Central Valley May 2018

Page 1


elevate your space

with custom upholstery Creating a space that is unique and true to your taste is easy with custom upholstery from the HGTV HOMETM Design Studio.

COMPLETE THE LOOK

with custom ottomans & benches plus options for arms, back cushions, legs or skirt.

15 WOOD FINISHES, 1000 FABRICS

makeover central

TM

one of our design consultants will help you create the custom room you’ve always imagined.

With domestic and imported fabrics

255 & 285 W. El Paso, Fresno / Behind Bed Bath & Beyond / (559) 440-9600 M-S: 10-7 / Sun: 11-6 / www.fashionfurnitureco.com



.................

May 2018

22

Gold medal Girl Scout

10 16 22 26 30

The CEO of Girl Scouts of Central California South has a firm place in history. That’s a Gold Medal achievement.

Adopt a furry friend Local animal shelters are packed with animals needing love. Learn about the shelters and local adoption events.

Wild nonprofit has wings The Fresno Wildlife Rehabilitation Service has been caring for native wildlife and birds of prey for 44 years.

Fetching a pet-friendly hotel Fido needs a vacation, too. After all, he is a part of the family. Check out our finds for the state’s pet-friendly spots.

Taste something fresh If you’re tired of over-processed and greasy food, take a bite of something fresh and feel good about eating again.

30

6 Sneak Peeks 7 Believe Its 8 Pastimes

10 25 Things You Didn’t Know About ... 12 Innovators 15 Don’t Miss Calendar 16 Timely Trends 26 Get Up & Go 30 Eat, Drink, Be Merry

0003590065-01

35 Snapshot

4 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

16

Bacon is a playfully active Chihuahua and Terrier mix. When we took this picture in late March, Bacon was available for adoption from Valley Animal Center. While he hopefully has a forever home now, many more furry friends are available and waiting for you. Read about local animal shelters and adoption events beginning on page 16. PHOTOGRAPHY: Gary Kazanjian

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m


.................

At Home

Adopt your best friend during May

I

bet you couldn’t help but smile when you saw this month’s cover photo. Bacon, our cover boy, is a playfully active Chihuahua and Terrier mix. When we took this picture in late March, Bacon was available for adoption from Valley Animal Center. While he hopefully has a forever home now, many more furry friends are available and waiting for you, if you’re looking for a new best friend and family member. My husband’s parents adopted their dog from Valley Animal Center and take advantage of membership to that center’s dog park, where photographer Gary Kazanjian photographed Bacon and several of his pals. The park is an oasis of dog happiness. Fenced off areas let vaccinated dogs run and play. It even features a doggy pool area with fountains to refresh your dog on a hot day. If you haven’t checked it out, a good time would be at Valley Animal Center’s upcoming Super Adopt event, scheduled for May 12. Valley Animal Center will be joined by several other shelters and will be enticing visitors with hundreds of dogs and cats available for adoption. I adopted my three cats from The Cat House on the Kings, which is also hosting an event this month. The Cat House on the Kings open house will be held May 5. If you’ve never had a

Thank You,

chance to visit The Cat House on the Kings in Parlier, let me tell you, it is worth the drive. The open house will feature a silent auction, music, raffles and, of course, lots and lots of cats to pet. Events like this take a lot of time to present, and we are blessed in this community to have a network of animal lovers dedicated to doing what it takes to end pet over-population in Fresno and the Central Valley. These people work tirelessly to educate, promote, fundraise and care for animals every day. Our story about local shelters and a wrap up of the events offered in the upcoming weeks, begins on page 16. That information is surrounded by pet photos submitted by Central Valley readers. I can’t thank you enough for responding to our call for photo submissions. It is a bit like asking an army of new grandparents if they have pictures of the grandkids. I’ll admit I didn’t have to do a whole lot of arm-twisting, and for that, I’m grateful.

or e Dec m o H t n e c Ac

TO OUR LOYAL CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS.

A ldren’s • Ch i

pparel • Gifts

0003588573-01

7 Years

8029 N. Cedar Ave. (at Nees) Fresno, CA 93720 559-440-1221 | www.batteruppancakes.com c e n t r a l v a l l e y. c o m

Verdalee Since 1997

2054 W Bullard Ave, Fresno 93711 NW Corner Bullard & West • 559.439.6844 Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 5


.................

Berry delicious

May 2018/ Vol. 7, Issue 5 ......................... Central Valley magazine is produced by the Custom Publications staff of The Fresno Bee and published by The Fresno Bee. It is inserted into The Fresno Bee on the fourth Saturday of the month in the Fresno/Clovis area. It can also be found in waiting rooms throughout Fresno/Clovis. Cover price $3.95 President & Publisher Ken Riddick Vice President, Sales & Strategic Marketing John Coakley Editor Carey Norton | 559-441-6755

When we think about blueberries, we imagine a guilt-free treat that provides a multitude of health benefits. The indigo-colored berries are rich in antioxidants, folic acid, phytonutrients and Vitamin C. Along with her husband, Gayle Willems — the namesake behind Berry Lady Farms — oversees 100 acres of land near the Kings River in Kingsburg. The Willems family started planting blueberries nearly 18 years ago. Today, they have grown into a full-fledged operation that includes growing 14 varieties of blueberries. As a member of the Fresno County Farm Trail, Berry Lady Farms partners with Top of the Hill to make jams and jellies in an assortment of flavors like spicy blackberry jam. The season for harvesting blueberries is mid-May through June. During the season, Willems manages the farm store from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Saturday. She also has a booth at three local farmers markets:

The Visalia Farmers Market 8 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., Saturdays The corner of Mooney and Caldwell avenues in the parking lot of Sears 5 to 8 p.m., Thursdays Church Street near Main Street The Kaiser Permanente Fresno Farmers Market 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Wednesdays Fresno Street near Herndon Avenue The farm store is located at 39771 Road 28, Kingsburg. Details: www.berryladyfarms.com

To the beat of my heart

Advertising Sales Director Bill Gutierrez | 559-441-6405 Production Coordinator Anna Ramseier | 559-441-6751 Central Valley Sales Leader Sonia White | 559-441-6156 Assistant Editor Monica Stevens | 559-441-6149 Custom Publications Staff Janessa Tyler | 559-441-6764 Dani Villalobos | 559-441-6759 Gary Kazanjian Contributing Writers Cyndee Fontana-Ott, Douglas Hoagland, Janice Stevens Contributing Photographers Matt Drake, Wayne Hutchison Contributing Artists Pat Hunter Design Carey Norton, Monica Stevens, Janessa Tyler, Juan Vega, Lisa Vogt Reader inquiries Central Valley magazine 1626 E St., Fresno, CA 93786 www.centralvalley.com 559-441-6755 All content © The Fresno Bee To contribute, please contact Carey Norton at 559-441-6755 or cnorton@fresnobee.com

The wonders of wrinkles The Fresno City College Division of Fine, Performing & Communication Arts is presenting New Wrinkles — the local, volunteer-based group of older adults who dance and sing to popular hits from the past — for the 30th season. The show runs from Thursday, May 24 to Sunday, June 10 at Fresno City College. The theme for 2018: “On the Road to Broadway!” Directed by David Bonetto, the production team includes Ellie Dote, Rebecca Sarkisian and Darrell Yates. Cast members will pay tribute to “The Great White Way” with songs from Broadway shows that have captured our hearts for decades. Details: www.newwrinklesfresno.com

The Fresno Convention Center invites you to witness the compelling sights and sounds of TAO: Drum Heart on Saturday, May 5 at Saroyan Theatre. TAO is the world-renowned taiko (“drum”) musical troupe based in Japan. It has been enjoyed by more than 7 million people in 500 cities in 23 countries. The 2018 North America Tour started in Canada, weaving through the East Coast and the Midwest before arriving on the West Coast in April. Stops were made in Poway, Santa Monica, Orange and Modesto. Fresno is the second to the last stop on the 2018 North America Tour. Details: www.fresnoconventioncenter.com

The Fresno Bee fresnobee.com

6 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m


.................

Heroes wear scrubs National Nurses Week runs Sunday, May 6 through Saturday, May 12 — the birth date of Florence Nightingale, a nurse who became famous for treating wounded soldiers during the Crimean war in the 1850s. Later, she worked to establish nursing as a profession. Known as “The Lady with the Lamp,” Nightingale carried a lamp as she made her rounds at nighttime. In July 1860, she founded the Nightingale Training School and Home for Nurses at St. Thomas’ Hospital in London. National Nurses Week, supported by the American Nurses Association, honors and celebrates nurses and their role in society. The theme for 2018: “Nurses: Inspire, Innovate, Influence.” Coincidentally, National Women’s Health Week runs Sunday, May 14 to Saturday, May 20. Details: www.nursingworld.org

Fido loves Fresno Did you know that Fresno is a dog-friendly city? In addition to pooch-approved parks like Woodward Dog Park, Roeding Park Dog Park, Victoria-West Dog Park and Todd Beamer Dog Park, there are a plethora of services to keep your pooch looking and feeling like a movie star. For example, Top Dog Dog Wash (www.facebook.com/ topdogpetwash). The DIYyourself dog wash is located across the street from Woodward Park —

Grocery delivery services Popular grocery services that allow online ordering and provide delivery to your home or car have come to Fresno through Instacart, Vons and Walmart. Instacart will deliver items ordered from Costco, CVS, Petco, Smart & Final, Sprouts and Vons to homes in 21 Zip codes in the Fresno-Clovis area. Customers place orders through the Instacart website (www.instacart.com) or phone app. Personal shoppers — who are contract workers — fill the orders and deliver items. Instacart requires personal shoppers to have approved insulated bags or coolers to ensure temperature-sensitive items are protected during transport. The delivery fee is $5.99 on orders of $35 or more. Or membership in Instacart Express ($14.99 a month or $149 a year) provides free, unlimited, same-day delivery on orders of $35 or more.

giving you easy access to bathing your pooch after a hike. It offers six tubs of various sizes and supplies like shampoo and conditioner, brushes, towels and dryers. If your dog needs coaxing into a bath, there are a variety treats to help with the transition. If you want to pamper your four-legged friend, Tailwaggers Fresno (www.tailwaggersfresno.com) is a full-service salon for dogs and cats. It also features a boutique with supplies and accessories, and bakery with gourmet treats like handmade cookies. Speaking of treats, head to Frosted Cakery (www.frostedcakery.com) on Wishon Avenue in the Tower District for the Pupcake — a canine cupcake. But don’t stop at treats! Eat a delicious meal with your pup on the patio at Rocket Dog Gourmet Brats & Brew (www.rocketdogbratsandbrew.com). A new chain restaruant is opening in the former Elephant Bar location. Not only can you bring your dog, but Fido can order a hamburger patty or grilled chicken with brown rice. Look for the Lazy Dog Restaurant & Bar (www.lazydogrestaurants.com) to open in the fall. Note: Dogs will only allowed on the patio.

c e n tra lva lle y.c o m

Customers of Walmart can shop online or through a mobile browser (www.walmart.com/ grocery). When they arrive at Walmart, they call a designated number to alert an employee and the pickup process takes only a few minutes. The service doesn’t add an additional cost to a grocery bill. Vons (www.vons.com) delivers to customers in the Fresno-Clovis area. Customers get free delivery on the first online order, and then regular home delivery rates in most areas are $9.95 on purchases of $150 or more and $12.95 on purchases under $150.

Applause 4 paws The newest local nonprofit organization aimed to help make an impact on the lives of homeless animals has arrived in the Central Valley. Introducing, Central Valley Cause 4 Paws. Founded by Cherice Kuest in 2017, Central Valley Cause 4 Paws aims to educate, promote and raise money for local animal rescue organizations in the Central Valley, with spaying and neutering being the No.1 goal. The inaugural Cause for Paws Gala is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 8 at Fort Washington Country Club. Proceeds will benefit the H.O.P.E. Animal Foundation. Since opening in June 2006, the H.O.P.E. Animal Foundation has spayed and neutered more than 160,000 dogs and cats. Details: www.centralvalleycause4paws.org

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 7


.................

Pastimes

Former Martin home remains distinctive BY: Janice Stevens | ILLUSTRATIONS: Pat Hunter

F Janice Stevens is the author of multiple books on California history: Fresno’s Architectural Past, Vol. I and II, William Saroyan: Places in Time; Remembering the California Missions; and An Artist and a Writer Travel Highway 1 (North, Central and South), plus Breaking Bread with William Saroyan, collaborations with her business partner, watercolorist Pat Hunter, and two volumes of Stories of Service, compilations of Valley veterans’ military memoirs. Ask Janice a Fresno history question by emailing custom@ fresnobee.com or posting your question on the Central Valley magazine Facebook page, www.facebook. com/CentralValleyMag.

or more than 80 years, the Willard Phipps family has owned and operated the Yost & Webb Funeral Home in the Central Valley. In the heart of downtown Fresno, in a residential area of historic homes, the former Martin home located at 1002 T St. is architecturally significant, and recognized to be the largest bungalow in Fresno. The Historic Resources Inventory prepared by William E. Patnaude in 1978 notes 1912 as the estimated construction date, however, the architect and builder are unknown. The home is “a superb example of a bungaloid style home — albeit larger than most. River rock piers support battered columns and reach up the sides of the house at the corners. Interesting fireplace of river rock with a brick chimney growing up out of the rock. Some modifications made in openings — door and windows — added roof at the second floor balcony and porte-cochere at side — all light metal construction.”

The book, “Heritage Fresno Homes and People” by American University Women, notes a few more details: “Listed for the first time in the 1914 City Directory, the house at 1002 T Street was probably built at this time. An expanded bungaloid home, it made use of large river rocks for fireplace and foundation. The arch over the porch and the lattice work are distinctive but not uncommon. The lattice work is a variation of the Western Stick Style.” An iconic drinking fountain constructed with large river rocks on the front porch invites a visitor to a cool drink of water before entering the home. “George V. Martin, a lawyer and real estate man, was the first known tenant of the structure, although he did not occupy until 1914. The building was sold to a Mr. Emerzian in 1919,” notes the Inventory and lists the present owner as Willard D. Phipps. His son, Willard (Billy) Phipps, corporate president, says the building was first used as a mortuary in the ’30s by Clements and Riker Undertaking. Al Yost and Ray Webb purchased the business in 1936. In 1959, Willard and Esther Phipps purchased

The monochromatic watercolor of the George V. Martin home was painted from a photograph in “Heritage Fresno Homes and People” by the American Association of University Women.

8 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

the business. After graduating from California College of Mortuary Science in 1969, their son, Billy, joined the company. Billy, Willard and Esther lived in an apartment above the funeral home for many years, so for Billy to join the company is actually a return to his former home. As the volume of service to the community has grown, space limitations required the eventual use of the former apartment as office space. To expand the level of service to the community and to control a high level of service, in 2009, Yost & Webb Funeral Home installed a crematory and is one of the very few funeral homes to have its own crematory under their control. Today, Yost & Webb Funeral Home is one of the few remaining funeral homes in the area that is owned and operated locally by a local family. In 2017, the company expanded with the opening of Yost & Webb Funeral Care in the Historic Vendome Building in Hanford. It’s the only locally owned and operated funeral home in the area. In downtown Fresno, the elegant old Martin home adds a distinctive charm to the residential area surrounding it. Indeed the owners bought another home directly behind their business. “The homes in Esther Phipps’ downtown neighborhood contain a lot of Fresno’s heritage, but her house almost was ancient history. In 1972, Phipps and her late husband, Bill, bought the historic Gundelfinger home behind their family-run Yost and Webb Funeral Home, which itself is historic,” writes Paula Lloyd in a 2006 Fresno Bee article. “Bill Phipps wanted to tear down the Gundelfinger house for more parking, but

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Yost & Webb Funeral Home is in the former George V. Martin home at 1002 T St. in downtown Fresno. The porcelain drinking fountain is tucked into river rock on the left side of the porch entrance of Yost & Webb Funeral Home.

Esther Phipps loved the house, even in its dilapidated condition. ‘I love old things,’ she says, taking visitors on a tour of her home, one of several early-1900 houses that remain between Divisadero, U, Tulare, Q and Fresno streets.” A meandering drive through the downtown neighborhood reveals a number of carefully groomed and preserved historic buildings, but the Yost & Webb Funeral Home remains distinctive for its use of large river rock in its architectural features.CV

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 9


.................

Pastimes

Former Martin home remains distinctive BY: Janice Stevens | ILLUSTRATIONS: Pat Hunter

F Janice Stevens is the author of multiple books on California history: Fresno’s Architectural Past, Vol. I and II, William Saroyan: Places in Time; Remembering the California Missions; and An Artist and a Writer Travel Highway 1 (North, Central and South), plus Breaking Bread with William Saroyan, collaborations with her business partner, watercolorist Pat Hunter, and two volumes of Stories of Service, compilations of Valley veterans’ military memoirs. Ask Janice a Fresno history question by emailing custom@ fresnobee.com or posting your question on the Central Valley magazine Facebook page, www.facebook. com/CentralValleyMag.

or more than 80 years, the Willard Phipps family has owned and operated the Yost & Webb Funeral Home in the Central Valley. In the heart of downtown Fresno, in a residential area of historic homes, the former Martin home located at 1002 T St. is architecturally significant, and recognized to be the largest bungalow in Fresno. The Historic Resources Inventory prepared by William E. Patnaude in 1978 notes 1912 as the estimated construction date, however, the architect and builder are unknown. The home is “a superb example of a bungaloid style home — albeit larger than most. River rock piers support battered columns and reach up the sides of the house at the corners. Interesting fireplace of river rock with a brick chimney growing up out of the rock. Some modifications made in openings — door and windows — added roof at the second floor balcony and porte-cochere at side — all light metal construction.”

The book, “Heritage Fresno Homes and People” by American University Women, notes a few more details: “Listed for the first time in the 1914 City Directory, the house at 1002 T Street was probably built at this time. An expanded bungaloid home, it made use of large river rocks for fireplace and foundation. The arch over the porch and the lattice work are distinctive but not uncommon. The lattice work is a variation of the Western Stick Style.” An iconic drinking fountain constructed with large river rocks on the front porch invites a visitor to a cool drink of water before entering the home. “George V. Martin, a lawyer and real estate man, was the first known tenant of the structure, although he did not occupy until 1914. The building was sold to a Mr. Emerzian in 1919,” notes the Inventory and lists the present owner as Willard D. Phipps. His son, Willard (Billy) Phipps, corporate president, says the building was first used as a mortuary in the ’30s by Clements and Riker Undertaking. Al Yost and Ray Webb purchased the business in 1936. In 1959, Willard and Esther Phipps purchased

The monochromatic watercolor of the George V. Martin home was painted from a photograph in “Heritage Fresno Homes and People” by the American Association of University Women.

8 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

the business. After graduating from California College of Mortuary Science in 1969, their son, Billy, joined the company. Billy, Willard and Esther lived in an apartment above the funeral home for many years, so for Billy to join the company is actually a return to his former home. As the volume of service to the community has grown, space limitations required the eventual use of the former apartment as office space. To expand the level of service to the community and to control a high level of service, in 2009, Yost & Webb Funeral Home installed a crematory and is one of the very few funeral homes to have its own crematory under their control. Today, Yost & Webb Funeral Home is one of the few remaining funeral homes in the area that is owned and operated locally by a local family. In 2017, the company expanded with the opening of Yost & Webb Funeral Care in the Historic Vendome Building in Hanford. It’s the only locally owned and operated funeral home in the area. In downtown Fresno, the elegant old Martin home adds a distinctive charm to the residential area surrounding it. Indeed the owners bought another home directly behind their business. “The homes in Esther Phipps’ downtown neighborhood contain a lot of Fresno’s heritage, but her house almost was ancient history. In 1972, Phipps and her late husband, Bill, bought the historic Gundelfinger home behind their family-run Yost and Webb Funeral Home, which itself is historic,” writes Paula Lloyd in a 2006 Fresno Bee article. “Bill Phipps wanted to tear down the Gundelfinger house for more parking, but

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Yost & Webb Funeral Home is in the former George V. Martin home at 1002 T St. in downtown Fresno. The porcelain drinking fountain is tucked into river rock on the left side of the porch entrance of Yost & Webb Funeral Home.

Esther Phipps loved the house, even in its dilapidated condition. ‘I love old things,’ she says, taking visitors on a tour of her home, one of several early-1900 houses that remain between Divisadero, U, Tulare, Q and Fresno streets.” A meandering drive through the downtown neighborhood reveals a number of carefully groomed and preserved historic buildings, but the Yost & Webb Funeral Home remains distinctive for its use of large river rock in its architectural features.CV

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 9


.................

PeopleProfile

12 4

Olympic gold medalist and Girl Scouts CEO

Cathy Ferguson BY: Doug Hoagland | PHOTOGRAPHY: Wayne Hutchison, Getty Photos, Fresno Bee archives

2

10 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

C

athy Ferguson’s drive to grab Olympic glory started when she was only 12 years old. Four years later, she won two gold medals in swimming at the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. Trips to European palaces and the White House followed. TV appearances, too. But in the end, Ferguson got an education and became someone besides a gold medalist: College professor. Coach. And now CEO of Girl Scouts of Central California South in Fresno. “My mission is to help young girls believe in themselves so they can do anything they set their minds to doing,” Ferguson says. 1 Crazy for cookies. Each year, under her leadership, Girl Scouts from Madera to Ridgecrest sell more than 900,000 packages in less than two months. 2 Her favorite Girl Scout cookie: Caramel Delight. “When the chocolate, caramel and coconut land in my mouth, I’m a happy camper.” 3 Leader to admire: former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. “Cool under great stress.” 4 Burglars stole her gold medals from her parents’ home in 1972. Japanese officials sent replacements — they had minted extras in case of ties.

5 Born in Stockton; moved to Burbank at age 8. “Cautious Cathy” could have been her childhood nickname. 6 Terrified of the water before learning to swim at age 9. Saw a drowned man pulled from a lake. 7 Shy as a child. “But I wanted my name someplace for all of history. And now it is.” 8 Gave a rose to her fourth-grade teacher more than once. “She boosted my self-confidence when I felt so inferior to other kids.”

9 Burbank High School, Class of 1966. Profile: focused, hard worker, kind. 10 Suffered through a Bob Dylan concert in the 1960s. Her boyfriend was a fan. Josh Groban and his song “You Raise Me Up” are her favorites today. 11 “Overwhelmed” to march in the Olympic Opening Ceremony in 1964. “You realize you’re really there and everyone is the best in the world.” 12 Came from behind in the 100-meter backstroke to win gold by .2 of a second. Won second gold medal in the 400-meter medley relay. 13 Post-Olympics: lunched with Princess Grace (American movie star Grace Kelly) at Monaco palace. Other U.S swimmers were there, too.

16 In her 20s, she rebuilt a 1955 Chevy “down to the pistons.” 17 Childhood heroine: 1960 Olympic gold medalist Wilma Rudolph. Rudolph overcame childhood polio to become a world-class sprinter. 18 “Gone With The Wind” her favorite film and Scarlett O’Hara (“an independent thinker”) her favorite character. Also likes World War II movies. 19 Earned a doctorate in education, taught kinesiology at California and Montana universities, shared her experience by coaching swimmers. 20 Three athletic daughters: diving, gymnastics, soccer, swimming. Two were Team U.S.A. divers, two were state gymnastics champs, one a ballerina. 21 Tim Tebow a favorite athlete. “I admire him as a person.” 22 Swims in her Clovis backyard. And yes, she still does the backstroke. 23 Collects giraffes — stuffed toys, figurines, etc. Saw real ones on safari in Africa. They have big hearts and look out for others — “a metaphor for life.” 24 Sings in Trinity Lutheran Church choir directed by her husband. Inspired by: “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” (Philippians 4:13) 25 Enjoys alone time. Content in a crowd by herself. CV

23

13

3

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

10

14 More golden memories: She and fellow Olympians dined with President Lyndon Johnson at the White House. Baked Alaska dessert is still memorable. 15 Trained for 1968 Olympics, but quit swimming in 1967. “I was tired of being told what to do every minute of my life.” c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 11


.................

PeopleProfile

12 4

Olympic gold medalist and Girl Scouts CEO

Cathy Ferguson BY: Doug Hoagland | PHOTOGRAPHY: Wayne Hutchison, Getty Photos, Fresno Bee archives

2

10 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

C

athy Ferguson’s drive to grab Olympic glory started when she was only 12 years old. Four years later, she won two gold medals in swimming at the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. Trips to European palaces and the White House followed. TV appearances, too. But in the end, Ferguson got an education and became someone besides a gold medalist: College professor. Coach. And now CEO of Girl Scouts of Central California South in Fresno. “My mission is to help young girls believe in themselves so they can do anything they set their minds to doing,” Ferguson says. 1 Crazy for cookies. Each year, under her leadership, Girl Scouts from Madera to Ridgecrest sell more than 900,000 packages in less than two months. 2 Her favorite Girl Scout cookie: Caramel Delight. “When the chocolate, caramel and coconut land in my mouth, I’m a happy camper.” 3 Leader to admire: former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. “Cool under great stress.” 4 Burglars stole her gold medals from her parents’ home in 1972. Japanese officials sent replacements — they had minted extras in case of ties.

5 Born in Stockton; moved to Burbank at age 8. “Cautious Cathy” could have been her childhood nickname. 6 Terrified of the water before learning to swim at age 9. Saw a drowned man pulled from a lake. 7 Shy as a child. “But I wanted my name someplace for all of history. And now it is.” 8 Gave a rose to her fourth-grade teacher more than once. “She boosted my self-confidence when I felt so inferior to other kids.”

9 Burbank High School, Class of 1966. Profile: focused, hard worker, kind. 10 Suffered through a Bob Dylan concert in the 1960s. Her boyfriend was a fan. Josh Groban and his song “You Raise Me Up” are her favorites today. 11 “Overwhelmed” to march in the Olympic Opening Ceremony in 1964. “You realize you’re really there and everyone is the best in the world.” 12 Came from behind in the 100-meter backstroke to win gold by .2 of a second. Won second gold medal in the 400-meter medley relay. 13 Post-Olympics: lunched with Princess Grace (American movie star Grace Kelly) at Monaco palace. Other U.S swimmers were there, too.

16 In her 20s, she rebuilt a 1955 Chevy “down to the pistons.” 17 Childhood heroine: 1960 Olympic gold medalist Wilma Rudolph. Rudolph overcame childhood polio to become a world-class sprinter. 18 “Gone With The Wind” her favorite film and Scarlett O’Hara (“an independent thinker”) her favorite character. Also likes World War II movies. 19 Earned a doctorate in education, taught kinesiology at California and Montana universities, shared her experience by coaching swimmers. 20 Three athletic daughters: diving, gymnastics, soccer, swimming. Two were Team U.S.A. divers, two were state gymnastics champs, one a ballerina. 21 Tim Tebow a favorite athlete. “I admire him as a person.” 22 Swims in her Clovis backyard. And yes, she still does the backstroke. 23 Collects giraffes — stuffed toys, figurines, etc. Saw real ones on safari in Africa. They have big hearts and look out for others — “a metaphor for life.” 24 Sings in Trinity Lutheran Church choir directed by her husband. Inspired by: “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” (Philippians 4:13) 25 Enjoys alone time. Content in a crowd by herself. CV

23

13

3

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

10

14 More golden memories: She and fellow Olympians dined with President Lyndon Johnson at the White House. Baked Alaska dessert is still memorable. 15 Trained for 1968 Olympics, but quit swimming in 1967. “I was tired of being told what to do every minute of my life.” c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 11


.................

Innovators

From idea to creation Ideaworks Makerspaces is part of the ‘maker movement’ in downtown Fresno BY: Doug Hoagland | PHOTOGRAPHY: Wayne Hutchison

I

Jimmy Stewart, Ben Mosemann, Peter Shenk and Zeke Hall work on a robot at Ideaworks Makerspaces on H Street in downtown Fresno.

12 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

deaworks Makerspaces is heaven on H Street for people who enjoy working with their hands. It’s a wood shop, machine shop, blacksmith forge, ceramics shop, robotics lab and more under one roof in downtown Fresno. “Make a project. Fix a project. You have an idea. You can create it here,” says Angela Cardona, finance and operations director for the 501(c)3 nonprofit. “People come here to share what they know and learn what they don’t know. That’s the beautiful thing that happens here. That’s the magic.” Members have access to tools and equipment at Ideaworks (1742 H St.) after they complete a safety course taught by each shop’s volunteer teacher. The shops have no walls, which facilitates cross-training and collaboration.

Scott Kramer, Ideaworks’ chief executive officer, and others started the organization in 2012. It’s part of the “maker movement” — a worldwide phenomenon built on people’s growing desire to do for themselves. “In this technological age, people want to make things and repair things — connecting with actual skills and trades that are being lost,” says Jeremy Short, director of strategic operations for Ideaworks. (Short, Cardona and others in leadership at Ideaworks are volunteers.) Woodworking and welding are the most popular shops, and the blacksmith forge and a fabrications lab are two of the most interesting. At the forge, members have made swords popularized by the History Channel’s “Forged in Fire.” The fabrication lab features new technology: a laser cutter, 3-D printer and desktop CNC mill.

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Clovis resident Sheri M. Walden enthusiastically endorses Ideaworks. She and her father-in-law learned welding there. It was her Christmas present to him, and, she says, the experience was “awesome.” Walden adds: “This place is a like a candy store for adults with hobbies. You could see projects that people were working on or had made, which was an added bonus.” Here are other things to know: Ideaworks is scheduled to move across the alley to a renovated 10,000-square-foot space at 1755 Broadway St. in January 2019. A partnership with the Clovis Veterans Memorial District will bring some Ideaworks shops to a warehouse on the campus of the CVMD as early as this summer, according to Cardona. Membership is $40 per month; $20 per month for students, seniors, veterans and members of the military on active duty. A Mini Maker Faire — organized by Ideaworks —

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Chris Bonner, a glass maker, creates a glass heart at Ideaworks Makerspaces. Members like Logan Stewart have access to tools and equipment at Ideaworks after they complete a safety course.

is scheduled at 11 a.m. on April 29 at Chukchansi Park. The event will showcase projects from throughout the area and have hands-on activities. Details: (559) 840-8749, ideaworksmakerspaces.org Ideaworks is also on Facebook. CV

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 13


.................

Innovators

From idea to creation Ideaworks Makerspaces is part of the ‘maker movement’ in downtown Fresno BY: Doug Hoagland | PHOTOGRAPHY: Wayne Hutchison

I

Jimmy Stewart, Ben Mosemann, Peter Shenk and Zeke Hall work on a robot at Ideaworks Makerspaces on H Street in downtown Fresno.

12 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

deaworks Makerspaces is heaven on H Street for people who enjoy working with their hands. It’s a wood shop, machine shop, blacksmith forge, ceramics shop, robotics lab and more under one roof in downtown Fresno. “Make a project. Fix a project. You have an idea. You can create it here,” says Angela Cardona, finance and operations director for the 501(c)3 nonprofit. “People come here to share what they know and learn what they don’t know. That’s the beautiful thing that happens here. That’s the magic.” Members have access to tools and equipment at Ideaworks (1742 H St.) after they complete a safety course taught by each shop’s volunteer teacher. The shops have no walls, which facilitates cross-training and collaboration.

Scott Kramer, Ideaworks’ chief executive officer, and others started the organization in 2012. It’s part of the “maker movement” — a worldwide phenomenon built on people’s growing desire to do for themselves. “In this technological age, people want to make things and repair things — connecting with actual skills and trades that are being lost,” says Jeremy Short, director of strategic operations for Ideaworks. (Short, Cardona and others in leadership at Ideaworks are volunteers.) Woodworking and welding are the most popular shops, and the blacksmith forge and a fabrications lab are two of the most interesting. At the forge, members have made swords popularized by the History Channel’s “Forged in Fire.” The fabrication lab features new technology: a laser cutter, 3-D printer and desktop CNC mill.

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Clovis resident Sheri M. Walden enthusiastically endorses Ideaworks. She and her father-in-law learned welding there. It was her Christmas present to him, and, she says, the experience was “awesome.” Walden adds: “This place is a like a candy store for adults with hobbies. You could see projects that people were working on or had made, which was an added bonus.” Here are other things to know: Ideaworks is scheduled to move across the alley to a renovated 10,000-square-foot space at 1755 Broadway St. in January 2019. A partnership with the Clovis Veterans Memorial District will bring some Ideaworks shops to a warehouse on the campus of the CVMD as early as this summer, according to Cardona. Membership is $40 per month; $20 per month for students, seniors, veterans and members of the military on active duty. A Mini Maker Faire — organized by Ideaworks —

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Chris Bonner, a glass maker, creates a glass heart at Ideaworks Makerspaces. Members like Logan Stewart have access to tools and equipment at Ideaworks after they complete a safety course.

is scheduled at 11 a.m. on April 29 at Chukchansi Park. The event will showcase projects from throughout the area and have hands-on activities. Details: (559) 840-8749, ideaworksmakerspaces.org Ideaworks is also on Facebook. CV

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 13


:

:

www.theclassicatpismobeach.com #MyPismoBeach


.................

May 2018

A wildly successful Relax & respite starlet returns home, a magician comes to the River Parkway Celebrate Trust with Respite by the River! Starting town and treasures at 6 p.m., listen to the sounds are to be found in of Danzantes Yoztaltepetl while enjoying a picnic in Clovis. In all, May front of the Ranch House. A looks like it’s going poetry reading by Kenneth to be pretty in P!NK Chacón — a professor of

Fresno’s darling

05.08

05.26

The Fresno Philharmonic presents Audra McDonald at the Saroyan Theatre. The six-time Tony Award-winning soprano has appeared on Broadway in “The Secret Garden,” “Marie Christine,” “Henry IV,” “110 in the Shade” and “Shuffle Along, Or, The Making of the Musical Sensation of 1921 and All That Followed.” She recieved her start in the arts with Good Company Players’ Junior Company in the early 1980s. Details: www.fresnophil.org

English and Chicano-Latino Studies at Fresno City College — will close the May session. Details: riverparkway.org

Defying death

05.09

Immerse yourself in the world of magic with David Blaine. The Fresno Convention Center welcomes you to experience the world-renowned magician and illusionist at the Saroyan Theatre. Described as “the greatest magician who ever lived” by Howard Stern, Blaine is known for performing deathdefying feats like being encased in a block of ice for 63 hours, 42 minutes and 15 seconds. Details: davidblaine.com

For more complete calendar listings, go to calendar.fresnobee.com

c e n t r a l v a l l e y. c o m

Treasure trove

05.12

Celebrate Mother’s Day at the Old Town Flea Market — an extension of The Foundry Collective. Held for two days at the Clovis Rodeo Grounds, you’ll find one-of-a-kind vintage

items, antiques, knickknacks, handmade crafts, repurposed furniture, apparel and jewelry. Details: oldtownflea.com

Pretty in P!NK

05.22

Think P!NK! The international pop and R&B singer/songwriter/actress is bringing “Beautiful Trauma” to Fresno. She will make a stop at Save Mart Center — performing songs from her 2017 album “Beautiful Trauma,” as well as hits from the early 2000s. Details: www.savemartcenter.com

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 15


BY: Carey Norton and Janessa Tyler | PHOTOGRAPHY: Gary Kazanjian and Central Valley readers Jennifer Brower, Judi and John Clifton, Kathleen Fowler, Tonia Freeman, Cori Higley, Mike Reddin, Harvie Schreiber, Janice Stevens, Amanda Trice, Karla Walter and Candie Wasson

I

f you’re owned by a cat or a dog, you’re in the majority. Sixty-eight percent of U.S. households, or about 85 million families, own a pet, according to the 2017-2018 National Pet Owners Survey conducted by the American Pet Products Association. This is up from 56 percent of U.S. households in 1988, the first year the survey was conducted. It appears dogs are winning the contest for the most beloved pet in the U.S., with 60.2 million households owning a pup, compared to the 47.1 million of us who are owned If you’re looking by cats. People who prefer their pets to adopt a pet, to swim come in at 12.5 million, while bird lovers account for 7.9 May — National million. Pet Month — is While more people own dogs than the purrr-fect cats, people who do own cats own more of them. There are 94.2 million pet cats, while time only 89.7 million pet dogs. This makes perfectly good sense to me, as a card-carrying member of the Crazy Cat Lady club. (I exaggerate, of course. I don’t know of such a club, but it’s nice to have goals.) Even with that many cat-and-dog households shelters are still full. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals estimate 7.6 million companion animals enter animal shelters every year.

Perfection

16 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Of those, approximately 3.3 million are dogs and 3.4 million are cats. It’s sobering that the Humane Society of the United States estimates that each year, approximately 1.5 million adoptable dogs and cats are euthanized in the U.S. simply because too many pets come into shelters and too few people consider adoption when looking for a pet. This number is down dramatically from the 2.6 million reported in past years, which is good news. “This is tremendous progress for America’s dogs and cats, and is the direct result of innovative, life-saving programs and hard work from local shelters, rescues and national organizations, like the ASPCA, to end homelessness and needless euthanasia of shelter animals,” says Matt Bershadker, president and CEO of the ASPCA. “It also reflects the public’s dedication to rescuing homeless animals.” We live in a community where no-kill shelters have thankfully made an impact, but more is needed to stop pet-overpopulation in the Central Valley and beyond. Pets should be spayed or neutered, and if you’re wanting a pet — adopt, don’t shop.

Local animal shelters and rescue groups

Animal Compassion Team (ACT) 2789 S. Orange Ave., Fresno (559) 266-6364 www.animalcompassionteam.com

Animal Rescue of Fresno (ARF) 4545 E. Dakota Ave., Fresno (559) 225-5715 www.arf-fresno.com

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Bandit’s Buddies Rescue

www.facebook.com/banditsbuddies

The Central California Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (CCSPCA) 103 S. Hughes Ave., Fresno (559) 233-7722 www.ccspca.com

Fresno Bully Rescue

8547 W. Herndon Ave., Fresno (559) 276-7611 www.fresnobullyrescue.org

Fresno Humane Animal Services 760 W. Nielsen Ave., Fresno (559) 600-7387 www.fresnohumane.org

Miss Winkles Pet Adoption Center 85 Temperance Ave., Clovis (559) 324-2465 www.misswinkles.com

Pawsitive Connections

(559) 393-1946 www.pawsitiveconnections.org

The Cat House on the Kings

7120 S. Kings River Road, Parlier Adoption centers are also held at Petco in Fresno and Clovis. The main Petco Adoption Center is located at 4144 N. Blackstone Ave., Fresno. (559) 638-8696 www.cathouseonthekings.com

Valley Animal Center

3934 N. Hayston Ave., Fresno (559) 233-8690 www.valleyanimal.org Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 17


BY: Carey Norton and Janessa Tyler | PHOTOGRAPHY: Gary Kazanjian and Central Valley readers Jennifer Brower, Judi and John Clifton, Kathleen Fowler, Tonia Freeman, Cori Higley, Mike Reddin, Harvie Schreiber, Janice Stevens, Amanda Trice, Karla Walter and Candie Wasson

I

f you’re owned by a cat or a dog, you’re in the majority. Sixty-eight percent of U.S. households, or about 85 million families, own a pet, according to the 2017-2018 National Pet Owners Survey conducted by the American Pet Products Association. This is up from 56 percent of U.S. households in 1988, the first year the survey was conducted. It appears dogs are winning the contest for the most beloved pet in the U.S., with 60.2 million households owning a pup, compared to the 47.1 million of us who are owned If you’re looking by cats. People who prefer their pets to adopt a pet, to swim come in at 12.5 million, while bird lovers account for 7.9 May — National million. Pet Month — is While more people own dogs than the purrr-fect cats, people who do own cats own more of them. There are 94.2 million pet cats, while time only 89.7 million pet dogs. This makes perfectly good sense to me, as a card-carrying member of the Crazy Cat Lady club. (I exaggerate, of course. I don’t know of such a club, but it’s nice to have goals.) Even with that many cat-and-dog households shelters are still full. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals estimate 7.6 million companion animals enter animal shelters every year.

Perfection

16 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Of those, approximately 3.3 million are dogs and 3.4 million are cats. It’s sobering that the Humane Society of the United States estimates that each year, approximately 1.5 million adoptable dogs and cats are euthanized in the U.S. simply because too many pets come into shelters and too few people consider adoption when looking for a pet. This number is down dramatically from the 2.6 million reported in past years, which is good news. “This is tremendous progress for America’s dogs and cats, and is the direct result of innovative, life-saving programs and hard work from local shelters, rescues and national organizations, like the ASPCA, to end homelessness and needless euthanasia of shelter animals,” says Matt Bershadker, president and CEO of the ASPCA. “It also reflects the public’s dedication to rescuing homeless animals.” We live in a community where no-kill shelters have thankfully made an impact, but more is needed to stop pet-overpopulation in the Central Valley and beyond. Pets should be spayed or neutered, and if you’re wanting a pet — adopt, don’t shop.

Local animal shelters and rescue groups

Animal Compassion Team (ACT) 2789 S. Orange Ave., Fresno (559) 266-6364 www.animalcompassionteam.com

Animal Rescue of Fresno (ARF) 4545 E. Dakota Ave., Fresno (559) 225-5715 www.arf-fresno.com

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Bandit’s Buddies Rescue

www.facebook.com/banditsbuddies

The Central California Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (CCSPCA) 103 S. Hughes Ave., Fresno (559) 233-7722 www.ccspca.com

Fresno Bully Rescue

8547 W. Herndon Ave., Fresno (559) 276-7611 www.fresnobullyrescue.org

Fresno Humane Animal Services 760 W. Nielsen Ave., Fresno (559) 600-7387 www.fresnohumane.org

Miss Winkles Pet Adoption Center 85 Temperance Ave., Clovis (559) 324-2465 www.misswinkles.com

Pawsitive Connections

(559) 393-1946 www.pawsitiveconnections.org

The Cat House on the Kings

7120 S. Kings River Road, Parlier Adoption centers are also held at Petco in Fresno and Clovis. The main Petco Adoption Center is located at 4144 N. Blackstone Ave., Fresno. (559) 638-8696 www.cathouseonthekings.com

Valley Animal Center

3934 N. Hayston Ave., Fresno (559) 233-8690 www.valleyanimal.org Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 17


6 top reasons to adopt a pet

You will save a life The number of euthanized animals could be reduced dramatically if more people adopted pets instead of buying them. When you adopt, you save a loving animal by making them part of your family and open up shelter space for another animal who might desperately need it. You will get a great animal Animal shelters and rescue groups are brimming with happy, healthy pets just waiting for someone to take them home. Most shelter pets wound up there because of a human problem like a move or a divorce, not because the animals did anything wrong. Many are already house-trained and used to living with families. It will cost you less Usually when you adopt a pet, the cost of spay/neuter, first vaccinations (and sometimes even microchipping) is included in the adoption price, which can save you some of the up-front costs of adding a new member to your family. Depending on the animal, you may also save on housebreaking and training expenses. It’s good for you Not only do animals give you unconditional love, but they have been shown to be psychologically, emotionally and physically beneficial to their companions. Caring for a pet can provide a sense of purpose and fulfillment and lessen feelings of loneliness. And when you adopt, you can also feel proud about helping an animal in need. It’s one way to fight puppy mills Puppy mills are factory-style breeding facilities that put profit above the welfare of dogs. Animals from puppy mills are housed in shockingly poor conditions with improper medical care, and are often very sick and behaviorally troubled as a result. These puppy mills will continue to operate until people stop supporting them. You will change an animal’s whole world And, you will get a new best friend in the process. What could be better than that?

Source: The Humane Society of the United States

Pet party We’re always up for celebrating pets and the humans who love them. We’ve complied a list of events happening in May.

Valley Animal Center’s Red Carpet Rescue May 4

0003590144-01

Thank You for Shopping with Us! 5215 N. Blackstone Fresno CA 93710

559-438-4343

www.whitiespets.com 18 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine cen tr al val l ey. co m

Join Valley Animal Center in honoring life-long animal lover, Lance Minnite, as the Animal Advocate of the Year recipient. After being greeted by adoptables, take a walk down the red carpet into TorNino’s Banquets & Catering to enjoy a delicious dinner, silent and live auction items, and learn how Minnite has helped the community with his passion for animals and humane education. The event will be held at 6 p.m., Friday, May 4 at TorNino’s Banquets & Catering, 5080 N. Blackstone Ave., Fresno. Tickets cost $60. Details: www.valleyanimal.org

The Cat House on the Kings 2018 Spring Open House May 5 If you’ve never visited The Cat House on the Kings make plans right now to celebrate Cinco de Mayo kitty style. The feline rescue is at 7120 S. Kings River Road, Parlier.

Please see next page


Gift Guides

0003586294-01

Under New Ownership

559 • 281 • 9111 Eileen Smith

www.eileenspermanentmakeup.com

New and Consignment

Home Furnishings

0003586281-01

The Gift of Lasting Beauty...

Decor & Collectibles

lerelle.reed@yahoo.com 1755 W. Bullard Ave., Fresno 559-374-6555

TRUSTED STYLIST • Human Hair & Synthetic Wigs • Hair Extensions • Toupees • Customized Colors and Fittings • Private In-Home Appointments

0003586393-01

Formerly The Consignment Emporium New Location 5761 N Palm Ave, Fresno, 93704 theemporiumfresno@gmail.com

: Food

Mirage Wigs 1589 W SHAW AVE #12 FRESNO, 93711

Your pets are important to us too! In honor of National Pet month we are offering to take your pet to get their annual checkup and give them the TLC they deserve!

Our services include a care plan membership @ $199 Month up to 24/7 care. Call our owner, Cheryl, for a free consultation at 559-906-6463 and visit us online to find out more!

August : Back to School

Contact Sonia White at (559) 441-6156 or swhite@fresnobee.com

Senior Care Home Services Inc. 1589 W. Shaw Ave. #15, Fresno, CA 93711 /

559-906-6463 www.seniorcarehomeservicesinc.com

0003586305-01

July

Emily Contino

559-906-6463

Upcoming themes: : Summer Recreation

(559) 431-7755

We are the ones that go into the home and help out with daily living.

Advertise in Central Valley June

We Buy & Sell Furs • Jewelry • Designer Bags Call for an appointment


continued ...

Anaimal Compassion Team Puppy Palooza May 5

Valley Animal Center’s Super Adoption 2018 May 12

Animal Compassion Team is celebrating the success of saving more than 12,000 pet lives in Fresno County in about nine years by hosting its ninth annual Puppy Palooza fundraiser, Cinco de Chihuahua. The event will be held from 5 to 9 p.m., Saturday, May 5 at 11933 E. Shaw Ave. Attendees will enjoy a lakeside dinner, no-host bar, music, a raffle and silent auction. The event will also feature gourmet appetizers, a taco feast and a margarita tent with a dance floor. Advance tickets cost $40, with a table of eight available for $290. The Puppy Palooza is its largest fundraiser of the

On Saturday, May 12, join Valley Animal Center and multiple local rescue shelters for the largest adoption event in the Central Valley. Hundreds of dogs and cats will be available for adoption during the event. Valley Animal Center is a no-kill shelter located at 3934 N. Hayston Ave., Fresno. It serves the Central Valley’s six-county region. Day-to-day shelter capacity can accommodate more than 100 dogs and 300 cats, and emergency capacity can accommodate 200 dogs and 500 cats. Details: www.valleyanimal.org CV

0003588061-01

year and helps cover the costs of operating the ACT shelter at 2789 S. Orange Ave. Details: www.animalcompassionteam.com, (559) 447-1471

0003588091-01

It operates adoption centers in Fresno and Clovis, but the main shelter is something you just have to experience. The rescue is California’s largest no-cage, no-kill lifetime cat sanctuary and adoption center. Its mission is to place rescued cats and kittens into loving, permanent homes; to provide a safe, happy and healthy home for unwanted cats and kittens in a unique, no-cage facility; to prevent pet overpopulation through spaying and neutering; and to educate the public about responsible pet ownership. The shelter is home to more than 700 cats and kittens, a dozen or so dogs and a large flock of wild of

peacocks. Since being founded 26 years ago, The Cat House on the Kings has saved more than 30,000 cats and 7,100 dogs and has spayed or neutered more than 56,000 animals. The open house will allow visitors to tour the sanctuary, bid on silent auction items and visit with the cats. A photo booth, DJ and food will also be available, as will a concession stand to allow visitors to purchase T-shirts, hats or The Famous Cats of the Cat House on the Kings magnet set for $6. A raffle will take place, with $5 tickets allowing one lucky winner to take home a 2006 VW Bug. The open house will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, May 5 at The Cat House on the Kings, 7120 S.

Kings River Road, Parlier. Admission is a donation of cash, cat or kitten food, litter, garbage bags, paper towels, bleach or cleaner. Details: www.cathouseonthekings.com

SCHEDULE YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY!

(559) 432-7877

6039 N. Palm Avenue, Fresno, CA 93704 20 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 21


continued ...

Anaimal Compassion Team Puppy Palooza May 5

Valley Animal Center’s Super Adoption 2018 May 12

Animal Compassion Team is celebrating the success of saving more than 12,000 pet lives in Fresno County in about nine years by hosting its ninth annual Puppy Palooza fundraiser, Cinco de Chihuahua. The event will be held from 5 to 9 p.m., Saturday, May 5 at 11933 E. Shaw Ave. Attendees will enjoy a lakeside dinner, no-host bar, music, a raffle and silent auction. The event will also feature gourmet appetizers, a taco feast and a margarita tent with a dance floor. Advance tickets cost $40, with a table of eight available for $290. The Puppy Palooza is its largest fundraiser of the

On Saturday, May 12, join Valley Animal Center and multiple local rescue shelters for the largest adoption event in the Central Valley. Hundreds of dogs and cats will be available for adoption during the event. Valley Animal Center is a no-kill shelter located at 3934 N. Hayston Ave., Fresno. It serves the Central Valley’s six-county region. Day-to-day shelter capacity can accommodate more than 100 dogs and 300 cats, and emergency capacity can accommodate 200 dogs and 500 cats. Details: www.valleyanimal.org CV

0003588061-01

year and helps cover the costs of operating the ACT shelter at 2789 S. Orange Ave. Details: www.animalcompassionteam.com, (559) 447-1471

0003588091-01

It operates adoption centers in Fresno and Clovis, but the main shelter is something you just have to experience. The rescue is California’s largest no-cage, no-kill lifetime cat sanctuary and adoption center. Its mission is to place rescued cats and kittens into loving, permanent homes; to provide a safe, happy and healthy home for unwanted cats and kittens in a unique, no-cage facility; to prevent pet overpopulation through spaying and neutering; and to educate the public about responsible pet ownership. The shelter is home to more than 700 cats and kittens, a dozen or so dogs and a large flock of wild of

peacocks. Since being founded 26 years ago, The Cat House on the Kings has saved more than 30,000 cats and 7,100 dogs and has spayed or neutered more than 56,000 animals. The open house will allow visitors to tour the sanctuary, bid on silent auction items and visit with the cats. A photo booth, DJ and food will also be available, as will a concession stand to allow visitors to purchase T-shirts, hats or The Famous Cats of the Cat House on the Kings magnet set for $6. A raffle will take place, with $5 tickets allowing one lucky winner to take home a 2006 VW Bug. The open house will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, May 5 at The Cat House on the Kings, 7120 S.

Kings River Road, Parlier. Admission is a donation of cash, cat or kitten food, litter, garbage bags, paper towels, bleach or cleaner. Details: www.cathouseonthekings.com

SCHEDULE YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY!

(559) 432-7877

6039 N. Palm Avenue, Fresno, CA 93704 20 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 21


.................

TimelyTrends

Local nonprofit group celebrates 44 years of caring for orphaned and injured native wildlife BY: Cyndee Fontana-Ott | PHOTOGRAPHY: Gary Kazanjian

E

mma the turkey vulture flapped immense wings as a caretaker told her story. She and the other “Teslas of the sky” are known for long and economical flight and their work as nature’s cleanup crew (they eat dead animals). But this bird is effectively grounded because much of one wing is missing — an injury plain to see as she perched on Pam Pierce’s gloved hand. So Emma is a wildlife ambassador for the Fresno Wildlife Rehabilitation Service. This 44-year-old nonprofit is an all-volunteer organization that cares for orphaned and/or injured native wildlife and also provides wildlife education in the Central Valley. Whenever possible, FWRS treats and returns animals to their natural habitat. But animals that cannot survive in nature — like Emma — become educational

22 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

ambassadors that reach thousands of children and adults every year. These animals may have limited vision or injuries from bullets or cars (birds can become so fixated on prey that they don’t notice an oncoming vehicle). On a recent sunny day, Emma was one of several birds showcased in a FWRS presentation at the Friant Interactive Nature Site below Friant Dam. Colleagues included a peregrine falcon, several owls and a hawk along with a few caregivers/volunteers and FWRS founder Cathy Garner. It was Garner who, in 1974, launched the organization after Fresno Chaffee Zoo stopped taking in local wildlife. Back then, she was a zoo docent who often

Torin Taylor from the Fresno Wildlife Rehabilitation Service shows owls to kids and their parents at the Friant Interactive Nature Site. FWRS is an all-volunteer organization whose mission is to rehabilitate and return native wildlife to their natural habitat while providing wildlife education to the public. Pam Pierce from the Fresno Wildlife Rehabilitation Service works with a turkey vulture while kids and family members watch.

Please see next page

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 23


.................

TimelyTrends

Local nonprofit group celebrates 44 years of caring for orphaned and injured native wildlife BY: Cyndee Fontana-Ott | PHOTOGRAPHY: Gary Kazanjian

E

mma the turkey vulture flapped immense wings as a caretaker told her story. She and the other “Teslas of the sky” are known for long and economical flight and their work as nature’s cleanup crew (they eat dead animals). But this bird is effectively grounded because much of one wing is missing — an injury plain to see as she perched on Pam Pierce’s gloved hand. So Emma is a wildlife ambassador for the Fresno Wildlife Rehabilitation Service. This 44-year-old nonprofit is an all-volunteer organization that cares for orphaned and/or injured native wildlife and also provides wildlife education in the Central Valley. Whenever possible, FWRS treats and returns animals to their natural habitat. But animals that cannot survive in nature — like Emma — become educational

22 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

ambassadors that reach thousands of children and adults every year. These animals may have limited vision or injuries from bullets or cars (birds can become so fixated on prey that they don’t notice an oncoming vehicle). On a recent sunny day, Emma was one of several birds showcased in a FWRS presentation at the Friant Interactive Nature Site below Friant Dam. Colleagues included a peregrine falcon, several owls and a hawk along with a few caregivers/volunteers and FWRS founder Cathy Garner. It was Garner who, in 1974, launched the organization after Fresno Chaffee Zoo stopped taking in local wildlife. Back then, she was a zoo docent who often

Torin Taylor from the Fresno Wildlife Rehabilitation Service shows owls to kids and their parents at the Friant Interactive Nature Site. FWRS is an all-volunteer organization whose mission is to rehabilitate and return native wildlife to their natural habitat while providing wildlife education to the public. Pam Pierce from the Fresno Wildlife Rehabilitation Service works with a turkey vulture while kids and family members watch.

Please see next page

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 23


Smooth Jazz Artist

continued ...

Bekah Faust shows an owl to kids and their parents at the Friant Interactive Nature Site. There are more than 20 known species of owls and they live just about everywhere in the world because they are highly adaptable to different environments.

Pam Pierce provides wildlife education to the public as a part of the Fresno Wildlife Rehabilitation Service. The organization helps between 400 and 1,200 animals each year and is always looking for additional volunteers and donations.

BOX OFFICE / 815 E. OLIVE / 559.485.9050

www.towertheatrefresno.com

0003586315-01

Turkey vultures are recognized by their featherless red head and large brown-black body. They can be easily spotted along roadways displaying their long wingspan, which can extend nearly 70 inches.

24 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Garner says she has about 30 “hardcore” volunteers and can always use more in various roles. Training is necessary — these animals aren’t pets — and the organization relies heavily on donations of time and money. One volunteer of roughly 15 years is Rebekah Faust, a former theme park animal trainer. She first encountered FWRS as a high school student and then reconnected with the organization after moving back to the area. Faust, who holds a degree in wildlife, fish and conservation biology, cares for Bellatrix the Western screech owl (she’s named for a villain in the Harry Potter books). However, Bellatrix the owl — who can no longer fly more than a foot off the ground — is “actually very mellow,” she says. Faust has helped rehabilitate all sorts of baby animals, including foxes and bobcats. She says her children — ages 4, 7 and 9 — “are just starting to learn that it’s not normal” to host so many different critters. FWRS also has a relationship with some students from CART (Center for Advanced Research and Technology) who have become dedicated volunteers. Garner says she loves working with the students, adding “they’re going to pick up the banner when we’re gone.” CV

Thank You Fresno for Voting The Tower Theatre #1 Entertainment Venue!

Phone: 559-485-9050 www.towertheatrefresno.com 0003586408-01

pushed her daughter’s stroller on the job. Garner wanted to ensure the little girl developed a love for animals — a lesson she continues to teach. FWRS received 46 animals that first year, but now the organization helps between 400 and 1,200 animals annually. Its website, www.fresnowildlife.org, provides advice and guidance for those who encounter an animal that may appear injured or orphaned; help also is available by phone at (559) 298-3276. While the public most often calls about birds, volunteers also rehabilitate orphaned or injured mammals such as foxes, opossums and squirrels.

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 25


Smooth Jazz Artist

continued ...

Bekah Faust shows an owl to kids and their parents at the Friant Interactive Nature Site. There are more than 20 known species of owls and they live just about everywhere in the world because they are highly adaptable to different environments.

Pam Pierce provides wildlife education to the public as a part of the Fresno Wildlife Rehabilitation Service. The organization helps between 400 and 1,200 animals each year and is always looking for additional volunteers and donations.

BOX OFFICE / 815 E. OLIVE / 559.485.9050

www.towertheatrefresno.com

0003586315-01

Turkey vultures are recognized by their featherless red head and large brown-black body. They can be easily spotted along roadways displaying their long wingspan, which can extend nearly 70 inches.

24 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Garner says she has about 30 “hardcore” volunteers and can always use more in various roles. Training is necessary — these animals aren’t pets — and the organization relies heavily on donations of time and money. One volunteer of roughly 15 years is Rebekah Faust, a former theme park animal trainer. She first encountered FWRS as a high school student and then reconnected with the organization after moving back to the area. Faust, who holds a degree in wildlife, fish and conservation biology, cares for Bellatrix the Western screech owl (she’s named for a villain in the Harry Potter books). However, Bellatrix the owl — who can no longer fly more than a foot off the ground — is “actually very mellow,” she says. Faust has helped rehabilitate all sorts of baby animals, including foxes and bobcats. She says her children — ages 4, 7 and 9 — “are just starting to learn that it’s not normal” to host so many different critters. FWRS also has a relationship with some students from CART (Center for Advanced Research and Technology) who have become dedicated volunteers. Garner says she loves working with the students, adding “they’re going to pick up the banner when we’re gone.” CV

Thank You Fresno for Voting The Tower Theatre #1 Entertainment Venue!

Phone: 559-485-9050 www.towertheatrefresno.com 0003586408-01

pushed her daughter’s stroller on the job. Garner wanted to ensure the little girl developed a love for animals — a lesson she continues to teach. FWRS received 46 animals that first year, but now the organization helps between 400 and 1,200 animals annually. Its website, www.fresnowildlife.org, provides advice and guidance for those who encounter an animal that may appear injured or orphaned; help also is available by phone at (559) 298-3276. While the public most often calls about birds, volunteers also rehabilitate orphaned or injured mammals such as foxes, opossums and squirrels.

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 25


.................

Fetching vacation spots

Timely Trends

Grab Fido and head to California’s top pet-friendly destinations

L

et’s face the furry facts. A vacation/getaway wouldn’t be the same unless your four-legged best friend(s) was by your side, right? If you’re wanting to hit the road — and see the sights — with your pooch as your co-pilot, we have selected four dog-friendly hotels to highlight.

Northern California

BY: Janessa Tyler | PHOTOGRAPHY: Visit SLO CAL, Pismo Beach Conference & Visitor’s Bureau, Petit Soleil, The Beverly Hills Hotel, The Ritz-Carlton, Laguna Niguel

Starting in Fresno County, make your way toward the Bay Area to Fort Bragg. Home to picturesque views of the Pacific Ocean, Fort Bragg is known for being close to Glass Beach — filled with sea glass created from years of dumping garbage into the area. But the coastal city is also praised for being accommodating to pets. For starters, your dog can be free to roam on the grounds of Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens, Noyo Beach and Pomo Bluffs Park. The Fort Bragg Dog Park is also an option for your dog to exercise without a leash. There are tons of cabins, Airbnb rentals and oceanfront properties to choose from for your stay. The Beachcomber Motel, located on the California Coastal Trail, provides quick access to Noyo Beach in Mendocino County. It includes two sister properties such as Surf & Sand Lodge and The Beach House Inn. For a fee of $20 each night, your dog can cuddle with you next to a fireplace. Rooms provide direct access to the Beachcomber Dog Park. “Canine companions are always welcome at The Beachcomber Motel,” says Jon Glidewell, the general manager of The Beachcomber Motel. When you arrive, your dog is greeted with a welcome kit that includes a treat, towel, sheet and waste bags. You’ll also receive a travel guide of Fido’s favorite spots in Mendocino County. “We take pride in keeping you and your pet happy and content,” he adds. Details: www.thebeachcombermotel.com Howl-or-able mentions: The Beach House Inn, Fort Bragg; Shoreline Cottages; Fort Bragg; and The Andiron Seaside Inn & Cabins; Little River

The Central Coast It isn’t a secret that the Central Coast is made for

26 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

man’s best friend. Start in San Luis Obispo County, which encompasses the seaside towns of Morro Bay, Pismo Beach and Grover Beach. Petit Soleil Bed et Breakfast transports you and your dog to the cobblestone streets of Europe without leaving San Luis Obispo. For a fee of $25 each night, your dog can experience the comfort and beauty of southeastern France. “Europeans travel with their dogs everywhere,” says Diane Conner, the co-owner of Petit Soleil Bed et Breakfast with her husband. The highlights include a patio and courtyard for your dog to sunbathe, as well as “Petit Bone Appetits” — homemade treats available upon request. Rooms are cleaned and maintained to be free of allergens. If your furbaby wants to play fetch, El Chorro Dog Park is located about 10 minutes along Cabrillo Highway. Details: www.petitsoleilslo.com Howl-or-able San Luis Obispo County is home to hotels that welcome pets, mentions: Beach as well as dog parks where your furry friends can run and play. Bungalow Inn & Suites, Morro Bay; Carlton Hotel, Atascadero; and Sand Dollar on the Beachfront, Pismo Beach

Southern California Escape reality and enter Beverly Hills — the city of glitz and glamor located between West Hollywood and Los Angeles. (Fact: The 2008 adventure movie “Beverly Hills Chihuahua” was filmed in 90210.) Built in 1912, The Beverly Hills Hotel is as iconic as the city — attracting celebrities like Elizabeth Taylor,

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 27


.................

Fetching vacation spots

Timely Trends

Grab Fido and head to California’s top pet-friendly destinations

L

et’s face the furry facts. A vacation/getaway wouldn’t be the same unless your four-legged best friend(s) was by your side, right? If you’re wanting to hit the road — and see the sights — with your pooch as your co-pilot, we have selected four dog-friendly hotels to highlight.

Northern California

BY: Janessa Tyler | PHOTOGRAPHY: Visit SLO CAL, Pismo Beach Conference & Visitor’s Bureau, Petit Soleil, The Beverly Hills Hotel, The Ritz-Carlton, Laguna Niguel

Starting in Fresno County, make your way toward the Bay Area to Fort Bragg. Home to picturesque views of the Pacific Ocean, Fort Bragg is known for being close to Glass Beach — filled with sea glass created from years of dumping garbage into the area. But the coastal city is also praised for being accommodating to pets. For starters, your dog can be free to roam on the grounds of Mendocino Coast Botanical Gardens, Noyo Beach and Pomo Bluffs Park. The Fort Bragg Dog Park is also an option for your dog to exercise without a leash. There are tons of cabins, Airbnb rentals and oceanfront properties to choose from for your stay. The Beachcomber Motel, located on the California Coastal Trail, provides quick access to Noyo Beach in Mendocino County. It includes two sister properties such as Surf & Sand Lodge and The Beach House Inn. For a fee of $20 each night, your dog can cuddle with you next to a fireplace. Rooms provide direct access to the Beachcomber Dog Park. “Canine companions are always welcome at The Beachcomber Motel,” says Jon Glidewell, the general manager of The Beachcomber Motel. When you arrive, your dog is greeted with a welcome kit that includes a treat, towel, sheet and waste bags. You’ll also receive a travel guide of Fido’s favorite spots in Mendocino County. “We take pride in keeping you and your pet happy and content,” he adds. Details: www.thebeachcombermotel.com Howl-or-able mentions: The Beach House Inn, Fort Bragg; Shoreline Cottages; Fort Bragg; and The Andiron Seaside Inn & Cabins; Little River

The Central Coast It isn’t a secret that the Central Coast is made for

26 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

man’s best friend. Start in San Luis Obispo County, which encompasses the seaside towns of Morro Bay, Pismo Beach and Grover Beach. Petit Soleil Bed et Breakfast transports you and your dog to the cobblestone streets of Europe without leaving San Luis Obispo. For a fee of $25 each night, your dog can experience the comfort and beauty of southeastern France. “Europeans travel with their dogs everywhere,” says Diane Conner, the co-owner of Petit Soleil Bed et Breakfast with her husband. The highlights include a patio and courtyard for your dog to sunbathe, as well as “Petit Bone Appetits” — homemade treats available upon request. Rooms are cleaned and maintained to be free of allergens. If your furbaby wants to play fetch, El Chorro Dog Park is located about 10 minutes along Cabrillo Highway. Details: www.petitsoleilslo.com Howl-or-able San Luis Obispo County is home to hotels that welcome pets, mentions: Beach as well as dog parks where your furry friends can run and play. Bungalow Inn & Suites, Morro Bay; Carlton Hotel, Atascadero; and Sand Dollar on the Beachfront, Pismo Beach

Southern California Escape reality and enter Beverly Hills — the city of glitz and glamor located between West Hollywood and Los Angeles. (Fact: The 2008 adventure movie “Beverly Hills Chihuahua” was filmed in 90210.) Built in 1912, The Beverly Hills Hotel is as iconic as the city — attracting celebrities like Elizabeth Taylor,

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 27


The Beverly Hills Hotel is known for housing Marilyn Monroe and her Maltese poodle named Maf (short for Mafia) — a gift from Frank Sinatra.

continued ...

At The Beverly Hills Hotel, part of the Dorchester Collection, your dog is welcomed for a fee of $35 each night.

Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Faye Dunaway and Neil Simon. Marilyn Monroe and her Maltese poodle named Maf (short for Mafia) — a gift from Sinatra — were also known to stay at the hotel.

“We’re more than just a pet-friendly hotel — we’re a pet-welcoming hotel,” says Brittany Williams, the director of communications for The Beverly Hills Hotel. “Instead of just allowing guests to bring their pets, we encourage them to do so.”

There are 208 rooms and suites, including 23 bungalows, as part of the Dorchester Collection. Your dog is welcomed for a fee of $35 each night. As for pooch-approved amenities, Williams says your dog receives bone-shaped treats, and a bed and bowls to use during your stay. Details: www.beverlyhillshotel.com After you leave Beverly Hills, head to Dana Point — home to The Ritz-Carlton, Laguna Niguel. Sitting on top of 150-foot bluff, you and your dog — or yes, your cat! — can play a round of fetch while enjoying views of the Pacific Ocean.

“As you can imagine, if your pet is part of your family, a vacation/getaway just isn’t complete without your furbaby,” says Deanne French, the director of public relations for The Ritz-Carlton, Laguna Niguel. The Posh Pooch Experience includes a bed and bowls to use during your stay, waste bags and a toy for a fee of $50 each night. It also offers a selection of in-room dining options — starting at $10 — for your dog like the Bow Wow Tenderloin, the Dog Bone Meatloaf, the Puppy Love and the Chop! Chop! Your cat can enjoy a plate of the Kitty’s Salmon Supreme. On the horizon: Bark your calendar for Yappy Hour, held monthly from May to December. Your dog can keep you company while you sip on a glass of wine like the Merlot Over and Play Dead, the Chateau d’Og Cabernet Sauvignon or the Mutt Lynch Unleashed Chardonnay. Proceeds from Yappy Hour support the Veterans Initiative of Canine Companions for Independence. Details: www.ritzcarlton.com/lagunaniguel Howl-or-able mentions: The Peninsula Beverly Hills, Beverly Hills; Hotel Amarano, Burbank; and Hotel Current, Long Beach CV

The Ritz-Carlton, Laguna Niguel features the Posh Pooch Experience, which includes a bed and bowls to use during your stay, waste bags and a toy for a fee of $50 each night.

Thanks for Supporting Local & Voting us #1!

For a Unique Shopping Experience Vintage Inspired ~ Unique Gifts Complimentary Gift Wrapping

7751 north first street | fresno, ca 93720

woodward village shopping center | southwest corner of first & nees

Serving Our Community Since 1990

www.authentiqueboutique.com

Receive a FREE GIFT with a $100 purchase! 28 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

559.225.0500 | www.resourcelenders.com ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

0003596955-01

559.449.1809

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 29


The Beverly Hills Hotel is known for housing Marilyn Monroe and her Maltese poodle named Maf (short for Mafia) — a gift from Frank Sinatra.

continued ...

At The Beverly Hills Hotel, part of the Dorchester Collection, your dog is welcomed for a fee of $35 each night.

Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Faye Dunaway and Neil Simon. Marilyn Monroe and her Maltese poodle named Maf (short for Mafia) — a gift from Sinatra — were also known to stay at the hotel.

“We’re more than just a pet-friendly hotel — we’re a pet-welcoming hotel,” says Brittany Williams, the director of communications for The Beverly Hills Hotel. “Instead of just allowing guests to bring their pets, we encourage them to do so.”

There are 208 rooms and suites, including 23 bungalows, as part of the Dorchester Collection. Your dog is welcomed for a fee of $35 each night. As for pooch-approved amenities, Williams says your dog receives bone-shaped treats, and a bed and bowls to use during your stay. Details: www.beverlyhillshotel.com After you leave Beverly Hills, head to Dana Point — home to The Ritz-Carlton, Laguna Niguel. Sitting on top of 150-foot bluff, you and your dog — or yes, your cat! — can play a round of fetch while enjoying views of the Pacific Ocean.

“As you can imagine, if your pet is part of your family, a vacation/getaway just isn’t complete without your furbaby,” says Deanne French, the director of public relations for The Ritz-Carlton, Laguna Niguel. The Posh Pooch Experience includes a bed and bowls to use during your stay, waste bags and a toy for a fee of $50 each night. It also offers a selection of in-room dining options — starting at $10 — for your dog like the Bow Wow Tenderloin, the Dog Bone Meatloaf, the Puppy Love and the Chop! Chop! Your cat can enjoy a plate of the Kitty’s Salmon Supreme. On the horizon: Bark your calendar for Yappy Hour, held monthly from May to December. Your dog can keep you company while you sip on a glass of wine like the Merlot Over and Play Dead, the Chateau d’Og Cabernet Sauvignon or the Mutt Lynch Unleashed Chardonnay. Proceeds from Yappy Hour support the Veterans Initiative of Canine Companions for Independence. Details: www.ritzcarlton.com/lagunaniguel Howl-or-able mentions: The Peninsula Beverly Hills, Beverly Hills; Hotel Amarano, Burbank; and Hotel Current, Long Beach CV

The Ritz-Carlton, Laguna Niguel features the Posh Pooch Experience, which includes a bed and bowls to use during your stay, waste bags and a toy for a fee of $50 each night.

Thanks for Supporting Local & Voting us #1!

For a Unique Shopping Experience Vintage Inspired ~ Unique Gifts Complimentary Gift Wrapping

7751 north first street | fresno, ca 93720

woodward village shopping center | southwest corner of first & nees

Serving Our Community Since 1990

www.authentiqueboutique.com

Receive a FREE GIFT with a $100 purchase! 28 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

559.225.0500 | www.resourcelenders.com ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

0003596955-01

559.449.1809

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 29


................

EatDrinkBeMerry

Acai bowls from Farm Fresh Bowls feature a base of acai and toppings like fresh fruit, granola, flaxseed, Greek yogurt and/or shredded coconut.

The Gourmet Verger from Raw Fresno has a portobello mushroom, walnut and pumpkin seed patty — smothered with fresh local produce and house hummus — between two pieces of flat bread. The Baked Potato Bowl from Farm Fresh Bowls is loaded with tomatoes, cheese, onions, black beans and pico de gallo.

Take a bite of goodness Raw Fresno is a food truck that specializes in the cleanest forms of eating. The Brownie Sandwich has two buckies glued with nut butter and molasses, topped with fresh seasonal fruit.

30 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

CHEF NAOMI’S SALTED CARAMEL CACAO BITES

25 dates (roughly chopped) 5 cups coconut chips 1 ⁄8 cup cacao nibs 2 pinches salt 2 tablespoons vanilla

Process this: More than ever, we’re opting for real foods to satisfy our cravings BY: Cyndee Fontana-Ott | PHOTOGRAPHY: Gary Kazanjian

A

nyone dedicated to a clean eating lifestyle might worry about dining out. After all, our burgerand-fries culture isn’t exactly in tune with the trend of eating whole, “real” foods that are minimally processed or refined (if at all) and often prepared at

home. Fortunately, more than a few Central Valley restaurants embrace this and other healthier paths. (Definitions of clean eating vary, so we’ll explore a range of healthy options in restaurants.) Here, the standard for clean eating must be Raw Fresno. The vegan downtown Fresno restaurant (and

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

food truck) offers organic, locally grown and plantbased gourmet meals and more to accommodate the cleanest palate. Chef Naomi Hendrix says one of the greatest misconceptions about raw food is that it isn’t tasty or filling. Hendrix, who switched to a raw diet partly due to health issues, counters skeptics with samples. “People who taste it are very pleasantly surprised,” she says. The menu includes buckies (buckwheat bars made with seeds), smoothies featuring housemade kefir water, stuffed mushrooms and salted caramel

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

cacao bites. Raw Fresno features unprocessed, unrefined foods made from nuts, seeds, fruits and vegetables. Ingredients may be used raw or fermented, for example, or prepared at extremely low temperatures (less than 115 degrees) to protect beneficial enzymes and nutrients. Another spot with a clean eating foundation is Farm

Use a food processor to blend until sticky. To serve, roll the mixture into individual balls or press into a shallow-sided sheet pan and cut to size. Chef Naomi Hendrix says her staff uses a miniature ice cream scoop to create little balls, but there aren’t rules (they even omit cacao nibs if they’re out of stock). “It’s about the joy of making it and eating it any way you like,” she says.

Please see next page

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 31


................

EatDrinkBeMerry

Acai bowls from Farm Fresh Bowls feature a base of acai and toppings like fresh fruit, granola, flaxseed, Greek yogurt and/or shredded coconut.

The Gourmet Verger from Raw Fresno has a portobello mushroom, walnut and pumpkin seed patty — smothered with fresh local produce and house hummus — between two pieces of flat bread. The Baked Potato Bowl from Farm Fresh Bowls is loaded with tomatoes, cheese, onions, black beans and pico de gallo.

Take a bite of goodness Raw Fresno is a food truck that specializes in the cleanest forms of eating. The Brownie Sandwich has two buckies glued with nut butter and molasses, topped with fresh seasonal fruit.

30 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

CHEF NAOMI’S SALTED CARAMEL CACAO BITES

25 dates (roughly chopped) 5 cups coconut chips 1 ⁄8 cup cacao nibs 2 pinches salt 2 tablespoons vanilla

Process this: More than ever, we’re opting for real foods to satisfy our cravings BY: Cyndee Fontana-Ott | PHOTOGRAPHY: Gary Kazanjian

A

nyone dedicated to a clean eating lifestyle might worry about dining out. After all, our burgerand-fries culture isn’t exactly in tune with the trend of eating whole, “real” foods that are minimally processed or refined (if at all) and often prepared at

home. Fortunately, more than a few Central Valley restaurants embrace this and other healthier paths. (Definitions of clean eating vary, so we’ll explore a range of healthy options in restaurants.) Here, the standard for clean eating must be Raw Fresno. The vegan downtown Fresno restaurant (and

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

food truck) offers organic, locally grown and plantbased gourmet meals and more to accommodate the cleanest palate. Chef Naomi Hendrix says one of the greatest misconceptions about raw food is that it isn’t tasty or filling. Hendrix, who switched to a raw diet partly due to health issues, counters skeptics with samples. “People who taste it are very pleasantly surprised,” she says. The menu includes buckies (buckwheat bars made with seeds), smoothies featuring housemade kefir water, stuffed mushrooms and salted caramel

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

cacao bites. Raw Fresno features unprocessed, unrefined foods made from nuts, seeds, fruits and vegetables. Ingredients may be used raw or fermented, for example, or prepared at extremely low temperatures (less than 115 degrees) to protect beneficial enzymes and nutrients. Another spot with a clean eating foundation is Farm

Use a food processor to blend until sticky. To serve, roll the mixture into individual balls or press into a shallow-sided sheet pan and cut to size. Chef Naomi Hendrix says her staff uses a miniature ice cream scoop to create little balls, but there aren’t rules (they even omit cacao nibs if they’re out of stock). “It’s about the joy of making it and eating it any way you like,” she says.

Please see next page

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 31


ThankyouCentralValley for all your support over the years and voting us

#1 People’s Choice! We congratulate our exemplary employees and unsurpassed experienced management team!

32 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

Fresh Bowls near Fresno State (the original location is in Visalia). Preparing and serving healthy fast food is “pretty much our entire business concept,” says co-owner Kristen De Groot-Vaz, who has a degree in business with a minor in nutrition. “We choose to only source and use very clean ingredients,” she says. The focus is on natural and generally local ingredients, nutritionally balanced meals and made-from-scratch food. The menu features breakfast bowls (the FFBowls Egg Scramble is a popular choice), acai bowls (the Berry Acai is a top choice) and savory bowls like the Baked Potato Bowl. The acai base is formed with organic juice, fresh frozen fruit and Greek yogurt. “It’s a totally different recipe than any other acai place,” De GrootVaz says. Acai bowls are a staple at Rio Acai Bowls in downtown Fresno. The location is the northern outpost of Bakersfield cafes that trade on the high antioxidant qualities of the acai berry. The acai base has an ice cream-like texture and can be topped with granola, bananas, strawberries, peanut butter, protein powder, honey and shredded coconut. Also popular are the poke bowls that feature raw, marinated tuna. Typically served with white rice, the poke bowls can be ordered with more health-conscious kale or spinach. “Poke is another healthy way of eating — it’s like eating a sushi roll in a bowl,” says Rudy Pereida, the store manager of Rio Acai Bowls in downtown Fresno. Poke bowls can be pretty clean — depending on your order and extras. At Butterfish (in Clovis and north Fresno), the emphasis is on healthy fast food but you can cheat a bit. Co-owner Rema Koligian says behind the Butterfish concept is a Please see next page ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

A healthy start to the morning might include the Powerhouse Bowl at Rio Acai Bowls, which is a local favorite that features strawberries, bananas, granola and peanut butter over a base of acai.

John Dunbar

Pete Garcia

Steve James

Lisa Garcia

20 Years Experience Expert in Mechanical Systems

20 Years Experience Specialist in HVAC

33 Years Experience Expert in Mechanical Systems & EMS

24 Years Experience Expert Job/Administrative Coordinator

Shane Johnson

Steve Mendrin

Simon DeLaCerda

Brian Biglione

Tobbie Biglione

29 Years Experience Expert in Commercial/ Residential Plumbing

29 Years Experience Expert in Commercial/ Residential HVAC

22 Years Experience Expert in Commercial/ Residential HVAC

27 Years Experience Expert in HVAC/ Plumbing

27 Years Experience Business Operations

Field Supervisor

Plumbing Dept. Mngr

Field Supervisor

HVAC Dept. Mngr

Manager/Owner

General Mngr

Office Manger

Manager/Owner

Manager/Owner

Since 1970 VAR’s goals have remained the same; to earn the trust of our customers by offering expert advice and quality service and conduct all service calls based on honorable intentions, never rushing to meet sales goals or quotas. We are committed to continuing the tradition we were founded on and hope to earn your vote year after year! LOCAL FAMILY OWNED SINCE 1970 and #fresnoproud!!!

10% OFF

*

Repairs and Maintenance Services Butterfish offers several healthy choices for customers like Ashley Medina who orders the Poke Bowl, consisting of raw marinated fish and fresh produce.

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Expires. 12/31/2018. Can not combine with any other discounted plans or services. *Residential services only.

0003525740-01

0003588555-01

continued ...

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 33


ThankyouCentralValley for all your support over the years and voting us

#1 People’s Choice! We congratulate our exemplary employees and unsurpassed experienced management team!

32 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

Fresh Bowls near Fresno State (the original location is in Visalia). Preparing and serving healthy fast food is “pretty much our entire business concept,” says co-owner Kristen De Groot-Vaz, who has a degree in business with a minor in nutrition. “We choose to only source and use very clean ingredients,” she says. The focus is on natural and generally local ingredients, nutritionally balanced meals and made-from-scratch food. The menu features breakfast bowls (the FFBowls Egg Scramble is a popular choice), acai bowls (the Berry Acai is a top choice) and savory bowls like the Baked Potato Bowl. The acai base is formed with organic juice, fresh frozen fruit and Greek yogurt. “It’s a totally different recipe than any other acai place,” De GrootVaz says. Acai bowls are a staple at Rio Acai Bowls in downtown Fresno. The location is the northern outpost of Bakersfield cafes that trade on the high antioxidant qualities of the acai berry. The acai base has an ice cream-like texture and can be topped with granola, bananas, strawberries, peanut butter, protein powder, honey and shredded coconut. Also popular are the poke bowls that feature raw, marinated tuna. Typically served with white rice, the poke bowls can be ordered with more health-conscious kale or spinach. “Poke is another healthy way of eating — it’s like eating a sushi roll in a bowl,” says Rudy Pereida, the store manager of Rio Acai Bowls in downtown Fresno. Poke bowls can be pretty clean — depending on your order and extras. At Butterfish (in Clovis and north Fresno), the emphasis is on healthy fast food but you can cheat a bit. Co-owner Rema Koligian says behind the Butterfish concept is a Please see next page ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m

A healthy start to the morning might include the Powerhouse Bowl at Rio Acai Bowls, which is a local favorite that features strawberries, bananas, granola and peanut butter over a base of acai.

John Dunbar

Pete Garcia

Steve James

Lisa Garcia

20 Years Experience Expert in Mechanical Systems

20 Years Experience Specialist in HVAC

33 Years Experience Expert in Mechanical Systems & EMS

24 Years Experience Expert Job/Administrative Coordinator

Shane Johnson

Steve Mendrin

Simon DeLaCerda

Brian Biglione

Tobbie Biglione

29 Years Experience Expert in Commercial/ Residential Plumbing

29 Years Experience Expert in Commercial/ Residential HVAC

22 Years Experience Expert in Commercial/ Residential HVAC

27 Years Experience Expert in HVAC/ Plumbing

27 Years Experience Business Operations

Field Supervisor

Plumbing Dept. Mngr

Field Supervisor

HVAC Dept. Mngr

Manager/Owner

General Mngr

Office Manger

Manager/Owner

Manager/Owner

Since 1970 VAR’s goals have remained the same; to earn the trust of our customers by offering expert advice and quality service and conduct all service calls based on honorable intentions, never rushing to meet sales goals or quotas. We are committed to continuing the tradition we were founded on and hope to earn your vote year after year! LOCAL FAMILY OWNED SINCE 1970 and #fresnoproud!!!

10% OFF

*

Repairs and Maintenance Services Butterfish offers several healthy choices for customers like Ashley Medina who orders the Poke Bowl, consisting of raw marinated fish and fresh produce.

c e n t r a lva lle y.c o m

Expires. 12/31/2018. Can not combine with any other discounted plans or services. *Residential services only.

0003525740-01

0003588555-01

continued ...

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 33


continued ...

0003587360-01

Fasika Ethiopian mainly offers traditional vegan and vegetarian dishes, which are minimally processed, and include kale, green mung beans, lentils and carrots.

tailored menu that is fresh, quick, healthy and tasty. It features what she describes as California poke — “our take on that isn’t just raw marinated fish.” For example, protein options also include cooked chicken, shrimp and crab. You can choose organic sushi or brown rice, or order a base of crunchy kelp noodles or mixed greens. Many toppings are vegetables like edamame, shaved snap peas or radishes. But you don’t have to be an angel. Koligian said she might add crispy onions to her otherwise clean bowl as a treat. “You can make a choice,” she says. “You don’t have to go all the way one way or the other.” Another healthy eating spot in Fresno is Fasika Restaurant, which features the cuisine of Ethiopia and Kenya. Vegetarian and/or vegan options include miser wat (split lentils with garlic, onions and olive oil finished with berbere sauce), kik alecha (yellow split peas cooked with onions, garlic and green peppers) and ndengu (green mung beans). Owner Charles Kaloki says many customers are interested in plantbased foods and cleaner eating, including truck drivers who swing by to pick up to-go orders. Kaloki says customers have dropped weight and improved their health by eating better. (His great-grandfather lived to age 107!) “When you feel good about yourself, you can’t hide it,” he says. “We are made up of what we eat.” Lastly, fine dining restaurants also are increasingly friendly to cleanereating customers. At Max’s Bistro & Bar in Fresno, for example, the dinner menu now carries two vegan items (a romesco of squash “pasta” and a wild mushroom wellington) that are gaining in popularity. Owner J.J. Wettstead says the restaurant also complies with customer requests related to other dietary restrictions. “We always accommodate those seeking to eat cleaner, even with other items on the menu,” he says. CV

Max’s Bistro & Bar offers vegan dishes like the mushroom wellington. It includes wild mushrooms, carrots, a cashew- andlegume- stuffed pastry, cauliflower mashers, shallots, sherry green beans and a roasted vegetable pan gravy.

34 MAY 2018 | Central Valley Magazine

ce n t r a lva lle y.c o m


.................

OutAndAbout

4 The Fresno-Clovis Comic Con The Fresno-Clovis Comic Con, hosted by the Ohana Comic Con, was held on Sunday, Jan. 21 at Ramada Fresno near Fresno State.

3

2 5 6

1

1 Lucas Rey and Joshua Rey 2 Isaiah Isassi 3 Luis Almendar 4 Alexis Gordon and Kassandra Gonzalez 5 Belinda Burger 6 Matthew Hernandez and Will Elizondo PHOTOGRAPHY: Matt Drake

Real Estate With Distinction The first choice for your real estate needs. With over 25 years experience, our top producing team offers... Superior Marketing, Negotiating and Service

www.cfcorealty.com 559-389-5896 Deb Tillis. Elise Souza. Kristie Spencer. Cathy Freeman

c e n t r a l v a l l e y. c o m

Cathy Freeman, Broker / Owner, GRI BRE # 01724853

Central Valley Magazine | MAY 2018 35



Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.