon, Fredericksburger, volunteer, extraordinary human being, citizen, husband, father, grandfather, educator, and friend, you are tremendously missed in your hometown.

Georgia Lee Strenz loves living in an old cottage in the ‘Burg near her grandchildren and their mom

COMING MAY 2016 at fredericksburgwriters.com front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

29


The Art of Recovery 12th annual event @ Ponshop

May 2016

two decades of service

be your brother’s keeper! By Jo Loving knowledge, experiences, abilities, and means. Can’t a few people make a difference? If we are not our brother’s keeper, at least let us not be his executioner. ~ Marlon Brando

“No More”, Karen Rees To correspond with the First Friday opening on May 6, 2016, there will be spoken word, poetry, and live music in the gallery’s back courtyard at 7:30 p.m. The Art of Recovery provides a forum for artists living with mental illness to gain confidence in their abilities, address misconceptions surrounding mental illness, and experience community support. Opening Reception May 6 from 69pm at the Ponshop Studio and Gallery, 712 Caroline Street, downtown. To learn more, contact Helen Conley at 540-373-7737 or artofrecovery@racsb.state.va.us. Or, visit www.racsb.state.va.us NOTE: Founded in 1970, the Rappahannock Area Community Services Board (RACSB) provides public mental health, intellectual disability, substance abuse, and prevention/early intervention services to the residents of the City of Fredericksburg and the counties of Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania, and Stafford. To learn more, visit www.racsb.state.va.us.

606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg

WINGS 20th anniversary Daffodil Luncheon. Benefiting Partnership for Academic Excellance. Surrounding Xavier Richardson (founder of Partnership) are Archer Williams, Jan Sokol, Jan Savage, Alice Parvin, Betsy Turner, Lana Digges, and Ann Scott.

Sketch of the Renwick Courthouse, Fredericksburg, VA When I was asked to do a quick stand-in for Casey Shaw for this month’s Fredericksburg sketch, my first thought was of a building which I have always loved. The day I did this sketch, it was overcast and the longer I sat there drawing, the darker the clouds became. Rain is always a risk when sketching outdoors but it also makes it challenging to see just how fast you can finish a drawing. In this case, I took a little over an hour and there are a few raindrops on the page. James Renwick, designed the former Fredericksburg Courthouse which was built in 1852. He is also the architect of St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City and the Smithsonian Castle in Washington, D.C. Currently in the news, the Courthouse building is being considered for a new chapter in its life and I look forward to seeing what it will become. Fredericksburg artist, Paula Raudenbush works from her studio at LibertyTown Arts Workshop when she’s not out sketching the world. Visit her at https://paularaudenbush.com

373-7847 www.gemstonecreations.org Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged 30

From My Porch

Wings By marilyn ayers

Remodeling Sale All items in the Rock and Shell Shop 50% OFF. Bring in this ad and receive a free gift with any purchase!

A visual Celebration of our community

By Casey Alan Shaw

By helen conley On First Friday, The May 6, Rappahannock Area Community Services Board (RACSB)will be presenting the 12th Annual “Art of Recovery” Art Show at PONSHOP Studio and Gallery. The exhibit features original artwork of adults with mental illness. The show is organized by members of Kenmore Club, a psychosocial rehabilitation program operated by RACSB. The exhibit coincides “All of Us” National with Brian Ford Mental Health Month and will be on display locally through May 29, 2016. “The Art of Recovery” show will feature more than 40 pieces from 35 artists and representing several art mediums. Artwork includes original d r a w i n g s , paintings, threedimensional a r t w o r k ( s c u l p t u r e ) , “White Flowers” textiles, and mixed Allison Mahaney media. All of the pieces will be available for purchase.

Fredericksburg Sketches

Front porch fredericksburg

Frontporchfredericksburg.com FB@FrontPorch Magazine

WINGS' (Women in Giving Spirit) two decades of community service began in 1996 with three local women, whose goal was to serve the Fredericksburg community. The three, Alice Parvin, Linda Sealy and Barbara Raphael, each asked three friends to join them; thus, WINGS charter board was born. The fledgling group quickly began recruiting members and, gathering in the basement of Trinity Episcopal Church, brainstormed about two questions: How could they help the growing numbers of area families with devastating expenses due to medical bills, fires or other disasters; and what could they do for the many charitable organizations that needed funds to better provide for those they served? Sixty-one fundraisers and 180 members later, WINGS community donations total more than a quarter million dollars, with recipients including families and individuals, as well as nonprofit charitable organizations throughout the Fredericksburg area. For unexpected community emergencies, the group also established a crisis fund. WINGS three fundraisers per year include the spring Daffodil luncheon, the fall Girls Night Out, and a Children's Holiday Party. The first fundraiser, the 1997 Daffodil Luncheon, which benefited Hospice Support Care, was held in the old Mary Washington Hospital, with WINGS members setting the tables with their own personal china tea cups and saucers. As a result of this first Daffodil luncheon, $10,000 was donated to Hospice Support Care.

Over the years, some of the organnizations WINGS has helped: Thurman Brisbane Center, Stafford Junction HUGS, Senior Visitors Program Court Appointed Special Advocates, Fredericksburg Area HIV/AIDS Support Services, Hope House, Hospice Support Care Inc. Moss Free Clinic, Rappahannock Big Brother Big Sister, Rappahannock Council of Domestic Violence, American Red Cross, RACSB Career Club Mental Health Association in Fredericksburg, Fredericksburg Area Food Bank, Fredericksburg Counseling Services, Rappahannock Council Against Sexual Abuse, Childcare Network, Abandoned Sheep Ministry, Germanna Community College Middle College Bragg Hill Family Life After School Program, Rappahannock Area Council for Child Abuse Prevention, Fredericksburg Downtown Greens WINGS seeks prospective recipients for its fundraisers throughout the year. Non-profit, charitable organizations that need financial assistance to better provide for those they serve or families or individuals in financial crises may be potential recipients of WINGS fundraisers. For further information, please go towww.wingsfredericksburg.com. WINGS is open to all women who are interested in working together, sharing ideas and talents, to serve our community. All interested women are invited to attend WINGS general membership meeting, May 11, 6 p.m., at Mary Washington Healthcare's Snowden House.

Marilyn Ayres is a member of WINGS

In my family, as the oldest, I was taught to look out for my siblings – in the backyard, in the neighborhood, and at school. If they were heading towards trouble, it was my job to step in and keep IT from happening, whatever IT was. I took this job seriously. Like me, my siblings were hardheaded daredevils. So the job wasn’t easy, and I was a bossy big sister, and although they didn’t like it, they knew that I loved them. I was there. I was someone they could turn to who wasn’t a parent – something that is true today, a ton of years later. This big sister became a person who takes care of people – my own children, my husband, my parents, my friends, my patients, my coworkers, my employees, and strangers. I care about other people. Maybe it is because of the early big sister responsibility. Maybe it was my parents and grandmothers, who always taught us to see things from another perspective, to “walk in someone else’s shoes.” Whatever the reason, I’m sensitive to the plight of others, and will jump in to help wherever I have something to contribute. I wish I could single-handedly keep my brothers and sisters in the world from harm. I cannot. You cannot. Together, though, we can help people – If we are aware, if we care, if we can step outside of ourselves and see the need around us. We all have different skills,

Today alone, on FaceBook, in one of the Pay it Forward groups to which I belong, a man who is insulin dependent was looking for advice on where to get insulin – he had run out and couldn’t get in to see his doctor for a couple of weeks. The group was helpful, offering advice on where he could find assistance and which pharmacies could provide the needed insulin for $25, and some offered to help him individually. They were being their brother’s keeper. A woman with three small children, one who is special needs, reached out for help. She needed a place to stay for a few days – she had been to the shelter, to churches, but nothing was available. She and the children had stayed in their car for the last two days. Someone from the group offered a camper as temporary housing. Another, a retired social worker, offered to help her find a more permanent solution. These are just a couple of examples, but think about it. All around you, people are fighting battles, and feel alone in their fight, and you might be able to help them. One person can’t solve it all. But if we make ourselves aware, if we care, if we reach out when we have something to offer, we can help. We – You and I – can make a difference, one brother or sister at a time.

Jo Loving is on her porch this evening, thinking about other ways she can help others, and hoping you will do the same.

donatelifevirginia.org dmv.virginia.gov/drivers/#organs.asp front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

31


The Art of Recovery 12th annual event @ Ponshop

May 2016

two decades of service

be your brother’s keeper! By Jo Loving knowledge, experiences, abilities, and means. Can’t a few people make a difference? If we are not our brother’s keeper, at least let us not be his executioner. ~ Marlon Brando

“No More”, Karen Rees To correspond with the First Friday opening on May 6, 2016, there will be spoken word, poetry, and live music in the gallery’s back courtyard at 7:30 p.m. The Art of Recovery provides a forum for artists living with mental illness to gain confidence in their abilities, address misconceptions surrounding mental illness, and experience community support. Opening Reception May 6 from 69pm at the Ponshop Studio and Gallery, 712 Caroline Street, downtown. To learn more, contact Helen Conley at 540-373-7737 or artofrecovery@racsb.state.va.us. Or, visit www.racsb.state.va.us NOTE: Founded in 1970, the Rappahannock Area Community Services Board (RACSB) provides public mental health, intellectual disability, substance abuse, and prevention/early intervention services to the residents of the City of Fredericksburg and the counties of Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania, and Stafford. To learn more, visit www.racsb.state.va.us.

606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg

WINGS 20th anniversary Daffodil Luncheon. Benefiting Partnership for Academic Excellance. Surrounding Xavier Richardson (founder of Partnership) are Archer Williams, Jan Sokol, Jan Savage, Alice Parvin, Betsy Turner, Lana Digges, and Ann Scott.

Sketch of the Renwick Courthouse, Fredericksburg, VA When I was asked to do a quick stand-in for Casey Shaw for this month’s Fredericksburg sketch, my first thought was of a building which I have always loved. The day I did this sketch, it was overcast and the longer I sat there drawing, the darker the clouds became. Rain is always a risk when sketching outdoors but it also makes it challenging to see just how fast you can finish a drawing. In this case, I took a little over an hour and there are a few raindrops on the page. James Renwick, designed the former Fredericksburg Courthouse which was built in 1852. He is also the architect of St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City and the Smithsonian Castle in Washington, D.C. Currently in the news, the Courthouse building is being considered for a new chapter in its life and I look forward to seeing what it will become. Fredericksburg artist, Paula Raudenbush works from her studio at LibertyTown Arts Workshop when she’s not out sketching the world. Visit her at https://paularaudenbush.com

373-7847 www.gemstonecreations.org Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesdays until 6:30 and by appointment

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged 30

From My Porch

Wings By marilyn ayers

Remodeling Sale All items in the Rock and Shell Shop 50% OFF. Bring in this ad and receive a free gift with any purchase!

A visual Celebration of our community

By Casey Alan Shaw

By helen conley On First Friday, The May 6, Rappahannock Area Community Services Board (RACSB)will be presenting the 12th Annual “Art of Recovery” Art Show at PONSHOP Studio and Gallery. The exhibit features original artwork of adults with mental illness. The show is organized by members of Kenmore Club, a psychosocial rehabilitation program operated by RACSB. The exhibit coincides “All of Us” National with Brian Ford Mental Health Month and will be on display locally through May 29, 2016. “The Art of Recovery” show will feature more than 40 pieces from 35 artists and representing several art mediums. Artwork includes original d r a w i n g s , paintings, threedimensional a r t w o r k ( s c u l p t u r e ) , “White Flowers” textiles, and mixed Allison Mahaney media. All of the pieces will be available for purchase.

Fredericksburg Sketches

Front porch fredericksburg

Frontporchfredericksburg.com FB@FrontPorch Magazine

WINGS' (Women in Giving Spirit) two decades of community service began in 1996 with three local women, whose goal was to serve the Fredericksburg community. The three, Alice Parvin, Linda Sealy and Barbara Raphael, each asked three friends to join them; thus, WINGS charter board was born. The fledgling group quickly began recruiting members and, gathering in the basement of Trinity Episcopal Church, brainstormed about two questions: How could they help the growing numbers of area families with devastating expenses due to medical bills, fires or other disasters; and what could they do for the many charitable organizations that needed funds to better provide for those they served? Sixty-one fundraisers and 180 members later, WINGS community donations total more than a quarter million dollars, with recipients including families and individuals, as well as nonprofit charitable organizations throughout the Fredericksburg area. For unexpected community emergencies, the group also established a crisis fund. WINGS three fundraisers per year include the spring Daffodil luncheon, the fall Girls Night Out, and a Children's Holiday Party. The first fundraiser, the 1997 Daffodil Luncheon, which benefited Hospice Support Care, was held in the old Mary Washington Hospital, with WINGS members setting the tables with their own personal china tea cups and saucers. As a result of this first Daffodil luncheon, $10,000 was donated to Hospice Support Care.

Over the years, some of the organnizations WINGS has helped: Thurman Brisbane Center, Stafford Junction HUGS, Senior Visitors Program Court Appointed Special Advocates, Fredericksburg Area HIV/AIDS Support Services, Hope House, Hospice Support Care Inc. Moss Free Clinic, Rappahannock Big Brother Big Sister, Rappahannock Council of Domestic Violence, American Red Cross, RACSB Career Club Mental Health Association in Fredericksburg, Fredericksburg Area Food Bank, Fredericksburg Counseling Services, Rappahannock Council Against Sexual Abuse, Childcare Network, Abandoned Sheep Ministry, Germanna Community College Middle College Bragg Hill Family Life After School Program, Rappahannock Area Council for Child Abuse Prevention, Fredericksburg Downtown Greens WINGS seeks prospective recipients for its fundraisers throughout the year. Non-profit, charitable organizations that need financial assistance to better provide for those they serve or families or individuals in financial crises may be potential recipients of WINGS fundraisers. For further information, please go towww.wingsfredericksburg.com. WINGS is open to all women who are interested in working together, sharing ideas and talents, to serve our community. All interested women are invited to attend WINGS general membership meeting, May 11, 6 p.m., at Mary Washington Healthcare's Snowden House.

Marilyn Ayres is a member of WINGS

In my family, as the oldest, I was taught to look out for my siblings – in the backyard, in the neighborhood, and at school. If they were heading towards trouble, it was my job to step in and keep IT from happening, whatever IT was. I took this job seriously. Like me, my siblings were hardheaded daredevils. So the job wasn’t easy, and I was a bossy big sister, and although they didn’t like it, they knew that I loved them. I was there. I was someone they could turn to who wasn’t a parent – something that is true today, a ton of years later. This big sister became a person who takes care of people – my own children, my husband, my parents, my friends, my patients, my coworkers, my employees, and strangers. I care about other people. Maybe it is because of the early big sister responsibility. Maybe it was my parents and grandmothers, who always taught us to see things from another perspective, to “walk in someone else’s shoes.” Whatever the reason, I’m sensitive to the plight of others, and will jump in to help wherever I have something to contribute. I wish I could single-handedly keep my brothers and sisters in the world from harm. I cannot. You cannot. Together, though, we can help people – If we are aware, if we care, if we can step outside of ourselves and see the need around us. We all have different skills,

Today alone, on FaceBook, in one of the Pay it Forward groups to which I belong, a man who is insulin dependent was looking for advice on where to get insulin – he had run out and couldn’t get in to see his doctor for a couple of weeks. The group was helpful, offering advice on where he could find assistance and which pharmacies could provide the needed insulin for $25, and some offered to help him individually. They were being their brother’s keeper. A woman with three small children, one who is special needs, reached out for help. She needed a place to stay for a few days – she had been to the shelter, to churches, but nothing was available. She and the children had stayed in their car for the last two days. Someone from the group offered a camper as temporary housing. Another, a retired social worker, offered to help her find a more permanent solution. These are just a couple of examples, but think about it. All around you, people are fighting battles, and feel alone in their fight, and you might be able to help them. One person can’t solve it all. But if we make ourselves aware, if we care, if we reach out when we have something to offer, we can help. We – You and I – can make a difference, one brother or sister at a time.

Jo Loving is on her porch this evening, thinking about other ways she can help others, and hoping you will do the same.

donatelifevirginia.org dmv.virginia.gov/drivers/#organs.asp front porch fredericksburg

May 2016

31



Front Porch Fredericksburg - May 2016