Issuu on Google+

YOUR GUIDE TO THE LOCAL GOOD LIFE

front porch T H E R E G I O N ' S free C O M M U N I T Y M A G A Z I N E L o c a l G o o d N e w s S i n c e 1 9 97

YEAR 16 • ISSUE 190 • APRIL 2013

Frontporchfredericksburg.com

April Showers

Our Cover 4

“Lucky” But Good

Art of the Watermen 9

‘Babbling Brook’

Stories Overflowing 11

Mason-Dixon

Kelly’s Dream Cafe 14

DayTripper

The Hague Winery 15

Dennis Ahearn

Walk With Me 19

Green is Good

23, 30

Poetry Month

For Grandmother 26

With All Smiles

Curtain Call 29


contents

closeups 6

MariA Linda ....My private collection

19

Walk with me ...dennis ahearn

28

phoebe willis ....the edge of comfort

28

porch talk 3

kilroy is here!...local robOtics team

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

7

what’s it worth?: Laura’s story

10

retired on the back porch: sunshine on my shoulder Vivan west:: under the mango tree

11

oral history, pt. 2: marion robinson

12

Vino: the papacy: funny hats & wine libations: the highland county

13

season’s bounty: tip toe through the garden

14

south of the mason-dixon

15

daytripper: hague winery

16-17

Calendar of Events

18

Our Heritage... the crhc collection history’s stories.: my right arm

20

companion care: ticks & lymne disease

21

autoknown better: it’s april, fools

22

Senior Care: importance of structure in life

23

green is healthier, too!

24

art in the’burg: gallery hopping

25

scene & heard...in the ‘burg!

26

downtown writing studio: where literature is born national poetry month for my grandmother

27

community link: rabies a serious discussion

28

my own path: equations of value

30

project plant it! learn to love trees

2

April 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Local Robotics team in need of Sponsorship By Amy Millis

21

...And more! 15

5

sally’s back in town! the incomparable miss struthers

9

cowboys on the potomac: michael dean

29

umw philharmonic’s season finale

31

blanton massey: meeting the public need Cover Photo By Arch DiPeppe

Spring On Down...

Our Joe is Blooming!

Kilroy is Here!

311 William Street 540-3 371-2 2727 www.lapetiteaubergefred.com Open for Lunch & Dinner Mon - Sat

Team 339 of the FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC) has changed the lives of countless members since its inception in 1998. Organized by the Commonwealth Governor’s School Colonial Forge site social studies teacher David Shotwell, the group, also known as “Team Kilroy,” has proven itself to be the premier STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) organization in Stafford, Spotsylvania, King George, and surrounding counties through its impressive performances at various competitions held across the nation. For example, at the 2012 IROC (ILITE Robotics Off-Season Challenge), Kilroy placed first out of over 20 competing teams, and in 2009, the team won the National Championship Delphi “Driving Tomorrow’s Technology” Award, which celebrates sophistication in the engineering and design of a single competing robot. Each year, the national robotics competition organizer FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) announces the rules and theme of the upcoming Robotics Competition games. All teams are provided with a basic kit for building the robot (also named Kilroy) immediately after the release of the year’s theme; all other materials must be obtained by the team. The game’s rules dictate that robots’ designs must allow for both autonomous and human-controlled operation; there are also restrictions on height and weight. The theme for the year of 2013 is called “Ultimate Ascent,” which is modeled on disc golf. After weeks of intense preparation, Team Kilroy 339 has finished setting their robot up for competition. In order to carry out planned functions and operations, however, the team requires additional funds. An estimated $15,000-$18,000 dollars are needed to cover costs related to repairs and maintenance of the robot

and competition entrance fees as well as expenses associated with travel and lodging. In the wake of the recession, times have been especially difficult for the program, which runs entirely on donations made by local businesses and individuals. If the set budget for the year is not met through monetary contributions, the team may be forced to make detrimental compromises in the building and maintenance of Kilroy. Team 339 would also be pushed to opt out of competitions, many of which require overnight stays at hotels while charging entrance fees that run into the thousands. The tragedy of this economic reality is especially apparent when one considers the magnitude of the impact that the program has had on STEM education in Spotsylvania and surrounding counties. Many of the team’s members claim that Team 339 is the reason for their career path choices. A recent study conducted by Brandeis University found that alumni of FIRST Robotics are 35% more likely to attend college and twice as likely to major in science and engineering as nonparticipants with similar backgrounds. Students who are involved in the local robotics program stress the educational value of the experiences that the program offers. Being a member of Team 339 allows for the mastering of skills that most traditional public schools never bother to develop or nurture. In many cases, it has also been the reason for the career choices of members. “Being on the mechanical team made me realize that I want to do engineering. It’s a load of fun and it really helps in a practical aspect. You can’t learn this at school,” says Arthur Pawlica, a junior at the Commonwealth Governor’s School, Colonial Forge site. Companies or individuals who wish to donate to the Kilroy 339 FRC Robotics team may call the head coach, David Shotwell, at 540-658-6115 or send a check to the Commonwealth Governor’s School, 12301 Spotswood Furnace Road, Fredericksburg, VA, 22407.

Amy Millis is a Fredericksburg-based writer and art critic.

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

3


contents

closeups 6

MariA Linda ....My private collection

19

Walk with me ...dennis ahearn

28

phoebe willis ....the edge of comfort

28

porch talk 3

kilroy is here!...local robOtics team

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

7

what’s it worth?: Laura’s story

10

retired on the back porch: sunshine on my shoulder Vivan west:: under the mango tree

11

oral history, pt. 2: marion robinson

12

Vino: the papacy: funny hats & wine libations: the highland county

13

season’s bounty: tip toe through the garden

14

south of the mason-dixon

15

daytripper: hague winery

16-17

Calendar of Events

18

Our Heritage... the crhc collection history’s stories.: my right arm

20

companion care: ticks & lymne disease

21

autoknown better: it’s april, fools

22

Senior Care: importance of structure in life

23

green is healthier, too!

24

art in the’burg: gallery hopping

25

scene & heard...in the ‘burg!

26

downtown writing studio: where literature is born national poetry month for my grandmother

27

community link: rabies a serious discussion

28

my own path: equations of value

30

project plant it! learn to love trees

2

April 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Local Robotics team in need of Sponsorship By Amy Millis

21

...And more! 15

5

sally’s back in town! the incomparable miss struthers

9

cowboys on the potomac: michael dean

29

umw philharmonic’s season finale

31

blanton massey: meeting the public need Cover Photo By Arch DiPeppe

Spring On Down...

Our Joe is Blooming!

Kilroy is Here!

311 William Street 540-3 371-2 2727 www.lapetiteaubergefred.com Open for Lunch & Dinner Mon - Sat

Team 339 of the FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC) has changed the lives of countless members since its inception in 1998. Organized by the Commonwealth Governor’s School Colonial Forge site social studies teacher David Shotwell, the group, also known as “Team Kilroy,” has proven itself to be the premier STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) organization in Stafford, Spotsylvania, King George, and surrounding counties through its impressive performances at various competitions held across the nation. For example, at the 2012 IROC (ILITE Robotics Off-Season Challenge), Kilroy placed first out of over 20 competing teams, and in 2009, the team won the National Championship Delphi “Driving Tomorrow’s Technology” Award, which celebrates sophistication in the engineering and design of a single competing robot. Each year, the national robotics competition organizer FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) announces the rules and theme of the upcoming Robotics Competition games. All teams are provided with a basic kit for building the robot (also named Kilroy) immediately after the release of the year’s theme; all other materials must be obtained by the team. The game’s rules dictate that robots’ designs must allow for both autonomous and human-controlled operation; there are also restrictions on height and weight. The theme for the year of 2013 is called “Ultimate Ascent,” which is modeled on disc golf. After weeks of intense preparation, Team Kilroy 339 has finished setting their robot up for competition. In order to carry out planned functions and operations, however, the team requires additional funds. An estimated $15,000-$18,000 dollars are needed to cover costs related to repairs and maintenance of the robot

and competition entrance fees as well as expenses associated with travel and lodging. In the wake of the recession, times have been especially difficult for the program, which runs entirely on donations made by local businesses and individuals. If the set budget for the year is not met through monetary contributions, the team may be forced to make detrimental compromises in the building and maintenance of Kilroy. Team 339 would also be pushed to opt out of competitions, many of which require overnight stays at hotels while charging entrance fees that run into the thousands. The tragedy of this economic reality is especially apparent when one considers the magnitude of the impact that the program has had on STEM education in Spotsylvania and surrounding counties. Many of the team’s members claim that Team 339 is the reason for their career path choices. A recent study conducted by Brandeis University found that alumni of FIRST Robotics are 35% more likely to attend college and twice as likely to major in science and engineering as nonparticipants with similar backgrounds. Students who are involved in the local robotics program stress the educational value of the experiences that the program offers. Being a member of Team 339 allows for the mastering of skills that most traditional public schools never bother to develop or nurture. In many cases, it has also been the reason for the career choices of members. “Being on the mechanical team made me realize that I want to do engineering. It’s a load of fun and it really helps in a practical aspect. You can’t learn this at school,” says Arthur Pawlica, a junior at the Commonwealth Governor’s School, Colonial Forge site. Companies or individuals who wish to donate to the Kilroy 339 FRC Robotics team may call the head coach, David Shotwell, at 540-658-6115 or send a check to the Commonwealth Governor’s School, 12301 Spotswood Furnace Road, Fredericksburg, VA, 22407.

Amy Millis is a Fredericksburg-based writer and art critic.

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

3


ON THE PORCH Rob Grogan Photographer Archer Di Peppe Contributing Writers & Artists A.E.Bayne Collette Caprara Lezlie Cheryl Arch Di Peppe Frank Fratoe Renee Gauvin Katie Hornung

Megan Byrnes C.Ruth Cassell Brittany Devries Arlene Evans William Garnett Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks Sara Hunt Karl Karch Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Sara Mattingly Valerie Jean Mayo Page Meade Jo Middleton Amy Millis Vanessa Moncure Amy Pearce Mary Lynn Powers Scott Richards Wendy Schmitz Craig Sheldon Troy Snuffer Jeremy Sutton Matt Thomas Christine Thompson Nancy Vance Rim Vining Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co., Inc. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Phone: 540-220-1922 E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2013 Olde Towne Publishing Co., LLC All rights reserved.

Robgwrites 4

Sally’s Back In Town!

Editor

April 2013

So Real A community reveals its true character when it celebrates a holiday or landmark occasion; or when times are good, yet the needy are not forgotten or set aside; and especially when one of its own citizens faces a sudden need or crisis. How Fredericksburg responds is a shining example of a godlike character. We have seen it all before -– how we jubilantly take to the streets for our nation’s major holidays; how we volunteer for the great local cause organizations, be it Habitat for Humanity, the Food Bank, or EmpowerHouse, to name a few of many. But an off-the-radar cause is the one that truly epitomizes a community’s heart and soul in such an organic grassroots way, it makes you think beyond good neighborliness, friendship, family support, and community quality. It reaches your core beliefs in humanity, goodness, and even one’s concept of God. In seeing responses like this unfold many times in my past 21 years here, I have come to truly believe in man’s goodness to man, despite world-wide news of man’s inhumanity to man. I have come to believe that good will conquer evil every time. My mindset on this is not just some defensive belief in order to avoid despair about the human condition but is truly so real that it takes on an aura, a healing energy, a soul-soothing almost tangible quality about it. It is real love and community fellowship at its best. Please indulge my vagueness, but I am talking about how friends and family and neighbors are responding to a crisis that I am viewing from close-up. It is the essence of Fredericksburg’s good people. It is proof that people are your best

messages Dear Rob, Thanks for listing Riverside Writers’ March event on your calendar. Attached is our release for the April event. We would be very grateful if you could list it. Several people mentioned they had come to our meeting specifically because of the notice in Front Porch. Jim Gaines, Riverside Writers NOTE: The Riverside Writers Eleventh Annual Celebration of Poetry will be held at 930A-4P, Salem Church Library, Mtg. Rm A. 2601, on April 13.

Front porch fredericksburg

The Incomparable Miss Struthers at Riverside medicine, the tonic that lifts the human spirit and helps in so real a manner to heal all wounds. It is the latest personal reminder of why my wife and I have lived here for longer than any single place that either of us has ever lived before. So real is their goodness that my everevolving concept of higher power or godliness has come to a simple but real definition for me. If you were to take all of the good in all of our people, cast away our flaws and banish all evil, then assemble that goodness into one shining light of energy, then you would have God. The signs are all there and all so real in the neighbor who helps you take on a daily task, the friend who sends a sweet thought your way, or the compassion of a loved one. Little acts of human kindness add up, for me, to my conclusion. Fredericksburgers – along with many good people from afar who are enamored by our community – make it real, so real. It is a wonderful, jubilant human feeling to either receive or contribute to that essence of goodness. It is an abstract blessing that becomes as real as the comfort of a good meal, a soft shirt, a task completed, or an outreaching hand offering assistance. And we – people who need people and who have that kind of network — are truly the luckiest people in the world.

Hi, Rob We enjoyed your March FP, with the nice update on Ernie and Lynn Ackermann and MHAF. Ernie has been volunteer webmaster for the Songwriters’ Showcase for many years, in addition to his other roles in the community. Isn’t it refreshing to know generous people like Ernie & Lynn? It’s fun for us to read about someone we know almost every month. Here is our April showcase announcement, and then we take the summer off to enjoy Bluemont and other seasonal live music. Thanks for keeping us in the loop of hometown happenings. Lou Gramann, Songwriters’ Showcase

by rob grogan months here (during Dolly), I fell in love with the area, and all of the people I came across during that time sure made me feel loved. The Full Monty can be a controversial play, with its initial Broadway production

So I think about these things and share them with you with a purpose -– to point to those who have needs but may have no one to turn to: the homeless, the traumatized war veteran, the gravely ill, the abused child. Their suffering is so real, and we, the entire community, have a moral duty to them… Here at Front Porch we also have a lesser duty — to offer you another issue of goodness, with features on the people and culture that make our community the quality community it is. So enjoy your reading. It is, I promise, so real.

What did it take to get Sally Struthers back in town again this year after her amazing performance here in Hello Dolly last year? I asked her, “Was it our town, the role, or the charming and persuasive Patrick A’Hearn, associate artistic director at Riverside Center?” “I’d have to say I returned for all three reasons. I’ve performed this role four times before and it is always a lot of fun for me. Having spent two-and-a-half NOTE: April’s Songwriters’ Showcase features Kevin Elliot, Rupert Wates, “beat generation” Charles Nolan, and awardwinning country voice, Karen Collins. April 26 at 8P. Picker’s Supply Concert Hall, 902 Caroline. $10; Students $5. 8980611.

About the Cover: Arch Di Peppe went timetraveling into April to capture a downtown scene for the theme, “April showers bring May flowers,” just to help us all keep our patience as we await the full-blooming season to unfold.

including full male nudity, so I wondered how our regional theater would handle that. “It’s not a good idea to give away the surprise at the end of the show, so all I can say to answer that is that in the final moment of the play… the lighting acts as a purity buffer. Honestly, the show is adorable, not shocking.” Sally’s role is that of “Jeanette,” who she describes as “quite delightful to portray because she’s been around the block a few times. She’s an old showbiz pro with lots of opinions and stories. And, I get to play the piano!” Piano? Another talent of this most talented lady.

Spoiled by her personality and performances on our stage, I leapt forward to another return engagement to Riverside. And another. And another… “You know – it could be, if they make live musicians a constant at the theater, I’ll have no problem saying yes about returning. Our band is just so delicious.” Having spent nearly three months here last time at the home of a Riverside board member (I’d tell you who but we want to maintain their privacy, and Sally’s), Sally has pretty much shopped until she dropped in downtown Fredericksburg and vicinity.

“I’m going to try to make it to Williamsburg this time. Other than that, I’ve pretty much seen all of the area. It’s the shopping that interests me. It’s a female thing.” Shopping… Whatever it takes to bring her back is all right with us males, too. Sally will perform as “Jeanette” in The Full Monty through April 28. For tickets, call (540) 370-4300 or visit riversidedt.com. See Calendar of Events for show times on page 16 of this issue of Front Porch.

Rob Grogan has followed Sally Struthers’ career since her TV days as “Gloria” in All In The Family.”

Days Gone By Courtesy of the William T. Garnett Collection

Did you know? What you now recognize as the Wallace Library at 1201 Caroline headquarters of the Central Rappahannock Regional Library system is also the former Fredericksburg High School.

Reach William T. Garnett Antiques at 540-424-2448.

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

5


ON THE PORCH Rob Grogan Photographer Archer Di Peppe Contributing Writers & Artists A.E.Bayne Collette Caprara Lezlie Cheryl Arch Di Peppe Frank Fratoe Renee Gauvin Katie Hornung

Megan Byrnes C.Ruth Cassell Brittany Devries Arlene Evans William Garnett Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks Sara Hunt Karl Karch Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy Sara Mattingly Valerie Jean Mayo Page Meade Jo Middleton Amy Millis Vanessa Moncure Amy Pearce Mary Lynn Powers Scott Richards Wendy Schmitz Craig Sheldon Troy Snuffer Jeremy Sutton Matt Thomas Christine Thompson Nancy Vance Rim Vining Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co., Inc. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Phone: 540-220-1922 E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2013 Olde Towne Publishing Co., LLC All rights reserved.

Robgwrites 4

Sally’s Back In Town!

Editor

April 2013

So Real A community reveals its true character when it celebrates a holiday or landmark occasion; or when times are good, yet the needy are not forgotten or set aside; and especially when one of its own citizens faces a sudden need or crisis. How Fredericksburg responds is a shining example of a godlike character. We have seen it all before -– how we jubilantly take to the streets for our nation’s major holidays; how we volunteer for the great local cause organizations, be it Habitat for Humanity, the Food Bank, or EmpowerHouse, to name a few of many. But an off-the-radar cause is the one that truly epitomizes a community’s heart and soul in such an organic grassroots way, it makes you think beyond good neighborliness, friendship, family support, and community quality. It reaches your core beliefs in humanity, goodness, and even one’s concept of God. In seeing responses like this unfold many times in my past 21 years here, I have come to truly believe in man’s goodness to man, despite world-wide news of man’s inhumanity to man. I have come to believe that good will conquer evil every time. My mindset on this is not just some defensive belief in order to avoid despair about the human condition but is truly so real that it takes on an aura, a healing energy, a soul-soothing almost tangible quality about it. It is real love and community fellowship at its best. Please indulge my vagueness, but I am talking about how friends and family and neighbors are responding to a crisis that I am viewing from close-up. It is the essence of Fredericksburg’s good people. It is proof that people are your best

messages Dear Rob, Thanks for listing Riverside Writers’ March event on your calendar. Attached is our release for the April event. We would be very grateful if you could list it. Several people mentioned they had come to our meeting specifically because of the notice in Front Porch. Jim Gaines, Riverside Writers NOTE: The Riverside Writers Eleventh Annual Celebration of Poetry will be held at 930A-4P, Salem Church Library, Mtg. Rm A. 2601, on April 13.

Front porch fredericksburg

The Incomparable Miss Struthers at Riverside medicine, the tonic that lifts the human spirit and helps in so real a manner to heal all wounds. It is the latest personal reminder of why my wife and I have lived here for longer than any single place that either of us has ever lived before. So real is their goodness that my everevolving concept of higher power or godliness has come to a simple but real definition for me. If you were to take all of the good in all of our people, cast away our flaws and banish all evil, then assemble that goodness into one shining light of energy, then you would have God. The signs are all there and all so real in the neighbor who helps you take on a daily task, the friend who sends a sweet thought your way, or the compassion of a loved one. Little acts of human kindness add up, for me, to my conclusion. Fredericksburgers – along with many good people from afar who are enamored by our community – make it real, so real. It is a wonderful, jubilant human feeling to either receive or contribute to that essence of goodness. It is an abstract blessing that becomes as real as the comfort of a good meal, a soft shirt, a task completed, or an outreaching hand offering assistance. And we – people who need people and who have that kind of network — are truly the luckiest people in the world.

Hi, Rob We enjoyed your March FP, with the nice update on Ernie and Lynn Ackermann and MHAF. Ernie has been volunteer webmaster for the Songwriters’ Showcase for many years, in addition to his other roles in the community. Isn’t it refreshing to know generous people like Ernie & Lynn? It’s fun for us to read about someone we know almost every month. Here is our April showcase announcement, and then we take the summer off to enjoy Bluemont and other seasonal live music. Thanks for keeping us in the loop of hometown happenings. Lou Gramann, Songwriters’ Showcase

by rob grogan months here (during Dolly), I fell in love with the area, and all of the people I came across during that time sure made me feel loved. The Full Monty can be a controversial play, with its initial Broadway production

So I think about these things and share them with you with a purpose -– to point to those who have needs but may have no one to turn to: the homeless, the traumatized war veteran, the gravely ill, the abused child. Their suffering is so real, and we, the entire community, have a moral duty to them… Here at Front Porch we also have a lesser duty — to offer you another issue of goodness, with features on the people and culture that make our community the quality community it is. So enjoy your reading. It is, I promise, so real.

What did it take to get Sally Struthers back in town again this year after her amazing performance here in Hello Dolly last year? I asked her, “Was it our town, the role, or the charming and persuasive Patrick A’Hearn, associate artistic director at Riverside Center?” “I’d have to say I returned for all three reasons. I’ve performed this role four times before and it is always a lot of fun for me. Having spent two-and-a-half NOTE: April’s Songwriters’ Showcase features Kevin Elliot, Rupert Wates, “beat generation” Charles Nolan, and awardwinning country voice, Karen Collins. April 26 at 8P. Picker’s Supply Concert Hall, 902 Caroline. $10; Students $5. 8980611.

About the Cover: Arch Di Peppe went timetraveling into April to capture a downtown scene for the theme, “April showers bring May flowers,” just to help us all keep our patience as we await the full-blooming season to unfold.

including full male nudity, so I wondered how our regional theater would handle that. “It’s not a good idea to give away the surprise at the end of the show, so all I can say to answer that is that in the final moment of the play… the lighting acts as a purity buffer. Honestly, the show is adorable, not shocking.” Sally’s role is that of “Jeanette,” who she describes as “quite delightful to portray because she’s been around the block a few times. She’s an old showbiz pro with lots of opinions and stories. And, I get to play the piano!” Piano? Another talent of this most talented lady.

Spoiled by her personality and performances on our stage, I leapt forward to another return engagement to Riverside. And another. And another… “You know – it could be, if they make live musicians a constant at the theater, I’ll have no problem saying yes about returning. Our band is just so delicious.” Having spent nearly three months here last time at the home of a Riverside board member (I’d tell you who but we want to maintain their privacy, and Sally’s), Sally has pretty much shopped until she dropped in downtown Fredericksburg and vicinity.

“I’m going to try to make it to Williamsburg this time. Other than that, I’ve pretty much seen all of the area. It’s the shopping that interests me. It’s a female thing.” Shopping… Whatever it takes to bring her back is all right with us males, too. Sally will perform as “Jeanette” in The Full Monty through April 28. For tickets, call (540) 370-4300 or visit riversidedt.com. See Calendar of Events for show times on page 16 of this issue of Front Porch.

Rob Grogan has followed Sally Struthers’ career since her TV days as “Gloria” in All In The Family.”

Days Gone By Courtesy of the William T. Garnett Collection

Did you know? What you now recognize as the Wallace Library at 1201 Caroline headquarters of the Central Rappahannock Regional Library system is also the former Fredericksburg High School.

Reach William T. Garnett Antiques at 540-424-2448.

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

5


What’s It Worth?

MY PRIVATE COLLECTION Maria Linda’s “Had to haves”

still picture Maria Linda Coleman behind the counter of Silk & Chocolate at 810 Caroline from 19931999. She and Victoria Hine owned the chic epicurean place, sort of a grown-up, I

and romantic version of a small Willy Wonka chocolate factory, with a distinct feminine twist. I would go there for a special gift for my wife – a silk scarf or a box of gourmet chocolates. The intimate

colorful shop boasted reds and blacks, if I remember accurately, but it was Maria Linda’s rich personality and colorful wardrobe complimenting her auburn-red hair that customers found worthy of returning as regulars. Silk was her second Fredericksburg retail venture, the first having been Little Women Country Cupboard in the early 80’s. After Silk had closed, Maria Linda helped Mona Albertine and Linda Pisenti of Jabberwocky open up The Mock Turtle in 2009 in Silk’s old space across from Mona’s children’s book store. Kathleen Fortune purchased The Mock Turtle from Mona in 2012. Maria Linda still works there two-three times a week selling “beautiful and trendy children’s clothes in sizes Preemie to Size 8.” This year, Maria Linda took a long hard look at her own private collection of antiques, collectibles, millinery, vintage clothing, and jewelry. It was, she decided, time to downsize. “I no longer needed all of my pieces from my private collection – things that I once had to have at one point or another.” In quest of a small retail space downtown, Maria Linda told others what she was planning on doing, and they in turn wanted to add to the collection. So it was kismet when 108 Wolfe Street, a few yards from the corner of Caroline and across from the municipal parking deck, became available. She grabbed the lease and opened My Private Collection (540273-2646) from 12 Noon to 5 p.m. Friday, Saturday, and Sundays. The space is a charming 1816 kitchen dependency that suits her and her private collection quite well in a very appealing and inviting ambiance. Inside, you escape real time and float through the historic building’s history on a tour of merchandise that my generation and today’s vintage lovers will well remember and prize. Maria Linda plans to also add some items she used to carry at Silk & Chocolate, which will really bring back memories for her old regular customers, and entice new ones as well. And, she will still carry her rich personality and colorful wardrobe complimenting her auburn-red hair that customers will again find worthy of returning as regulars. In view of her past successes in retail, we look forward to her newest venture as a welcome addition to the business culture of our quaint and colorful downtown. Rob Grogan has a chocolate craving worthy of a stop at My Private Collection, with an eye out for vintage jewelry for his wife and daughter.

6

April 2013

Laura’s Story

presents

The Magnolia Ball Saturday, April 13, 2013

By rob grogan

Front porch fredericksburg

For Our Oral History -A Fredericksburg Treasure

By archer Dipeppe

6:00 - 11:00 p.m. Fredericksburg Expo & Conference Center Cocktail Hour and Silent Auction Dinner followed by Dancing to Fredericksburg Big Band $90 per person / $650 per table of 8 Black tie optional Cash Bar

Tickets On Sale Now! Phone:

(540) 361-7071 E-mail:

cchavez@hospicesupportcare.org Web:

www.hospicesupportcare.org PROCEEDS

BENEFIT

HOSPICE SUPPORT CARE

Ask about Sponsorship and Promotional/Memorial Ad Opportunities. Silent Auction Items Accepted

Sunday Brunch 9 AM to 2PM

Breakfast

Lunch

Dearly Wanted: Fredericksburg's Oldest Residents

For years now I have had the opportunity to conduct workshops for the Barbara Hicks Geslock Women’s Forum held at James Monroe High School every March. It is a terrific event where hundreds of women get together to share their talents and interests and network. I usually conduct forums on antiques and appraising. This year the forum was wide open for any question, and the discussions were lively. I brought some American coins and paper money in case we had time at the end of the forum. A Washington Quarter was a good place to start the discussion. Before 1965 American silver dollars, half dollars, quarters, and dimes were 90 % silver. Silver is one of the bright spots in the market since a troy ounce of silver is hovering near $28.00 today. Just before I left the house that morning, I was doing some last minute research on the design and mintage of the quarter. I suddenly discovered the following thought-provoking story. At the time I did not have enough time to flesh out the whole story, so I promised my second workshop that I would finish the research and write this article. From the earliest days of the Republic there was a hesitancy to put our presidents on our coins. It smacked of monarchies. The first American president to appear on a coin was Abraham Lincoln

in 1909 to commemorate the centennial of his birth. In 1931 the Treasury Department decided it wanted to commemorate the bicentennial of Washington’s birth in 1932. Originally, the new coin was to be a new half dollar, but Congress intervened and changed the coin to a quarter. As was the custom, a design competition was announced for both the new quarter and a commemorative Washington medal. Over 100 entries were submitted to the George Washington Bicentennial Commission who was assisted by the National Fine Arts Commission. The commission’s decision was unanimous. They chose the design by Laura Gardin Fraser. She was an eminent artist and sculptor who had worked with her husband on the 1926 design for the commemorative Oregon Trail Half Dollar. She was well known for her full size equestrian statues. Her husband James had designed the Buffalo Nickel and was famous for his iconic Native American End of the Trail sculpture. Unfortunately for Laura Fraser, Andrew Mellon, the current Secretary of the Treasury, decided that since he was not involved in the original competition, they would have to start over. They did have a second competition, and Laura Fraser won again. Never to be deterred, Mellon found what he said were a few design flaws in Fraser’s work. The commission asked

that the artist be able to make those changes. Mellon said that it would be “discriminatory” to only allow one artist to make changes, so he chose three other artists from the competition to make changes in their work. The Bicentennial Commission looked at the work yet again and a third time chose Fraser’s design. Andrew Mellon simply ignored their choice and chose John Flangan’s design reportedly because he just couldn’t bring himself to allow a woman to win such an important contest. The Bicentennial Commission was furious. It wasn’t until 1999 that Laura Fraser’s original design was used for a commemorative U.S Five Dollar Gold Piece. The injustice never stopped Laura Fraser. She not only survived, but thrived with more work than she could do for the rest of her life. Still, I will never look at a quarter the same way. Each time you look at a quarter it should remind you that prejudice is real, and prejudice against one is prejudice against all.

Front Porch is calling for Our Town's Ageless Citizens to let us know who they are so our writers can sit and hear their wonderful stories. We treasure your lives and memories.

Archer Di Peppe is a certified appraiser. Call him at 540-373-9636.

Dinner

New On Fridays April 26 May 10 & 24 Blues and Jazz Music In Mary Washington Room Cash cover charge 620 CAROLINE STREET FREDERICKSBURG VA 22401 540.373.8300 front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

7


What’s It Worth?

MY PRIVATE COLLECTION Maria Linda’s “Had to haves”

still picture Maria Linda Coleman behind the counter of Silk & Chocolate at 810 Caroline from 19931999. She and Victoria Hine owned the chic epicurean place, sort of a grown-up, I

and romantic version of a small Willy Wonka chocolate factory, with a distinct feminine twist. I would go there for a special gift for my wife – a silk scarf or a box of gourmet chocolates. The intimate

colorful shop boasted reds and blacks, if I remember accurately, but it was Maria Linda’s rich personality and colorful wardrobe complimenting her auburn-red hair that customers found worthy of returning as regulars. Silk was her second Fredericksburg retail venture, the first having been Little Women Country Cupboard in the early 80’s. After Silk had closed, Maria Linda helped Mona Albertine and Linda Pisenti of Jabberwocky open up The Mock Turtle in 2009 in Silk’s old space across from Mona’s children’s book store. Kathleen Fortune purchased The Mock Turtle from Mona in 2012. Maria Linda still works there two-three times a week selling “beautiful and trendy children’s clothes in sizes Preemie to Size 8.” This year, Maria Linda took a long hard look at her own private collection of antiques, collectibles, millinery, vintage clothing, and jewelry. It was, she decided, time to downsize. “I no longer needed all of my pieces from my private collection – things that I once had to have at one point or another.” In quest of a small retail space downtown, Maria Linda told others what she was planning on doing, and they in turn wanted to add to the collection. So it was kismet when 108 Wolfe Street, a few yards from the corner of Caroline and across from the municipal parking deck, became available. She grabbed the lease and opened My Private Collection (540273-2646) from 12 Noon to 5 p.m. Friday, Saturday, and Sundays. The space is a charming 1816 kitchen dependency that suits her and her private collection quite well in a very appealing and inviting ambiance. Inside, you escape real time and float through the historic building’s history on a tour of merchandise that my generation and today’s vintage lovers will well remember and prize. Maria Linda plans to also add some items she used to carry at Silk & Chocolate, which will really bring back memories for her old regular customers, and entice new ones as well. And, she will still carry her rich personality and colorful wardrobe complimenting her auburn-red hair that customers will again find worthy of returning as regulars. In view of her past successes in retail, we look forward to her newest venture as a welcome addition to the business culture of our quaint and colorful downtown. Rob Grogan has a chocolate craving worthy of a stop at My Private Collection, with an eye out for vintage jewelry for his wife and daughter.

6

April 2013

Laura’s Story

presents

The Magnolia Ball Saturday, April 13, 2013

By rob grogan

Front porch fredericksburg

For Our Oral History -A Fredericksburg Treasure

By archer Dipeppe

6:00 - 11:00 p.m. Fredericksburg Expo & Conference Center Cocktail Hour and Silent Auction Dinner followed by Dancing to Fredericksburg Big Band $90 per person / $650 per table of 8 Black tie optional Cash Bar

Tickets On Sale Now! Phone:

(540) 361-7071 E-mail:

cchavez@hospicesupportcare.org Web:

www.hospicesupportcare.org PROCEEDS

BENEFIT

HOSPICE SUPPORT CARE

Ask about Sponsorship and Promotional/Memorial Ad Opportunities. Silent Auction Items Accepted

Sunday Brunch 9 AM to 2PM

Breakfast

Lunch

Dearly Wanted: Fredericksburg's Oldest Residents

For years now I have had the opportunity to conduct workshops for the Barbara Hicks Geslock Women’s Forum held at James Monroe High School every March. It is a terrific event where hundreds of women get together to share their talents and interests and network. I usually conduct forums on antiques and appraising. This year the forum was wide open for any question, and the discussions were lively. I brought some American coins and paper money in case we had time at the end of the forum. A Washington Quarter was a good place to start the discussion. Before 1965 American silver dollars, half dollars, quarters, and dimes were 90 % silver. Silver is one of the bright spots in the market since a troy ounce of silver is hovering near $28.00 today. Just before I left the house that morning, I was doing some last minute research on the design and mintage of the quarter. I suddenly discovered the following thought-provoking story. At the time I did not have enough time to flesh out the whole story, so I promised my second workshop that I would finish the research and write this article. From the earliest days of the Republic there was a hesitancy to put our presidents on our coins. It smacked of monarchies. The first American president to appear on a coin was Abraham Lincoln

in 1909 to commemorate the centennial of his birth. In 1931 the Treasury Department decided it wanted to commemorate the bicentennial of Washington’s birth in 1932. Originally, the new coin was to be a new half dollar, but Congress intervened and changed the coin to a quarter. As was the custom, a design competition was announced for both the new quarter and a commemorative Washington medal. Over 100 entries were submitted to the George Washington Bicentennial Commission who was assisted by the National Fine Arts Commission. The commission’s decision was unanimous. They chose the design by Laura Gardin Fraser. She was an eminent artist and sculptor who had worked with her husband on the 1926 design for the commemorative Oregon Trail Half Dollar. She was well known for her full size equestrian statues. Her husband James had designed the Buffalo Nickel and was famous for his iconic Native American End of the Trail sculpture. Unfortunately for Laura Fraser, Andrew Mellon, the current Secretary of the Treasury, decided that since he was not involved in the original competition, they would have to start over. They did have a second competition, and Laura Fraser won again. Never to be deterred, Mellon found what he said were a few design flaws in Fraser’s work. The commission asked

that the artist be able to make those changes. Mellon said that it would be “discriminatory” to only allow one artist to make changes, so he chose three other artists from the competition to make changes in their work. The Bicentennial Commission looked at the work yet again and a third time chose Fraser’s design. Andrew Mellon simply ignored their choice and chose John Flangan’s design reportedly because he just couldn’t bring himself to allow a woman to win such an important contest. The Bicentennial Commission was furious. It wasn’t until 1999 that Laura Fraser’s original design was used for a commemorative U.S Five Dollar Gold Piece. The injustice never stopped Laura Fraser. She not only survived, but thrived with more work than she could do for the rest of her life. Still, I will never look at a quarter the same way. Each time you look at a quarter it should remind you that prejudice is real, and prejudice against one is prejudice against all.

Front Porch is calling for Our Town's Ageless Citizens to let us know who they are so our writers can sit and hear their wonderful stories. We treasure your lives and memories.

Archer Di Peppe is a certified appraiser. Call him at 540-373-9636.

Dinner

New On Fridays April 26 May 10 & 24 Blues and Jazz Music In Mary Washington Room Cash cover charge 620 CAROLINE STREET FREDERICKSBURG VA 22401 540.373.8300 front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

7


Cowboys On The Potomac “Lucky” Dean’s Art Tribute to Watermen By Renee Gauvin

See Our Garden-Inspired Table Settings During Garden Week, April 21-28 at

374-0443 www.shopwhittingham.com 1021 Caroline Street

In an on going series of large 3’x4’ paintings Michael (Lucky) Dean pays homage to the watermen who risk their lives every day on the wild and untamable river. Thirty years ago, Michael found himself in the little harbour town of Fairview Beach, VA. He saw the beauty of the river and met the people who worked it and decided to stay. Michael was drawn to this area because it reminded him of New Mexico in that you are at the mercy of the environment. Both river and dessert are wild, unpredictable and can be unkind. Each can ravage the human body. The watermen brought him in and Michael said he got to be a witness to their world. He compares Fairview Beach to how D. H. Lawrence describes Arizona in his book, St Mawr, and the watermen to New Mexico and the cowboys of the West, because they deal everyday with the untamed entities of their environment. “They aren’t like anybody else and he calls them heroes and outlaws. There is nothing romantic about this life! The work is hard and conditions are rough. It is not a sophisticated lifestyle and they will never get rich.”

8

April 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Teddy Slick is the main character in this series, but you will also see Ivan Payne, Roger Payne, and Albert Covington and 2nd generation watermen, Robby and BO. Michael began painting when he was twenty-one. His style has always been impasto (very thick textural strokes and layers of paint). In 1976, in Taos New Mexico, he met Aldo Giodanni, a sculptor and painter from Milan, Italy, who taught Michael how to use the pallet knife. If you have watched him paint, the innate skill in the strokes and the colors that he chooses is a special gift and genius. Michaels says that “even though I have done over forty works, I will continue to paint Fairview until I feel like I have told its story...” The show will be on display April, May and June at The Virginia Wine Experience, Upstairs Gallery, 826 Caroline Street.

Renee Gauvin curates the Upstairs Gallery at The Virginia Wine Experience.

CHUCK HOFFMAN REALTOR, ABR, SFR, MBA I will provide professional help for both home buyers and sellers to accomplish your real estate objectives! TRUSTED & CANDID SERVICE FOR DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG & NEARBY COMMUNITIES Award Winning Service

www.yourFREDrealtor.com 540-370-0695 Direct 540-845-1468 Cell 540-373-0100 Office 540-370-0757 Fax choffman@cbcarriagehouse.com

520 William Street, Suite A, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 Chuck Hoffman is a licensed salesperson in the Commonwealth of Virginia

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

9


Cowboys On The Potomac “Lucky” Dean’s Art Tribute to Watermen By Renee Gauvin

See Our Garden-Inspired Table Settings During Garden Week, April 21-28 at

374-0443 www.shopwhittingham.com 1021 Caroline Street

In an on going series of large 3’x4’ paintings Michael (Lucky) Dean pays homage to the watermen who risk their lives every day on the wild and untamable river. Thirty years ago, Michael found himself in the little harbour town of Fairview Beach, VA. He saw the beauty of the river and met the people who worked it and decided to stay. Michael was drawn to this area because it reminded him of New Mexico in that you are at the mercy of the environment. Both river and dessert are wild, unpredictable and can be unkind. Each can ravage the human body. The watermen brought him in and Michael said he got to be a witness to their world. He compares Fairview Beach to how D. H. Lawrence describes Arizona in his book, St Mawr, and the watermen to New Mexico and the cowboys of the West, because they deal everyday with the untamed entities of their environment. “They aren’t like anybody else and he calls them heroes and outlaws. There is nothing romantic about this life! The work is hard and conditions are rough. It is not a sophisticated lifestyle and they will never get rich.”

8

April 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Teddy Slick is the main character in this series, but you will also see Ivan Payne, Roger Payne, and Albert Covington and 2nd generation watermen, Robby and BO. Michael began painting when he was twenty-one. His style has always been impasto (very thick textural strokes and layers of paint). In 1976, in Taos New Mexico, he met Aldo Giodanni, a sculptor and painter from Milan, Italy, who taught Michael how to use the pallet knife. If you have watched him paint, the innate skill in the strokes and the colors that he chooses is a special gift and genius. Michaels says that “even though I have done over forty works, I will continue to paint Fairview until I feel like I have told its story...” The show will be on display April, May and June at The Virginia Wine Experience, Upstairs Gallery, 826 Caroline Street.

Renee Gauvin curates the Upstairs Gallery at The Virginia Wine Experience.

CHUCK HOFFMAN REALTOR, ABR, SFR, MBA I will provide professional help for both home buyers and sellers to accomplish your real estate objectives! TRUSTED & CANDID SERVICE FOR DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG & NEARBY COMMUNITIES Award Winning Service

www.yourFREDrealtor.com 540-370-0695 Direct 540-845-1468 Cell 540-373-0100 Office 540-370-0757 Fax choffman@cbcarriagehouse.com

520 William Street, Suite A, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 Chuck Hoffman is a licensed salesperson in the Commonwealth of Virginia

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

9


Retired & Buck Naked

On The Back Porch

Sunshine on my shoulder makes me smile by jo middleton My snow crocus, or is it croci, always bloomed the first of April, over there on beautiful Brompton Street. I had them planted by the sidewalk so everybody could see them as they walked by. They should have been called “smile” because everyone did when they saw them, especially in the snow, and that was their favorite time to bloom. April is truly the best month of the year and not just because of the crocus. Back in the day, the young and incredibly handsome, very fit, though head-shaved Marines would do an April troll through campus. This was in the years of having the road through the college, meandering by the E. Lee Trinkle Library, Ann Carter Lee Student Union, Custis, Ball and Madison dorms. Those boys would gawk at those of us slathered in oil and cocoa butter, lying spread eagle on our towels, wearing as little as possible, to transform skin from newspaper white to Bahamas brown. We were only vaguely aware of their presence since we were mostly asleep and drooling on the textbooks we brought out under the guise of studying. I have always been one to tan quickly. My Irish red-headed friend, Cassidy, lay on her towel until her freckles merged, usually around August, when she was at home on her towel out in the field with the pinto horses who found her cocoa butter scent offensive. We didn’t know the evils of the sun back then. We were never Vitamin D deficient, but looked and felt in the bloom of health. I spent most of my life outside, since I came from the generation that you didn’t come in from playing until dinnertime.

In my 74th year it was assumed by my doc and the plastic surgeon that the thing growing on my cheek was a skin cancer. “Have you spent time in the sun? Are you using SPF 50* cosmetics?” I use no cosmetics and plan on sitting on my deck with my tanning mirror for my sagging chin. What’s it to ya’? The surgeon made sure to “get it all,” by whacking around the outside of the offending growth. The biopsy proved it was just an offending growth that populates my skin along with age spots, so now I have this scar that makes me look like a mobster’s moll. The wonderful thing about a tan is back then it removed all signs of acne, and now it blurs mobster moll scars. So, back to my flawed skin solution: a towel, the backyard grass, oil and cocoa butter and the bright beautiful sun. What I don’t get is those tanning salons. Young girls are opting for those rather than bright sunshine, blue skies, sweet breezes, a towel on green grass. Part of our culture, I guess. Don’t open windows. Don’t breathe fresh air. Go to the Mall. Stay out of the sun. Not me, baby. I’m out here retired and buck naked, in the sun, on my back porch!

Jo Middleton breathes in the air and warms from the sun in Oxford, MI.

Vivan West Under the mango tree By craig sheldon A soft breeze caresses you and tropical fragrances and sounds relax your mind as you enter the door of a wonderful secret oasis upstairs at 606 Caroline. Two years ago, Vivian West launched Under the Mango Tree as not only a beautiful place for beautiful things, but a restful oasis to serve the needs of women around the world. Involved in several business ventures here since 1977, Vivian says that Under the Mango Tree started with a newspaper article about the Haiti earthquake in early 2010. Snowbound during February 2010 she searched through old newspapers to find the story she remembered of Marguerite Dorival who was in Port au Prince and injured during the quake, then walked 20 miles back to her farm in Cabarat. In the article Marguerite stated that she had stopped to rest under a Mango Tree with hummingbirds buzzing around. Based on those words, a vision gradually grew and took shape in Vivian’s heart and soul, a vision of a shop selling art made by women from worldwide. In the spring of 2011, she was offered the use of a room upstairs at 606 Caroline above Gemstone Creations, and her dream started to come to life. Today, with a framed copy of the article about Marguerite Dorival prominently in view, more than 20 artists consign their works, from soaps and lotions to jewelry, clothing, paintings and stuffed bears. Purchases help support worthy causes. For example, one hundred percent of the proceeds from sales of

items on the Haiti wall go to missionary activities there; all proceeds from items from the Maranatha Alpaca Farm support building a church and orphanage in Peru. Consignors are drawn to Vivian as they rest for a while Under the Mango Tree. One of Vivian’s favorite things is the beauty and peace of the day within the comforting confines of her shop, giving her the opportunity to interact with people, listening to their stories, learning about the world through their eyes. When asked if she could have one wish come true, Vivian’s eyes sparkle and her face lights up: she would like to meet Marguerite Dorival to let her know how Marguerites’s life’s struggle touched Vivian in such a way that she created her own oasis, where anyone can stop in, rest, and feel welcome, Under the Mango Tree. 3 p.m.), On Sat., April 20 (1-3 Vivian will host a book signing for Thomas Higgins (How Far is it From Richmond to Heaven), as well as a special showing by artist Anne Higgins.

Oral History, Part 2 a “babbling brook” overflows with stories By rob grogan Last month, Marion Robinson poured us stories from her childhood and early adult years in old Falmouth. This month, we join her for more rich tales of yesteryear… These days, Marion Robinson looks and sounds great, despite a six-month onslaught of shingles and a slip-and-fall inside a Rite-Aid, where she was headed ironically for a shingles vaccine. “I shattered my shoulder, hurt my wrist, thigh, and eye socket, and cracked my cheekbone,” she says as though that’s just life. Marion raised four boys and has seven grand sons and one grand daughter, two male dogs and a male cat. She likes the flower garden but says “the critters like it better.” Deer and raccoon are common visitors to her parkland home… which leads her to a story about millionaire John Lee Pratt. It was Mr. Pratt, who at the time says Marion was “the third richest man in America” and president of General Motors. He owned hundreds of acres of land surrounding the Brooks’ property and decided to honor his friend, St.Clair Brooks, with a public park. Later, he would build Pratt Park. Mr. Pratt, says Marion, gave away about ¾ of his estate,

donating money, land, and buildings for public use, and bequeathing the second largest Faberge collection in the world (only Queen Elizabeth held more) to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Mr. Pratt was often seen on foot, his chauffeured car trailing behind. Thinking she was finished, I asked Marion if I could come back for more stories. She burst into laughter: “Why do you want me to keep talking? I come from the Brooks family, the ‘Babbling Brooks’. We don’t stop talking.” Then she launched into another great story… She took a job with CBS affiliate WTOP in Washington, doing a show about women. Names like Edward R. Murrow and Eric Severeid headlined the CBS roster. She spent time with singer Kate Smith, whose America’s Sweetheart persona, says Marion, was a fake. “She was not nice. She would order a whole pile of food and give none to anybody else. Everyone on the crew hated our Kate Smith days,” because they worked the five-hour set-up without food. On assignment, she walked a White House receiving line, where she met President Harry Truman, his wife Bess, and their daughter Margaret. The President joked with her, saying she had to be an

imposter because no one at CBS was younger than Edward R. Murrow. Trying to show the President her press card, she nervously dropped her handbag on his feet. When she and the President bent down to retrieve its contents, the Secret Service pointed guns at her, unconvinced she was Press, even thinking she had shot the President. Truman assured them everything was fine. Reflecting again on Falmouth, Marion called church a unifier. In 1946, she married Franklin in the Old Falmouth Baptist Church. “That was our morning church. At two in the afternoon, we would attend the Union Church; it unified all of us.” The memory of Franklin having played football at JM revived another story. On Thanksgiving Day 1942, after their last game, 8 of the seniors and juniors on the team stood in line while Coach John Fenlon announced they would leave immediately by train for Quantico to join the U.S. Marines. The school band escorted them to the RF&P station with great fan-fare as the rest of the team followed. Four months later, all 8 were in the Pacific; 5 were killed in action. Franklin, wounded, came home three years later.

Before the present Falmouth Bridge, Marion’s story of her dad on the old bridge’s pedestrian walkway is my favorite. It is a human drama within a larger news story of the 1942 flood. She was a 17-year-old freshman at Mary Washington, living at home because her parents felt 17 was too young for campus life. “We had little sense as freshmen,” she says. “This story proves it.” Working inside Trinkle Library, Marion didn’t notice the rains. When she left, she called a cab but none showed. Some 45 minutes later, she did what any freshman would – walk home across the pedestrian plank walkway, over the rising tides gurgling between the planks, broken umbrella in hand. Halfway across, she heard her dad’s rising voice. He was crying, the only time she’d ever heard him cry. “He was losing his mind.” They made it home but their home and most of Falmouth was lost that night, including that footbridge. CORRECTION: Last month, my error misquoted/ misinterpreted Miss Robinson about Principal Drew. Mr. Drew in no way used corporal punishment and was an excellent administrator. I regret the error. - RG

Craig Sheldon is Nancy Yun Seldon’s husband. Nancy owns Gemstone Creation.

Turn Gold in Your Drawer Into Cash in Your Hand! Unwanted Gold? We Want It! Fair Market Prices Paid Wanted:10kt, 14kt,18kt and dental gold

212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-5 10

April 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

11


Retired & Buck Naked

On The Back Porch

Sunshine on my shoulder makes me smile by jo middleton My snow crocus, or is it croci, always bloomed the first of April, over there on beautiful Brompton Street. I had them planted by the sidewalk so everybody could see them as they walked by. They should have been called “smile” because everyone did when they saw them, especially in the snow, and that was their favorite time to bloom. April is truly the best month of the year and not just because of the crocus. Back in the day, the young and incredibly handsome, very fit, though head-shaved Marines would do an April troll through campus. This was in the years of having the road through the college, meandering by the E. Lee Trinkle Library, Ann Carter Lee Student Union, Custis, Ball and Madison dorms. Those boys would gawk at those of us slathered in oil and cocoa butter, lying spread eagle on our towels, wearing as little as possible, to transform skin from newspaper white to Bahamas brown. We were only vaguely aware of their presence since we were mostly asleep and drooling on the textbooks we brought out under the guise of studying. I have always been one to tan quickly. My Irish red-headed friend, Cassidy, lay on her towel until her freckles merged, usually around August, when she was at home on her towel out in the field with the pinto horses who found her cocoa butter scent offensive. We didn’t know the evils of the sun back then. We were never Vitamin D deficient, but looked and felt in the bloom of health. I spent most of my life outside, since I came from the generation that you didn’t come in from playing until dinnertime.

In my 74th year it was assumed by my doc and the plastic surgeon that the thing growing on my cheek was a skin cancer. “Have you spent time in the sun? Are you using SPF 50* cosmetics?” I use no cosmetics and plan on sitting on my deck with my tanning mirror for my sagging chin. What’s it to ya’? The surgeon made sure to “get it all,” by whacking around the outside of the offending growth. The biopsy proved it was just an offending growth that populates my skin along with age spots, so now I have this scar that makes me look like a mobster’s moll. The wonderful thing about a tan is back then it removed all signs of acne, and now it blurs mobster moll scars. So, back to my flawed skin solution: a towel, the backyard grass, oil and cocoa butter and the bright beautiful sun. What I don’t get is those tanning salons. Young girls are opting for those rather than bright sunshine, blue skies, sweet breezes, a towel on green grass. Part of our culture, I guess. Don’t open windows. Don’t breathe fresh air. Go to the Mall. Stay out of the sun. Not me, baby. I’m out here retired and buck naked, in the sun, on my back porch!

Jo Middleton breathes in the air and warms from the sun in Oxford, MI.

Vivan West Under the mango tree By craig sheldon A soft breeze caresses you and tropical fragrances and sounds relax your mind as you enter the door of a wonderful secret oasis upstairs at 606 Caroline. Two years ago, Vivian West launched Under the Mango Tree as not only a beautiful place for beautiful things, but a restful oasis to serve the needs of women around the world. Involved in several business ventures here since 1977, Vivian says that Under the Mango Tree started with a newspaper article about the Haiti earthquake in early 2010. Snowbound during February 2010 she searched through old newspapers to find the story she remembered of Marguerite Dorival who was in Port au Prince and injured during the quake, then walked 20 miles back to her farm in Cabarat. In the article Marguerite stated that she had stopped to rest under a Mango Tree with hummingbirds buzzing around. Based on those words, a vision gradually grew and took shape in Vivian’s heart and soul, a vision of a shop selling art made by women from worldwide. In the spring of 2011, she was offered the use of a room upstairs at 606 Caroline above Gemstone Creations, and her dream started to come to life. Today, with a framed copy of the article about Marguerite Dorival prominently in view, more than 20 artists consign their works, from soaps and lotions to jewelry, clothing, paintings and stuffed bears. Purchases help support worthy causes. For example, one hundred percent of the proceeds from sales of

items on the Haiti wall go to missionary activities there; all proceeds from items from the Maranatha Alpaca Farm support building a church and orphanage in Peru. Consignors are drawn to Vivian as they rest for a while Under the Mango Tree. One of Vivian’s favorite things is the beauty and peace of the day within the comforting confines of her shop, giving her the opportunity to interact with people, listening to their stories, learning about the world through their eyes. When asked if she could have one wish come true, Vivian’s eyes sparkle and her face lights up: she would like to meet Marguerite Dorival to let her know how Marguerites’s life’s struggle touched Vivian in such a way that she created her own oasis, where anyone can stop in, rest, and feel welcome, Under the Mango Tree. 3 p.m.), On Sat., April 20 (1-3 Vivian will host a book signing for Thomas Higgins (How Far is it From Richmond to Heaven), as well as a special showing by artist Anne Higgins.

Oral History, Part 2 a “babbling brook” overflows with stories By rob grogan Last month, Marion Robinson poured us stories from her childhood and early adult years in old Falmouth. This month, we join her for more rich tales of yesteryear… These days, Marion Robinson looks and sounds great, despite a six-month onslaught of shingles and a slip-and-fall inside a Rite-Aid, where she was headed ironically for a shingles vaccine. “I shattered my shoulder, hurt my wrist, thigh, and eye socket, and cracked my cheekbone,” she says as though that’s just life. Marion raised four boys and has seven grand sons and one grand daughter, two male dogs and a male cat. She likes the flower garden but says “the critters like it better.” Deer and raccoon are common visitors to her parkland home… which leads her to a story about millionaire John Lee Pratt. It was Mr. Pratt, who at the time says Marion was “the third richest man in America” and president of General Motors. He owned hundreds of acres of land surrounding the Brooks’ property and decided to honor his friend, St.Clair Brooks, with a public park. Later, he would build Pratt Park. Mr. Pratt, says Marion, gave away about ¾ of his estate,

donating money, land, and buildings for public use, and bequeathing the second largest Faberge collection in the world (only Queen Elizabeth held more) to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Mr. Pratt was often seen on foot, his chauffeured car trailing behind. Thinking she was finished, I asked Marion if I could come back for more stories. She burst into laughter: “Why do you want me to keep talking? I come from the Brooks family, the ‘Babbling Brooks’. We don’t stop talking.” Then she launched into another great story… She took a job with CBS affiliate WTOP in Washington, doing a show about women. Names like Edward R. Murrow and Eric Severeid headlined the CBS roster. She spent time with singer Kate Smith, whose America’s Sweetheart persona, says Marion, was a fake. “She was not nice. She would order a whole pile of food and give none to anybody else. Everyone on the crew hated our Kate Smith days,” because they worked the five-hour set-up without food. On assignment, she walked a White House receiving line, where she met President Harry Truman, his wife Bess, and their daughter Margaret. The President joked with her, saying she had to be an

imposter because no one at CBS was younger than Edward R. Murrow. Trying to show the President her press card, she nervously dropped her handbag on his feet. When she and the President bent down to retrieve its contents, the Secret Service pointed guns at her, unconvinced she was Press, even thinking she had shot the President. Truman assured them everything was fine. Reflecting again on Falmouth, Marion called church a unifier. In 1946, she married Franklin in the Old Falmouth Baptist Church. “That was our morning church. At two in the afternoon, we would attend the Union Church; it unified all of us.” The memory of Franklin having played football at JM revived another story. On Thanksgiving Day 1942, after their last game, 8 of the seniors and juniors on the team stood in line while Coach John Fenlon announced they would leave immediately by train for Quantico to join the U.S. Marines. The school band escorted them to the RF&P station with great fan-fare as the rest of the team followed. Four months later, all 8 were in the Pacific; 5 were killed in action. Franklin, wounded, came home three years later.

Before the present Falmouth Bridge, Marion’s story of her dad on the old bridge’s pedestrian walkway is my favorite. It is a human drama within a larger news story of the 1942 flood. She was a 17-year-old freshman at Mary Washington, living at home because her parents felt 17 was too young for campus life. “We had little sense as freshmen,” she says. “This story proves it.” Working inside Trinkle Library, Marion didn’t notice the rains. When she left, she called a cab but none showed. Some 45 minutes later, she did what any freshman would – walk home across the pedestrian plank walkway, over the rising tides gurgling between the planks, broken umbrella in hand. Halfway across, she heard her dad’s rising voice. He was crying, the only time she’d ever heard him cry. “He was losing his mind.” They made it home but their home and most of Falmouth was lost that night, including that footbridge. CORRECTION: Last month, my error misquoted/ misinterpreted Miss Robinson about Principal Drew. Mr. Drew in no way used corporal punishment and was an excellent administrator. I regret the error. - RG

Craig Sheldon is Nancy Yun Seldon’s husband. Nancy owns Gemstone Creation.

Turn Gold in Your Drawer Into Cash in Your Hand! Unwanted Gold? We Want It! Fair Market Prices Paid Wanted:10kt, 14kt,18kt and dental gold

212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-5 10

April 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

11


Libations the highland county

April. A cocktail lover’s delightful month. Sweet air, warm temperatures, al fresco dining, and Happy Hour! There is nothing like sitting at the pine bar at Bistro Bethem or at a sidewalk table on bustling William Street

The Papacy: Funny Hats & Wine By Jeremy sutton

By sara mattingly

photo by nancy vance

Vino

watching the Restaurant Row crowd shake its booty from one fine establishment to the next, people enjoying themselves responsibly. Key to their enjoyment are the libations they order, and I, pre-eminent worldwide cocktail consumer that I am, have an April fave I want to share. It comes from the Bistro bar crew and it is delightful – The Highland Country — light enough for spring; hearty enough for April showers. It’s actually a small martini, as Ryan, Derek, Jeffie and Bistro’s other fine tenders have told us. It’s easy to mix at home, too: 1.5 oz local Bowman Brothers Virginia Whiskey .75 oz Patricia Fino Sherry .75 oz Highland County VA Grade B Dark Amber maple syrup* (available in Highland County at annual festival; also check with Made in VA store on Caroline) 1 dropper house bitters (Angosturo) Pour all into a shaker of ice; shake, and strain into a small martini glass. Garnish with orange twist. And why use pure maple? 1) Pure maple syrup contains no preservatives, artificial flavoring or color. Pure maple syrup is FAT FREE! 2) Maple Syrup only has 40 calories per Tablespoon. Honey has 45, white sugar has 55 & corn sugar has 60. 3) Maple Syrup contain iron, potassium, magnesium & phosphorus - and has a higher calcium content that milk, and contains small amounts of amino acids, proteins & vitamins B2, B5 & niacin. 4) Tapping causes no permanent damage to the maple sugar tree. To your health and enjoyment! Cheers. Sara Mattingly attended the *Highland County Maple Syrup Festival last month (highlandcounty.org/maplefestival). Photo by Nancy Vance for Highland County Chamber of Commerce: Making maple syrup in Highland County, VA.

The Griffin Bookshop & Coffee Bar Introducing Bag Lunches! Fresh Sandwiches Tastefully Priced Scrumptiously Delicious

Since this is the monthly “Vino” column, we’ll focus on the wine (see next month’s Funny Hat column for more on that subject). We recently welcomed a new Pope, Francis the First, to the blessed ranks. It brings to mind the papacy’s role in one of this world’s truly great wines: Chateauneuf-du-Pape. Sourced from vineyards surrounding the small village bearing the same name in France’s southern Rhone Valley, they are the greatest of the southern French wines and the pride of Provence. The wines share a history with the Mother Church as well serendipitously being a great pair for the early spring weather and cuisine; the last days of true red wine weather, before Memorial Day hits and we ditch the stem for a can of whatever is coldest and closest. For awhile there (this is 14th c.) there were two popes: one in Rome and one in Avignon in southern France. Long story short, taking offense to a recently elected Italian pope turned haughty, several groups of Catholics choose to elect a new pope in Avignon. Known as the Western Schism, it saw nine popes take up residency in the Palais du Papes, and also saw the first whisperings abroad of the local wines of the area. Initially, all the rave was about the white wines, as good as those of the famed slopes of FrancheComte (as Burgundy was then named), while the local reds were held in low regard. This would soon change, as the second Avignon Pope, John XXII worked to expand the local vineyards and improve the local technique, particularly just north of Avignon, in a small village on the banks of the Rhone River. Wines from these vineyards began to be labeled as “Vin du Papes,” and after erecting a castle near the village (still a prominent symbol of the region) they became known as Chateuneufdu-Pape, or Little House of the Pope. As wine growing in the area expanded and improved, several dormant truths came to light. The northern stretch of what would eventually become the Chateauneuf-du-Pape AOC (that’s appellation d’origine controlee, a

regulated viticultural area, established here in 1936) was strewn with small, fistsized rocks over the clay soil, known as galets. These galets provided a wonderful service: during the day they would soak up the plentiful Provencal sunlight and store it, then at night release that heat back at the vines, increasing and hurrying the ripeness of the grapes. They would also protect the small amounts of moisture in the intense summer months from quick evaporation, refreshing the vines as well. Throw in the constant breath of the mistral (a northerly wind that helps cool the grapes during the day and prevent disease), better soils and a slightly higher elevation all lead to some great conditions for growing great red wines. Local reds are based on Grenache, a juicy and ebullient grape laced with dark red fruit and black pepper, the meatier and denser Syrah grape, earthy and herbal Mourvedre and a full 10 other red grape varieties of varying importance and qualities. The wines of CdP (their industry shorthand) see little oak and are made to maximize tannin to compete with the inherent lushness of the Grenache grape. What we’re left with nowadays is a lovely wine with powerful tannin, lush and juicy fruit and fantastic purity. Toss in some gamey, funky, fungal, piquant peripherals on the nose and it’s a wine we can all get behind. And a wine that’s perfect for those early forays on the grill. Leaner steak cuts like hangar or flank, spring lamb or even some heirloom pork rib chops all make wonderful pairs for these wines with simple preparations (rub with herbs de provence, S&P and call it done). Roast the last root vegetables of winter and lightly dress the first fresh greens of spring and you’ve got yourself a wonderful tie in to this transitional season. Throw a toast to Frankie One while you’re at it, wish him luck and enjoy the first meal of the season outside on the front porch. Jeremy Sutton is a national sales agent for Virginia-based wine importer Kysela Pere et Fils, Ltd.

Jake & Mike’s Restaurant Great Food, Excellent Service, In a Relaxing Upscale Atmosphere Open for Lunch, Dinner and Sunday Brunch 10% off one Entree with this Ad

Season’s Bounty

tiptoe through the garden with me

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Street Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540.370.4105

By vanessa moncure OK, I know Tiny Tim’s falsetto encouraged his audience to “tiptoe through the tulips with me”, but my tulips are still trying to recuperate from 70degree days, followed by wind and March snowstorms. Nothing left to tiptoe through here. Following is my annual garden update - last year’s potatoes, planted on St. Patrick’s Day, rotted in the too-wet ground and had to be replanted, from which we later had a bounteous crop. This year’s are barely peeking through, onions are several inches high, cabbage shivering but still hanging in there - but wow, the lettuce! Spinach! Beets! Mixed baby greens! Radishes! Best of all, our large asparagus bed and strawberries. Every pea is popping up; can’t wait for time to put in herbs, transplant tomatoes, peppers, then on to warm-weather crops. We have a stone foundation that holds the heat —I had okra through October. Our raised-bed garden is small but great for onions, greens. Even if your garden patch is a half-whiskey barrel, you can have greens, herbs, tomatoes, peppers, onions - even sweet potatoes. Best of all, no voles. We are as organic as we can be – Marigolds discourage pests, and use my special garlic/oil mixture: Two large whole heads of garlic boiled til very tender. Add 5 T. hot sauce, ½ c. vegetable oil, strain garlic, place liquid in spray bottle. Shake every time - great for aphids; stinkbugs don’t like it either! SPRING SALAD Wash and rinse thoroughly several times spinach and mixed greens, then lightly towel dry. Pea shoots are the first to grow, and delicious on a salad. Arrange atop. Lightly steam pea pods, sugar snap peas and English shelled peas, then plunge into ice water to chill and stop the cooking. Drain and arrange over greens. Add thinly sliced radishes. Dress with a French

www.oldetownebutcher.com

dressing made with one crushed garlic pod, S&fresh cracked pepper, one T. whole grain mustard, ¼ tsp. dried thyme, ¼ c. white balsamic vinegar and ¾ c. olive oil or half olive oil and canola oil. Add freshsteamed Gulf shrimp for a delicious luncheon dish - top with finely minced

Open: 10am - 7pm Monday through Friday 9am - 7pm Saturday, 11am - 6pm Sunday Lee Russell Proprietor

fresh red peppers. ASPARAGUS SALAD Have you ever wondered about the difference between white and green asparagus? Beyond the dramatic difference in cost, that is, and the availability. If you have your own asparagus bed, just keep mounding your light soil around the growing asparagus the white asparagus are delicacies because they are usually only available in early spring - and are white because the sunlight was blocked and they never developed their chlorophyll. Steam half green and half white asparagus, trying to have both the same size. Plunge into ice water so they will retain their colors. Set aside and toss lightly one jar of plain sliced artichoke hearts, drained; one jar sliced and drained hearts of palm, sliced green onions, finely diced fresh red peppers, halved grape tomatoes. Arrange asparagus on a platter, then top with vegetable mixture. Drizzle with a French

S ammy T’ s DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG’S

Serving Great Food Since 1981

Home of the “Camper Special” & the Best Burger in Town 801 Caroline Street

Try Our Self-Serve Yogurt open 11:30 am Daily Still Owned by the Emory Family

dressing and serve as salad course. STRAWBERRIES, LEMON CURD AND SCONES Delicious afternoon tea break. Slice strawberries, place in container sprinkle w/2T or more to taste but don’t stir til 5 min beforel serving… Lemon Curd - 2 c. water, 1 ½ c. sugar, ½ c. fresh lemon juice, 1 t. fresh lemon zest, cornstarch, dash salt, 3 egg yolks Combine water, sugar, cornstarch; bring to boil over med. heat, stir constantly. When mixture thickens, remove from heat, stir in juice, zest, salt. Whisk small amount boiling solution into beaten egg yolks, slowly so not to scramble. Return to heat, cook two min. Chill or bring to room temp… Scones: 2 c. cake flour, 6 T. butter, ¼ c. sugar, dash salt, 2 tsp. baking powder, 1 t. lemon zest - mix together, add ¾ c whipping cream, 2 well-beaten eggs. Roll out lightly on floured surface, cut into small rectangles or circles; brush tops w/whipping cream, sprinkle w/white sanding sugar or turbinado. Place on parchment paper, bake 400F til light brown, cooked through - less than 10 min. Serve w/strawberries, lemon curd - Enjoy

FREDERICKSBURG

Old Town’s Greatest Tour 35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

your SPRING!

New & Used Books/Coffee 723 Caroline Street 540-899-8041

12

April 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

806 William Street (540)-370-4590

(540) 371-2008

Vanessa Moncure spoiled her Easter guests with a meal to remember.

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

13


Libations the highland county

April. A cocktail lover’s delightful month. Sweet air, warm temperatures, al fresco dining, and Happy Hour! There is nothing like sitting at the pine bar at Bistro Bethem or at a sidewalk table on bustling William Street

The Papacy: Funny Hats & Wine By Jeremy sutton

By sara mattingly

photo by nancy vance

Vino

watching the Restaurant Row crowd shake its booty from one fine establishment to the next, people enjoying themselves responsibly. Key to their enjoyment are the libations they order, and I, pre-eminent worldwide cocktail consumer that I am, have an April fave I want to share. It comes from the Bistro bar crew and it is delightful – The Highland Country — light enough for spring; hearty enough for April showers. It’s actually a small martini, as Ryan, Derek, Jeffie and Bistro’s other fine tenders have told us. It’s easy to mix at home, too: 1.5 oz local Bowman Brothers Virginia Whiskey .75 oz Patricia Fino Sherry .75 oz Highland County VA Grade B Dark Amber maple syrup* (available in Highland County at annual festival; also check with Made in VA store on Caroline) 1 dropper house bitters (Angosturo) Pour all into a shaker of ice; shake, and strain into a small martini glass. Garnish with orange twist. And why use pure maple? 1) Pure maple syrup contains no preservatives, artificial flavoring or color. Pure maple syrup is FAT FREE! 2) Maple Syrup only has 40 calories per Tablespoon. Honey has 45, white sugar has 55 & corn sugar has 60. 3) Maple Syrup contain iron, potassium, magnesium & phosphorus - and has a higher calcium content that milk, and contains small amounts of amino acids, proteins & vitamins B2, B5 & niacin. 4) Tapping causes no permanent damage to the maple sugar tree. To your health and enjoyment! Cheers. Sara Mattingly attended the *Highland County Maple Syrup Festival last month (highlandcounty.org/maplefestival). Photo by Nancy Vance for Highland County Chamber of Commerce: Making maple syrup in Highland County, VA.

The Griffin Bookshop & Coffee Bar Introducing Bag Lunches! Fresh Sandwiches Tastefully Priced Scrumptiously Delicious

Since this is the monthly “Vino” column, we’ll focus on the wine (see next month’s Funny Hat column for more on that subject). We recently welcomed a new Pope, Francis the First, to the blessed ranks. It brings to mind the papacy’s role in one of this world’s truly great wines: Chateauneuf-du-Pape. Sourced from vineyards surrounding the small village bearing the same name in France’s southern Rhone Valley, they are the greatest of the southern French wines and the pride of Provence. The wines share a history with the Mother Church as well serendipitously being a great pair for the early spring weather and cuisine; the last days of true red wine weather, before Memorial Day hits and we ditch the stem for a can of whatever is coldest and closest. For awhile there (this is 14th c.) there were two popes: one in Rome and one in Avignon in southern France. Long story short, taking offense to a recently elected Italian pope turned haughty, several groups of Catholics choose to elect a new pope in Avignon. Known as the Western Schism, it saw nine popes take up residency in the Palais du Papes, and also saw the first whisperings abroad of the local wines of the area. Initially, all the rave was about the white wines, as good as those of the famed slopes of FrancheComte (as Burgundy was then named), while the local reds were held in low regard. This would soon change, as the second Avignon Pope, John XXII worked to expand the local vineyards and improve the local technique, particularly just north of Avignon, in a small village on the banks of the Rhone River. Wines from these vineyards began to be labeled as “Vin du Papes,” and after erecting a castle near the village (still a prominent symbol of the region) they became known as Chateuneufdu-Pape, or Little House of the Pope. As wine growing in the area expanded and improved, several dormant truths came to light. The northern stretch of what would eventually become the Chateauneuf-du-Pape AOC (that’s appellation d’origine controlee, a

regulated viticultural area, established here in 1936) was strewn with small, fistsized rocks over the clay soil, known as galets. These galets provided a wonderful service: during the day they would soak up the plentiful Provencal sunlight and store it, then at night release that heat back at the vines, increasing and hurrying the ripeness of the grapes. They would also protect the small amounts of moisture in the intense summer months from quick evaporation, refreshing the vines as well. Throw in the constant breath of the mistral (a northerly wind that helps cool the grapes during the day and prevent disease), better soils and a slightly higher elevation all lead to some great conditions for growing great red wines. Local reds are based on Grenache, a juicy and ebullient grape laced with dark red fruit and black pepper, the meatier and denser Syrah grape, earthy and herbal Mourvedre and a full 10 other red grape varieties of varying importance and qualities. The wines of CdP (their industry shorthand) see little oak and are made to maximize tannin to compete with the inherent lushness of the Grenache grape. What we’re left with nowadays is a lovely wine with powerful tannin, lush and juicy fruit and fantastic purity. Toss in some gamey, funky, fungal, piquant peripherals on the nose and it’s a wine we can all get behind. And a wine that’s perfect for those early forays on the grill. Leaner steak cuts like hangar or flank, spring lamb or even some heirloom pork rib chops all make wonderful pairs for these wines with simple preparations (rub with herbs de provence, S&P and call it done). Roast the last root vegetables of winter and lightly dress the first fresh greens of spring and you’ve got yourself a wonderful tie in to this transitional season. Throw a toast to Frankie One while you’re at it, wish him luck and enjoy the first meal of the season outside on the front porch. Jeremy Sutton is a national sales agent for Virginia-based wine importer Kysela Pere et Fils, Ltd.

Jake & Mike’s Restaurant Great Food, Excellent Service, In a Relaxing Upscale Atmosphere Open for Lunch, Dinner and Sunday Brunch 10% off one Entree with this Ad

Season’s Bounty

tiptoe through the garden with me

Olde Towne BUTCHER Corner of William & Charles Street Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540.370.4105

By vanessa moncure OK, I know Tiny Tim’s falsetto encouraged his audience to “tiptoe through the tulips with me”, but my tulips are still trying to recuperate from 70degree days, followed by wind and March snowstorms. Nothing left to tiptoe through here. Following is my annual garden update - last year’s potatoes, planted on St. Patrick’s Day, rotted in the too-wet ground and had to be replanted, from which we later had a bounteous crop. This year’s are barely peeking through, onions are several inches high, cabbage shivering but still hanging in there - but wow, the lettuce! Spinach! Beets! Mixed baby greens! Radishes! Best of all, our large asparagus bed and strawberries. Every pea is popping up; can’t wait for time to put in herbs, transplant tomatoes, peppers, then on to warm-weather crops. We have a stone foundation that holds the heat —I had okra through October. Our raised-bed garden is small but great for onions, greens. Even if your garden patch is a half-whiskey barrel, you can have greens, herbs, tomatoes, peppers, onions - even sweet potatoes. Best of all, no voles. We are as organic as we can be – Marigolds discourage pests, and use my special garlic/oil mixture: Two large whole heads of garlic boiled til very tender. Add 5 T. hot sauce, ½ c. vegetable oil, strain garlic, place liquid in spray bottle. Shake every time - great for aphids; stinkbugs don’t like it either! SPRING SALAD Wash and rinse thoroughly several times spinach and mixed greens, then lightly towel dry. Pea shoots are the first to grow, and delicious on a salad. Arrange atop. Lightly steam pea pods, sugar snap peas and English shelled peas, then plunge into ice water to chill and stop the cooking. Drain and arrange over greens. Add thinly sliced radishes. Dress with a French

www.oldetownebutcher.com

dressing made with one crushed garlic pod, S&fresh cracked pepper, one T. whole grain mustard, ¼ tsp. dried thyme, ¼ c. white balsamic vinegar and ¾ c. olive oil or half olive oil and canola oil. Add freshsteamed Gulf shrimp for a delicious luncheon dish - top with finely minced

Open: 10am - 7pm Monday through Friday 9am - 7pm Saturday, 11am - 6pm Sunday Lee Russell Proprietor

fresh red peppers. ASPARAGUS SALAD Have you ever wondered about the difference between white and green asparagus? Beyond the dramatic difference in cost, that is, and the availability. If you have your own asparagus bed, just keep mounding your light soil around the growing asparagus the white asparagus are delicacies because they are usually only available in early spring - and are white because the sunlight was blocked and they never developed their chlorophyll. Steam half green and half white asparagus, trying to have both the same size. Plunge into ice water so they will retain their colors. Set aside and toss lightly one jar of plain sliced artichoke hearts, drained; one jar sliced and drained hearts of palm, sliced green onions, finely diced fresh red peppers, halved grape tomatoes. Arrange asparagus on a platter, then top with vegetable mixture. Drizzle with a French

S ammy T’ s DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG’S

Serving Great Food Since 1981

Home of the “Camper Special” & the Best Burger in Town 801 Caroline Street

Try Our Self-Serve Yogurt open 11:30 am Daily Still Owned by the Emory Family

dressing and serve as salad course. STRAWBERRIES, LEMON CURD AND SCONES Delicious afternoon tea break. Slice strawberries, place in container sprinkle w/2T or more to taste but don’t stir til 5 min beforel serving… Lemon Curd - 2 c. water, 1 ½ c. sugar, ½ c. fresh lemon juice, 1 t. fresh lemon zest, cornstarch, dash salt, 3 egg yolks Combine water, sugar, cornstarch; bring to boil over med. heat, stir constantly. When mixture thickens, remove from heat, stir in juice, zest, salt. Whisk small amount boiling solution into beaten egg yolks, slowly so not to scramble. Return to heat, cook two min. Chill or bring to room temp… Scones: 2 c. cake flour, 6 T. butter, ¼ c. sugar, dash salt, 2 tsp. baking powder, 1 t. lemon zest - mix together, add ¾ c whipping cream, 2 well-beaten eggs. Roll out lightly on floured surface, cut into small rectangles or circles; brush tops w/whipping cream, sprinkle w/white sanding sugar or turbinado. Place on parchment paper, bake 400F til light brown, cooked through - less than 10 min. Serve w/strawberries, lemon curd - Enjoy

FREDERICKSBURG

Old Town’s Greatest Tour 35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

your SPRING!

New & Used Books/Coffee 723 Caroline Street 540-899-8041

12

April 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

806 William Street (540)-370-4590

(540) 371-2008

Vanessa Moncure spoiled her Easter guests with a meal to remember.

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

13


South of the Mason-Dixon

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS

tucked away at bowman center

It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

by mary lynn powers

Dixon I caught wind of the Mason-D Café and Bakery when a friend asked me to meet her for brunch on a Saturday morning. I had missed the opening of this new café, but my interest was piqued by the name, reminiscent of The Whistle Stop Café in the film “Fried Green Tomatoes.” I had visions of an old house type building renovated into a restaurant that served the best southern cuisine available. Well, the Café turned out to be set in an old warehouse district in the Bowman Center off of Rte. 2/17, and the only similarities to the Whistle Stop is that you have to go over the railroad tracks to get there, and the food is down home cooking good! When I talked with Kelly Hunt, owner and chef, she said the name came to her in a daydream about owning a business, and stuck there until it finally came true. She said it also has a bit to do with living and being raised in Fredericksburg, which is the South, but her family on her Mom’s side is from New York City, New Jersey and Philly. They were Jewish, and her great grandparents owned a Jewish Deli in Manhattan in the early 1900s. She grew up on the food that Mom, Grandmother and Great Grandmother cooked, Northern style. Her husband, from Philly, loves to cook with her, so hence the North-South blending. There is a thoroughly modern feel to this little café. I say “little” in that there are about a handful of tables, in a simplistic setting, but there is much to like about this eatery. The food itself is consistently good, which is always a selling point. All fresh made, from breakfast to lunch to baked goods, everything looks awesome. Some of the specialties include hand-cut potato chips topped with blue cheese, and deviled eggs topped with bacon. The steak fries are a French fry lover’s dream. The Saturday brunch is an offering that is not available at most other spots where Sunday brunch is more

14

April 2013

prevalent. There is nothing like starting your weekend with Eggs Benedict or an asparagus feta omelet. Some specialty drinks are available for brunch, plus a selection of bottled beers, and wines from VA and California. The bakery portion of the shop is more about pre-ordering, though they always have a small selection of sweets available. See the website for photos of their cakes, for instance, the coconut-pineapple cake looked like a blue ribbon winner. You can preorder cakes, pies and sandwich platters with 48 hours notice. The prices are very reasonable, and if the photos indicate the quality, the bakery alone will be a success. If you have not been out to this area, it houses the Blue and Gray Brewery. The remainder of the complex is industrial and storage, with a few tech and software businesses interspersed throughout, plus the Railroad Museum. This being said, the Café will have to pull in a good following to survive in this location. Never fear though, this new endeavor has a strong background. Kelly has just shy of a quarter century in the restaurant business, working all facets from serving and bartending to her last position with Wegmans as team leader of the seafood bar. She really liked the job there, and almost felt she had found her life career, when she saw a downtown eatery up for sale. Unfortunately for Kelly, that deal fell through. The seed had been planted though, and the availability of the new café space enabled her to pursue her dream. The upside to the location is the rent is considerably lower than downtown, and the building has a good basic kitchen. Right now, Kelly runs the shop with only one employee. You really have to know your stuff to be able to cook solo for a lunch crowd. If you need your lunch in a hurry, it’s best to call ahead, though there didn’t seem to be too long of a wait the day I ate there. I tried one of the entrée salads, which was a perfect size. I will definitely be back to try some sandwiches — all looked delicious going by my table! One of the main selling points is the friendly atmosphere, again kind of like walking into the Whistle Stop where everyone is glad to see each other! Mary Lynn Powers enjoyed the Mason-Dixon, 3318 Bourbon St., 22408, 540-371-1950. Open: Tues-Fri- 8-5 p.m., Sat Brunch 9-2 p.m. 10% Discount to Police, Fire & Rescue, Military in Uniform or with ID.

Front porch fredericksburg

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

DayTripper Hague Winery by scott richards

Michael “Lucky” Dean

Serving Traditional

at

Mexican, Tex-Mex Food

The Virginia Wine Experience Upstairs Art Gallery: “People, Places, Moments” April thru June

and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

3’x4’ Impasto-Style Paintings from photos of 1970’s-’80s living in Fairview Beach

Phone: 540-899-0969 E-mail: soupntaco@yahoo.com

826 Caroline Street Call Renee Gauvin (847-9231) for more information

Home of great Food & great Art! 720 Littlepage Sunkenwelltavern.com

EAT WELL DRINK WELL LIVE WELL

The General Store

Restaurant

Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~ Biological Terrain Assessment ~VoiceBio Analysis ~Aura Photography ~Body Cleanse Foot Detox We Carry Home Brewing Supplies ! Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

It is the season of wine festivals in Virginia, where everyone crowds in front of the winery booths with glasses extended, paying little attention, if any, to what the person pouring the wine is relating to them concerning what makes up this wine and why it should be your very favorite of all the wines in the festival. Many winery workers and owners love the rush of the people and the exposure of their product to the masses that attend these festivals. There exists, however, one winery in the Northern Neck of Virginia where the winery owner takes a much more laid back approach. I refer to none other than Steve Madey, owner and operator along with his wife, Cynthia, of Hague Winery. Steve stated he would rather concentrate on selling wine at the winery where he can take the time to talk with his customers. A wine club has been started with the idea that when people come to pick up their wine at a club event, it will provide a social atmosphere that is relaxed with people enjoying the food, wine and one another’s company. Situated on the historic Buena Vista Farm just outside of Hague, Virginia, there exists across the lawn from the vineyard, a renovated cottage that dates back to the early 1800’s and was built prior to the existing manor house (1835). In addition to restoring the structural integrity of the cottage as well as its original floor plan, many new amenities were added such as a new completely equipped kitchen and bath to make it a perfect place to spend several days while visiting the other local wineries in the area. Since 2004 when the vines were first planted, the Madeys have developed wines that have become a benchmark in

Virginia. Most of the wines produced are of the drier Bordeaux style that is finding more and more of an audience as the palate of the Commonwealth matures. A premier among hybrid vines in Virginia is the Chardonel. With their 2010 vintage, Hague Winery was awarded a Governor’s Cup Silver Medal. A light wine with medium body, it is similar to a French Chablis and would go exceptionally well with Thai or other spicy cuisine. The 2009 Rose, reminiscent of a Cote de Rhone dry rose, is made from a blend of Cabernet Franc and Touriga and aged only briefly in oak so that the fruit taste of the wine is not lost in the aging and the dryness of its taste is not overly prevalent. A favorite pairing is smoked pork loin with pasta and lightly sautéed vegetables. The 2010 Cabernet Franc, winner of a Governor’s Cup Silver Medal is a three to one blend of two Cabernet Franc clones, the greater being a VCR-10 Italian and the lesser a French clone. This is a wine to taste. Displaying a full-bodied richness that begs for food, whether a plate of Spanish Tapas or a meal such as lamb with all the trimmings, this wine will surely enhance a dining experience. The 2010 Meritage Reserve, a big bold taste that makes ones mouth glad it was tasted, is a Bordeaux blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot that was aged in new French Oak. Perfect with a big piece of meat or to accompany a nice cigar, it is little wonder this wine won a gold medal at the Virginia State Fair and a silver at the Governor’s Cup. Steve still envisions changes that he is confident will be big improvements to Hague Winery. At present, the tasting room has a large deck that hopefully will be covered in the next few months that will allow for outside events even when there is a chance of inclement weather. In addition to the continued development of an excellent portfolio of wines, Steve and Cynthia’s visionary restoration of this historic property makes Hague Winery a must see for all those who enjoy the beauty of the Northern Neck. Scott Richards owns Loch Haven Vineyards. He is a member of Virginia Vineyards Association, blogs at fromthevine.wordpress.com, and is a wine columnist for Front Porch and sports writer for The Caroline Progress.

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

15


South of the Mason-Dixon

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS

tucked away at bowman center

It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

by mary lynn powers

Dixon I caught wind of the Mason-D Café and Bakery when a friend asked me to meet her for brunch on a Saturday morning. I had missed the opening of this new café, but my interest was piqued by the name, reminiscent of The Whistle Stop Café in the film “Fried Green Tomatoes.” I had visions of an old house type building renovated into a restaurant that served the best southern cuisine available. Well, the Café turned out to be set in an old warehouse district in the Bowman Center off of Rte. 2/17, and the only similarities to the Whistle Stop is that you have to go over the railroad tracks to get there, and the food is down home cooking good! When I talked with Kelly Hunt, owner and chef, she said the name came to her in a daydream about owning a business, and stuck there until it finally came true. She said it also has a bit to do with living and being raised in Fredericksburg, which is the South, but her family on her Mom’s side is from New York City, New Jersey and Philly. They were Jewish, and her great grandparents owned a Jewish Deli in Manhattan in the early 1900s. She grew up on the food that Mom, Grandmother and Great Grandmother cooked, Northern style. Her husband, from Philly, loves to cook with her, so hence the North-South blending. There is a thoroughly modern feel to this little café. I say “little” in that there are about a handful of tables, in a simplistic setting, but there is much to like about this eatery. The food itself is consistently good, which is always a selling point. All fresh made, from breakfast to lunch to baked goods, everything looks awesome. Some of the specialties include hand-cut potato chips topped with blue cheese, and deviled eggs topped with bacon. The steak fries are a French fry lover’s dream. The Saturday brunch is an offering that is not available at most other spots where Sunday brunch is more

14

April 2013

prevalent. There is nothing like starting your weekend with Eggs Benedict or an asparagus feta omelet. Some specialty drinks are available for brunch, plus a selection of bottled beers, and wines from VA and California. The bakery portion of the shop is more about pre-ordering, though they always have a small selection of sweets available. See the website for photos of their cakes, for instance, the coconut-pineapple cake looked like a blue ribbon winner. You can preorder cakes, pies and sandwich platters with 48 hours notice. The prices are very reasonable, and if the photos indicate the quality, the bakery alone will be a success. If you have not been out to this area, it houses the Blue and Gray Brewery. The remainder of the complex is industrial and storage, with a few tech and software businesses interspersed throughout, plus the Railroad Museum. This being said, the Café will have to pull in a good following to survive in this location. Never fear though, this new endeavor has a strong background. Kelly has just shy of a quarter century in the restaurant business, working all facets from serving and bartending to her last position with Wegmans as team leader of the seafood bar. She really liked the job there, and almost felt she had found her life career, when she saw a downtown eatery up for sale. Unfortunately for Kelly, that deal fell through. The seed had been planted though, and the availability of the new café space enabled her to pursue her dream. The upside to the location is the rent is considerably lower than downtown, and the building has a good basic kitchen. Right now, Kelly runs the shop with only one employee. You really have to know your stuff to be able to cook solo for a lunch crowd. If you need your lunch in a hurry, it’s best to call ahead, though there didn’t seem to be too long of a wait the day I ate there. I tried one of the entrée salads, which was a perfect size. I will definitely be back to try some sandwiches — all looked delicious going by my table! One of the main selling points is the friendly atmosphere, again kind of like walking into the Whistle Stop where everyone is glad to see each other! Mary Lynn Powers enjoyed the Mason-Dixon, 3318 Bourbon St., 22408, 540-371-1950. Open: Tues-Fri- 8-5 p.m., Sat Brunch 9-2 p.m. 10% Discount to Police, Fire & Rescue, Military in Uniform or with ID.

Front porch fredericksburg

The Soup & Taco, Etc. 813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

DayTripper Hague Winery by scott richards

Michael “Lucky” Dean

Serving Traditional

at

Mexican, Tex-Mex Food

The Virginia Wine Experience Upstairs Art Gallery: “People, Places, Moments” April thru June

and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

3’x4’ Impasto-Style Paintings from photos of 1970’s-’80s living in Fairview Beach

Phone: 540-899-0969 E-mail: soupntaco@yahoo.com

826 Caroline Street Call Renee Gauvin (847-9231) for more information

Home of great Food & great Art! 720 Littlepage Sunkenwelltavern.com

EAT WELL DRINK WELL LIVE WELL

The General Store

Restaurant

Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~ Biological Terrain Assessment ~VoiceBio Analysis ~Aura Photography ~Body Cleanse Foot Detox We Carry Home Brewing Supplies ! Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

It is the season of wine festivals in Virginia, where everyone crowds in front of the winery booths with glasses extended, paying little attention, if any, to what the person pouring the wine is relating to them concerning what makes up this wine and why it should be your very favorite of all the wines in the festival. Many winery workers and owners love the rush of the people and the exposure of their product to the masses that attend these festivals. There exists, however, one winery in the Northern Neck of Virginia where the winery owner takes a much more laid back approach. I refer to none other than Steve Madey, owner and operator along with his wife, Cynthia, of Hague Winery. Steve stated he would rather concentrate on selling wine at the winery where he can take the time to talk with his customers. A wine club has been started with the idea that when people come to pick up their wine at a club event, it will provide a social atmosphere that is relaxed with people enjoying the food, wine and one another’s company. Situated on the historic Buena Vista Farm just outside of Hague, Virginia, there exists across the lawn from the vineyard, a renovated cottage that dates back to the early 1800’s and was built prior to the existing manor house (1835). In addition to restoring the structural integrity of the cottage as well as its original floor plan, many new amenities were added such as a new completely equipped kitchen and bath to make it a perfect place to spend several days while visiting the other local wineries in the area. Since 2004 when the vines were first planted, the Madeys have developed wines that have become a benchmark in

Virginia. Most of the wines produced are of the drier Bordeaux style that is finding more and more of an audience as the palate of the Commonwealth matures. A premier among hybrid vines in Virginia is the Chardonel. With their 2010 vintage, Hague Winery was awarded a Governor’s Cup Silver Medal. A light wine with medium body, it is similar to a French Chablis and would go exceptionally well with Thai or other spicy cuisine. The 2009 Rose, reminiscent of a Cote de Rhone dry rose, is made from a blend of Cabernet Franc and Touriga and aged only briefly in oak so that the fruit taste of the wine is not lost in the aging and the dryness of its taste is not overly prevalent. A favorite pairing is smoked pork loin with pasta and lightly sautéed vegetables. The 2010 Cabernet Franc, winner of a Governor’s Cup Silver Medal is a three to one blend of two Cabernet Franc clones, the greater being a VCR-10 Italian and the lesser a French clone. This is a wine to taste. Displaying a full-bodied richness that begs for food, whether a plate of Spanish Tapas or a meal such as lamb with all the trimmings, this wine will surely enhance a dining experience. The 2010 Meritage Reserve, a big bold taste that makes ones mouth glad it was tasted, is a Bordeaux blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot that was aged in new French Oak. Perfect with a big piece of meat or to accompany a nice cigar, it is little wonder this wine won a gold medal at the Virginia State Fair and a silver at the Governor’s Cup. Steve still envisions changes that he is confident will be big improvements to Hague Winery. At present, the tasting room has a large deck that hopefully will be covered in the next few months that will allow for outside events even when there is a chance of inclement weather. In addition to the continued development of an excellent portfolio of wines, Steve and Cynthia’s visionary restoration of this historic property makes Hague Winery a must see for all those who enjoy the beauty of the Northern Neck. Scott Richards owns Loch Haven Vineyards. He is a member of Virginia Vineyards Association, blogs at fromthevine.wordpress.com, and is a wine columnist for Front Porch and sports writer for The Caroline Progress.

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

15


april 2013… From showers to flowers *Some events run same day weekly or more than one day.

monday, april 1

Don’t be a fool! Be kind today… *Riverside Dinner Theater: The Full Monty featuring Sally Struthers thru April 28; Children’s Theater Lunch N Show (Sat, some Tues/Thurs). Wed matinee: arrive 1130A, show 130P; Sun matinee: arrive 1P, show 3P; Thurs., Fri., Sat: arrive 6P, show 8P. Tix: 730-4300; riversidedt.com Register for Walk: Individ., teams, orgs and donors for “Sixth Annual Walk for Mental Wellness”. Mental Health America of FXBG (MHAF). Online til May 2: mhafred.org/walk2013 for May 4 event RACSB seeking entries for Ninth Annual “The Art of Recovery” exhibit featuring artwork by adults w/ mental illness. Opens May 3 at PONSHOP Heard In The Burg: Tix on sale at Sunken Well Tavern! Larry Keel, Hackensack Boys, Big Daddy Love, Elby Brass, and www.heardintheburg.com for June 8 show at FXBG Fair Grounds. VIP tickets available only at the Well. Info: heardintheburg.com. Some proceeds to Community Outreach

tuesday, april 2

SanKocho Live! Live music w/ $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials! No cover, all ages. Bistro Bethem *April’s Chappell Great Lives Lecture Series: Tonight: Queen Elizabeth II. Apr 9: Bill Wilson (Alcoholics Anonymous). Apr 11: Ernest Hemingway. Apr 16: Rasputin. Apr 18: Abraham Lincoln. Apr 23: Michelangelo. Apr 25: Madness & Greatness. GW Hall, Dodd Auditorium. 730P. 6541065

wednesday, april 3

Kenmore Inn Spring Wine Dinner 7P. “A sensitive plant, poetic inspired.” Where is the Line? Attendees assemble care kits for victims of sexual abuse to distribute to MW Hospital, Safe Harbor and Rappahannock Council Against Sexual Assault. Goolrick Hall, Gym. 6-8P. 654-1053 150th Reenactment Revisited” - photographic tribute to December 2012 reenactment of Battle of FXBG by artist Sue Henderson. Central Rapp. Regional Library Atrium April 2-30. sue@suehendersoncreates.com *Miss Lady & Mr. Man’s Open Mic Jam 8-11P every Wed. The Rec Center, 213 William

Wags & Purrs Pet Aupair Service

For Special Attention All Year Round Call Alexis Grogan at 540 - 903 - 0437 Serving 22401 & 22405 16

April 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

CALENDAR of events FCCA Poetry Group first Sat monthly 1P. Free

thursday, april 4

*FXBG Jazz Collective’s open jazz jam twice monthly: 1st & 3rd Thurs. Live bebop, Latin jazz, fine cocktails. Musicians, bring instruments (no large amps). fredericksburgjazzcollective.org *CommonWealth Slam Poetry Open Mic 7-10P. Read All Over Books, 307 William. Acoustic performers, singers encouraged to perform. Weekly! $5; free w/ student I.D Schwetzburg preview of Fred-Zingen: Art Exhibition. Tanya M. Richey transports FXBG to partner city in Germany via artwork. Her paintings of FXBG at her studio on Caroline *Music every Thurs live at Kenmore Inn 8-11P

first friday, april 5

LibertyTown, 5-9P: “Feast for the Eyes” juried exhibition of Art about Food. Show runs til Apr 28. Opening night 5-8P, Edible Art Competition, Food about Art. Enter your creation by 5 that day. Vote your favorites! libertytownarts.com Art First Gallery featuring works of Jessica Cannon, other member artists. 6-9P. Up Apr 2-29 11-5 PONSHOP Studio/Gallery Opening Reception: Crystal Rodrigue, Nicholas Candela, Gabriel Pons, Stephen Graham, Josh Barber, Scarlett Pons, Julie Maida, Caitlin Emison; Leslie Brier, Ashleigh Burbidge *England Run Library Poetry Readings each Fri in April. 4P. Share your favorite published poems, original work, or just come listen. Populuxe 1st Friday art event 5-9P at 107 William *FCCA Opening: Regional Juried Show, and Garden Portraits by Kathy Guzman. Joseph DiBella Critiques Apr 27, register by Apr 20. 373-5646. 813 Sophia. fccava.org. Wed-Mon 12-4P, Sat 11-4P Norma Woodward, featured artist. Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline. Reception 6-9P. Daily 11-5P *Fridays@The Last Resort. St. George’s Church Reception: 810 Weekend Gallery at 810 Caroline. 10-6 Fri & Sat.; 1-4 Sun. 371-8100 Live Music @ Courtyard Marriott - Wave on Wave every First Friday

saturday, april 6

FXBG Farmer’s Market at Hurkamp Park, William at Prince Edward. Art in the Park 7A-2P featuring Sonja Wise (sonjawise.com) and others. Every First Sat

Relay for Life: American Cancer Society. Apr 6-7. 6P-7A. Register/info: www.relayforlife.org

Women’s Empowerment Seminar in Warrenton: Michelle Kelley, licensed counselor, owner of Girls Stand Strong. 5-hr. empowerment seminar: how to change toxic relationships: How to Find & Claim Your Voice -Your Key to Happier, Empowered Future. Airlie Conference Center, 930A-230P. 703505-2413

wednesday, april 10

Hormone, Toxicity & Weight Gain Connection 630–8P. Whole Health Chiropractic, 434 Bridgewater. $15. If you have been interested in Detoxification and Weight Loss, here’s your chance to learn more and begin your journey to renewed health and vitality! Opening Reception: Juried Student Exhibition. duPont Gallery. College at Thornton. 4-6P.

thursday, april 11

Free PRIDE Training sessions 9-5P. UMFS, 305 Charlotte. 540-898-1773 before Apr 5. Become a Foster Parent, change the life of a child forever. umfs.org

Bill Harris: New Paintings. Stephen Graham’s film premier: “W.C. Harris -The Making of a Painting.” 20-min. film shown every hour on the hour. 7P10P. Sunken Well Tavern. Apps; Cash bar. Show runs thru May 11

FXBG Area Museum w/ Hallowed Ground Tours: third season of walking tours of historic downtown. Bricks and Boards in the ’Burg. Every Sat, 10A. $5/adults $2/child, students. Info: 540809-3918

*The Tempest. duPont Hall, Klein Theatre. AfterWords post-performance discussions. $18/general admission; $16/students, senior citizens. Thru Apr 21. Times: 654-1111

sunday, april 7

*AM1230 WFVA “Community Link” 8-830A. Spotsy Schools social worker Michelle Patton on homeless in area schools. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net *Kenmore Inn, 1200 Princess Anne, 3717622/•kenmoreinn.com: Elegant Sun. Brunch, 1130A-230P *Courtyard Marriott: Every Sunday Brunch 9A-2P *Jams: Colonial Tavern: Jazz 7P; *Sunken Well Tavern: Bluegrass 7P

monday, april 8

FXBG Sister City Association w/ UMW. Visit by head municipal archaeologist of Frejus, FR. 7P. Mansard Gallery, Area Museum. Apr 9: 7P, Monroe Hall 116, UMW. Talks free. 654 1342 Art Opening at Bistro Bethem: “The Release,” opens 6P-9P. Solo Show of New works by Jenna Anderson. JennaAndersonFineArt.com

tuesday, april 9

*Gemstone Creations’ Antwerp Diamond Event, 606 Caroline. Details: 373-7847. Through Apr 20 *Evening w/ an Expert lecture series: Impact of Emancipation Proclamation on freed slaves; role of African American churches in strengthening black communities; 1963 March in FXBG, how local churches responded to racial tensions. Mansard Gallery 7P. 1001 Princess Anne. 371-3037 Jon Wiley & Friends Live at Bistro Bethem: $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials! All ages, no cover. 8-11P

*Basic Digital Photography: Fundamentals of digital camera ops. Bring camera/ manual. Every Thurs thru Apr 25. 7-9P; Sun Apr 27 130P. Courthouse Community Center. $78 Stafford residents; $88 Non-Stafford. Deadline one week prior: 658-5116

Food Swap in Hurkamp Park: 10-330P. Register. http://fredfoodswap1.eventbrite.com/#. Bakers, canners, picklers, distillers, home cooks. All homemade, homegrown, or foraged by you Stafford Hospital Foundation 5K Coldwell Banker Elite Grand Prix race. Stafford Hospital. Two & a half loop USA Track & Field Certified. $30. Register: on-line til Apr 11, 8A. Mail-ins received by Apr 12. In-person at VA Runner (1993 Carl D. Silver Pkwy) Apr 12. At race, Apr 13

sunday, april 14

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Tory Willis, Historic Garden Week. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net *Chamber Music Series: “Beautiful Music in a Beautiful Space.” 3P. $10/person; students free. St. George’s, Princess Anne. stgeorgesepiscopal.net. Third Sun monthly thru May

Explore Lauck’s Island: old winery ruins, identify native plants! Bring bag lunch for island. Min age 8 yrs. 10am-3pm. $30/per Book signing: Thomas Higgins, author of How Far is it From Richmond to Heaven; special showing of artwork by Anne Higgins. Under the Mango Tree, 606 Caroline, 1P-3P

Mercutio Live at Bistro Bethem: $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials! All ages, no cover at door

Fairy Godmother Project for pediatric cancer: Scavenger hunt starts at J.Brian’s Tap Rm. fairygodmotherproject.org/fredericksburg-events

Courtyard Marriott: Blues / Jazz in M. Washington Rm. Cash cover. 620 Caroline. 373-8300

LibertyTown Artists’ Yard Sale 8-Noon (raindate: May 11). We’ll be out in the yard! The Kenmore Inn Is Very Pleased To Present International Recording Artist Shane Alexander. One Night Only. $20/door. Presale: 540-371-7622. Bed & Bistro since 1793. Listen to Shane at shanealexandermusic.com. 1200 Princess Anne. 540-371-7622. Kenmoreinn.com

UMW Jazz Ensemble featuring Rick Whitehead. GW Hall, Dodd Auditorium. 3P. Whitehead Trio 330P

Free Vegetarian Cooking class every 3rd Sat. 2330P. Meditation 4-5P. Porter Library

U.S. Air Force Premier Jazz Ensemble -Airmen of Note. GW Hall, Dodd Auditorium. 430P

FCCA Art Guild of VA meets third Sat 10-Noon. $15/year

UMW Concert Band: GW Hall, Dodd Auditorium. 730P. 654-1012

monday, april 15 Tax Day

FCCA’s “Trash To Art” at Caledon State Park. Sign up by today: 540-663-3861. Event: 10-3P

saturday, april 13

tuesday, april 16

sunday, april 21

friday, april 12

Earth Day on the Rappahannock at Old Mill Park: 11A-3P. Tenth year of festival Magnolia Ball. See ad for details

Eddie James Trio Live at bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials! All ages, no cover. 8-11P

wednesday, april 17

Workshop: Master Class Clinic w/ Guitarist Pete Fields. UMW Jazz Festival. Pollard Hall, Rm 304. 2P. Performance by Peter Fields & World Jam Club. 4P

Free Lunch & Learn: 12N. 30 min talk on Family Dynamics when new person enters family. Bring bag lunch to 305 Charlotte. RSVP: 540-898-1773 before April 16. www.umfs.org

Riverside Writers 11th Annual Celebration of Poetry 930A-4P. Salem Church Library, Mtg. Rm A. 2601

thursday, april 18

23rd Annual Multicultural Fair. UMW campus. 10–5P. Free YMCA, 5700 Smith Station: Spring Fling Zumbathon. Mardi Gras meets Carnival. Costume Contest, music, art, raffles. Bring towel. $10/door. Benefits Jay Massad Support Campaign; Area Sickle Cell Anemia Art Show at My Place Latin Grill: Peggy Wickham’s “Vacation Memories”. Thru May 13. 10908 Courthouse Rd. Spotsy. 891-2002 “Tell” monthly show at Horseshoes & Hand Grenades

Take Back the Night. Rapp. Council Against Sexual Assault. Ball Circle. 5-7P

friday, april 19

80th Historic Garden Week tour features historic sites. Rappahannock Valley Garden Club. 10–5P. Tix: $25/advance; $30/day of. www.vagardenweek.org/toursdetails.cfm?TourID=67.

friday, april 26

Spring Concert – Young at Heart. 730P. Dodd Auditorium. Popular classics. Rapp.Youth Symphony directed by V. Jackson. $10; w/ UMW ID $2. Tix: philharmonic.umw.edu Songwriters’ Showcase: Kevin Elliot, Rupert Wates, “beat generation” Charles Nolan, awardwinning country voice Karen Collins. 8P. Picker’s Supply Concert Hall, 902 Caroline. $10; Students $5.898-0611 Ingleside Winery Spring Barrel Tasting 1–4P. Straight from the barrel tour, tasting, souvenir glass, music, light fare. $20. Reservations: 804/224-8687 Mid-Atlantic Wind Symphony “1963”. FXBG Academy. Hindemith Elegy for Young American, Lo Presti: To Set the Darkness Echoing, Dana Wilson, Beatles Medley. MidAtlanticWindSymphony.com $5/Adv./$7 Door

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Dr Brooke Rossheim, Rappahannock Area Health District Director talks about rabies. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net

sunday, april 28

St. George’s Chamber Music Series: Beautiful Music in a Beautiful Space. Guitarist James Manuele 3P. $10; Students free. 905 Princess Anne. stgeorgesepiscopal.net

Fair Trade: Ten Thousand Villages in Village at Towne Centre. 15% net sales benefit Haiti Micah Project for impoverished/uneducated children. 15P. haiti-micha.org. fredericksburg.tenthousandvillages.com

UMW Choral Concert. GW Hall, Dodd Auditorium. 730P. Free. 654-1012

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Battle of Chancellorsville preview. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net

tuesday, april 30

3rd Fri, 830A business ladies’ free networking “TIPS”. Ellen Baptist, 548-0652

monday, april 22

Free Health Seminar. Belmont, 224 Washington. Pediatric ear, nose, throat (ENT) disorders

The Recliners: Colonial Tavern. Free show. 930P

tuesday, april 23

Larry, Harry & Buck Live at Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials. All ages, no cover

saturday, april 20

UMW Philharmonic Musical Mix. GW Hall, Dodd Auditorium. 730P. Tix prices TBD. 654-1324 Rapp. Adult Activities Plant Sale. 750 Kings Hwy. Mon-Sat 10-4P; Sun 12-4P. At Mayfest, May 4, 103P Trinity Episcopal Church spring yard/ bake sale 830A-3P. Rain/ shine. Corner William and College

Earth Day

Garden Art Show & Sale. 102 W Cambridge. 10-4P. http://www.Professional-Artists-Stafford-VA.com The Kitchen At Wittingham: “From Garden to Table”. Chef LB, Ambassador to Thomas Jefferson’s Gardens at Monticello, Cooking Instructor at Whittingham. Special Garden Day Food Tastings 11-3P. Demo 2P:”Best Ways to Prepare and Cook Leafy Greens”

If you are reading this 190th issue of FP, thank an advertiser! If you are an advertiser, list your event. Deadline for May. is April 20. Paste your event in an email to frntprch@aol.com or go to http://frontporchfredericksburg.com/calendar/su bmitcalevent.cfm for both print and e-e editions.

~ Peggy Wickham Art ~ Companionship Meal Preparation Medication Reminders Laundry

Light Housekeeping Shopping/Errands Personal Care Flexible Hours

Call for a free, no-obligation appointment

540.899.1422 Each HomeInstead Franchise Office is Independently Owned & Operated

homeinstead.com

1692 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

At My Latin Grill Art Show April 13th to May 13th Artist Peggy Wickham’s “Vacation Memories” 10908 Courthouse Rd Spotsylvania, VA 540-891-2002

Front Porch on front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

17


april 2013… From showers to flowers *Some events run same day weekly or more than one day.

monday, april 1

Don’t be a fool! Be kind today… *Riverside Dinner Theater: The Full Monty featuring Sally Struthers thru April 28; Children’s Theater Lunch N Show (Sat, some Tues/Thurs). Wed matinee: arrive 1130A, show 130P; Sun matinee: arrive 1P, show 3P; Thurs., Fri., Sat: arrive 6P, show 8P. Tix: 730-4300; riversidedt.com Register for Walk: Individ., teams, orgs and donors for “Sixth Annual Walk for Mental Wellness”. Mental Health America of FXBG (MHAF). Online til May 2: mhafred.org/walk2013 for May 4 event RACSB seeking entries for Ninth Annual “The Art of Recovery” exhibit featuring artwork by adults w/ mental illness. Opens May 3 at PONSHOP Heard In The Burg: Tix on sale at Sunken Well Tavern! Larry Keel, Hackensack Boys, Big Daddy Love, Elby Brass, and www.heardintheburg.com for June 8 show at FXBG Fair Grounds. VIP tickets available only at the Well. Info: heardintheburg.com. Some proceeds to Community Outreach

tuesday, april 2

SanKocho Live! Live music w/ $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials! No cover, all ages. Bistro Bethem *April’s Chappell Great Lives Lecture Series: Tonight: Queen Elizabeth II. Apr 9: Bill Wilson (Alcoholics Anonymous). Apr 11: Ernest Hemingway. Apr 16: Rasputin. Apr 18: Abraham Lincoln. Apr 23: Michelangelo. Apr 25: Madness & Greatness. GW Hall, Dodd Auditorium. 730P. 6541065

wednesday, april 3

Kenmore Inn Spring Wine Dinner 7P. “A sensitive plant, poetic inspired.” Where is the Line? Attendees assemble care kits for victims of sexual abuse to distribute to MW Hospital, Safe Harbor and Rappahannock Council Against Sexual Assault. Goolrick Hall, Gym. 6-8P. 654-1053 150th Reenactment Revisited” - photographic tribute to December 2012 reenactment of Battle of FXBG by artist Sue Henderson. Central Rapp. Regional Library Atrium April 2-30. sue@suehendersoncreates.com *Miss Lady & Mr. Man’s Open Mic Jam 8-11P every Wed. The Rec Center, 213 William

Wags & Purrs Pet Aupair Service

For Special Attention All Year Round Call Alexis Grogan at 540 - 903 - 0437 Serving 22401 & 22405 16

April 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

CALENDAR of events FCCA Poetry Group first Sat monthly 1P. Free

thursday, april 4

*FXBG Jazz Collective’s open jazz jam twice monthly: 1st & 3rd Thurs. Live bebop, Latin jazz, fine cocktails. Musicians, bring instruments (no large amps). fredericksburgjazzcollective.org *CommonWealth Slam Poetry Open Mic 7-10P. Read All Over Books, 307 William. Acoustic performers, singers encouraged to perform. Weekly! $5; free w/ student I.D Schwetzburg preview of Fred-Zingen: Art Exhibition. Tanya M. Richey transports FXBG to partner city in Germany via artwork. Her paintings of FXBG at her studio on Caroline *Music every Thurs live at Kenmore Inn 8-11P

first friday, april 5

LibertyTown, 5-9P: “Feast for the Eyes” juried exhibition of Art about Food. Show runs til Apr 28. Opening night 5-8P, Edible Art Competition, Food about Art. Enter your creation by 5 that day. Vote your favorites! libertytownarts.com Art First Gallery featuring works of Jessica Cannon, other member artists. 6-9P. Up Apr 2-29 11-5 PONSHOP Studio/Gallery Opening Reception: Crystal Rodrigue, Nicholas Candela, Gabriel Pons, Stephen Graham, Josh Barber, Scarlett Pons, Julie Maida, Caitlin Emison; Leslie Brier, Ashleigh Burbidge *England Run Library Poetry Readings each Fri in April. 4P. Share your favorite published poems, original work, or just come listen. Populuxe 1st Friday art event 5-9P at 107 William *FCCA Opening: Regional Juried Show, and Garden Portraits by Kathy Guzman. Joseph DiBella Critiques Apr 27, register by Apr 20. 373-5646. 813 Sophia. fccava.org. Wed-Mon 12-4P, Sat 11-4P Norma Woodward, featured artist. Brush Strokes Gallery, 824 Caroline. Reception 6-9P. Daily 11-5P *Fridays@The Last Resort. St. George’s Church Reception: 810 Weekend Gallery at 810 Caroline. 10-6 Fri & Sat.; 1-4 Sun. 371-8100 Live Music @ Courtyard Marriott - Wave on Wave every First Friday

saturday, april 6

FXBG Farmer’s Market at Hurkamp Park, William at Prince Edward. Art in the Park 7A-2P featuring Sonja Wise (sonjawise.com) and others. Every First Sat

Relay for Life: American Cancer Society. Apr 6-7. 6P-7A. Register/info: www.relayforlife.org

Women’s Empowerment Seminar in Warrenton: Michelle Kelley, licensed counselor, owner of Girls Stand Strong. 5-hr. empowerment seminar: how to change toxic relationships: How to Find & Claim Your Voice -Your Key to Happier, Empowered Future. Airlie Conference Center, 930A-230P. 703505-2413

wednesday, april 10

Hormone, Toxicity & Weight Gain Connection 630–8P. Whole Health Chiropractic, 434 Bridgewater. $15. If you have been interested in Detoxification and Weight Loss, here’s your chance to learn more and begin your journey to renewed health and vitality! Opening Reception: Juried Student Exhibition. duPont Gallery. College at Thornton. 4-6P.

thursday, april 11

Free PRIDE Training sessions 9-5P. UMFS, 305 Charlotte. 540-898-1773 before Apr 5. Become a Foster Parent, change the life of a child forever. umfs.org

Bill Harris: New Paintings. Stephen Graham’s film premier: “W.C. Harris -The Making of a Painting.” 20-min. film shown every hour on the hour. 7P10P. Sunken Well Tavern. Apps; Cash bar. Show runs thru May 11

FXBG Area Museum w/ Hallowed Ground Tours: third season of walking tours of historic downtown. Bricks and Boards in the ’Burg. Every Sat, 10A. $5/adults $2/child, students. Info: 540809-3918

*The Tempest. duPont Hall, Klein Theatre. AfterWords post-performance discussions. $18/general admission; $16/students, senior citizens. Thru Apr 21. Times: 654-1111

sunday, april 7

*AM1230 WFVA “Community Link” 8-830A. Spotsy Schools social worker Michelle Patton on homeless in area schools. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net *Kenmore Inn, 1200 Princess Anne, 3717622/•kenmoreinn.com: Elegant Sun. Brunch, 1130A-230P *Courtyard Marriott: Every Sunday Brunch 9A-2P *Jams: Colonial Tavern: Jazz 7P; *Sunken Well Tavern: Bluegrass 7P

monday, april 8

FXBG Sister City Association w/ UMW. Visit by head municipal archaeologist of Frejus, FR. 7P. Mansard Gallery, Area Museum. Apr 9: 7P, Monroe Hall 116, UMW. Talks free. 654 1342 Art Opening at Bistro Bethem: “The Release,” opens 6P-9P. Solo Show of New works by Jenna Anderson. JennaAndersonFineArt.com

tuesday, april 9

*Gemstone Creations’ Antwerp Diamond Event, 606 Caroline. Details: 373-7847. Through Apr 20 *Evening w/ an Expert lecture series: Impact of Emancipation Proclamation on freed slaves; role of African American churches in strengthening black communities; 1963 March in FXBG, how local churches responded to racial tensions. Mansard Gallery 7P. 1001 Princess Anne. 371-3037 Jon Wiley & Friends Live at Bistro Bethem: $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials! All ages, no cover. 8-11P

*Basic Digital Photography: Fundamentals of digital camera ops. Bring camera/ manual. Every Thurs thru Apr 25. 7-9P; Sun Apr 27 130P. Courthouse Community Center. $78 Stafford residents; $88 Non-Stafford. Deadline one week prior: 658-5116

Food Swap in Hurkamp Park: 10-330P. Register. http://fredfoodswap1.eventbrite.com/#. Bakers, canners, picklers, distillers, home cooks. All homemade, homegrown, or foraged by you Stafford Hospital Foundation 5K Coldwell Banker Elite Grand Prix race. Stafford Hospital. Two & a half loop USA Track & Field Certified. $30. Register: on-line til Apr 11, 8A. Mail-ins received by Apr 12. In-person at VA Runner (1993 Carl D. Silver Pkwy) Apr 12. At race, Apr 13

sunday, april 14

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Tory Willis, Historic Garden Week. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net *Chamber Music Series: “Beautiful Music in a Beautiful Space.” 3P. $10/person; students free. St. George’s, Princess Anne. stgeorgesepiscopal.net. Third Sun monthly thru May

Explore Lauck’s Island: old winery ruins, identify native plants! Bring bag lunch for island. Min age 8 yrs. 10am-3pm. $30/per Book signing: Thomas Higgins, author of How Far is it From Richmond to Heaven; special showing of artwork by Anne Higgins. Under the Mango Tree, 606 Caroline, 1P-3P

Mercutio Live at Bistro Bethem: $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials! All ages, no cover at door

Fairy Godmother Project for pediatric cancer: Scavenger hunt starts at J.Brian’s Tap Rm. fairygodmotherproject.org/fredericksburg-events

Courtyard Marriott: Blues / Jazz in M. Washington Rm. Cash cover. 620 Caroline. 373-8300

LibertyTown Artists’ Yard Sale 8-Noon (raindate: May 11). We’ll be out in the yard! The Kenmore Inn Is Very Pleased To Present International Recording Artist Shane Alexander. One Night Only. $20/door. Presale: 540-371-7622. Bed & Bistro since 1793. Listen to Shane at shanealexandermusic.com. 1200 Princess Anne. 540-371-7622. Kenmoreinn.com

UMW Jazz Ensemble featuring Rick Whitehead. GW Hall, Dodd Auditorium. 3P. Whitehead Trio 330P

Free Vegetarian Cooking class every 3rd Sat. 2330P. Meditation 4-5P. Porter Library

U.S. Air Force Premier Jazz Ensemble -Airmen of Note. GW Hall, Dodd Auditorium. 430P

FCCA Art Guild of VA meets third Sat 10-Noon. $15/year

UMW Concert Band: GW Hall, Dodd Auditorium. 730P. 654-1012

monday, april 15 Tax Day

FCCA’s “Trash To Art” at Caledon State Park. Sign up by today: 540-663-3861. Event: 10-3P

saturday, april 13

tuesday, april 16

sunday, april 21

friday, april 12

Earth Day on the Rappahannock at Old Mill Park: 11A-3P. Tenth year of festival Magnolia Ball. See ad for details

Eddie James Trio Live at bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials! All ages, no cover. 8-11P

wednesday, april 17

Workshop: Master Class Clinic w/ Guitarist Pete Fields. UMW Jazz Festival. Pollard Hall, Rm 304. 2P. Performance by Peter Fields & World Jam Club. 4P

Free Lunch & Learn: 12N. 30 min talk on Family Dynamics when new person enters family. Bring bag lunch to 305 Charlotte. RSVP: 540-898-1773 before April 16. www.umfs.org

Riverside Writers 11th Annual Celebration of Poetry 930A-4P. Salem Church Library, Mtg. Rm A. 2601

thursday, april 18

23rd Annual Multicultural Fair. UMW campus. 10–5P. Free YMCA, 5700 Smith Station: Spring Fling Zumbathon. Mardi Gras meets Carnival. Costume Contest, music, art, raffles. Bring towel. $10/door. Benefits Jay Massad Support Campaign; Area Sickle Cell Anemia Art Show at My Place Latin Grill: Peggy Wickham’s “Vacation Memories”. Thru May 13. 10908 Courthouse Rd. Spotsy. 891-2002 “Tell” monthly show at Horseshoes & Hand Grenades

Take Back the Night. Rapp. Council Against Sexual Assault. Ball Circle. 5-7P

friday, april 19

80th Historic Garden Week tour features historic sites. Rappahannock Valley Garden Club. 10–5P. Tix: $25/advance; $30/day of. www.vagardenweek.org/toursdetails.cfm?TourID=67.

friday, april 26

Spring Concert – Young at Heart. 730P. Dodd Auditorium. Popular classics. Rapp.Youth Symphony directed by V. Jackson. $10; w/ UMW ID $2. Tix: philharmonic.umw.edu Songwriters’ Showcase: Kevin Elliot, Rupert Wates, “beat generation” Charles Nolan, awardwinning country voice Karen Collins. 8P. Picker’s Supply Concert Hall, 902 Caroline. $10; Students $5.898-0611 Ingleside Winery Spring Barrel Tasting 1–4P. Straight from the barrel tour, tasting, souvenir glass, music, light fare. $20. Reservations: 804/224-8687 Mid-Atlantic Wind Symphony “1963”. FXBG Academy. Hindemith Elegy for Young American, Lo Presti: To Set the Darkness Echoing, Dana Wilson, Beatles Medley. MidAtlanticWindSymphony.com $5/Adv./$7 Door

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Dr Brooke Rossheim, Rappahannock Area Health District Director talks about rabies. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net

sunday, april 28

St. George’s Chamber Music Series: Beautiful Music in a Beautiful Space. Guitarist James Manuele 3P. $10; Students free. 905 Princess Anne. stgeorgesepiscopal.net

Fair Trade: Ten Thousand Villages in Village at Towne Centre. 15% net sales benefit Haiti Micah Project for impoverished/uneducated children. 15P. haiti-micha.org. fredericksburg.tenthousandvillages.com

UMW Choral Concert. GW Hall, Dodd Auditorium. 730P. Free. 654-1012

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Battle of Chancellorsville preview. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net

tuesday, april 30

3rd Fri, 830A business ladies’ free networking “TIPS”. Ellen Baptist, 548-0652

monday, april 22

Free Health Seminar. Belmont, 224 Washington. Pediatric ear, nose, throat (ENT) disorders

The Recliners: Colonial Tavern. Free show. 930P

tuesday, april 23

Larry, Harry & Buck Live at Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine & cocktail specials. All ages, no cover

saturday, april 20

UMW Philharmonic Musical Mix. GW Hall, Dodd Auditorium. 730P. Tix prices TBD. 654-1324 Rapp. Adult Activities Plant Sale. 750 Kings Hwy. Mon-Sat 10-4P; Sun 12-4P. At Mayfest, May 4, 103P Trinity Episcopal Church spring yard/ bake sale 830A-3P. Rain/ shine. Corner William and College

Earth Day

Garden Art Show & Sale. 102 W Cambridge. 10-4P. http://www.Professional-Artists-Stafford-VA.com The Kitchen At Wittingham: “From Garden to Table”. Chef LB, Ambassador to Thomas Jefferson’s Gardens at Monticello, Cooking Instructor at Whittingham. Special Garden Day Food Tastings 11-3P. Demo 2P:”Best Ways to Prepare and Cook Leafy Greens”

If you are reading this 190th issue of FP, thank an advertiser! If you are an advertiser, list your event. Deadline for May. is April 20. Paste your event in an email to frntprch@aol.com or go to http://frontporchfredericksburg.com/calendar/su bmitcalevent.cfm for both print and e-e editions.

~ Peggy Wickham Art ~ Companionship Meal Preparation Medication Reminders Laundry

Light Housekeeping Shopping/Errands Personal Care Flexible Hours

Call for a free, no-obligation appointment

540.899.1422 Each HomeInstead Franchise Office is Independently Owned & Operated

homeinstead.com

1692 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

At My Latin Grill Art Show April 13th to May 13th Artist Peggy Wickham’s “Vacation Memories” 10908 Courthouse Rd Spotsylvania, VA 540-891-2002

Front Porch on front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

17


history’s stories

OUR HERITAGE

My Right Arm By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

I was in process of working on the April article about the amputation of Jackson’s arm when there appeared in the local news a story of the Central Battlefield Trust’s purchase of the 81-acre burial site of Stonewall Jackson’s arm. My friend Ralph Happel, who is deceased, had done extensive research on the death of Jackson many years ago. He and I had spoken about the subject. In 1975, Dr. Beverly Smith published an article in the VMI Alumni Review on the death of Jackson. According to both of these scholars, Jackson was wounded around 9PM on May 2nd, 1863, just beneath the shoulder of the left arm, fracturing the humerus with a second bullet in the upper forearm. A third bullet struck his right hand and lodged beneath the skin. Jackson was carried to a Field Hospital Tent near Wilderness Tavern where Dr. Henry Black met him. Dr. McGuire arrived and was unable to operate until after Jackson’s condition improved. At 2am Jackson was in agreement with Dr. McGuire that his arm would have to be amputated. Dr. McGuire had Dr. Coleman use chloroform to put Jackson to sleep. Dr. McGuire first removed the round ball from under the skin of the right hand. This was almost proof that Jackson was wounded by his own troops, as the North Carolina soldiers used many smooth bore rifles that fired the round shot, unlike the Union troops who fired mostly elongated bullets. At 3:30 Jackson was awake and speaking to General Pendleton. The arm was taken by Reverend Beverley Lacy, the Chaplain of Jackson’s Second Corp, one mile to Ellwood, the home of his brother, and buried in the family cemetery. In 1903, James Powell Smith, a member of the Stonewall Brigade, put up several stone markers on the battlefield, and the Ellwood cemetery became one of the sites to mark the location of Jackson’s arm. Another fact, according to Ralph Happel, was that Captain James Boswell (who was killed with the same volley that wounded Jackson) was buried in Ellwood along with Major Joshua Stone of the 10th Virginia, who was killed during the Battle of Chancellorsville. Both of these soldiers were reburied in the Confederate Cemetery in Fredericksburg after the Civil War. One interesting story is that there were two volleys fired on the Jackson patrol and that, in fact, after the patrol yelled, “We are Southern Troops — cease fire!,” Major John Barry yelled to the North Carolina troops, “It is a damned Yankee trick – FIRE!” It was this volley that may have hit Jackson. There is a story that the table and canvas stretcher used in Jackson’s amputation is located in a museum in Gettysburg. I think, according to Happel and others, this would be difficult to prove since during the battle there were many tables and stretchers in use on the battlefield and there is no record of any being put aside. There were several hundred wounded left at Chancellorsville and Ellwood after Jackson was moved to Guinea Station, May 4th. As late as May 1863, Ellwood was still flying a hospital flag with over 100 southern wounded there. Now you know some of the many stories… Tuffy Hicks is our very own Paul Harvey.

Central Rappahannock

HERITAGE CENTER Volunteers needed to process historical documents and aid researchers. Training provided. Phone 540-373-3704 or email crhc@verizon.net Open to the public for scholarly research

The Heritage Center 18

April 2013

Maury Commons

900 Barton St

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg

A monthly look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

Fredericksburg’s Day of Historic Garden Week in Virginia Tuesday April 23 Sponsored by The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club, Fredericksburg’s Day of Historic Garden Week in Virginia will be April 23 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. To celebrate the anniversary – this tour will feature homes that were opened 80 years ago! Featured locations include Belmont in Falmouth, The Snowden House, Chatham, Brompton and Fall Hill. All of these properties enjoy spectacular views of the area and the Rappahannock. Belmont was once the residence of the renowned American painter Gari Melchers and his wife Corinne and is a National Historic Landmark. Mrs. Melchers was a member-at-large of the Garden Club of Virginia in 1931 and a founding member of The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club. She was involved in the restoration of the grounds at Kenmore and the gardens at Stratford Hall. In 1993, the Garden Club returned the favor and restored Mrs. Melchers’ garden at Belmont (Photo: Belmont’s Summer house). Snowden House is an imposing Greek Revival mansion that sits atop one of the highest points in Fredericksburg. In the early 18th century, the property of 1,008 acres commanded a breathtaking view of the Rappahannock to its north. The original house was built around 1815, but it is speculated that the small stone cottage behind the main house may have been constructed as early as 1720.

Ticket price also includes admission to the following locations and activities: Garden Day, Kenmore, George Washington’s Ferry Farm, The James Monroe Museum and Memorial Library. Tickets: $30 on day of and $25 in advance at : Fredericksburg Visitor Center and Stafford Visitor Center. For more information, contact Tory Willis at twillis@durrette.com or Becca Mahon at bmahon100@yahoo.com And visit the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center on Barton Street downtown to do scholarly research of our local history and heritage.

Dennis E. Ahearn walk with me By Lenora Kruk-mullanaphy

Dennis E. Ahearn set up his law practice Downtown in 1998 and is currently a partner in Ahearn Phillips, LLP. He has served individuals and business clients in estate planning, estate administration and business law, including business succession, since 1977. The same dedication Ahearn devotes to his clients is evident in his efforts to help the citizens of the community in the many roles he has undertaken since moving here from Alexandria in 1996. An advocate of “mental wellness,” he has been an integral part of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg (MHAF), serving in such capacities as a director on the board for seven consecutive years and as president for two of those years. Ahearn, who is co-chair of the MHAF’s Walk Committee for the “Sixth Annual Walk for Mental Wellness” with Linda LaFave, shares his boundless energy and positive outlook to enhance the event each year. Last year, he hosted the Walk as Master of Ceremonies, as well as leading his team on the three-mile trek from Hurkamp Park through Downtown. His team members were from his close-knit family as they are every year. His wife, Ann – they’ll celebrate their 40th Wedding Anniversary in May — three “graduated, grown and married” children and five grandchildren comprise Team Ahearn. “I believe in the MHAF and how well its many services and programs help the citizens in the community,” said Dennis. “Before I served on the board for MHAF, I researched it and found that it’s an invaluable organization.” Dennis said he supports MHAF because of a history of some mental illness in his family, which makes it an organization that’s close to his heart. As an attorney for patients of Snowden (provider of comprehensive behavioral

health services), he works to protect their interests. His goal for the “Sixth Annual Walk for Mental Wellness” is to encourage more people to come out and walk. Each year, the event brings an increase in participation and proceeds earned, and he’d like to see a banner year in 2013. Dennis is also a member of the Fredericksburg Area Bar Association (President 2004); Virginia State Bar; Virginia Trial Lawyers Association and District of Columbia Bar (inactive). He previously served the Rappahannock Legal Services Corporation for six years and was on the board for the Alexandria Employment Workshop. He received a PhB from Pontificia Universita Gregoriana, Roma, Italia, and a J.D. from Catholic University of America in Washington, DC. During his free time, Ahearn enjoys gardening and cooking. Join Dennis Ahearn at the “Sixth Annual Walk for Mental Wellness” sponsored by the MHAF on May 4. Register online until May 2 at www.mhafred.org/walk2013. Registration forms and donations will also be accepted on the day of the Walk. Participation fee for the event is $25 per walker and includes a commemorative t-shirt. Dennis wants people to see the participants wearing the t-shirts while walking downtown to show what they’re walking for. “We all want to help promote mental wellness,” he said.

Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy is a public relations consultant/ freelance writer whose professional background includes PR for Morton’s The Steakhouse, TREVI Italian Restaurant, Bertolini’s Authentic Trattoria (Las Vegas); director media relations - Atlantic City Convention & Visitors Authority; writing for MidAtlantic Events magazine 12 years.

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

19


history’s stories

OUR HERITAGE

My Right Arm By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

I was in process of working on the April article about the amputation of Jackson’s arm when there appeared in the local news a story of the Central Battlefield Trust’s purchase of the 81-acre burial site of Stonewall Jackson’s arm. My friend Ralph Happel, who is deceased, had done extensive research on the death of Jackson many years ago. He and I had spoken about the subject. In 1975, Dr. Beverly Smith published an article in the VMI Alumni Review on the death of Jackson. According to both of these scholars, Jackson was wounded around 9PM on May 2nd, 1863, just beneath the shoulder of the left arm, fracturing the humerus with a second bullet in the upper forearm. A third bullet struck his right hand and lodged beneath the skin. Jackson was carried to a Field Hospital Tent near Wilderness Tavern where Dr. Henry Black met him. Dr. McGuire arrived and was unable to operate until after Jackson’s condition improved. At 2am Jackson was in agreement with Dr. McGuire that his arm would have to be amputated. Dr. McGuire had Dr. Coleman use chloroform to put Jackson to sleep. Dr. McGuire first removed the round ball from under the skin of the right hand. This was almost proof that Jackson was wounded by his own troops, as the North Carolina soldiers used many smooth bore rifles that fired the round shot, unlike the Union troops who fired mostly elongated bullets. At 3:30 Jackson was awake and speaking to General Pendleton. The arm was taken by Reverend Beverley Lacy, the Chaplain of Jackson’s Second Corp, one mile to Ellwood, the home of his brother, and buried in the family cemetery. In 1903, James Powell Smith, a member of the Stonewall Brigade, put up several stone markers on the battlefield, and the Ellwood cemetery became one of the sites to mark the location of Jackson’s arm. Another fact, according to Ralph Happel, was that Captain James Boswell (who was killed with the same volley that wounded Jackson) was buried in Ellwood along with Major Joshua Stone of the 10th Virginia, who was killed during the Battle of Chancellorsville. Both of these soldiers were reburied in the Confederate Cemetery in Fredericksburg after the Civil War. One interesting story is that there were two volleys fired on the Jackson patrol and that, in fact, after the patrol yelled, “We are Southern Troops — cease fire!,” Major John Barry yelled to the North Carolina troops, “It is a damned Yankee trick – FIRE!” It was this volley that may have hit Jackson. There is a story that the table and canvas stretcher used in Jackson’s amputation is located in a museum in Gettysburg. I think, according to Happel and others, this would be difficult to prove since during the battle there were many tables and stretchers in use on the battlefield and there is no record of any being put aside. There were several hundred wounded left at Chancellorsville and Ellwood after Jackson was moved to Guinea Station, May 4th. As late as May 1863, Ellwood was still flying a hospital flag with over 100 southern wounded there. Now you know some of the many stories… Tuffy Hicks is our very own Paul Harvey.

Central Rappahannock

HERITAGE CENTER Volunteers needed to process historical documents and aid researchers. Training provided. Phone 540-373-3704 or email crhc@verizon.net Open to the public for scholarly research

The Heritage Center 18

April 2013

Maury Commons

900 Barton St

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg

A monthly look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

Fredericksburg’s Day of Historic Garden Week in Virginia Tuesday April 23 Sponsored by The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club, Fredericksburg’s Day of Historic Garden Week in Virginia will be April 23 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. To celebrate the anniversary – this tour will feature homes that were opened 80 years ago! Featured locations include Belmont in Falmouth, The Snowden House, Chatham, Brompton and Fall Hill. All of these properties enjoy spectacular views of the area and the Rappahannock. Belmont was once the residence of the renowned American painter Gari Melchers and his wife Corinne and is a National Historic Landmark. Mrs. Melchers was a member-at-large of the Garden Club of Virginia in 1931 and a founding member of The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club. She was involved in the restoration of the grounds at Kenmore and the gardens at Stratford Hall. In 1993, the Garden Club returned the favor and restored Mrs. Melchers’ garden at Belmont (Photo: Belmont’s Summer house). Snowden House is an imposing Greek Revival mansion that sits atop one of the highest points in Fredericksburg. In the early 18th century, the property of 1,008 acres commanded a breathtaking view of the Rappahannock to its north. The original house was built around 1815, but it is speculated that the small stone cottage behind the main house may have been constructed as early as 1720.

Ticket price also includes admission to the following locations and activities: Garden Day, Kenmore, George Washington’s Ferry Farm, The James Monroe Museum and Memorial Library. Tickets: $30 on day of and $25 in advance at : Fredericksburg Visitor Center and Stafford Visitor Center. For more information, contact Tory Willis at twillis@durrette.com or Becca Mahon at bmahon100@yahoo.com And visit the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center on Barton Street downtown to do scholarly research of our local history and heritage.

Dennis E. Ahearn walk with me By Lenora Kruk-mullanaphy

Dennis E. Ahearn set up his law practice Downtown in 1998 and is currently a partner in Ahearn Phillips, LLP. He has served individuals and business clients in estate planning, estate administration and business law, including business succession, since 1977. The same dedication Ahearn devotes to his clients is evident in his efforts to help the citizens of the community in the many roles he has undertaken since moving here from Alexandria in 1996. An advocate of “mental wellness,” he has been an integral part of Mental Health America of Fredericksburg (MHAF), serving in such capacities as a director on the board for seven consecutive years and as president for two of those years. Ahearn, who is co-chair of the MHAF’s Walk Committee for the “Sixth Annual Walk for Mental Wellness” with Linda LaFave, shares his boundless energy and positive outlook to enhance the event each year. Last year, he hosted the Walk as Master of Ceremonies, as well as leading his team on the three-mile trek from Hurkamp Park through Downtown. His team members were from his close-knit family as they are every year. His wife, Ann – they’ll celebrate their 40th Wedding Anniversary in May — three “graduated, grown and married” children and five grandchildren comprise Team Ahearn. “I believe in the MHAF and how well its many services and programs help the citizens in the community,” said Dennis. “Before I served on the board for MHAF, I researched it and found that it’s an invaluable organization.” Dennis said he supports MHAF because of a history of some mental illness in his family, which makes it an organization that’s close to his heart. As an attorney for patients of Snowden (provider of comprehensive behavioral

health services), he works to protect their interests. His goal for the “Sixth Annual Walk for Mental Wellness” is to encourage more people to come out and walk. Each year, the event brings an increase in participation and proceeds earned, and he’d like to see a banner year in 2013. Dennis is also a member of the Fredericksburg Area Bar Association (President 2004); Virginia State Bar; Virginia Trial Lawyers Association and District of Columbia Bar (inactive). He previously served the Rappahannock Legal Services Corporation for six years and was on the board for the Alexandria Employment Workshop. He received a PhB from Pontificia Universita Gregoriana, Roma, Italia, and a J.D. from Catholic University of America in Washington, DC. During his free time, Ahearn enjoys gardening and cooking. Join Dennis Ahearn at the “Sixth Annual Walk for Mental Wellness” sponsored by the MHAF on May 4. Register online until May 2 at www.mhafred.org/walk2013. Registration forms and donations will also be accepted on the day of the Walk. Participation fee for the event is $25 per walker and includes a commemorative t-shirt. Dennis wants people to see the participants wearing the t-shirts while walking downtown to show what they’re walking for. “We all want to help promote mental wellness,” he said.

Lenora Kruk-Mullanaphy is a public relations consultant/ freelance writer whose professional background includes PR for Morton’s The Steakhouse, TREVI Italian Restaurant, Bertolini’s Authentic Trattoria (Las Vegas); director media relations - Atlantic City Convention & Visitors Authority; writing for MidAtlantic Events magazine 12 years.

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

19


Companion Care

Full Service Hospital featuring: Grooming Salon Canine Boarding in Our Indoor/Outdoor Runs Dog Training & Behavioral Consults with certified dog trainer Feline Boarding in Our Spacious Multi-room Condos

ticks and lyme disease by arlene evans, DVM

AutoKnown Better it’s april, fools online: www.save7lives.org

By Rim Vining Twitter we won’t have the orange Ford to tell us of spring’s arrival. There are other local signs of spring including the arrival of bright yellow flyers announcing the annual Spring Swap Meet at the Classic Car Center on Lee Hill Drive next to the Food Bank. This is their 6th spring event

Tech Talk: Home dental care is essential to the health and well-being of pets. Poor oral hygiene can cause bad breath, abscesses in the mouth, and in severe cases problems with the heart and GI tract. The use of toothbrushes, oral rinses, and dental chew toys can help keep teeth healthy and happy. Talk to your veterinarian about finding an at-home dental care plan that works for you and your pet! -Amanda Schultz, LVT

and it grows each year. On April 20th you can bring your old cars and parts and sell them for free. In the warm spring weather the old cars with their bright colors make quite a display. Like the cherry blossoms but different. For more info check out their websitewww.classiccarcenter.net or stop by 3591Lee Hill Drive and look around. The next week, April 24th –

Stacy L. Horner, DVM; Gary B. Dunn, DVM; Melanie Bell, DVM; Sandi L. Pepper, DVM; Melissa A. DeLauter, DVM ; Arlene Evans, DVM; Jennnifer Skarbek, DVM

www.woahvets.com Now that Spring has arrived, we are drawn outdoors to enjoy time in the warm sun. The flower and vegetable gardens are calling, and a walk in the woods to look for signs of spring are a welcome change of activity from the cold winter months. Unfortunately, the warmer weather and more time spent outdoors increase our dog’s potential exposure to ticks and the diseases they transmit. If you use leaves for garden mulch or if your yard backs up to woods, ticks can survive the winter under the leaf litter. Wildlife harbor ticks through the winter as well, and the ticks drop off into the vegetation. Even a short walk in the woods can expose your pet to ticks that have fallen off the deer. These tick climb up the taller grasses and brush and drop down on your pet as it passes. The bacteria that causes Lyme disease is now commonly found in the deer ticks in our region. This bacteria is transmitted from the tick to your dog after the tick attaches to the skin and begins a blood meal. Symptoms of exposure to Lyme disease in dogs can vary from a silent infection with no obvious signs to lameness, fever, swollen joints, appetite loss and kidney failure (rare). This disease can NOT be transmitted directly from your pet to you; a tick bite from an infected tick is the only known transmission route but both you and your dog can be exposed to these ticks. There are two ways to protect your dog from Lyme disease: the first is to stop the tick, and the second is to stop the disease-causing bacteria.

20

April 2013

Topical tick prevention is applied monthly to the skin to help kill and repel ticks- there are several products that are available but none is 100% effective in killing an attached tick before disease transmission occurs. Daily checks for ticks are needed if your dog has exposure in its yard. After a day spent outdoors in the woods or in brushy areas, be sure to check your pet carefully and remove any ticks. Ticks can vary in size. The newly hatched babies can look as small as a pin head; while adult engorged ticks can become as large as a small grape! Do not use your fingers to pull off a tick because you can become exposed to the Lyme disease organism. Instead, use tweezers or a special tick removal tool applied at the attachment next to the skin and slowly and gently pull the tick free. A vaccine is available to protect your dog from Lyme disease before it is bitten by an infected tick. Vaccination is recommended if your pet has an increased likelihood of exposure to ticks. The vaccine is best given in the spring before the tick population explodes. An initial vaccine with a booster in 3-4 weeks is needed, and then a yearly booster is given thereafter. Most experts recommend a blood test to screen for Lyme disease before the vaccine is given. Speak to your veterinarian to discuss if the vaccine is right for your dog. More information is available on line at www.dogs and ticks.com.

540/374-0462

10 Walsh Lane

in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

So why doesn’t a chicken coop have four doors? Cause then it would be a sedan. I just flew in from New York and boy, are my arms tired. Thank you, thank you I’ll be here all week… remember to try the veal. (That is ‘free-range’ veal, right?) So Fredericksburg has said farewell to the “Cowan Carpentry” pickup truck brought from the west coast by one Greg Cowan, local paint and wood restoration savant, and later transferred to a good home and the loving stewardship of one Laura Shepard. With tender care over the years and more than a few new parts installed by the “Ford Guy” and chocoholic at Graves Automotive the distinctive orange F150 is now headed to a new life in St Pete Florida relaxing in the warmth and learning its way around on the gulf coast. Instead of being loaded with hedge and holly it will be hauling palms and grasses. For some, spring’s arrival is signaled by the return of robins and the din of birds everywhere building nests.

ROXBURY F

ARM

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

You can look out and see all those male warblers fluffing and puffing, and strutting and trying their level best to impress the ladies. Meanwhile the girls gather and look at each other with that “who are they kidding with that stuff,” kind of demeanor. Like middle school. Others knew it was spring when the orange truck moved. It would sit in its spot near the Downtown Greens garden all winter while Miss Laura visited family and friends and traveled to exotic shores and her beloved New Zealand. When she returned in mid-March to wake up the garden and try to get ahead of the weeds in yards all over town the truck would move and be gone when you drove by and you could feel secure that spring was here. Many in this community envied her a little for her freedom and her spirit and for twenty odd years enjoyed the fruits of her labor and the crazy events she helped inspire. I wish Laura well in the next phase of life and while in the modern age we can follow her on Facebook and

28th , marks the start of the old car Spring Carlisle season with in Pennsylvania. It is a huge event with 8,100 vendor spaces and a giant car corral where you can find almost every make and model automobile for sale or trade. Some are even in such small pieces you could carry them out one part at a time. Some assembly required. So enjoy your spring, pull some weeds for Laura and wax some paint on your old jalopy. I can’t help but envy, just a little, the orange truck’s life. Think about it; Spend your youth on the Pacific in So Cal, middle age in Virginia and retire on the Gulf Coast. Autoknown that would be nice.

Rim Vining has the enviable job of working at the Classic Car Center.

Front Porch Fredericksburg

Supporting Local Artists Since 1997

& GARDEN CENTER

Since 1929

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

April is Spring Planning Month ! Come Shop With Us FREDERICKSBURGCOLLABORATIVE

Arlene Evans, DVM, practices veterinary medicine at White Oak Animal Hospital

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

21


Companion Care

Full Service Hospital featuring: Grooming Salon Canine Boarding in Our Indoor/Outdoor Runs Dog Training & Behavioral Consults with certified dog trainer Feline Boarding in Our Spacious Multi-room Condos

ticks and lyme disease by arlene evans, DVM

AutoKnown Better it’s april, fools online: www.save7lives.org

By Rim Vining Twitter we won’t have the orange Ford to tell us of spring’s arrival. There are other local signs of spring including the arrival of bright yellow flyers announcing the annual Spring Swap Meet at the Classic Car Center on Lee Hill Drive next to the Food Bank. This is their 6th spring event

Tech Talk: Home dental care is essential to the health and well-being of pets. Poor oral hygiene can cause bad breath, abscesses in the mouth, and in severe cases problems with the heart and GI tract. The use of toothbrushes, oral rinses, and dental chew toys can help keep teeth healthy and happy. Talk to your veterinarian about finding an at-home dental care plan that works for you and your pet! -Amanda Schultz, LVT

and it grows each year. On April 20th you can bring your old cars and parts and sell them for free. In the warm spring weather the old cars with their bright colors make quite a display. Like the cherry blossoms but different. For more info check out their websitewww.classiccarcenter.net or stop by 3591Lee Hill Drive and look around. The next week, April 24th –

Stacy L. Horner, DVM; Gary B. Dunn, DVM; Melanie Bell, DVM; Sandi L. Pepper, DVM; Melissa A. DeLauter, DVM ; Arlene Evans, DVM; Jennnifer Skarbek, DVM

www.woahvets.com Now that Spring has arrived, we are drawn outdoors to enjoy time in the warm sun. The flower and vegetable gardens are calling, and a walk in the woods to look for signs of spring are a welcome change of activity from the cold winter months. Unfortunately, the warmer weather and more time spent outdoors increase our dog’s potential exposure to ticks and the diseases they transmit. If you use leaves for garden mulch or if your yard backs up to woods, ticks can survive the winter under the leaf litter. Wildlife harbor ticks through the winter as well, and the ticks drop off into the vegetation. Even a short walk in the woods can expose your pet to ticks that have fallen off the deer. These tick climb up the taller grasses and brush and drop down on your pet as it passes. The bacteria that causes Lyme disease is now commonly found in the deer ticks in our region. This bacteria is transmitted from the tick to your dog after the tick attaches to the skin and begins a blood meal. Symptoms of exposure to Lyme disease in dogs can vary from a silent infection with no obvious signs to lameness, fever, swollen joints, appetite loss and kidney failure (rare). This disease can NOT be transmitted directly from your pet to you; a tick bite from an infected tick is the only known transmission route but both you and your dog can be exposed to these ticks. There are two ways to protect your dog from Lyme disease: the first is to stop the tick, and the second is to stop the disease-causing bacteria.

20

April 2013

Topical tick prevention is applied monthly to the skin to help kill and repel ticks- there are several products that are available but none is 100% effective in killing an attached tick before disease transmission occurs. Daily checks for ticks are needed if your dog has exposure in its yard. After a day spent outdoors in the woods or in brushy areas, be sure to check your pet carefully and remove any ticks. Ticks can vary in size. The newly hatched babies can look as small as a pin head; while adult engorged ticks can become as large as a small grape! Do not use your fingers to pull off a tick because you can become exposed to the Lyme disease organism. Instead, use tweezers or a special tick removal tool applied at the attachment next to the skin and slowly and gently pull the tick free. A vaccine is available to protect your dog from Lyme disease before it is bitten by an infected tick. Vaccination is recommended if your pet has an increased likelihood of exposure to ticks. The vaccine is best given in the spring before the tick population explodes. An initial vaccine with a booster in 3-4 weeks is needed, and then a yearly booster is given thereafter. Most experts recommend a blood test to screen for Lyme disease before the vaccine is given. Speak to your veterinarian to discuss if the vaccine is right for your dog. More information is available on line at www.dogs and ticks.com.

540/374-0462

10 Walsh Lane

in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

So why doesn’t a chicken coop have four doors? Cause then it would be a sedan. I just flew in from New York and boy, are my arms tired. Thank you, thank you I’ll be here all week… remember to try the veal. (That is ‘free-range’ veal, right?) So Fredericksburg has said farewell to the “Cowan Carpentry” pickup truck brought from the west coast by one Greg Cowan, local paint and wood restoration savant, and later transferred to a good home and the loving stewardship of one Laura Shepard. With tender care over the years and more than a few new parts installed by the “Ford Guy” and chocoholic at Graves Automotive the distinctive orange F150 is now headed to a new life in St Pete Florida relaxing in the warmth and learning its way around on the gulf coast. Instead of being loaded with hedge and holly it will be hauling palms and grasses. For some, spring’s arrival is signaled by the return of robins and the din of birds everywhere building nests.

ROXBURY F

ARM

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

You can look out and see all those male warblers fluffing and puffing, and strutting and trying their level best to impress the ladies. Meanwhile the girls gather and look at each other with that “who are they kidding with that stuff,” kind of demeanor. Like middle school. Others knew it was spring when the orange truck moved. It would sit in its spot near the Downtown Greens garden all winter while Miss Laura visited family and friends and traveled to exotic shores and her beloved New Zealand. When she returned in mid-March to wake up the garden and try to get ahead of the weeds in yards all over town the truck would move and be gone when you drove by and you could feel secure that spring was here. Many in this community envied her a little for her freedom and her spirit and for twenty odd years enjoyed the fruits of her labor and the crazy events she helped inspire. I wish Laura well in the next phase of life and while in the modern age we can follow her on Facebook and

28th , marks the start of the old car Spring Carlisle season with in Pennsylvania. It is a huge event with 8,100 vendor spaces and a giant car corral where you can find almost every make and model automobile for sale or trade. Some are even in such small pieces you could carry them out one part at a time. Some assembly required. So enjoy your spring, pull some weeds for Laura and wax some paint on your old jalopy. I can’t help but envy, just a little, the orange truck’s life. Think about it; Spend your youth on the Pacific in So Cal, middle age in Virginia and retire on the Gulf Coast. Autoknown that would be nice.

Rim Vining has the enviable job of working at the Classic Car Center.

Front Porch Fredericksburg

Supporting Local Artists Since 1997

& GARDEN CENTER

Since 1929

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

April is Spring Planning Month ! Come Shop With Us FREDERICKSBURGCOLLABORATIVE

Arlene Evans, DVM, practices veterinary medicine at White Oak Animal Hospital

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

21


Senior Care the importance of structure in life

Green is Healthier, Too Affordable ‘Green’ Option for Heating & Air Conditioning! By mike appleton

By Karl Karch

In order for my day to start smoothly, I need to follow certain routines. Perhaps it’s the engineer in me that requires structure for my day to go smoothly. Other people seem to float from one thing to the next and take disruptions in stride. Not me. My daily routine only allows for so much disruption before I unravel, or at least have a “bad hair” day even though I don’t have hair. A case in point is if my morning newspaper doesn’t arrive on time. I frequently go to the front door to see if it has arrived and utter a few choice words if it’s still not there, I’m that unsettled. Many people can benefit from a daily routine. It often makes life easier and gives comfort and predictability in our daily lives. I gather everything I need to take with me when I leave the house in one place so I don’t forget something. My wife, on the other hand, often forgets critical things like her cell phone or golf GPS yardage finder and calls me to her rescue. A daily routine can be particularly important for older adults. In some cases it can make the difference between healthy living and just “getting through the day,” or worse yet, the lack of a routine can put a senior at serious health risk. A perfect example is the need to take medications on time to receive the expected benefits. Establishing a daily exercise and stretching routine as discussed in my article last month is important to maintaining your health. Daily routines can be especially helpful for those with cognitive impairment, such as Alzheimer’s disease, as well as for their primary caregivers. Structure and pleasant activities can often

22

April 2013

reduce agitation and improve mood. As a caregiver, you may need to experiment to find out what works best. Allow for some flexibility as needs and moods change (boredom, distraction, irritability), and as the disease progresses. It may help to write down a daily plan for morning, afternoon, and evening to maintain consistency. A caregiver can put sticky notes on mirrors, tables, or other conspicuous places to remind a loved one to do specific tasks like brushing teeth, taking medications, or eating a meal. Try keeping consistent daily times for activities like waking up, mealtimes, bathing, dressing, and bedtime. Daily routines allow a loved one to maintain their independence and remain at home with minimal supervision for a longer period of time. If a routine is infrequent, you may need to make a list. I need lists when traveling or I’m certain to forget something important. I often use sticky notes as reminders for appointments or to bring something to work. My steering wheel is a good place to put some notes. Routines need to be periodically reassessed and changed. What meets the needs today, may not tomorrow. While we seniors do not want to be perceived as too rigid, our children and loved ones should encourage and respect our need for some structure in our lives. Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services. Please go to www.homeinstead.com/FredericksburgVA

Front porch fredericksburg

Until now geothermal was the only ‘green’ heating and air conditioning option. While an environmentally sound choice—geothermal can be cost prohibitive for smaller residential customers. Geothermal remains an excellent choice for very large residences and for commercial properties but now there is an affordable ‘green’ option for the majority of residential customers. Through the emergence of leading-edge, high-efficiency Greenspeed™ intelligence heat pump technology— ‘green’ heating and air conditioning is now financially feasible for many more households. This new technology means exceptional ongoing energy savings for customers and expanded long-term system reliability. It is now possible for the majority of homeowners to go ‘green’ and get a great return on their HVAC investment. The Carrier® Infinity® heat pump with Greenspeed™ intelligence is a breakthrough product featuring the highest heating efficiency of any split-

system air source heat pump. It provides heating efficiencies up to an unprecedented 13.0 HSPF (Heating Seasonal Performance Factor)—this is 29% higher than any other system in its class. It delivers SEER (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio) ratings as high as 20.5. The Infinity® heat pump with Greenspeed™ intelligence is designed to more precisely match the home’s load requirement in both cooling and heating modes. System controls monitor conditions and automatically vary the speed of the unit’s compressor based on the outdoor temperature, indoor humidity, and indoor temperature demands. The Greenspeed™ intelligence system has many advantages: It operates fluidly between its minimum and maximum capacity and delivers only the heating and cooling required at the specific time. It is able to match the load of the home at much lower outdoor temperatures than standard heat pump systems. The system has more heating capacity at low outdoor temperatures which results in less need for auxiliary heat such as electric strip heat or gas heating. It can be upsized for more heating capacity without the summer humidity problems associated with oversized single-speed units. The system will match the load in cooling and work to dehumidify the space without the typical problems of shortcycling when the cooling load is low. It provides increased heat pump run time and less auxiliary heat operation which means more energy savings for homeowners. It can replace an existing heat

pump without any major duct changes and it requires no digging or drilling like geothermal does. The new Carrier® Infinity® heat pump with Greenspeed™ technology was designed with utility companies, as well as consumers in mind. Utility companies have optional load shedding programs that are in effect only during the cooling season. If a customer chooses to participate in this program, the Utility Saver feature enables the system to interact with a utility relay for load shedding during peak conditions. When the utility company sends the signal—the system reacts by shutting down or running at minimum speed. The system control displays to the customer that

A unique feature of this system compared to others is that it is a softstarting system. The variable-speed drive gently ramps up the compressor at start up. It does not have the inrush current of a standard scroll compressor which should minimize light flicker in the home and also be easier on the utility grid. Greenspeed™ technology eases the strain on the utility infrastructure and is being recognized by utility systems as a positive step in going ‘green.’ Utilities in the northwest are awarding the highest rebates ever to customers who implement this technology. It is possible that attractive rebates for high efficiency, utility compatible heat pumps such as the Carrier® Infinity® heat pump with Greenspeed™ intelligence will be put in place by utilities in our region in the future. Those in search of a ‘green’, affordable, energy-efficient, cost-saving heating and air conditioning system now have a viable option to consider.

Mike Appleton is President of Appleton Campbell, a local, family owned heating, air conditioning, plumbing, and electrical services business. Appleton Campbell has been providing customers throughout the Greater Piedmont Region and Northern Virginia with honesty, integrity, and experience since 1976. You can reach Appleton Campbell at 540.347.0765 or at appletoncampbell.com. utility curtailment is active. Because the customer is informed, there are fewer calls to service technicians when the utility company has shut the system down due to peak demand.

Healthcare For the Whole Person SPECIALIZING IN: ` Gentle, Individualized Chiropractic Care ` Cranio-Sacral Balancing (Sacro

online: www.save7lives.org in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

Occipital Technique - SOT) ` Addressing Your Total Health Needs with Natural, Holistic Treatment Methods ` Detoxification/Weight Loss Nutritional Programs

Your Hot Yoga Studio 540-659-0777 staffordhouseofyoga.com

Dr. Christine Thompson

971 Garrisonville Rd Stafford

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

23


Senior Care the importance of structure in life

Green is Healthier, Too Affordable ‘Green’ Option for Heating & Air Conditioning! By mike appleton

By Karl Karch

In order for my day to start smoothly, I need to follow certain routines. Perhaps it’s the engineer in me that requires structure for my day to go smoothly. Other people seem to float from one thing to the next and take disruptions in stride. Not me. My daily routine only allows for so much disruption before I unravel, or at least have a “bad hair” day even though I don’t have hair. A case in point is if my morning newspaper doesn’t arrive on time. I frequently go to the front door to see if it has arrived and utter a few choice words if it’s still not there, I’m that unsettled. Many people can benefit from a daily routine. It often makes life easier and gives comfort and predictability in our daily lives. I gather everything I need to take with me when I leave the house in one place so I don’t forget something. My wife, on the other hand, often forgets critical things like her cell phone or golf GPS yardage finder and calls me to her rescue. A daily routine can be particularly important for older adults. In some cases it can make the difference between healthy living and just “getting through the day,” or worse yet, the lack of a routine can put a senior at serious health risk. A perfect example is the need to take medications on time to receive the expected benefits. Establishing a daily exercise and stretching routine as discussed in my article last month is important to maintaining your health. Daily routines can be especially helpful for those with cognitive impairment, such as Alzheimer’s disease, as well as for their primary caregivers. Structure and pleasant activities can often

22

April 2013

reduce agitation and improve mood. As a caregiver, you may need to experiment to find out what works best. Allow for some flexibility as needs and moods change (boredom, distraction, irritability), and as the disease progresses. It may help to write down a daily plan for morning, afternoon, and evening to maintain consistency. A caregiver can put sticky notes on mirrors, tables, or other conspicuous places to remind a loved one to do specific tasks like brushing teeth, taking medications, or eating a meal. Try keeping consistent daily times for activities like waking up, mealtimes, bathing, dressing, and bedtime. Daily routines allow a loved one to maintain their independence and remain at home with minimal supervision for a longer period of time. If a routine is infrequent, you may need to make a list. I need lists when traveling or I’m certain to forget something important. I often use sticky notes as reminders for appointments or to bring something to work. My steering wheel is a good place to put some notes. Routines need to be periodically reassessed and changed. What meets the needs today, may not tomorrow. While we seniors do not want to be perceived as too rigid, our children and loved ones should encourage and respect our need for some structure in our lives. Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services. Please go to www.homeinstead.com/FredericksburgVA

Front porch fredericksburg

Until now geothermal was the only ‘green’ heating and air conditioning option. While an environmentally sound choice—geothermal can be cost prohibitive for smaller residential customers. Geothermal remains an excellent choice for very large residences and for commercial properties but now there is an affordable ‘green’ option for the majority of residential customers. Through the emergence of leading-edge, high-efficiency Greenspeed™ intelligence heat pump technology— ‘green’ heating and air conditioning is now financially feasible for many more households. This new technology means exceptional ongoing energy savings for customers and expanded long-term system reliability. It is now possible for the majority of homeowners to go ‘green’ and get a great return on their HVAC investment. The Carrier® Infinity® heat pump with Greenspeed™ intelligence is a breakthrough product featuring the highest heating efficiency of any split-

system air source heat pump. It provides heating efficiencies up to an unprecedented 13.0 HSPF (Heating Seasonal Performance Factor)—this is 29% higher than any other system in its class. It delivers SEER (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio) ratings as high as 20.5. The Infinity® heat pump with Greenspeed™ intelligence is designed to more precisely match the home’s load requirement in both cooling and heating modes. System controls monitor conditions and automatically vary the speed of the unit’s compressor based on the outdoor temperature, indoor humidity, and indoor temperature demands. The Greenspeed™ intelligence system has many advantages: It operates fluidly between its minimum and maximum capacity and delivers only the heating and cooling required at the specific time. It is able to match the load of the home at much lower outdoor temperatures than standard heat pump systems. The system has more heating capacity at low outdoor temperatures which results in less need for auxiliary heat such as electric strip heat or gas heating. It can be upsized for more heating capacity without the summer humidity problems associated with oversized single-speed units. The system will match the load in cooling and work to dehumidify the space without the typical problems of shortcycling when the cooling load is low. It provides increased heat pump run time and less auxiliary heat operation which means more energy savings for homeowners. It can replace an existing heat

pump without any major duct changes and it requires no digging or drilling like geothermal does. The new Carrier® Infinity® heat pump with Greenspeed™ technology was designed with utility companies, as well as consumers in mind. Utility companies have optional load shedding programs that are in effect only during the cooling season. If a customer chooses to participate in this program, the Utility Saver feature enables the system to interact with a utility relay for load shedding during peak conditions. When the utility company sends the signal—the system reacts by shutting down or running at minimum speed. The system control displays to the customer that

A unique feature of this system compared to others is that it is a softstarting system. The variable-speed drive gently ramps up the compressor at start up. It does not have the inrush current of a standard scroll compressor which should minimize light flicker in the home and also be easier on the utility grid. Greenspeed™ technology eases the strain on the utility infrastructure and is being recognized by utility systems as a positive step in going ‘green.’ Utilities in the northwest are awarding the highest rebates ever to customers who implement this technology. It is possible that attractive rebates for high efficiency, utility compatible heat pumps such as the Carrier® Infinity® heat pump with Greenspeed™ intelligence will be put in place by utilities in our region in the future. Those in search of a ‘green’, affordable, energy-efficient, cost-saving heating and air conditioning system now have a viable option to consider.

Mike Appleton is President of Appleton Campbell, a local, family owned heating, air conditioning, plumbing, and electrical services business. Appleton Campbell has been providing customers throughout the Greater Piedmont Region and Northern Virginia with honesty, integrity, and experience since 1976. You can reach Appleton Campbell at 540.347.0765 or at appletoncampbell.com. utility curtailment is active. Because the customer is informed, there are fewer calls to service technicians when the utility company has shut the system down due to peak demand.

Healthcare For the Whole Person SPECIALIZING IN: ` Gentle, Individualized Chiropractic Care ` Cranio-Sacral Balancing (Sacro

online: www.save7lives.org in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

Occipital Technique - SOT) ` Addressing Your Total Health Needs with Natural, Holistic Treatment Methods ` Detoxification/Weight Loss Nutritional Programs

Your Hot Yoga Studio 540-659-0777 staffordhouseofyoga.com

Dr. Christine Thompson

971 Garrisonville Rd Stafford

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

23


ART IN THE ‘BURG gallery hopping, let’s get started

by megan byrnes

By lezlie cheryl Our art galleries always offer a lot but now Spring makes it even easier to get out there and see the abundance of local talent. Dozens of galleries and studios mean something for everyone. First Friday comes alive when artists and non-artists alike converge on downtown to gallery hop, visit open houses and new exhibits. To really take it all in though, plan to do a little extra ‘hopping’ every free day you have. Art First Gallery at 824 Caroline is our first established artists’ cooperative, this month presenting works by Bowling Green artist Jessica Cannon and other member artists through April 28th. artfirstgallery.com. Also at 824 Caroline is Brush Strokes Gallery, exhibiting “Roadside Relics,” featuring photographs by Norma Woodward through April 28. brushstrokesfredericksburg.com. Artful Dimensions Gallery at 911 Charles is dedicated to three-dimensional arts, featuring 8 working studios, this month’s exhibit is by master woodcrafter Joe Wilkinson. artfuldimensionsgallery.com.

Jenna Anderson

through April 26th, and the “Annual Student Juried Art Exhibition” April 11-21, respectively, with a preview reception April 10th 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. galleries.umw.edu. Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts at 813 Sophia is our oldest art gallery, presenting regional and national juried shows in its Frederick Gallery and member artist exhibits in the Members’ Gallery. April brings a Regional Juried Exhibition of all media; “Garden Portraits” by member artist Kathy Guzman. Joseph DiBella, Professor of Art, UMW offers a Critique Workshop April 27. fccava.org. Celebrate artful Earth Day at Caledon State Park’s “Trash to Art” Contest April 20, a great community effort to preserve the beaches of the Potomac by collecting litter and transforming it into art. Last year’s Best-InShow went to the Gateway Community Church youth group for their giraffe sculpture (left). Register before April 19th to participate: Call (540) 663-3861. Sonja Wise hangs her “so wise” art at The Farmers Market downtown April 6th from 7 a.m.

Congrats to exec of local home building company Atlantic Builders, Gene Brown, for being named one of the ’40 under 40’ in the March issue of Professional Builders magazine. A cool honor!

I may be a bit biased when it comes to March birthdays since it is the month I celebrate my own (it was the big 3-0 this year! I don’t want to talk about it.) but I am in good company, no question. Kellie Walsh, Rebecca Thomas, Dawn Darby (pictured/center above), Elliot Currie, Alex Capshaw-T Taylor, and Kristin Vinagro. Those are some awesome ladies (and one gentleman).

Seen:

Have you heard? Matt and Rebecca Thomas have unveiled their new bar and dining area at Kybecca and it’s the coolest. My business partner, Alicia Austin Morgan, and I were lucky enough to get an all-access pass to the fresh space on a cold, rainy March Sunday afternoon (seriously, what was up with that weather?) to shoot Forage’s spring/summer look book. With the genius talents of Ryan Poe behind the lens, we carefully crafted a party scene that was powered by champagne, cocktails and some seriously stylish local talent. Models Blaize Rai, Meg Dumlao, Drew Fristoe, Chris Lobmeyr von Hohenleiten, Brian Downing, Tom Byrnes, Jake Morgan, Alex Capshaw-T Taylor (third from left), Rose Taylor, Corinne Marghella vamped it up for the cameras and by the end of the shoot, the staged party had turned into the real thing.

Heard:

Kyle Snyder surprised

long-time girlfriend Mitzy Osterhout (and the entire Bistro Bethem staff) by proposing at the restaurant during a busy Saturday service. Congratulations you two!

Heard: Andrew Hellier brought

24

April 2013

Lezlie Cheryl is publicity director for the FCCA and a patron of all the galleries.

Front porch fredericksburg

Scen(ic):

Kent Ippolito and

Justin Jones to the Kenmore Inn last month; word is Justin chastised the audience for not getting up and shaking a tail feather…but it was only because they were stunned into silence by his talent!

Claudia Emerson (above) exploring Mount Adams in Cincinnati, Ohio. What a great photo of a great couple!

Seen: A huge truck pulling a trailer with

at Mike Skinner’s Horseshoes and Hand Grenades was christened last month with a show featuring the Madonnas, In a Field, Save the Arcadian and Kissing Fractures. H&H has also become the new home of Tell, the monthly storytelling event hosted (as always!) by Maura Wilson Schneider.

a car on it with people pretending to drive said car and a great many men wearing headphones and handling expensivelooking film equipment on the back of the trailer on Princess Anne St. Ryan Gosling, is that you filming Drive 2??

Heard:

the freshly built stage

presents

The Magnolia Ball Saturday, April 13, 2013 6:00 - 11:00 p.m. Fredericksburg Expo & Conference Center Cocktail Hour and Silent Auction Dinner followed by Dancing to Fredericksburg Big Band $90 per person / $650 per table of 8 Black tie optional Cash Bar

Tickets On Sale Now!

several weeks during regular dining hours: “The Release,” New Works (JennaAndersonFineArt.com).Top Right For more art events, see the Calendar of Events, pages 16-17.

Exposure Unlimited’s 27th anniversary show has been extended through April at P Rose Gallery. Here, art superstars Paula Rose, Betsy Glassie, David Lovegrove, Retta Robbins, John Nichols, Cathy Herndon and Mayor Mary Catherine Greenlaw (above) take a moment to mark the occasion with a photo. Not included in photo but still obviously worth the mention: members Joan Limbrick & Bob Worthy.

Nicole Gebhart stocking

up on essentials right before her new baby’s arrival at Wegmans; Matt Russ Rivers walking down Kenmore Ave on his way to work (arf); Bill Freehling grabbing afternoon coffee at Hyperion Espresso; Hyperion’s own Dan Peterson on quite an intense run on the new walking trail on Fall Hill Ave; Candis and Eve Wenger on William St heading to music class; Rebecca Thomas dining with a friend at Sammy T’s; Kybecca bartender Calvin Roberts chatting up friends outside of Bourbon Room; Phillip Baxter grabbing coffee to go at Barnes and Noble.

to 2 p.m. And Jenna Anderson’s Solo Show opens at Bistro Bethem Monday, April 8th 6-9 p.m. for

LibertyTown Arts Workshop is 50 artists and 30 studios at 916 Liberty. The 7th Annual “Feast for the Eyes” Art About Food is April 5-28, with the Edible Art Competition April 5th. libertytownarts.com. UMW offers the Ridderhof Martin Gallery and duPont Gallery, presenting “Spotlight: Designers from the Department of Theatre & Design”

Downtown’s Katie Dunn met up with three of her cousins (who are sisters) (Below L-R: Brynn Pacciti of Vienna VA, Michelle Paige of Amherst NY, Rachel Hamele of Baltimore, and Katie) to celebrate Michelle’s 40th at Tarara Winery in Leesburg. If there’s one thing I’ve learned about turning one of those seminal ages, wine is always a nice accompaniment.

Phone:

(540) 361-7071 E-mail:

cchavez@hospicesupportcare.org Web:

hours Fri - Sat 10:30 to 4:30 Sun 1 to 4 810 Caroline St., Downtown

www.hospicesupportcare.org PROCEEDS

BENEFIT

HOSPICE SUPPORT CARE

Ask about Sponsorship and Promotional/Memorial Ad Opportunities. Silent Auction Items Accepted

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

25


ART IN THE ‘BURG gallery hopping, let’s get started

by megan byrnes

By lezlie cheryl Our art galleries always offer a lot but now Spring makes it even easier to get out there and see the abundance of local talent. Dozens of galleries and studios mean something for everyone. First Friday comes alive when artists and non-artists alike converge on downtown to gallery hop, visit open houses and new exhibits. To really take it all in though, plan to do a little extra ‘hopping’ every free day you have. Art First Gallery at 824 Caroline is our first established artists’ cooperative, this month presenting works by Bowling Green artist Jessica Cannon and other member artists through April 28th. artfirstgallery.com. Also at 824 Caroline is Brush Strokes Gallery, exhibiting “Roadside Relics,” featuring photographs by Norma Woodward through April 28. brushstrokesfredericksburg.com. Artful Dimensions Gallery at 911 Charles is dedicated to three-dimensional arts, featuring 8 working studios, this month’s exhibit is by master woodcrafter Joe Wilkinson. artfuldimensionsgallery.com.

Jenna Anderson

through April 26th, and the “Annual Student Juried Art Exhibition” April 11-21, respectively, with a preview reception April 10th 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. galleries.umw.edu. Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts at 813 Sophia is our oldest art gallery, presenting regional and national juried shows in its Frederick Gallery and member artist exhibits in the Members’ Gallery. April brings a Regional Juried Exhibition of all media; “Garden Portraits” by member artist Kathy Guzman. Joseph DiBella, Professor of Art, UMW offers a Critique Workshop April 27. fccava.org. Celebrate artful Earth Day at Caledon State Park’s “Trash to Art” Contest April 20, a great community effort to preserve the beaches of the Potomac by collecting litter and transforming it into art. Last year’s Best-InShow went to the Gateway Community Church youth group for their giraffe sculpture (left). Register before April 19th to participate: Call (540) 663-3861. Sonja Wise hangs her “so wise” art at The Farmers Market downtown April 6th from 7 a.m.

Congrats to exec of local home building company Atlantic Builders, Gene Brown, for being named one of the ’40 under 40’ in the March issue of Professional Builders magazine. A cool honor!

I may be a bit biased when it comes to March birthdays since it is the month I celebrate my own (it was the big 3-0 this year! I don’t want to talk about it.) but I am in good company, no question. Kellie Walsh, Rebecca Thomas, Dawn Darby (pictured/center above), Elliot Currie, Alex Capshaw-T Taylor, and Kristin Vinagro. Those are some awesome ladies (and one gentleman).

Seen:

Have you heard? Matt and Rebecca Thomas have unveiled their new bar and dining area at Kybecca and it’s the coolest. My business partner, Alicia Austin Morgan, and I were lucky enough to get an all-access pass to the fresh space on a cold, rainy March Sunday afternoon (seriously, what was up with that weather?) to shoot Forage’s spring/summer look book. With the genius talents of Ryan Poe behind the lens, we carefully crafted a party scene that was powered by champagne, cocktails and some seriously stylish local talent. Models Blaize Rai, Meg Dumlao, Drew Fristoe, Chris Lobmeyr von Hohenleiten, Brian Downing, Tom Byrnes, Jake Morgan, Alex Capshaw-T Taylor (third from left), Rose Taylor, Corinne Marghella vamped it up for the cameras and by the end of the shoot, the staged party had turned into the real thing.

Heard:

Kyle Snyder surprised

long-time girlfriend Mitzy Osterhout (and the entire Bistro Bethem staff) by proposing at the restaurant during a busy Saturday service. Congratulations you two!

Heard: Andrew Hellier brought

24

April 2013

Lezlie Cheryl is publicity director for the FCCA and a patron of all the galleries.

Front porch fredericksburg

Scen(ic):

Kent Ippolito and

Justin Jones to the Kenmore Inn last month; word is Justin chastised the audience for not getting up and shaking a tail feather…but it was only because they were stunned into silence by his talent!

Claudia Emerson (above) exploring Mount Adams in Cincinnati, Ohio. What a great photo of a great couple!

Seen: A huge truck pulling a trailer with

at Mike Skinner’s Horseshoes and Hand Grenades was christened last month with a show featuring the Madonnas, In a Field, Save the Arcadian and Kissing Fractures. H&H has also become the new home of Tell, the monthly storytelling event hosted (as always!) by Maura Wilson Schneider.

a car on it with people pretending to drive said car and a great many men wearing headphones and handling expensivelooking film equipment on the back of the trailer on Princess Anne St. Ryan Gosling, is that you filming Drive 2??

Heard:

the freshly built stage

presents

The Magnolia Ball Saturday, April 13, 2013 6:00 - 11:00 p.m. Fredericksburg Expo & Conference Center Cocktail Hour and Silent Auction Dinner followed by Dancing to Fredericksburg Big Band $90 per person / $650 per table of 8 Black tie optional Cash Bar

Tickets On Sale Now!

several weeks during regular dining hours: “The Release,” New Works (JennaAndersonFineArt.com).Top Right For more art events, see the Calendar of Events, pages 16-17.

Exposure Unlimited’s 27th anniversary show has been extended through April at P Rose Gallery. Here, art superstars Paula Rose, Betsy Glassie, David Lovegrove, Retta Robbins, John Nichols, Cathy Herndon and Mayor Mary Catherine Greenlaw (above) take a moment to mark the occasion with a photo. Not included in photo but still obviously worth the mention: members Joan Limbrick & Bob Worthy.

Nicole Gebhart stocking

up on essentials right before her new baby’s arrival at Wegmans; Matt Russ Rivers walking down Kenmore Ave on his way to work (arf); Bill Freehling grabbing afternoon coffee at Hyperion Espresso; Hyperion’s own Dan Peterson on quite an intense run on the new walking trail on Fall Hill Ave; Candis and Eve Wenger on William St heading to music class; Rebecca Thomas dining with a friend at Sammy T’s; Kybecca bartender Calvin Roberts chatting up friends outside of Bourbon Room; Phillip Baxter grabbing coffee to go at Barnes and Noble.

to 2 p.m. And Jenna Anderson’s Solo Show opens at Bistro Bethem Monday, April 8th 6-9 p.m. for

LibertyTown Arts Workshop is 50 artists and 30 studios at 916 Liberty. The 7th Annual “Feast for the Eyes” Art About Food is April 5-28, with the Edible Art Competition April 5th. libertytownarts.com. UMW offers the Ridderhof Martin Gallery and duPont Gallery, presenting “Spotlight: Designers from the Department of Theatre & Design”

Downtown’s Katie Dunn met up with three of her cousins (who are sisters) (Below L-R: Brynn Pacciti of Vienna VA, Michelle Paige of Amherst NY, Rachel Hamele of Baltimore, and Katie) to celebrate Michelle’s 40th at Tarara Winery in Leesburg. If there’s one thing I’ve learned about turning one of those seminal ages, wine is always a nice accompaniment.

Phone:

(540) 361-7071 E-mail:

cchavez@hospicesupportcare.org Web:

hours Fri - Sat 10:30 to 4:30 Sun 1 to 4 810 Caroline St., Downtown

www.hospicesupportcare.org PROCEEDS

BENEFIT

HOSPICE SUPPORT CARE

Ask about Sponsorship and Promotional/Memorial Ad Opportunities. Silent Auction Items Accepted

front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

25


National Poetry Month in Fredericksburg For my grandmother By A.E. Bayne When there are no words, there is always poetry. You know what I mean. When the literal fails us, the figurative remains. Images charged with emotion and forged from memory and experience fly onto the page with unbridled urgency. Then the work begins – the weeding, the trimming, the selecting and tying of loose ends. The poet’s toolbox is language, and the motivation is life. In April, we celebrate National Poetry Month. Initiated in 1996 by the Academy of American Poets, it is a celebration of the figurative expression of human emotion. Our own Central Rappahannock Regional Library is sponsoring poetry related events throughout the month, including Poem in Your Pocket Day on Thursday, April 18th. branch. To commemorate National Poetry enjoyment. Written about my grandmother, me about family and home while sharing the when I wrote this; that’s poetry.

Visit their website for specifics at each Month, I offer this poem for your Treva Bayne, it honors what she taught art of knitting during our visits. I wept

Slipping Stitches Fingers like bobbins slide yarn from point to point slip, wrap, finger, draw through, repeat. Quicker than the eye her needles clack and scissor, weaving and weaving Knit, purl, knit, purl, drop a stitch and carry to the back. My hands on her hands, skin like iced tissue paper, yarn moves the blood. She moves my fingers, needling them nudge the tip, hold it steady, wrap the yarn, pull through the loop. We’ve moved the world. Picking up speed, now a purse, some socks, mittens, silky scarves, a tam; and now booties and a blanket for my boy a jumper for my boy a sweater for my boy. Oh! The patterned textures that pass over two slender bodies stitches lost and retrieved while weaving and dropping, yanked clean out at times, then resting with the others. All the while, even after thin fingers grow still, after joints grow too stiff for needles, her hands are my hands and in my hands, her hands, always. A.E. Bayne is a teacher and writer who has lived and worked in Fredericksburg for fourteen years.

26

April 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

COMMUNITY LINK

Downtown Writing Studio

Courtesy of WFVA and Front Porch

Where new literature is born

rabies - a serious discussion

By page meade Don’t we all love the delicious feeling of sinking into a book, poem, essay or news article? What if you were to go a step further and do some of your own writing? Where do we begin? How do we organize our thoughts into something cohesive that will pull us along and into the story? The Downtown Writing Studio opened last year and offers two such writing workshops for people to write and share their work. The studio is located at LibertyTown Arts Workshop and where Susan Carter-M Morgan oversees and guides us in our efforts. Helen writes about her years growing up on a cattle ranch in North Dakota as a legacy for her grandchildren. Theresa finds a writing group has inspired her to go beyond her comfort zone of just writing poetry. She has now self-published and is writing short Mary Ann is already an avid stories. writer, editor and publisher. She was missing the company of other writers and lovers of good literature. Susan believes anyone can be taught to write. “Everyone is born with an imagination and an ability to be creative. We can feel insecure as writers, but this may give us the edge to come back and improve. This insecurity comes from the “red pen” syndrome many of us experienced in school and tends to inhibit writing. Sharing writing can also be difficult, and we must be gentle when we support writers.” She also likes the phrase, “I wonder…” “Curiosity is the key. Write and don’t edit or revise as your write. It is important to let the ideas flow. Part of becoming a good writer is to participate in a writing group. This way you can see your work through a different vision and then tell us if what is in our head is coming through.” When asked if we need to write about what we know, she said. “If you try to write in someone else’s voice, you won’t be successful. You can do the research, but it is written in your own voice. You can’t try to be someone else.” Another recommendation of hers to improve your writing is to read often. “If you are trying to write in a certain genre, than begin to read that genre.” The every other Tuesday evening group meets at 7 pm and focuses on a gentle critique of the writing that we share with one another. “We don’t spend time writing here. People bring work they want you to hear.” The Wednesday morning group meets at 11, am and we begin by talking about the writing we did that week. We then do a writing “prompt,” which is when you are given an idea for writing and then write it

by amy pearce

and share what you have written. We also share other pieces we wrote that week. When asked if she had any more ideas about writing to share with us, she said, “Start with something personal.” Susan says having her studio is “my perfect world. I can’t imagine anything better than being around people who love to write and talk about writing.” Visit her website downtownwriting.com for information, tips and online resources. Susan also works individually with children and teens, those who already love to write and those who find it a challenge. Author Steve Watkins will be teaching a class in short fiction this month for the studio and a memoir writing class is planned for summer. We are all awaiting the online literary journal she is creating for Fredericksburg writers. Susan also notes, “I am also starting a Fredericksburg Area Writers blog, which I hope will produce a print book at least once a year. I have been surprised and delighted by the process.” Page Meade is a student of Susan’s, and a flight attendant currently assigned to Beijing.

In July 2012, two Spotsylvania County sisters were bitten by a rabid beaver and began a month-long series of antirabies injections. Wendy Radnovich, mother of Alyssa and Annabella Radnovich, said her two girls, ages 11 and 8 at the time, were bitten on the legs by a beaver while swimming in Lake Anna. A relative killed the animal, which was taken to a state lab in Richmond and found to be rabid. The girls received the first of a series of anti-rabies shots — two shots each initially and more the following month at the Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center. Mrs. Radnovich said her daughters received additional injections of the vaccine on days 3, 7, 14 and 28 following their first treatment. They became the 22nd and 23rd people in the Fredericksburg region

Advanced Dental Care of Fredericksburg 540-891-9911

$79

EXTENDED THRU APRIL

Listen in at 8 a.m. on Sunday, April 21 on NewsTalk 1230 WFVA when Dr. Brooke Rossheim will be Ted Schubel’s guest on Community Link to talk about rabies. And get to an AM radio or listen live to the program at newstalk1230.net

Amy Pearce is a monthly contributor to Front Porch.

$650

New Patient Special

Per Arch Denture or Partial

With this Coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 5/1/13 A $239.00 Value

With this Coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 5/1/13 A $1100.00 Value

Includes Exam, X-Rays and Cleaning

who received treatment in 2012 for exposure to rabies. In 2010, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention changed the recommended treatment for those bitten by rabid animals. “The CDC said it is OK to give the victim four doses of the rabies vaccine, rather than five,” said Dr. Brooke Rossheim, director of the Rappahannock Area Health District. “It’s up to the discretion of the clinician. If people still use the fifth-dose regimen, that’s fine.” Rabies is a potentially fatal virus, usually transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected animal. More than 11 rabid animals have been identified in the Fredericksburg area since 2011, including a cat, four skunks and six raccoons.

“In Virginia, the main rabies carriers tend to be the same ones from year to year: raccoon, skunk, fox and bats. Those are the big hitters,” Rossheim said. The Lake Anna beaver is only the fourth case in Virginia in the last decade. “Wild animals get exposed the same way people get exposed, which is through the bite of a rabid animal,” Rossheim said.

Because we care for you! 10524 Spotsylvania Ave. Ste #104 Fredericksburg, VA front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

27


National Poetry Month in Fredericksburg For my grandmother By A.E. Bayne When there are no words, there is always poetry. You know what I mean. When the literal fails us, the figurative remains. Images charged with emotion and forged from memory and experience fly onto the page with unbridled urgency. Then the work begins – the weeding, the trimming, the selecting and tying of loose ends. The poet’s toolbox is language, and the motivation is life. In April, we celebrate National Poetry Month. Initiated in 1996 by the Academy of American Poets, it is a celebration of the figurative expression of human emotion. Our own Central Rappahannock Regional Library is sponsoring poetry related events throughout the month, including Poem in Your Pocket Day on Thursday, April 18th. branch. To commemorate National Poetry enjoyment. Written about my grandmother, me about family and home while sharing the when I wrote this; that’s poetry.

Visit their website for specifics at each Month, I offer this poem for your Treva Bayne, it honors what she taught art of knitting during our visits. I wept

Slipping Stitches Fingers like bobbins slide yarn from point to point slip, wrap, finger, draw through, repeat. Quicker than the eye her needles clack and scissor, weaving and weaving Knit, purl, knit, purl, drop a stitch and carry to the back. My hands on her hands, skin like iced tissue paper, yarn moves the blood. She moves my fingers, needling them nudge the tip, hold it steady, wrap the yarn, pull through the loop. We’ve moved the world. Picking up speed, now a purse, some socks, mittens, silky scarves, a tam; and now booties and a blanket for my boy a jumper for my boy a sweater for my boy. Oh! The patterned textures that pass over two slender bodies stitches lost and retrieved while weaving and dropping, yanked clean out at times, then resting with the others. All the while, even after thin fingers grow still, after joints grow too stiff for needles, her hands are my hands and in my hands, her hands, always. A.E. Bayne is a teacher and writer who has lived and worked in Fredericksburg for fourteen years.

26

April 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

COMMUNITY LINK

Downtown Writing Studio

Courtesy of WFVA and Front Porch

Where new literature is born

rabies - a serious discussion

By page meade Don’t we all love the delicious feeling of sinking into a book, poem, essay or news article? What if you were to go a step further and do some of your own writing? Where do we begin? How do we organize our thoughts into something cohesive that will pull us along and into the story? The Downtown Writing Studio opened last year and offers two such writing workshops for people to write and share their work. The studio is located at LibertyTown Arts Workshop and where Susan Carter-M Morgan oversees and guides us in our efforts. Helen writes about her years growing up on a cattle ranch in North Dakota as a legacy for her grandchildren. Theresa finds a writing group has inspired her to go beyond her comfort zone of just writing poetry. She has now self-published and is writing short Mary Ann is already an avid stories. writer, editor and publisher. She was missing the company of other writers and lovers of good literature. Susan believes anyone can be taught to write. “Everyone is born with an imagination and an ability to be creative. We can feel insecure as writers, but this may give us the edge to come back and improve. This insecurity comes from the “red pen” syndrome many of us experienced in school and tends to inhibit writing. Sharing writing can also be difficult, and we must be gentle when we support writers.” She also likes the phrase, “I wonder…” “Curiosity is the key. Write and don’t edit or revise as your write. It is important to let the ideas flow. Part of becoming a good writer is to participate in a writing group. This way you can see your work through a different vision and then tell us if what is in our head is coming through.” When asked if we need to write about what we know, she said. “If you try to write in someone else’s voice, you won’t be successful. You can do the research, but it is written in your own voice. You can’t try to be someone else.” Another recommendation of hers to improve your writing is to read often. “If you are trying to write in a certain genre, than begin to read that genre.” The every other Tuesday evening group meets at 7 pm and focuses on a gentle critique of the writing that we share with one another. “We don’t spend time writing here. People bring work they want you to hear.” The Wednesday morning group meets at 11, am and we begin by talking about the writing we did that week. We then do a writing “prompt,” which is when you are given an idea for writing and then write it

by amy pearce

and share what you have written. We also share other pieces we wrote that week. When asked if she had any more ideas about writing to share with us, she said, “Start with something personal.” Susan says having her studio is “my perfect world. I can’t imagine anything better than being around people who love to write and talk about writing.” Visit her website downtownwriting.com for information, tips and online resources. Susan also works individually with children and teens, those who already love to write and those who find it a challenge. Author Steve Watkins will be teaching a class in short fiction this month for the studio and a memoir writing class is planned for summer. We are all awaiting the online literary journal she is creating for Fredericksburg writers. Susan also notes, “I am also starting a Fredericksburg Area Writers blog, which I hope will produce a print book at least once a year. I have been surprised and delighted by the process.” Page Meade is a student of Susan’s, and a flight attendant currently assigned to Beijing.

In July 2012, two Spotsylvania County sisters were bitten by a rabid beaver and began a month-long series of antirabies injections. Wendy Radnovich, mother of Alyssa and Annabella Radnovich, said her two girls, ages 11 and 8 at the time, were bitten on the legs by a beaver while swimming in Lake Anna. A relative killed the animal, which was taken to a state lab in Richmond and found to be rabid. The girls received the first of a series of anti-rabies shots — two shots each initially and more the following month at the Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center. Mrs. Radnovich said her daughters received additional injections of the vaccine on days 3, 7, 14 and 28 following their first treatment. They became the 22nd and 23rd people in the Fredericksburg region

Advanced Dental Care of Fredericksburg 540-891-9911

$79

EXTENDED THRU APRIL

Listen in at 8 a.m. on Sunday, April 21 on NewsTalk 1230 WFVA when Dr. Brooke Rossheim will be Ted Schubel’s guest on Community Link to talk about rabies. And get to an AM radio or listen live to the program at newstalk1230.net

Amy Pearce is a monthly contributor to Front Porch.

$650

New Patient Special

Per Arch Denture or Partial

With this Coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 5/1/13 A $239.00 Value

With this Coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 5/1/13 A $1100.00 Value

Includes Exam, X-Rays and Cleaning

who received treatment in 2012 for exposure to rabies. In 2010, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention changed the recommended treatment for those bitten by rabid animals. “The CDC said it is OK to give the victim four doses of the rabies vaccine, rather than five,” said Dr. Brooke Rossheim, director of the Rappahannock Area Health District. “It’s up to the discretion of the clinician. If people still use the fifth-dose regimen, that’s fine.” Rabies is a potentially fatal virus, usually transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected animal. More than 11 rabid animals have been identified in the Fredericksburg area since 2011, including a cat, four skunks and six raccoons.

“In Virginia, the main rabies carriers tend to be the same ones from year to year: raccoon, skunk, fox and bats. Those are the big hitters,” Rossheim said. The Lake Anna beaver is only the fourth case in Virginia in the last decade. “Wild animals get exposed the same way people get exposed, which is through the bite of a rabid animal,” Rossheim said.

Because we care for you! 10524 Spotsylvania Ave. Ste #104 Fredericksburg, VA front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

27


The Edge of the Comfort Zone Phoebe Willis makes the cut By Katie Hornung

Inspiration is a funny thing. It can come from a loved one, a stranger, a fantastic or devastating moment; it can be embodied by a quote: “Life begins at the edge of your comfort zone.” The sentiment, by Neale Donald Walsch, just about sums up Phoebe Willis’s maximum velocity adventure through life. The UVA senior has made good on a promise of a few months ago. In the January Front Porch, Phoebe educated readers about St. Baldrick’s Foundation and a new friend, Travis Compher. A bright and sweet, young boy, who has faced childhood cancer with an intrepid mindset that many will never know, has fueled Phoebe’s efforts to inform and raise money for the foundation. Her passion led her to raise over $14,000. Now, she’s a walking billboard. On March 21st, Phoebe took on the selfless plunge into extreme activism. She shaved her head in honor of those children she so passionately regards. With a large crowd of family, friends, and field

hockey teammates upstairs at The Biltmore in Charlottesville, Phoebe claimed to have been the one inspired when over 140 people donated to St. Baldrick’s, stirred by Phoebe’s efforts and moved by the cause. Humbled, grateful, and overwhelmingly appreciative, Phoebe found herself silently coaching Don’t cry, just don’t cry. Not an overly emotional young woman, Phoebe said that looking to her mother, Tory, tearful as she watched her daughter’s corn silk, dark brown hair being cut from her head, made her laugh and smile in appreciation of her love. It helped that the hairdresser cracked jokes, too. But when she made eye contact with Travis, who had made the trek out with his dad to support her in that moment, it all changed. To watch her meet his young gaze, fixed and hopeful, was overwhelming to everyone. For Phoebe it was the height of joy, bringing forth hot tears of more gratitude. Once the final piece of hair fell to the floor, she rose from her chair, held her shorn locks high, and immediately went to Travis, pulling him close, embracing him. “It’s difficult,” she said, “to put anything about cancer into a positive light.” Travis’s father helped verbalize the feelings that needed to be expressed. An event like that turns the sadness of cancer on its head. While there wasn’t a dry eye in the room, no one doubted they had tears of pride, knowing this young woman and supporting her in her efforts. The morning after the event, Phoebe felt like she’d won the Super Bowl. A few more weeks of classes, papers, and the life she’s known for the past four years are left for her. On May 6, she’ll move to Philadelphia to take part in Teach for America as a science teacher. She’ll graduate on May 19. For the young woman, who according to her brother Hugh “has never looked so beautiful,” flirting with the edge of her comfort zone has given her renewed confidence. She has no qualms about being almost bald for graduation; instead, she marvels at what cool pictures she’ll have to remember this moment in time when supporting the continuation of life was more important than any vanity. “I hope I’ve inspired people to follow their passions, too.” Phoebe expressed thanks for the questions she gets from brave people who ask about her shaved head. She hopes others will support Travis by joining Team Travis Compher on Facebook. Katie Hornung is an English teacher and journalism advisor at The James Monroe High School.

28

April 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

My Own Path equations of value By c. ruth cassell I finally found my word. Everything I read or heard about finding an inspirational word for the year—not a resolution or a goal, but a theme, a purpose — proved true. The word repeatedly solved perceived problems. In and of itself, the word became a way to delineate the options ahead of me. Other words clambered for top spot: intention, power, passion. No other word became the common denominator for each solution. Value. Not worth, or merit, or cost, or amount. Value. The overall benefit of a factor to the whole. Some choices become exponentially better, by maximizing the experience’s value, and may be considered the only alternative. Some beliefs measure stronger, by reinforcing value, and may be sought as the obstruction to doubt. Some factors generate better solutions, by inherently inserting value, and may be considered vital to future equations for more equitable results. The theme as I approach each future moment is how to elicit the most value from the experience or relationship. Knowing I am not given an infinite supply, I must demand the most valuable denominator. I view moments as valuable elements. I base decisions and choices on the value of each component. I decipher life’s equations based on which solutions produce the most value. Through this process, I identify the factors that most greatly benefit my whole: I value my thoughts, choices and opinions. I value words, books and time to write. I value the shallow sleeping breaths of my child. I value quiet days at

home. I value each “I love you.” I value eye contact, whispered expressions of love, and cuddles. I value female friends, our shared experiences, and words of advice. I value being a sister and an aunt. I value my mother’s embrace and father’s steadfastness. I value my brothers’ memory and presence. I value natural sustenance, my vitality, and pushing my limits. I value hard work, energy and motivation, and a tidy space to live and work. I value a skyline of peaks against slate. I value a maze of trees. I value faint trickles against stone. I value silent encouragement, spoken substantiation, and supportive deeds. I value your thoughts, choices and opinions.

Ruth Cassell, a UMW grad and Bistro Bethem veteran, now finds her path in Roanoke, VA. She blogs about similar topics as addressed in My Own Path in her personal blog at www.attentionanonymous.wordpress.com

UMW Philharmonic’s Season Finale

For Sale Now at Amazon.com

Going out with “all smiles” By Troy Snuffer

The UMW Philharmonic Orchestra will present its season finale on Saturday, April 20. After a groundbreaking year that featured a national PBS show and flutist Sir James Galway, the program entitled “Young at Heart” will present popular classics for all ages. Says Maestro Dr. Kevin Bartram, “I wanted to end the year with music that is all smiles-sure to please the entire family.” The concert will feature as guests the Rappahannock Youth Symphony, directed by Veronica Jackson, who will perform a number on their own and then will combine with the Philharmonic in the rousing “Russian Sailor’s Dance.” The Philharmonic will present “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra” by Benjamin Britten, narrated by Keith Peters from Classics Radio. This famous work

highlights each section of the orchestra and teaches us what the instruments sound like and are capable of doing. This is the first time the Philharmonic has performed the work. Also on the program is Copland’s “Billy the Kid Suite”, Kabalevsky’s “Dance of the Comedians”, and the spirited “Polka and Fugue from Schwanda the Bagpiper” by Jaromir Weinberger. The UMW Philharmonic Orchestra was honored in 2009 with the American Prize for outstanding orchestra at the collegiate level, and Bartram was also honored as a top conductor. The group is comprised of both students and talented community members. “It’s a great mix of talent, and each group brings out the best in the other,” says Bartram. The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. in Dodd Auditorium on the campus of the University of Mary Washington. Tickets are available online by calling atphilharmonic.umw.edu, 540/654-1324 or at the Fredericksburg Visitor Center.

Troy Snuffer is a UMW Philharmonic Board Member.

Author: J Robert Du Bois Edited by Rob Grogan

Give a Child Something to Think About Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

Larry Keel Hackensack Boys Big Daddy Love Elby Brass Tickets available at Sunken Well Tavern or www.heardintheburg.com June 8th at the Fredericksburg Fair Grounds VIP tickets available only at Sunken Well Tavern Info at heardintheburg.com or call 5403700911 Percentage of proceeds go to Community Outreach front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

29


The Edge of the Comfort Zone Phoebe Willis makes the cut By Katie Hornung

Inspiration is a funny thing. It can come from a loved one, a stranger, a fantastic or devastating moment; it can be embodied by a quote: “Life begins at the edge of your comfort zone.” The sentiment, by Neale Donald Walsch, just about sums up Phoebe Willis’s maximum velocity adventure through life. The UVA senior has made good on a promise of a few months ago. In the January Front Porch, Phoebe educated readers about St. Baldrick’s Foundation and a new friend, Travis Compher. A bright and sweet, young boy, who has faced childhood cancer with an intrepid mindset that many will never know, has fueled Phoebe’s efforts to inform and raise money for the foundation. Her passion led her to raise over $14,000. Now, she’s a walking billboard. On March 21st, Phoebe took on the selfless plunge into extreme activism. She shaved her head in honor of those children she so passionately regards. With a large crowd of family, friends, and field

hockey teammates upstairs at The Biltmore in Charlottesville, Phoebe claimed to have been the one inspired when over 140 people donated to St. Baldrick’s, stirred by Phoebe’s efforts and moved by the cause. Humbled, grateful, and overwhelmingly appreciative, Phoebe found herself silently coaching Don’t cry, just don’t cry. Not an overly emotional young woman, Phoebe said that looking to her mother, Tory, tearful as she watched her daughter’s corn silk, dark brown hair being cut from her head, made her laugh and smile in appreciation of her love. It helped that the hairdresser cracked jokes, too. But when she made eye contact with Travis, who had made the trek out with his dad to support her in that moment, it all changed. To watch her meet his young gaze, fixed and hopeful, was overwhelming to everyone. For Phoebe it was the height of joy, bringing forth hot tears of more gratitude. Once the final piece of hair fell to the floor, she rose from her chair, held her shorn locks high, and immediately went to Travis, pulling him close, embracing him. “It’s difficult,” she said, “to put anything about cancer into a positive light.” Travis’s father helped verbalize the feelings that needed to be expressed. An event like that turns the sadness of cancer on its head. While there wasn’t a dry eye in the room, no one doubted they had tears of pride, knowing this young woman and supporting her in her efforts. The morning after the event, Phoebe felt like she’d won the Super Bowl. A few more weeks of classes, papers, and the life she’s known for the past four years are left for her. On May 6, she’ll move to Philadelphia to take part in Teach for America as a science teacher. She’ll graduate on May 19. For the young woman, who according to her brother Hugh “has never looked so beautiful,” flirting with the edge of her comfort zone has given her renewed confidence. She has no qualms about being almost bald for graduation; instead, she marvels at what cool pictures she’ll have to remember this moment in time when supporting the continuation of life was more important than any vanity. “I hope I’ve inspired people to follow their passions, too.” Phoebe expressed thanks for the questions she gets from brave people who ask about her shaved head. She hopes others will support Travis by joining Team Travis Compher on Facebook. Katie Hornung is an English teacher and journalism advisor at The James Monroe High School.

28

April 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

My Own Path equations of value By c. ruth cassell I finally found my word. Everything I read or heard about finding an inspirational word for the year—not a resolution or a goal, but a theme, a purpose — proved true. The word repeatedly solved perceived problems. In and of itself, the word became a way to delineate the options ahead of me. Other words clambered for top spot: intention, power, passion. No other word became the common denominator for each solution. Value. Not worth, or merit, or cost, or amount. Value. The overall benefit of a factor to the whole. Some choices become exponentially better, by maximizing the experience’s value, and may be considered the only alternative. Some beliefs measure stronger, by reinforcing value, and may be sought as the obstruction to doubt. Some factors generate better solutions, by inherently inserting value, and may be considered vital to future equations for more equitable results. The theme as I approach each future moment is how to elicit the most value from the experience or relationship. Knowing I am not given an infinite supply, I must demand the most valuable denominator. I view moments as valuable elements. I base decisions and choices on the value of each component. I decipher life’s equations based on which solutions produce the most value. Through this process, I identify the factors that most greatly benefit my whole: I value my thoughts, choices and opinions. I value words, books and time to write. I value the shallow sleeping breaths of my child. I value quiet days at

home. I value each “I love you.” I value eye contact, whispered expressions of love, and cuddles. I value female friends, our shared experiences, and words of advice. I value being a sister and an aunt. I value my mother’s embrace and father’s steadfastness. I value my brothers’ memory and presence. I value natural sustenance, my vitality, and pushing my limits. I value hard work, energy and motivation, and a tidy space to live and work. I value a skyline of peaks against slate. I value a maze of trees. I value faint trickles against stone. I value silent encouragement, spoken substantiation, and supportive deeds. I value your thoughts, choices and opinions.

Ruth Cassell, a UMW grad and Bistro Bethem veteran, now finds her path in Roanoke, VA. She blogs about similar topics as addressed in My Own Path in her personal blog at www.attentionanonymous.wordpress.com

UMW Philharmonic’s Season Finale

For Sale Now at Amazon.com

Going out with “all smiles” By Troy Snuffer

The UMW Philharmonic Orchestra will present its season finale on Saturday, April 20. After a groundbreaking year that featured a national PBS show and flutist Sir James Galway, the program entitled “Young at Heart” will present popular classics for all ages. Says Maestro Dr. Kevin Bartram, “I wanted to end the year with music that is all smiles-sure to please the entire family.” The concert will feature as guests the Rappahannock Youth Symphony, directed by Veronica Jackson, who will perform a number on their own and then will combine with the Philharmonic in the rousing “Russian Sailor’s Dance.” The Philharmonic will present “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra” by Benjamin Britten, narrated by Keith Peters from Classics Radio. This famous work

highlights each section of the orchestra and teaches us what the instruments sound like and are capable of doing. This is the first time the Philharmonic has performed the work. Also on the program is Copland’s “Billy the Kid Suite”, Kabalevsky’s “Dance of the Comedians”, and the spirited “Polka and Fugue from Schwanda the Bagpiper” by Jaromir Weinberger. The UMW Philharmonic Orchestra was honored in 2009 with the American Prize for outstanding orchestra at the collegiate level, and Bartram was also honored as a top conductor. The group is comprised of both students and talented community members. “It’s a great mix of talent, and each group brings out the best in the other,” says Bartram. The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. in Dodd Auditorium on the campus of the University of Mary Washington. Tickets are available online by calling atphilharmonic.umw.edu, 540/654-1324 or at the Fredericksburg Visitor Center.

Troy Snuffer is a UMW Philharmonic Board Member.

Author: J Robert Du Bois Edited by Rob Grogan

Give a Child Something to Think About Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

Larry Keel Hackensack Boys Big Daddy Love Elby Brass Tickets available at Sunken Well Tavern or www.heardintheburg.com June 8th at the Fredericksburg Fair Grounds VIP tickets available only at Sunken Well Tavern Info at heardintheburg.com or call 5403700911 Percentage of proceeds go to Community Outreach front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

29


Project Plant It !

Please Join Us from April 9th to the 20th as We host Our Antwerp Diamond Event. Lots of Diamonds at Antwerp Prices! Antwerp Reeption on April 13th & 20th with Belgian Waffles & Chocolates!

learn to love trees

Blanton Massey 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847

meeting the public’s need

gemstonecreations.org

by sara hunt

Once again, Dominion’s Project Plant It! blossoms with new ways to engage Fredericksburg-area elementary students in learning about trees and the environment. The program has earned the prestigious Public Awareness of Trees award from the Arbor Day Foundation and also has been recognized by the Virginia Association of Science Teachers. In January, teachers received a kit with lesson plans, posters, stickers and other instructional tools. All of the materials align with state learning standards for math, science, language arts and social studies. A new lesson plan for 2013 helps students understand more about renewable and nonrenewable energy sources. “The activities are studentcentered and relate well to the Standards of Learning about energy,” said Dr. Jean Young, Curriculum and Instruction Specialist for Spotsylvania County Schools. “I look forward to sharing this lesson plan with our teachers when it’s time to start studying Project Plant It!” Dr. Young also serves as president of the Virginia Science Education Leadership Association. The cornerstone of the program is the distribution of a redbud tree seedling to each participating student on Arbor Day. “This beautiful tree species is native to Virginia, and children will enjoy caring for it and watching it grow,” said

30

April 2013

Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesday 10-6:30 Paulin Cheatham, spokesman for Dominion’s Project Plant It!. Dominion is the parent company of Dominion Virginia Power. Since 2007, Project Plant It! has distributed more than 160,000 tree seedlings to students in seven states. According to the Virginia Department of Forestry, this equates to 400 acres of new forest if all of the tree seedlings are planted and grow to maturity. I n Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania, 17 elementary schools are enrolled in Project Plant It! this year: Battlefield, Berkeley, Brock Road, Cedar Forest, Chancellor, Courthouse Road, Courtland, Harrison Road, Lee Hill, Livingston, Parkside, Riverview, Robert E. Lee, Salem, Smith Station, Spotswood and Wilderness. “Project Plant It! was featured in the March issue of our publication that is targeted to teachers and educators across the Commonwealth,” said Dory Suttmiller, editor of Virginia Teacher magazine. “We wanted to share details about this educational program. Plus, the teaching materials and redbud tree seedlings are provided by Dominion at no cost to the schools. It’s a wonderful way for students to celebrate Spring while learning about trees and the environment!” The website, www.projectplantit.com, features videos and interactive games about trees. For more information, visit the website or Facebook page. “Each year, we closely evaluate all programs that are offered to our students and Project Plant It! continues to provide high quality instructional materials,” concluded Dr. Young. “The lesson plans emphasize 21st century skills such as communicating and collaborating in teams, while building a more global awareness about our environment.” Sara Hunt is Senior Public Relations Manager at Touch Points Public Relations.

Front porch fredericksburg

By valerie jean mayo Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

volunteer lawyers and a yearly budget of less than $500. Though it wasn’t a favored organization of the administration, Blanton saw the need and when he returned to his hometown Fredericksburg he helped organize the Rappahannock Legal Services which, with offices in Culpeper, Fredericksburg and Tappahannock, will be celebrating their 40th anniversary this year.

Situated in a historic building across the street from the Library Headquarters in Fredericksburg is the office of the multi-faceted attorney A. Blanton Massey. While maintaining a traditional law practice, Blanton has spent his legal career working in and promoting alternative ways for clients to access legal solutions for their problems. While working for a legal aid organization in Roanoke during the Nixon administration, Blanton observed an IRS auditor spend a day auditing the records for an office with three part-time

After seeing this access to legal services for low-income persons established, Blanton expanded his interest in legal trends. In 1986 he was trained as a divorce mediator, a skill he uses regularly today. He then cofounded the Rappahannock Mediation Center that served the community and the courts for nearly 20 years. Mediation is now an established method for resolving disputes in the Fredericksburg area. Then in 2003 Blanton was trained in the collaborative divorce process, after which he co-founded the Fredericksburg Area Collaborative Professionals who offer a process of resolving domestic disputes without litigation with a team of trained professionals. This method of dispute resolution was started in 1990 by attorney Stu Webb, an avid Civil War buff. Blanton was thrilled after attending a training by Stu in Richmond to treat Stu to a tour of the Fredericksburg battle sites and lunch at Goolrick’s. The focus of each of the abovementioned organizations has been to meet the public’s need for cost-effective, quality legal services. Blanton says each of these services has been about giving people the

opportunity for “self-determination based upon informed consent.” Blanton has seen the self-help movement expand rapidly though the vast web resources, but he also sees too many people making legal decisions based on cognitive and emotional distortions of facts rather than on a knowledge of the law and its application to the facts. Too often, he says, by failing to seek good advice and assistance, creative practical options are missed. While Blanton’s primary focus is on his divorce mediation services and the team of local professionals he works with in that practice, he now also offers “collaborative divorce” services using another team of professionals, some of whom drive here from Richmond to participate in FACP. The good news is that there are dispute resolution methods designed for everyone – legal aid services, mediation, collaborative law, negotiation and the

more familiar and most expensive method — litigation. What is comforting is that some professionals like Blanton Massey have devoted their careers to finding and using the best process for each individual case. Be sure to ask your lawyer about all your options the next time you have a legal issue.

Valerie Jean Mayo is a member of Fredericksburg Area Collaborative Professionals.

ARCHER DI PEPPE CAGA

CERTIFIED APPRAISER

Insurance Riders Estate Settlements Divorce Cases Damage Claims Oral or Written Appraisals SPECIALIZING IN ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

Certified Appraiser Certified Appraiser’s Guild of America

adipeppe@aol.com

(540) 373-9636

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890 front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

31


Project Plant It !

Please Join Us from April 9th to the 20th as We host Our Antwerp Diamond Event. Lots of Diamonds at Antwerp Prices! Antwerp Reeption on April 13th & 20th with Belgian Waffles & Chocolates!

learn to love trees

Blanton Massey 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847

meeting the public’s need

gemstonecreations.org

by sara hunt

Once again, Dominion’s Project Plant It! blossoms with new ways to engage Fredericksburg-area elementary students in learning about trees and the environment. The program has earned the prestigious Public Awareness of Trees award from the Arbor Day Foundation and also has been recognized by the Virginia Association of Science Teachers. In January, teachers received a kit with lesson plans, posters, stickers and other instructional tools. All of the materials align with state learning standards for math, science, language arts and social studies. A new lesson plan for 2013 helps students understand more about renewable and nonrenewable energy sources. “The activities are studentcentered and relate well to the Standards of Learning about energy,” said Dr. Jean Young, Curriculum and Instruction Specialist for Spotsylvania County Schools. “I look forward to sharing this lesson plan with our teachers when it’s time to start studying Project Plant It!” Dr. Young also serves as president of the Virginia Science Education Leadership Association. The cornerstone of the program is the distribution of a redbud tree seedling to each participating student on Arbor Day. “This beautiful tree species is native to Virginia, and children will enjoy caring for it and watching it grow,” said

30

April 2013

Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesday 10-6:30 Paulin Cheatham, spokesman for Dominion’s Project Plant It!. Dominion is the parent company of Dominion Virginia Power. Since 2007, Project Plant It! has distributed more than 160,000 tree seedlings to students in seven states. According to the Virginia Department of Forestry, this equates to 400 acres of new forest if all of the tree seedlings are planted and grow to maturity. I n Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania, 17 elementary schools are enrolled in Project Plant It! this year: Battlefield, Berkeley, Brock Road, Cedar Forest, Chancellor, Courthouse Road, Courtland, Harrison Road, Lee Hill, Livingston, Parkside, Riverview, Robert E. Lee, Salem, Smith Station, Spotswood and Wilderness. “Project Plant It! was featured in the March issue of our publication that is targeted to teachers and educators across the Commonwealth,” said Dory Suttmiller, editor of Virginia Teacher magazine. “We wanted to share details about this educational program. Plus, the teaching materials and redbud tree seedlings are provided by Dominion at no cost to the schools. It’s a wonderful way for students to celebrate Spring while learning about trees and the environment!” The website, www.projectplantit.com, features videos and interactive games about trees. For more information, visit the website or Facebook page. “Each year, we closely evaluate all programs that are offered to our students and Project Plant It! continues to provide high quality instructional materials,” concluded Dr. Young. “The lesson plans emphasize 21st century skills such as communicating and collaborating in teams, while building a more global awareness about our environment.” Sara Hunt is Senior Public Relations Manager at Touch Points Public Relations.

Front porch fredericksburg

By valerie jean mayo Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged

volunteer lawyers and a yearly budget of less than $500. Though it wasn’t a favored organization of the administration, Blanton saw the need and when he returned to his hometown Fredericksburg he helped organize the Rappahannock Legal Services which, with offices in Culpeper, Fredericksburg and Tappahannock, will be celebrating their 40th anniversary this year.

Situated in a historic building across the street from the Library Headquarters in Fredericksburg is the office of the multi-faceted attorney A. Blanton Massey. While maintaining a traditional law practice, Blanton has spent his legal career working in and promoting alternative ways for clients to access legal solutions for their problems. While working for a legal aid organization in Roanoke during the Nixon administration, Blanton observed an IRS auditor spend a day auditing the records for an office with three part-time

After seeing this access to legal services for low-income persons established, Blanton expanded his interest in legal trends. In 1986 he was trained as a divorce mediator, a skill he uses regularly today. He then cofounded the Rappahannock Mediation Center that served the community and the courts for nearly 20 years. Mediation is now an established method for resolving disputes in the Fredericksburg area. Then in 2003 Blanton was trained in the collaborative divorce process, after which he co-founded the Fredericksburg Area Collaborative Professionals who offer a process of resolving domestic disputes without litigation with a team of trained professionals. This method of dispute resolution was started in 1990 by attorney Stu Webb, an avid Civil War buff. Blanton was thrilled after attending a training by Stu in Richmond to treat Stu to a tour of the Fredericksburg battle sites and lunch at Goolrick’s. The focus of each of the abovementioned organizations has been to meet the public’s need for cost-effective, quality legal services. Blanton says each of these services has been about giving people the

opportunity for “self-determination based upon informed consent.” Blanton has seen the self-help movement expand rapidly though the vast web resources, but he also sees too many people making legal decisions based on cognitive and emotional distortions of facts rather than on a knowledge of the law and its application to the facts. Too often, he says, by failing to seek good advice and assistance, creative practical options are missed. While Blanton’s primary focus is on his divorce mediation services and the team of local professionals he works with in that practice, he now also offers “collaborative divorce” services using another team of professionals, some of whom drive here from Richmond to participate in FACP. The good news is that there are dispute resolution methods designed for everyone – legal aid services, mediation, collaborative law, negotiation and the

more familiar and most expensive method — litigation. What is comforting is that some professionals like Blanton Massey have devoted their careers to finding and using the best process for each individual case. Be sure to ask your lawyer about all your options the next time you have a legal issue.

Valerie Jean Mayo is a member of Fredericksburg Area Collaborative Professionals.

ARCHER DI PEPPE CAGA

CERTIFIED APPRAISER

Insurance Riders Estate Settlements Divorce Cases Damage Claims Oral or Written Appraisals SPECIALIZING IN ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

Certified Appraiser Certified Appraiser’s Guild of America

adipeppe@aol.com

(540) 373-9636

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890 front porch fredericksburg

April 2013

31



April 2013 - Front Porch Fredericksburg