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FRESH VEGAN magazine Issue 4 August 2014 £3.95 GBP $6.66 USD €4.80 Euro

Happy Maki

Japanese Streetfood

Peruvegan Peruvian Cookbook from Vicky Cosio

Vegan in Africa

Luke Berman on the road in Kenya

Vegan Mashup TV Talking to founder Betsy Carson

Organic Farming, Malaga Veganbnb Travel

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Welcome from Jacqui our Editor

H

ere we are at the 4th issue of Fresh Vegan already, and still only half way through the year. This issue comes just 2 months after the 3rd!! We are getting better at this and we only have myself and husband Ron putting it together, so incredibly proud and grateful to all of our contributors and supporters who help us along this journey. Talking of which we have to give a big shout out to Jim Corbett who has been an incredible support to us and donated a computer sent swiftly by courier as Rons was on loan and mine is literally held together with sellotape (I kid you not) Thank you Jim, and Bernard who brought us together, we truly are gathering a great support network of people to this magazine.

Fresh Vegan Magazine is 100% Tree free and will never end in landfill

Front Cover Image

We have also been nominated for “Best publication” in the 2014 London VegFest awards which is great for bringing about awareness in the vegan world as it gives readers an opportunity to support their favourite businesses, we are in very good company with the Vegan Society who we personally hope wins as they are celebrating their 70th anniversary and without them none of this would be possible. Voting closes September 15th so if you’d like to vote for us please do. This issue is our biggest ever to date and in 2 months! 132 pages filled with contributors from all over the world, especially sharing lots of vegan Sushi as well as the company Clearspring Organic who shares their knowledge of traditional noodle making. A great article from Luke Berman who is in Kenya volunteering with Colobus Conservation as a field researcher for six months, following the rare Angolan black and white Colobus monkey, Luke is also an ambassador at Wild Futures and runs their London group to raise vital funds and to work to stop the legal primate pet trade. We are pleased to have him in the magazine at last as we missed his last entry, a big welcome to Luke and all of our fantastic contributors. Now sit back and enjoy your latest issue. Best wishes

Beautiful Front cover Image is Courtesy of Vegan Miam. The interview and recipes may be found on page 72.

Jacqui Deoir

Editor Jacqui Deoir jacqui@freshvegan.eu Design Ron Fairfield ron@freshvegan.eu Enquiries enquiries@freshvegan.eu Advertising advertising@freshvegan.eu

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Contributors contributors@freshvegan.eu Website www.freshvegan.eu Facebook www.facebook.com/FreshVegan Twitter www.twitter.com/freshvegan1

Whilst every effort is made to provide our readers with accurate and authentic content, Fresh vegan Magazine may not be held responsible for any content, recipes or information that may prove to be inaccurate. All content is copyrighted to either Fresh Vegan Magazine or to the Contributors whose work it originally was.

All content has been provided with the permission of the creators to include in this issue. The views expressed within the magazine may not be the views of Fresh Vegan or the magazine editor © fresh vegan magazine 2014


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6 Creative vegetarian, vegan & raw food

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24

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Day Radley Raw food Evolution or Revolution

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Mayumi

Nishimura

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45

72

Clearspring

60 12 78

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Aux Vivres

30 82

Vegan Miam

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Vegan in Africa


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Sarmado Sibley is 24 unique

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Vegan bnb Travel

105 126

Mayumi 120

Nishimura

And so much more............... 5


Creative vegetarian, vegan & raw food

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Interview with John Baley from Cashew Catering FV: Hello John, I have been a fan of your work for some time, watching your facebook pages and seeing you create food with Shazzie and a lovely food demonstration on youtube, but never actually met you. As a professionally trained chef your approach to the food you create makes it clear to see where the training and discipline comes from, can you just explain about your training and how your culinary adventure with food began. JB: Well, it really started when I was about 19 and my then girlfriend turned vegetarian – I became completely dedicated to learning about vegetarian nutrition, making sure that her diet was healthy and therefore cooking loads of veggie meals. I was a fully fledged meat eater at the time but after about a year of learning all about the nutritional side of the diet and mainly eating vegetarian meals I realised it was right for me also and so I stopped eating meat (and fish). From then on I was completely obsessed with it and would read any article I could get my hands on, or programme I could watch, about vegetarian/vegan food, cooking, nutrition etc and really just cooking in general, so any technique or dish that could be adapted to being meat free. Soon after this I travelled the world for almost 2 years (mainly around Asia and Australasia) and of course food is such a central part to life around the world it was an excellent way to learn about local culture as well as feed my food based desires to learn as much as I could. Its funny though as time goes by I start to realise

how little I really know, it’s one of those life long lessons that you can never really stop learning! I’m also quite a strong believer in the difference between reading about something and actually experiencing or doing it – don’t get me wrong, factual based learning is an integral part of cookery but there is no substitute for actually experiencing a process and or eating a dish! I’m sure there is a statistic out there that suggests as a nation we buy the most cookery books, watch the most cookery programmes on the telly but consumption of processed foods and ready made meals is through the roof – this just doesn’t quite stack up does it! After returning from my travels I completed a 2 year hospitality management course in Brighton and also set up Natures Plate (with my old friend Robert Barker) that was an organic vegan festival catering trailer. At the end of the 2 year course it turned out there was funding available to further studies in anything hospitality based outside of the UK – I applied to the fund to attend the School of Natural Cookery in Colorado and received a full bursary to go through there complete course with flights, accommodation and even a little spending money included. Honestly, I think I felt a little like Charlie when he won his golden ticket to go to the chocolate factory!!! The experience of the school completely blew me away and the skill of the teachers (one in particular) and the things that were possible using only plant based materials was mind blowing! I met my now wife while I was out there and we have 2 happy healthy children together now – so I really have a lot to be thankful for from the whole experience! It has literally put me exactly where I am today!

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FV: Your food looks so simple, light and full of passion do you feel your passion for food comes through in your creations or do you feel training has a lot to do with this. JB: I think It’s a combination of the two – without the knowledge of how ingredients and techniques work then how can you make anything successfully?

food coming through so strongly, he’s definitely a food hero of mine. Then more specifically to what I do Chard Sarno is such a ground breaking and inspirational man – he is definitely at the forefront of the vegan/raw food movement and literally invented dozens of techniques that are now widely used in every day food

Equally without some passion for what you do, then how can you have the creative ability to come up with ideas that inspire people to eat what you create or try a recipe that you have made? FV: Do you have any tips for anyone starting their Chefs training as a vegan/vegetarian/raw food chef?

JB: I think that learning the basics are essential and from there expanding what you do will come naturally!

Love him or not, Jamie Oliver is a massive inspiration to millions of people to learn how to cook simple whole foods and learn about what they putting inside their bodies. I reckon I’ve watched almost every programme he has made and for the most part you can just feel the love for

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The Lewes New School (veggie school where I was a ‘dinner lady) was possibly the most challenging – trying to create healthy vegetarian meals that 70 plus children would all eat in one session, NOT EASY!!! Saf was my first exposure to a ‘real’ restaurant with exceptionally high standards of food preparation – a truly ground breaking place. Aloka was an incredible opportunity and experience (I was the ‘conceptual head chef – so created all menus, hired and trained all kitchen staff etc) for which I owe a lot too, I am still in constant contact with a number of the guys and girls from there and we work together often. Tilton House has been great because I do everything – write the menus, hand choose/pick all the ingredients, make all the meals, wash all the pots and meet all the guests, that’s quite a powerful and unique kitchen experience!

How onions work in a dish for example or the difference between boiling, steaming, frying or roasting an ingredient – without this type of knowledge you truly can’t move forward. I also think its important to find chefs out there who inspire you and flick that switch somewhere inside to get you going!

Its funny though as time goes by I start to realise how little I really know, it’s one of those life long lessons, that you can never really stop learning

Natures Plate taught me so many life lessons. The School of Natural Cookery opened my eyes to what was possible.

preparation world wide.

FV: You have had a wonderful journey working with amazing people in wonderful locations, which was the restaurant or project where you really felt you learnt and grew the most throughout your training?

JB: I think all of the projects I have worked on have been incredible and have all been great learning experiences – I couldn’t pick just one!

The Community Chef project aka Robin Van Crevald, of which I am now on the board of directors – has been an incredible experience and Robin is someone else who has continually inspired me and more so supported me for years to help me get to where I am right now! And of course Cashew – which seems to be going from strength to strength, I have loved it all!


FV: Can you tell us more about your involvement in the Community Chef in Lewes sounds like a wonderful organisation?

JB: Classes that we run are usually a combination of what we do (so cooked and raw) and often involve my favourite things to make and eat at that particular time!

JB: When I moved to Lewes, I had ideas of cooking in the community and discovered that Community Chef existed here already – at first I was a little disappointed thinking if someone already has the idea I couldn’t do the same thing (another thing I feel strongly about – not stealing peoples ideas or treading on toes) but thought why don’t I just get in touch and see what happens and the rest is history as the say!

I try to make the sessions as informal and authentic as possible, so that people who attend can relax together, learn new skills, eat delicious foods and go away feeling like they have had an empowering experience!

I am now involved on a daily basis as we share the same office and kitchen space at the Lewes Community Kitchen that I helped Robin set up and have been involved in most areas of what Community Chef does for years now – including public cookery demos, cookery leader training, smoothie bike workshops, catering and also the bread club training! Part of Robins statement is,

mission

FV: Do you have any cookery classes for Vegans in the coming months that people can sign up for? I do have a class in October when the next class takes place. The best way to find out about classes is to check the website or go on the mailing list (which I only use for letting people know about classes).

I think all of the projects I have worked on have been incredible and have all been great learning experiences, I couldn’t pick just one

JB: People can expect to see 10 authentic Cashew recipes – tried and tested, that are part of our core repertoire.

I want to see how this is received and possibly put it out there to a few publishers and just see what happens? Also I just want to share what we do!

“Cooking and eating together is a simple way of connecting with other people. It helps individuals, families and communities to be healthier, more connected and in tune with the natural rhythms of life.”

FV: I notice you will soon have a download of your recipes John what can people expect to see in this?

It makes a lot of sense! FV: I’d like to encourage more people to go and train with great Chefs like you not just for professional experience and gaining more expertise but just people learning more about food and what a plant based diet can bring to their life.

To find out at more visit the Cashew website: www.cashewcatering.co.uk

Now enjoy some of John Recipes over the page.

Can you tell us about your cookery classes John and what people can expect on a Vegan or Raw course, or do you combine everything in a cookery class?

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Potato, Ginger & Apple Beignet

Now start to fry the mixture by carefully placing spoonfuls of the mix into the hot oil. Turning after a few minutes to ensure even cooking.

2 large potato – washed and grated and patted dry 3 large apples – grated and patted dry 3 tbs fresh ginger – minced 2 clove garlic - minced 1 ½ cup gram flour - sifted 1.5 tbs baking powder - sifted 1 cup sparkling water 2 tsp salt 2 tsp nigella seeds 1 tsp chilli powder – optional

Fry about 5 at a time, being very careful not to overload the pan, remove with a dry slotted spoon and place onto kitchen roll to drain off excess oil.

(makes 12)

Heat a suitable amount of frying in a large saucepan. Mix together the gram flour, baking powder, salt, nigella and chilli and then make it into a smooth batter by mixing in the water, use your judgment here to make sure the mix is not too thin or to thick. Start with about ¾ of a cup and only add the remaining water if you think the batter needs it, the batter should be quite thick a bit like porridge. Then mix in the potato, apple, ginger and garlic.

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Repeat the process until they are made.

Salsa Romesco

(serves 4) 2 large red peppers – deseeded and roughly chopped 1 large onion – peeled and roughly chopped ½ cup almonds ¼ cup olive oil 1 tbs smoked paprika salt to taste 2 tbs water ½ small clove garlic – finely minced Rub the pepper and onion with a little oil and roast in a medium oven for about 15 – 20mins, until soft and a little charred. When there is about 5 mins to go on the cooking time add the almonds, so they get about 5

mins in the oven. Remove from the oven, cool and then carefully blitz all the ingredients in food processor so they become a thick sauce with a little texture to it (ie not quite smooth), season to taste.

Pickled Cucumber 1 small cucumber – thinly sliced 1 small red onion – thinly sliced 2 tbs oil ¼ cup (white wine) vinegar salt & sugar to taste Heat a medium sized saucepan to a medium heat and begin to fry the onion with the salt for about 5 mins until translucent, stirring and adding water to stop it sticking if needs be. Then add the vinegar, bring to the boil and add the cucumber and simmer for about 4-5 mins, until the cucumber becomes soft but still has some crunch. Add salt and sugar to taste and either serve straight away or cool and store. Now just bring it all together by plating up and serving!


Almond Fudge Brownie (serves about 8)

Base Ingredients 200g dates 150g almonds 50g desiccated coconut 3 TBS carob powder (unroasted) 1 TBS water (if necessary) Topping Ingredients 2 TBS agave nectar ¼ cup tahini ¼ cup carob powder (unroasted) 1 TBS water (if necessary) Prep time 5 to 10 mins Start by blending up the dates, almonds, coconut and carob (base ingredients) in a ‘robust’ food processor, until the mixture is well processed (crumb like but not homogenised) and easily sticks together, use a tablespoon of water if necessary to help it stick. Next line a suitably sized tin or container, a loaf tin works well, with greaseproof paper and press the base in firmly and smooth it off with a spatula. Next process the agave, tahini, carob powder

and water (use enough water as necessary to get the mixture to come together and become soft and malleable) until it becomes quite dough like and soft. Next evenly distribute the topping onto the base and smooth over with a spatula, palette knife or similar. The topping can be quite sticky, so make sure that keep the implement you are smoothing it down with is clean, you can also use a little water on it but not too much or else it will spoil the top.

Griddled Peach 1 peach per 2 diners, choose something that isn’t completely ripe so it holds up to being cooked (but if its too hard though it will be very difficult to split them in half cleanly) a little sugar and oil cooking. Half the peach and remove the stone. Heat your griddle pan to a medium hot temperature. Now brush the peaches with a little oil and small sprinkle of sugar and begin to cook them, turning only once you think that side is completely cooked and do this carefully or the lovely griddle marks will stay on the griddle pan! Now cook the other side and repeat the process until all peaches are done. If you do not have a griddle pan then just place the oiled and sugared peaches on

a baking tray in a medium temperature oven and roast until soft.

Sloe Gin Ice 100ml sloe gin 400 ml water 1/2 cup agave syrup 1 tbs vanilla extract Combine the ingredients. Then place in an ice cream churn until frozen. If you do not have a churn you can just pop it in a freezer and every hour or so break it up with a fork until it is all frozen – if you use this technique you will end up with something more like granite rather than sorbet.

Pistachio Cream ½ cup unsalted shelled pistachio, peeled 1/3 cup water 1 tbs agave syrup 1 tsp vanilla extract Place all ingredients into a liquidiser and blitz until smooth. Now just plate up all ingredients and serve.

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by Day Radley On a steamy hot summers day

for a coffee and respite from the ( a rarity in the UK) I walked into office. He sat down with his Latte Nama’s new Notting Hill location and laptop, the raw desserts in the chiller caught his eye. Resistance and into.........serenity. was futile. The stone grey tones married together with welcoming waiting Within minutes he was devouring a staff to create an aura of inclusivity; blueberry cheesecake. I think I saw perfect calm and charm. Simple the making of a raw food convert decor and neutral tones are a that day. Upon my second visit two perfect fit to the menu in this elegant ladies, strangers to one another, London location and, I am happy to struck up a conversation about add, it moves vegan fooderies one being recent Nama converts. One more step away from the cliche visit and you’re hooked! hippy dives they once were. Nama’s food is top-quality, highThe juice board, large and end and, most importantly, entirely extensive with its long list of alluring accessible. I believe that this cold pressed juice elixirs, looms is the key to Nama’s success, over me. Blood Cleanser, Green accessibility. I know that isn’t the Dream and my personal favourite, sexiest word to use about food but Pearfecto are too tempting to resist. my god, is it important!!! The food menu is just as enticing, it is broad and balanced enough to There is a lot of vegan food that is cater for any food mood you may great for people who have been vegan/healthy eating for many be in. years. During my visit to Nama’s new location a gentleman came with Food that declares its’ healthiness his laptop. This was his first visit with every bite and doesn’t care to Nama and had just stepped in what it looks like. Whilst that food

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can be lovely (and I have enjoyed it on many occasions) it is hard for many carnivores and newbie vegans/ veggies to stomach. Nama’s food is entirely healthy, robust in flavour, stylishly presented and heartily satiating, which is a welcome relief to much of our vegan food history which has been the opposite.

Rich and Irene joined forces, they sold raw food at festivals and events and ran workshops. They developed their own raw food style whilst working as consultants developing a raw food menu for a cafe. It was an obvious next step to open Nama in a shared space in Queens Park.

The reaction was entirely positive. It was so positive that Nama quickly outgrew the unit. On 26th April of If you want to dip your toe into raw, this year Nama reopened in its new or have a friend you would like to Notting Hill home. introduce vegan food too, this is the place to head for. Maybe don’t go Despite a soft opening and no there on a date, you’ll be upstaged promotion Nama has welcomed many, many customers, both new by the starter! and old. Nama will shortly be resuming raw food classes and currently offer a to-your-door juice cleanse program.

Who is Nama?

Three years ago Rich Havardi and Irene Arango met at a London juice detox workshop. They had both been on their own individual raw food journey, exploring how eating living foods could improve their health.

To be kept in the loop about all things Nama sign up to the newsletter on their website. www.namafoods.com/


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Courgette pasta with cashew ‘cheese’ sauce & marinated portobello mushrooms

This recipe makes a single portion

Marinated Mushrooms 1 Portobello mushroom 1 tsp balsamic vinegar 1 tbsp olive oil 1Ž4 tsp garlic powder pinch of Himalayan salt

Cut the Portobello mushroom into small cubes, massage with the marinade made with the rest of the ingredients for 1 hour or until soft.

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Courgette Pasta

1 medium courgette Spiralise, shred or use a potato peeler to make courgette ‘pasta’ spirals or tagliatelle style noodles. Cashew ‘cheese’ sauce 1 cup cashews, soaked for 4 hours and rinsed 2 tbsp nutritional yeast 1 lemon, just the juice 1Ž2 tsp Himalayan salt pinch of black pepper

In a blender, place the cashews, nutritional yeast, salt & lemon juice and blend adding enough water to make a creamy sauce. To serve, mix the courgette with some of the cheese sauce, add the mushrooms and place on a plate topping up with some extra cream sauce.


Ajo Blanco- cold Spanish soup Ajo Blanco is a traditional and refreshing Spanish soup usually served seasonally in the summer. It is very simple to prepare and, this raw & gluten free version, tops the original one. Serves 4

Ingredients for Ajoblanco Soup 200g whole, skinned almonds 6 cloves garlic, shoot removed 1 cucumber, peeled and chopped 100g soaked cashews 500mls cold water, plus a little more if necessary to achieve creaminess 2tsp Himalayan salt 300mls cold pressed olive oil 2-3tbsp raw apple cider vinegar

Ingredients for for garnish Grapes Olive oil Freshly ground pepper

Place the almonds and all other ajoblanco soup ingredients in a blender and process until creamy. If the soup is not cold place in the fridge until ready to serve as its best chilled.

Soak the whole almonds for 8 hours or overnight in warm water. When the almonds are very plump should be say to remove the skins. This will help the soup to have a better colouring and texture.

Serve in bowls and garnish with a dash of olive oil, a few goji berries (traditionally grapes are used and its delicious with them too) and a dusting of freshly ground pepper.

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Raw Food:

Revolution, Evolution or Fashion?

October 5th 2013

In the expansive surroundings of London Olympia Exhibition Centre I stared at a wide eyed and utterly attentive audience at the ‘Living Raw’ zone. Chef Chad Sarno had taken to the stage, demonstrating how to ‘smoke’ raw mushrooms. The crowd reacted like children to a magician, eyes ever widening, I even heard a gasp. The only interruption to this hypnotism was the chaos that ensued when pristine canapes of raw food creations were offered to the masses. Chad’s helpers, dubbed Team Chad (by me), presented the platters to the salivating audience who proceeded to voraciously inhale the offerings. The extreme fervour of this gathering was a running theme for the Raw Zone over the entire two days. people were hungry, for any information about raw food; how to create it, the benefits of it, tales of personal raw food journeys, what you ‘should’ be eating.....etc. Every word spoken by the presenters was duly imbibed by the masses. There was a power here, and a need, an urgent need. I could not deny that there was something very real and important happening which these gatherings were a reflection of. Could this be the turning tide that I had been waiting for? Could this be the movement that would mark the beginning of a true healthy diet for all? Could this end the tyranny that the multinational agribusiness has on our diets, health, quality of life and life expectancy? Was this a sign that a big positive change of dietary health was imminent? A raw food revolution?

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Dayprivate Radley chef

Ten years ago a friend, on discovering my veganness, told me of the wonderful health benefits and tastes of Raw Food. She worked under Chef Juliano in his Santa Monica restaurant and instantly became a follower/disciple. Flicking through the pages of his epic book ‘Raw’, bright colours and fresh ingredients were thrown at me, mixed with an artistic creativity I had never seen before in cookbook form.

This was the antithesis of the Hamlyn All Colour Cookbook I had grown up with. This isn’t the first time that raw food has come into the spotlight; in the 1830’s Sylvester Graham, a Presbyterian minister, preached a vegetarian raw diet. He claimed that it could prevent cholera and would inhibit lascivious thoughts and desires. Later that century Dr Max Bircher- Benner fed his patients at his Swiss sanatorium a diet of raw fruit, vegetables and nuts. Weston Price, a Canadian dentist, was very progressive with his research in the late 19th Century. His work examined how nutrition affects our teeth, something that we now see as an obvious fact, largely due to this man’s work. In the early 20th Century Dr Max Gerson developed a nutrition plan to cure patients with severe illnesses including cancer. A controversial application of the raw food diet to be sure. In our time Raw Food, also known interchangeably as Living Food, reemerged in California, a state known for its attention to health and well-being, where you don’t have to be vegan to eat vegan food. The mid-eighties saw the rise of fast food in the US, however, a ground-breaking book ‘The New Raw Energy’ by Leslie Kenton was very popular, planting the seed of raw food for health. Kenton published many books around this time and continues today. Her focus was not only health but also physical appearance. They were inseparable for her. She believed that by following her biogenic diet you would look and feel wonderful. The biogenic diet was not a temporary extreme diet; it is a permanent change that you commit to. All processed foods are off-limits, the diet mainly consists of nuts, sprouted seeds, whole grains, beans and fresh fruit and vegetables. During this same period Karyn Calabrese, a model in Chicago, became so enthralled by raw foodism that she left her career to become a raw vegan caterer and coach, a brave step but one that undoubtedly paid off.


In

1995 she opened her first restaurant which is now touted as the oldest gourmet raw food restaurant in America. Karyn has added to her empire with raw food shops, a second and more formal raw restaurant, a cooked food restaurant (famously patroned by Beyonce during her brief vegan period), and a holistic therapy centre and raw food products. Chef Juliano also launched his first raw food venture at this time, opening Raw in 1994, serving burgers’ with buckwheat ‘buns’ that had been ‘cooked’ for 10 hours in the California sun. This was quite a transition for a lad whose father owned and managed several Italian dairy- and meat-laden restaurants across America. At 19 he became vegan after a period of vegetarianism, this was shortly followed by the final move to 100% raw. Juliano’s restaurant grew in popularity attracting celebrities and the media attention that goes along with this. Karyn and Juliano are just two examples of the plethora of healthy-minded people that took raw to their hearts and started to build up the raw food world that we know today. The Raw Food scene was in its Springtime period; cafe’s, restaurants, coaching and classes were appearing, whilst still In its infancy, there was definitely a movement starting to happen. Since that first flush we have seen a slew of raw food restaurants open with the requisite cookbook which followed. Of course many, many books have been published in the last twenty years on raw food, not just on how to create it but also on the benefits of it

and how to bring it into your life. Some restaurants did not survive, recently we saw the sad closure of London’s SAF, but many have continued to flourish, Café Gratitude exemplifies raw food’s best principles to the core; all their ingredients are organic, many coming from their own garden, the food is made daily and is always seasonal, and dishes are named as affirmations - ‘I am Thriving’, ‘I am Elated’, ‘I am Liberated’. Raw foodism has always gone hand in hand with a type of mindfulness

foot and mouth disease threw light onto meat production practices. The China Study and numerous similar books revealed the damage that processed foods are capable of. We are not experiencing the quality nutrition we think we are entitled to. This anxiety is expressed very vividly in extreme dieting, the 5:2 diet being a particularly good example. People are so desperate that they are willing to starve themselves for two days per week. This radical behaviour is the action of people

“Raw foodism has always gone hand in hand with a type of mindfulness that runs through body, self, mind and soul” that runs through body, self, mind and soul. For many of its proponents they are inseparable. In fact raw food for many is a symptom of an overarching belief, that diet is just one way to express that central belief. Raw food restaurants have gone international, with establishments all over America, the UK, Europe and Australia. But is the raw food movement (RFM) a revolution or a mere food fashion? Is it a sign of a changing attitude to our culinary exploits or just a kooky cuisine? There has been a recent growing anxiety and mistrust of the food industry and agribusiness. In the UK the horse-meat scandal and

who do not know how to eat healthily. And why is that? These are not stupid people. They will buy ‘low fat’, ‘natural’, ‘healthy’ products from the supermarket shelves believing these products to be exactly what they claim to be. No, they are not stupid but they have misplaced their trust. The consequences of this is body fat that continues to increase with the resulting diseases, a frustrating experience at the least and life threatening at its furthest conclusion. This is where the fissure occurs, in the ever widening gap of where we think we should be and where we actually are, is this where a food revolution steps

in? The growth of the Raw Food Movement also coincides with the rapid growth of the processed foods industry and also a decline in the amount of fruits and vegetables purchased in some households (the former could, of course, be a factor in the latter). The decline of fresh food purchasing is shown in the 2013 UK food document ‘The Food Book’ which shows the statistics on food purchasing for the UK (I loved finding and reading this document. Judge my food geekiness all you want). This document also details food concerns, the highest being food price (understandable just after the Double Dip recession), followed by concerns over fat and sugar content and food aimed at children. These anxieties obviously point you towards a diet filled with fresh fruit and vegetables, but do they have to be raw for you to get the most out of them? Whilst it’s useful to include some raw fruit and vegetables in the diet, some of the nutrients in vegetable and fruits may be better absorbed when cooked, for example beta carotene in carrots and lycopene in tomatoes is more useful when cooked. Overall, the notion of a balanced diet may be best achieved by a mixture of raw and cooked foods.” The internet is filled to the brim with personal accounts of the

People who say they thrived on it. 100% raw food diet.

People who say they became sick. And, of course, all are passionate about their point of view.

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This makes for very confusing reading indeed. Perhaps the vitriolic cries of the once-raw raw-food critics have their origin in the despair they felt when they were not awarded with the elixir of life, a prize that should have been theirs as they had paid dearly for it (purchasing equipment, dehydrating for eons, seeking out nutrient-dense superfoods etc). In the 1990’s many raw food gurus, including Chef Juliano, proclaimed themselves 100% raw and expounded the great vitality it gave them. Many, many followers, in keen eagerness dived in feet first. This is where we see the first wave of raw food popularity in our generation. The uniqueness of the diet was appealing, understandably. The alchemy of it, with strange equipment and processes, was alluring. The theory behind it appears sound and sensible. But, of course, a diet has to work in practice, not just theory.

Today

most raw food chefs and raw foodists say they are not 100% raw and that there is no need to be so strict with this diet. Amanda Baker, from The UK Vegan Society, gives her point of view “I think almost all of us could benefit from eating more raw. But unless we are privileged with time, money, highly-equipped kitchens, excellent access to food etc. it is very hard to eat a balanced raw diet as a healthy adult. Children & many adults with health challenges need 20% cooked food. Raw food also should never be claimed to cure medical problems, although a healthy vegan diet with plenty of fresh uncontaminated vegetables can support improved health.

as they feel their body responds better to it. And this is one very important factor to consider with raw food, you must listen to your body. You may be enthralled and excited by raw food and your decision to ‘go raw’. But your body needs to have a little time to get used to it. So, slowly, slowly. Raw food can be tough on those with weak digestion, but a gradual introduction to raw food should combat this issue. In fact, this is a good process for anyone considering increasing the raw food in their diet; go slowly and listen to your body every step of the way. So, is this a raw food revolution? As much as I would like this to be the case I think the answer is no, but also maybe ......... yes. The RFM is a symptom, a symptom of a greater revolution that is happening. The RFM is not a revolution in and of itself. Raw products will not be overthrowing the hegemony of the food multinationals, unfortunately. I fear their power and domination may be too great. What it is doing, and will continue to do, is to introduce us all to opening up to raw and allowing it into our lives more and more. The revolution is people crying out for healthier food alternatives. Anxiety about processed foods is real and growing every year. We want transparency. We want to know what we are eating. The great thing about raw food compared to other diets is that, along the way, you learn so much about nutrition. This is, I believe, a big part of Raws’ appeal. It is a diet that gives power to you through knowledge. But it’s up to you to learn, to read, to question, to experiment, to play, to create, to reflect.

The equivalent of three portions of whole culinary fruit daily is plenty for most people.” “The power is within you and within all of us”.

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Many raw foodists are 70%, 80% or more. The percentage depends on the time of year, what is happening in your life and all of the practicalities that we each have to deal with on a day to day basis. Of course, this figure is not exact, it’s used as a flexible guide. Many people will now eat cooked foods socially, enabling them to conquer what was previously a very big problem. Some people will eat more cooked foods during inclement weather

Day Radley is a private Chef, writer and photographer www.inradleyskitchen.com/


Raw Like Sushi

Makes 2 portions

Everybody loves sushi, especially kids. This is a super-simple raw recipe. You can try using carrot instead of parsnip, ideal for Halloween. Ingredients 1 & 1/2 cups parsnip 2 nori sheets 1 ripe avocado 1/2 a lemon 1 small cucumber Equipment Hand blender with a chopper attachment Sushi mat Bowl of water Cloth/tea towel Method Peel the parsnip and cut into chunks. Process in the chopper until it is fine, but not so much that it is puree. Mash the avocado with a little lemon juice. Cut the cucumber into long strips, about 1cm square Put a nori sheet on the sushi mat. Cover the bottom third with half the avocado. Add a layer of parsnip on top of the avocado. Put a strip of cucumber on the parsnip. Roll the mat and sushi roll over the cucumber. Wet the uncovered nori and complete the roll.

Cut into 2cm pieces using a very sharp knife. Best served immediately.

Asian Beet Salad Makes 2 portions

Fresh citrus is combined with earthy beetroot in this tasty salad. It’s versatile so play around with it, try adding toasted sesame seeds, seaweed or grated carrot. Ingredients 2 cups of golden beetroot 2 cups of red beetroot 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 tablespoon tamari 1 cup cashews 1 tablespoon nigella seeds Method Soak the cashew nuts for 4 hours. Rinse well and drain. Peel the beetroot and slice into thin pieces, with a mandolin if you have one, if not a sharp knife and a steady hand will do. Cut the slices lengthways so you end up with thin matchsticks. Put the beetroot and cashews into a large bowl. Mix the oil, juice and tamari. Add this to the bowl and mix everything well. Place the salad on a dish or plate. Scatter with nigella seeds.

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Berry Zing Smoothie You may have heard that melon should be eaten alone, however, it can be eaten with berries. This smoothie includes Maca, an ancient root that gives you energy and balances your hormones. The combination of melon, strawberry and maca is perfectly balanced, which is vital when using maca which has a distinctive taste. Ingredients 1/2 galia melon 5 strawberries (freeze the berries for a super chilled smoothie) 1 tablespoon maca powder 1/2 cup spring water Method Cut the melon into chunks and place in the jug for your hand blender Cut the leaves and stalks off the strawberries, add these to the jug Add the maca powder and spring water Blend till smooth

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Yuzu Banana Dessert Makes 1 dessert

Yuzu is an amazing ingredient. It is similar to lime but more intense. You can find it in Japanese grocery stores, but look for pure Yuzu, as some products are not 100% Yuzu juice. 1/2 cup brazil nuts 1 banana 1 medjool date 1 tablespoon yuzu or lime Equipment Hand blender or jug blender Method Soak the brazil nuts for 4 hours. Rinse and drain. Blend the nuts, banana, date and juice. You may need to add a little water to get the mixture moving but add it slowly to avoid adding too much. Pour into a ramekin and chill for 30 minutes before serving. Decorate with cocoa or lime zest.

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Vicki Cosio and Peruvian Vegan food by Ron Fairfield

I was thrilled to get an email from Vicki Cosio asking us to review her Peruvian Vegan cookbook, my mouth was watering already. But who is Vicki Cosio and why Peruvian? My next pleasant surprise was seeing Vicki appear in the Vegan magazine from the Vegan Society featuring her career as a nationally ranked tennis player, how many strings to her bow had she? Vicki kindly agreed to an interview and sent us a copy of the intriguingingly named “Peruvegan” cookbook. As I love potatoes it was heartening to discover that Peru has 3,800 different types! wow now I’m interested. All I can say is add this book to your collection - today.

Vicki’s Story After spending a 25 year career in law enforcement, Vicki was now finally able to follow her passion, which is to help animals by promoting veganism as much as possible. As a nationally ranked athlete, health and fitness nut and long time vegan, Vicki knows first hand how a plant based diet supports exceptional health and athletic performance. Vicki promotes veganism, by being an example in her sport and in her cooking. Vicki is featured on the Great Vegan Athletes website and she has been featured in Vegan Health and Fitness Magazine and The Vegan magazine. Vicki lives in Northern California with her wonderful vegan husband and rescue pups. Peruvegan is Vicki’s first cookbook.

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Interview

that vegan Peruvian food tastes so much better than what he ate when he was growing up.

Hi Vicki, we were really excited to see you featured in Vegan magazine from the Vegan Society. Many people know you as being a Vegan athlete and much of the publicity surrounding you had centred on this.

Where did the recipes come from? Are they a mix of traditional and your own, and how much experimentation went into the final results.

However we came to know you through your cookbook, something many people may not know about.

Q.

A.

They are a mix, and they are all my own recipes. Some of them are traditional dishes of Peru, which I’ve tweaked

involved, as far as what ingredients worked best with which recipe, but nothing that had me too stumped!

Q. A.

What is your favourite recipe from the book?

That is a really hard question!!!! I love so many of the recipes, and we just about subsist on Peruvian food these days. I would have to say Ajiaco de Papas (a creamy, cheesy, spicy potato stew), Lomito Saltado

Importantly for me (Ron) it was a Peruvian cookbook and as I love Mexican food this was a very exciting prospect.

Q.

Q.

Where did the idea for the cookbook come from, and why in particular Peruvian?

A.

A.

I’ve had the cookbook in my head for quite some time, but just never had the chance to work on it, since I was working full time.

It’s very common in Peru to use a boiled or fried egg as a decoration for dishes, and to have a dozen eggs in some desserts. I wanted to show people that you don’t need animal products to enjoy the cuisine of Peru. My husband says

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What has been the response to the book, and what feedback have you had?

The response has been fantastic, and I’ve really appreciated the exposure the book has received. The most common feedback I receive is how easy and fast the recipes are, yet the dishes are so delicious. My goal was to mostly create recipes that people could make on a weeknight after work, without spending hours in the kitchen.

Well my husband is a native of Peru, so I’ve been cooking vegan Peruvian food for us, family and friends since we turned vegan (15 years ago).

I really wanted to show the world how delicious vegan Peruvian food is. Peru is well known for their meat centered diet. They are also very heavy on the eggs, cream and cheese.

A.

Yes, the Vegan Garlic Aioli! The first time I experimented with it, it was runny like oil, definitely not an aioli! It was more like a garlic infused oil. It was tasty, but not what I was looking for. I had to play around with the measurements, before I found what worked. The end product ended up being better than I imagined. If you love garlic, this recipe is for you. If you don’t love garlic so much, you can just reduce the amount of cloves in the recipe.

and changed and added my vegan spin to. And some of them are original recipes of favourite dishes that I’ve made, and how I think they would taste if they were a traditional dish of Peru.

(which I renamed No Meat-O Saltado)……which is a delicious Peruvian stir-fry of onions, tomatoes, seitan and French fries, topped with a creamy cilantro sauce. And Seco, which is a seitan stew cooked in a cilantro broth.

When I wrote the cookbook, my husband was the ultimate taster, Were there any surprises since Peru is where he was born when you worked on the and raised. And I can’t forget my recipes, any that didn’t two wonderful dogs, they tasted work or any that worked everything also, and gave the recipes better than expected? two paws up.

Q.

There was some experimentation

Q. A.

So can we expect to see Peruvigan 2 any time soon?

Ha! Well, for right now, I’m still recovering from doing all of the work on the first cookbook!! However, it’s definitely something I’ve thought of for the future. The book is available online at: Barnes and Noble Book Depository Also promote your local bookshop and ask them to order it for you. Thank you so much Vicki for sharing with us at Fresh Vegan Magazine.


Ingredients Serves 4

2 avocados 1 lime 2 cups of cooked vegetables (I like to use cooked carrots, corn, peas, and raw tomato) ½ cup of Vegan Garlic Aioli Salt and pepper 1 cup of sunflower sprouts

PALTA RELLENA

Hollowed out avocado halves, filled with a creamy mixture of cooked vegetables and Vegan Garlic Aioli.

Method

Cut the avocados in half and peel away the skin. Remove the pit. Take a spoon and hollow out a little more of the avocado halves, to make the center a little bigger. Sprinkle with a little of the lime juice and sprinkle with salt and pepper. In a bowl, mixed the cooked vegetables and raw tomato with the Vegan Garlic Aioli. Add salt and pepper to taste. Place vegetable mixture inside of the hollowed out avocado halves. Top with sunflower sprouts. VEGAN GARLIC AIOLI 3 cloves of garlic, minced 2/3 cup canola oil ¾ teaspoon apple cider vinegar ½ to 1 teaspoon of salt (to taste) Place soy milk and garlic in a blender. Use the lowest speed possible. If you have a “stir” setting, that works great. Blend soy milk and garlic. With the blender running, add the canola oil one tablespoon at a time, pouring it in as slowly as possible. Keep the blender running, until you have incorporated all of the oil and the mixture is the consistency of mayonnaise. Add cider vinegar and salt and blend. Spoon on top of just about everything and enjoy! Makes approximately ¾ cup.

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PERUVIAN SECO “This is one of my most favorite recipes. Seitan cooked in a cilantro broth with potatoes. Seco is traditionally cooked until dry, but I like mine saucy so the rice can absorb all of the delicious broth. It’s also really fast to put together for a weeknight meal.”

Ingredients

Garlic Cashew Cheese

1 ½ cups cubed seitan 1 onion, diced 3 cloves of garlic, minced 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 teaspoons cumin 1 large potato, cubed 4 cups water 2 tablespoons vegetable bouillon base 1 bunch fresh cilantro, lower stems cut and removed 1/2 cup water Vegan Garlic Aioli Sunflower sprouts

2 cups raw cashew pieces (soaked in water overnight) ½ cup water 1 ½ tablespoons rice vinegar (unseasoned) or apple cider vinegar 3 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 ¼ tablespoons of yellow miso 5 – 8 cloves of garlic 1 teaspoon of salt (or to taste) Dash of agave nectar (optional)

Serves 4

In a fry pan over medium heat, sauté onion, garlic and seitan in olive oil until lightly browned and the onions turn translucent. Add cumin and sauté for another minute. Add potato, 4 cups of water and the bouillon base. Increase heat to medium high and bring to a low boil, stirring to melt the bouillon base. Reduce heat to medium low and cover so that the Seco simmers. Immediately cut away lower stems from the cilantro. Put the remaining cilantro (leaves and upper stems) into a blender with 1/2 cup of water. Blend until you have a cilantro sauce.

“Oh my, wait until you try this Garlic Cashew Cheese. You will wake up thinking about what you are going to make, just so you can put cashew cheese on it” It’s delicious on anything and delicious when added to anything. “ 28

Add half of the cilantro sauce to the simmering pan. Simmer the Seco until potatoes are tender, approximately 15 minutes. Remove from heat. Add the remaining cilantro sauce and stir. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve over rice, topped with a dollop of Vegan Garlic Aioli and sunflower sprouts.

Makes approx 1 ½ cups.

Combine all ingredients in a blender or food processor. You can also add a big handful of rehydrated sundried tomatoes, for Sundried Tomato Cashew Cheese. Or, you can add chopped fresh chives for Garlic Chive Cashew Cheese. VEGAN GARLIC AIOLI ¼ cup soy milk 3 cloves of garlic, minced 2/3 cup canola oil ¾ tsp apple cider vinegar ½ to 1 tsp of salt (to taste) Place soy milk and garlic in a blender. Use the lowest speed possible. Blend soy milk and garlic. With the blender running, add the canola oil one tablespoon at a time, pouring it in as slowly as possible until you have incorporated all of the oil and the mixture is the consistency of mayonnaise. Add cider vinegar and salt and blend. enjoy! Makes approximately ¾ cup.


PAPA RELLENA

“A seitan filling encircled by mashed potatoes, and formed into the shape of a whole potato. The “potato” is then rolled in bread crumbs and fried”

Ingredients

7 medium unpeeled gold or brown skinned potatoes, cut into thirds 2 tablespoons garbanzo bean flour 1 tablespoon salt 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 onion, chopped 2 cloves of garlic, minced 1 ½ cups ground seitan 1 ½ teaspoons cumin ¾ teaspoon smoked paprika 1 tablespoon aji amarillo paste 1 tablespoon aji panca paste 1/3 cup chopped cilantro ¾ cup panko bread crumbs Olive oil for cooking Onion Criollo Sauce Place potatoes in a large stock pot. Fill with water to cover. Bring to a boil over medium high heat. Reduce heat to

medium low and simmer until cooked through, approximately 25 minutes. Mash potatoes with a potato masher. Add garbanzo bean flour and salt. Set aside and let cool. While the potatoes are cooking, prepare the seitan and onion mixture. In a large fry pan over medium heat, sauté the onion in olive oil for approximately five minutes. Add garlic, seitan, cumin, paprika, aji amarillo paste and aji panca paste. Lower heat to medium low and cook for approximately 10 minutes, stirring frequently. Add a little vegetable broth or water, if the seitan mixture becomes too dry. Add cilantro and remove from heat. Set aside. Scoop ¾ cup of mashed potatoes from

the pot and form into a disk. Make a hollow in the center and fill with some of the seitan filling. Leave enough room so that you can enclose the potatoes around the filling. Shape into the size of a medium baked potato. Roll in panko bread crumbs. Repeat with the rest of the potatoes, until the filling or potatoes run out. Pour olive oil in large fry pan, until it measures approximately one inch. Preheat olive oil for a few minutes. Fry potatoes over medium heat until browned and crispy on both sides. Use extra caution when you turn the potatoes over, as they are delicate. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve hot with Onion Criollo Sauce and your favorite vegan gravy. Garnish with any leftover seitan filling.

Onion Criollo Salsa

Try this on sandwiches, veggies, grains or potatoes.

Ingredients

1 yellow onion, sliced thinly into crescents 1 ½ cups vegetable broth (heated until almost boiling) ½ tablespoon aji panca paste ½ tablespoon aji amarillo paste Juice of one lime 1/3 cup chopped cilantro

Method

Combine all ingredients except cilantro. Allow to marinate for approximately 30 minutes. Add cilantro and serve. Makes approximately 1 ½ cups.

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Jacqui from Fresh Vegan interviews Betsy Carson

Betsy Carson holds an MFA in Filmmaking from the San Francisco Art Institute. She is the president of Delicious TV, (of All Art Media, Inc.) a production company she started in1997. In 2003 she started Delicious TV and began producing plant-based television programming.

Hello Betsy and welcome to Toni cooked a Quorn Roast with We provided short video recipes I looked for people who had a Mango stuffing. We aired that and it became a top-10 food television experience, and found Fresh Vegan Magazine. People like to know what inspired people to start promoting and becoming involved in bringing about awareness of a compassionate lifestyle and the medium you are using is TV.

episode on a local Public Access TV station available to 60,000 people in the fall of 2002. From there we started filming a show every month.

podcast on itunes. I produced that for several years and created a second online series called Vegan Hotspot. Filming 6 episodes in 2009 in NYC with host Linda Long.

Tell us more about Delicious She dined at NYC vegan and TV’s first series of “Totally vegan friendly restaurants while chatting with stars like Moby & How did Delicious TV and Vegetarian” In 2005 Robin Quivers. Lack of funding then Vegan Mashup come about from your production I found a public television made it difficult to continue. distributor, and Delicious TV’s company and why? I had been thinking about a new Delicious TV’s Totally Vegetarian was our first series. And it came about when I met Toni Fiore through my partner Kate Kaminski.

Totally Vegetarian began airing on TV stations available to millions of people across the United States.

TV show for a while, one that highlighted the evolution of modern vegan cuisine and the diversity of We went on to make 52 episodes people creating it. That became my that are still airing today. It’s also latest series Delicious TV’s Vegan aired in Canada, Romania, and Mashup. Bulgaria.

Chatting about our passion for animals and good food over a glass of wine, and snacks of course. we lamented over the compete lack of Funding has been a non-stop issue. vegetarian cooking shows on TV.

my core three pretty quickly. I also wanted to film chefs in their own kitchens. This was a challenge because I had to travel, find crew or bring crew and hope that the chefs had film friendly kitchens. My roots are in ultra low-budget filmmaking so I knew I would just make the best product I could with what I had to work with. We did end up flying Terry to film in Maine because she has a small galley kitchen that was difficult to maneuver cameras in. The three chefs finally all met at the NYC vegetarian Festival months after we had finished filming the first season. It was a fun vegan food filled weekend!

You have 3 very well known, powerful and beautiful women on Vegan Mashup how did you pick them and Kate or I suggested “Why don’t we Around 2008 a major contributor was this project an organic that came about There is such an absence of TV film an episode?” Toni piped in “I’d passed away and I had also started one shows for not only vegans but love to be a show host!” so we shot an online podcast series with Toni naturally? an episode for Thanksgiving a few weeks later. 30

that eventually became my main focus.

vegetarians and that would be a start in itself here in UK and sure it is a familiar story all over the world,


How does the show come together, as I know how content comes together for the magazine and that is a full time juggling act, how do you make the shows We trust we are changing the world happen? by what we do but we don’t have a the last show we had on TV in the UK was back in the 80’s it’s crazy. It must have been huge when the show ran for the first time, so how was the TV show received?

gauge. There are over 300 public I have a group conversation with television stations across the U.S., Toni, Terry and Miyoko, and we so it’s hard to tell people when and all hash out the episode topics. where it’s airing. Then they each decide what they want to make. I’ve met so many They just have to check their dial or chefs over the years that I wanted TV listings. And since we couldn’t afford Neilsen ratings It’s hard to really know how many people are tuning in.

So they can air it whenever they Also the lasting support we’ve like. It’s public television so we gotten from The Boston Vegetarian provide the series to them for free. Society and Maine Animal Coalition both local groups doing good work, Creative people like has been really helpful.

ourselves, put a lot of work in to what we do and I certainly know you do Betsy how do you manage financially? Self funding or do you have sponsors for the show?

What can our readers from all over the world do to see more of your shows on TV and more shows like this develop? Help us find a European distributor. Help fund outreach. I’d love to film a series in the U.K. Or collaborate with someone on it.

We’ve had great comments on the website and have gotten slivers of data over the years. At one point during our first series Totally Vegetarian, I was told we had ratings the equivalent of a hit show in Memphis Tennessee, which is probably the Barbeque capitol of the world, that was heart- warming news. That and the fact that Toni has been recognized and stopped by fans on the streets while visiting NYC and the grocery stores of to promote so there was no Portland Maine. problem finding guest chefs. I met Demetrius Bagley co-producer of The data we have gotten only tells the movie Vegucated at the Boston us how many times we have aired Vegetarian Festival and invited on public television stations. him to co-produce season two with me. He brings a lot to the table as The Totally Vegetarian series have social media guru and his everhad 53,000 airings around the U.S. growing connections within the over an 8 year period, and Vegan vegan community. Mashup has already aired 6000 times in the first year. We filmed in Maine, NYC, and San Francisco and Los Angeles. If I could change one thing it would And this last season I was able to be to have enough money for to hire an editor in LA to help me edit promote the work. Most people and Fancy Film a post-production stumble across the show. We really company, (also in LA) provided need some major PR muscle. color correction. Then it went for closed captioning and was fed via satellite for TV stations to record.

Crowd funding has been an amazing way to help fill the funding gap since many of our sponsors have so many other projects to help fund.

So what can people expect to see in season 1 on-line and what does season 2 have in store?

The first thing is lining up funding through sponsorships and crowd funding campaigns. Once I have seed funding I start working.

Vegan Mashup Season 1 episodes include Party Foods, Flavors of the Mediterranean, Reinventing the Holiday, Cooking on a Budget, Cooking for Teens, & Breakfast ideas. Season 2 covers; Lunch to go, cooking with Tempeh, Cooking on a Budget, Everything Mushroom and a Vegan Barbeque episode.

I have a firm belief in my skills and feel a responsibility to make it happen so there is no going back Both seasons are available as even when I don’t find full funding. pay-per-view online. I’d love to find I’ll just do most of the work myself. advertisers so I could offer it for free. I’m trying to figure that out. I’m resourceful and live a pretty simple life. I have huge admiration May I jut finish by saying a for our public television sponsors. big thank you and wish you Friends of Animals & A Well Fed great things for the future. World; both incredible organizations that support Vegan Mashup and For more information: many other projects going on all http://www.delicioustv.com over the globe. https://twitter.com/delicioustv 31 https://www.facebook.com/pages/Delicious-TV/167590356431


Toni Fiore Toni Fiore has been with Delicious TV from the beginning, as the host and co-creator of Delicious TV’s Totally Vegetarian, and then the VegEZ podcast. She is the author of the upcoming VegEZ e-cookbook & Totally Vegetarian.

Miyoko Schinner Miyoko Schinner is the author of 3 vegan cookbooks, including the Amazon bestseller Artisan Vegan Cheese. She’s the mastermind behind Miyoko’s Kitchen, a vegan cheese company based in California.

Her cheeses will soon be available to order A vegetarian for more than 25 years, Fiore is a online. She has contributed to Vegetarian Times self-taught chef who embraced Mediterranean and has been featured on NPR’s Marketplace, culinary techniques and food philosophy while New York Post, ABC World News Tonight, & growing up in Italy. She resides on the rocky the Washington Post. Schinner resides in Marin County, California. coast of Southern Maine.

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Terry Hope Romero Terry Hope Romero is author and co-author of bestselling vegan cookbooks Salad Samarai (2014) and Veganomicon: The Ultimate Vegan Cookbook, and many others. She presents informative and lively cooking demonstrations and talks to hungry crowds the world over. She holds a certificate in Plant Based Nutrition from Cornell University. Romero lives, cooks, and eats in New York City.


Savory Mushroom & Leek Tarte Tatin By Toni Fiore

Serves 4-6 Total Prep: 45-50 minutes Easy and elegant, my Mushroom Leek Tarte Tatin is a savory play on the extremely popular French dessert traditionally made with apples. Bursting with juicy mushrooms, mellow leeks and crunchy walnuts on a tender puff pastry crust this recipe utilizes a cooking technique you’ll use over and over. Ingredients 1 sheet prepared vegan puff pastry rolled into a 12-inch round, placed on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet and refrigerated 1/2 cup walnut pieces, lightly toasted and minced (divide in half) 3 tablespoons refined coconut oil or extra-virgin olive oil 2 cups sliced leeks, white and pale parts only 1 1/2 pounds cremini, portobello, or standard cultivated mushrooms cleaned, trimmed, and cut into thick slices 3 tablespoons minced fresh flat leaf parsley (divide in half) Sea salt 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves, minced (may use 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme, if necessary) 2 cloves fresh garlic, minced Freshly ground white pepper to taste 1 tablespoon walnut oil vinaigrette (Recipe below) Walnut Oil Vinaigrette 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice Fine sea salt, to taste 1/4 cup organic walnut oil Method To prepare the tarte tatin: 1.Preheat the oven to 425°F. 2. Gently preheat a 10-inch cast iron or ovenproof skillet. Toast the walnuts in the pan, chop, and set aside.

3. Add the oil to the pan, wait a few seconds until it warms, then add sliced leeks and sauté until soft but not too browned. Remove the leeks from the heat and set aside. 4. Next add the mushrooms to your pan, season lightly with salt and sauté until they begin to sweat, about 5 to 7 minutes. Reduce the heat and add thyme, garlic, shallot, half the minced parsley and half the chopped walnuts. Sauté an additional 1 to 2 minutes, stirring regularly and shaking the pan. Season generously with salt and pepper and remove from the pan from the heat. 5. Spread the reserved leeks on top of the mushrooms right in the pan, then remove the pastry from the refrigerator and lay it over the leek/ mushroom mixture, gently pushing the edges of the pastry down around the inside edge of the pan. 6. Bake 20 to 25 minutes or until the pastry is puffed and a rich golden color. Combine the lemon juice and salt and whisk until the salt dissolves. Add the walnut oil, whisking again to combine. Taste for seasoning. Remove the baked tarte from the oven. Run a knife around the outside edge of the pastry, set a serving platter over the skillet, and invert, gently lifting the pan away. If any mushrooms stick to the pan, simply spoon them out and place them on top. Sprinkle with parsley and walnuts, drizzle with a bit of dressing, season to taste, and serve warm. This dish has a lovely presentation for a light lunch or dinner served with a simple green salad. You can also cut into smaller servings for an elegant appetizer. 33


Serves 4 Time: 20 minutes Here’s a recipe that is traditionally made using an oil-based roux. I’ve veganized it and made it oilfree! If you’re gluten-free, just substitute fat rice noodles for the udon. Ingredients for Curry Sauce 4 to 5 cup vegetable broth 1 heaping tablespoon Curry Powder 3 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce 3 to 4 tablespoons potato flour (not starch)

Method for Curry Sauce 1. Combine all ingredients in a saucepan and bring to a simmer. 2. Cook for about 5 minutes until thickened and flavorful. Adjust seasonings as desired, adding more curry powder and/or tamari to taste. Ingredients for Noodles and Vegetables 4 servings of udon noodles, either fresh or dried 1 carrot, thinly sliced 1/2 cup daikon or turnips, thinly sliced 1 radish, zucchini, or broccoli stalk, thinly sliced 2 cups fresh spinach

Method for Noodles and Vegetables 1. Bring a pot of water to a boil. If you are using dry udon noodles, you will need to boil them for 8 to 10 minutes, or according to package instructions. Fresh noodles will require only a couple of minutes, so please adjust cooking times according to what you’re using. 2. You can steam, blanch, or sauté the vegetables separately, but I prefer – and it’s easier – to simply add them to the noodles during the last minute or two of cooking.

3. Note that the spinach should be added at the very last and just for a few seconds, as it will cook very quickly. 4. Drain the noodles and vegetables and portion them out into 4 bowls, then pour top with sauce and enjoy.

Japanese Curry Udon Noodles

by Miyoko Schinner

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Oyster Mushroom Tacos with Avocado Almond Crema By Terry Hope Romero Serves 2-3 Time: 20 minutes Light and spicy, chewy oyster mushrooms are rubbed in a sweet, smoky rub for a fast taco filling. Spoon on a crunchy, creamy avocado topping and don’t be shy adding on classic taco toppings. 1 pound oyster mushrooms, trimmed and pulled apart Smoke n’ Spice Rub Olive oil cooking spray Avocado crema 2 tablespoons sliced almonds 1 avocado, cut into cubes 3 tablespoons lime juice 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro (optional) ½ teaspoon salt

4 corn tortillas 2 cups shredded Romaine lettuce 1 small carrot, shredded 1 small red onion, sliced paper-thin Smoke n’ Spice Rub 2 tablespoons smoked sweet paprika 2 teaspoons organic sugar 1 teaspoons black pepper 1 teaspoons onion powder 1 teaspoon celery seeds 1 teaspoons garlic powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1. Prepare the oyster mushrooms

by slicing off any tough, hard stems. Pull apart the mushrooms. If any mushrooms are very large (3 inches wider or more), slice in half. Leave small mushrooms whole, as oyster mushrooms shrink dramatically with cooking and you want substantial chunks of mushroom for these tacos!

2. Before cooking the mushrooms,

prepare the avocado crema. Pulse the almonds as fine as possible in a food processor. Add the remaining ingredients and pulse until smooth. Cover and chill until ready to use.

3. Preheat a large cast iron skillet

over medium-high heat. In a large bowl toss the mushrooms with 3 tablespoons of the spice rub mix; very gently rub the spices into the mushrooms, taking care not the break the mushrooms apart into small pieces. Generously spray the bottom of the skillet. Add the mushrooms, spray with a little more oil, and quickly sauté the mushrooms for 3-5 minutes. The high heat should sear the mushrooms.

Cook the mushrooms only long enough to render them soft and tender in the inside and lightly seared on the outside. Do not overcook! Overcooked oyster mushrooms will shrink in size to almost nothing and become a little rubbery in texture. When done, remove from heat and cover.

4. Heat the corn tortillas: I heat them directly on the burner, flipping once with long handled metal tongs until soft and pliable.

To serve, pile some hot mushrooms on a hot tortilla, dollop with a little avocado crema, and top with remaining toppings. Eat immediately!

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Mayumi

Nishimura

Interview

Hello Mayumi, welcome to fresh Vegan and thank you for taking the time to grant us an interview. Q. Can you tell our readers what they will find in your book entitled? “Mayumis kitchen, Macrobiotic cooking for body and soul” A. You can find step by step 10 day detox menu and recipe as well as Party recipe for gathering. Q. The book was published in 2010 so what inspired you to write this particular book in English as I believe you had already written four other books in Japanese, your first language? A. I wanted to show how beautiful Macrobiotic food is. When I started to practice Macrobiotics I found macrobiotic cooking books were hard to follow because of unfamiliar ingredients and terms, lots of words not many pictures to explain how the food should look. Also, my children were born in US and they didn’t read Japanese, I wanted to write a cook book they can use Q. Many people became aware of you as Madonna’s Chef, both on tour and personally. What were you doing before that particular part of your journey? A. I was teaching some cooking classes at Kushi Institute in Becket. And cooking for cancer patients as well as working at a Japanese restaurant at the weekends. I was working 7days a week to raise my 2 children as a single mother.

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www.mayuminishimura.com/ www.facebook.com/mayumi.nishimura


Q. I know many of our readers will want to know more about your work with Madonna, but we want to know about Mayumi. However, lets get the Madonna questions out of the way, what sort of food did you prepare that was so effective in helping a hard working athletic musician, on the road, keep in shape? I think whole grain based Macrobiotic diet does works very well for most of us. I can’t say what I served for her in detail but when you see “Mayumi’s Kitchen” you can almost see what I was cooking for her. Q. When and why were you prompted to begin your study of Macrobiotics? I moved to US in 1982 to study Macrobiotics with Michio & Aveline Kushi. I started cooking Brown rice a few years before that by reading few of George Ohsawa’s books. I had minor health problems such as seasonal dry and itchy skin, constipation, menstral pain. Ohsawa talks about how all of those condition will disappear so I followed his advice right away. More than that, reading Ohsawa’s and Michi Kushi’s books made me feel like I can be a part of world peace by eating brown rice and miso soup. When I read that I can be healthy and that it is a direct answer to world peace I was inspired. He is a genius”.

Q. How do you feel your book differs from the many other book available on the subject of Macrobiotics? At a glance it looks very much like regular a cook book but has information to get you started with Macrobiotics. Also more focused for day to day eating rather than healing any particular condition. Q. How does the Japanese Macrobiotic community view the West’s enthusiasm for all things macrobiotic? We all like something different. Western style Macrobiotics is welcome in Japan. They see western style cooking as for festive or special occasion. Q. So what can our readers expect from you in the future, and do you have plans for more books? I’d like to travel and teach cookings in future. Last year and this year are my recharging time. I am spending lots of time in my Vegetable garden, Natural building project, as well as making a cooking video in Macrobiotic community (Ionia) in Alaska. I wish to translate “MIRIN cook book” to English. Like to take my cooking class on the road in few years.

Q. Could you explain your use of the term “Petite Macrobiotics”? While I was in Japan, to write a book and introduce Macrobiotics in women’s magazines, I often heard “Macrobiotic is so difficult to do, and the food looks all brown” and “It is for sick people, isn’t it?” from interviewers and publishers. I wanted people to take off all those assumptions about macrobiotics. I thought people should try it as a small step to change their consciousness towards food and life style.

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Vegan Shumai (make 12 pieces) Ingredients: 12 pieces Shumai skin (store bought) 1cup of Seitan (or soy protein) 2/3 cup of onion 2-3 cloves of garlic 2-3 dried Shitake mushroom (soak in the water to reconstitute) pinch of sea salt pinch of black pepper 1-2 Tbsp unbleached white flour ( or Kuzu , Arrowroot flour cnabe used) Dipping sauce: 1 Tbsp Brown rice vinegar 2 tsp Shoyu 1 tsp Mustard of your choice (optional)

1) Mince Seitan, onion, garlic and Shitake mushroom. 2) Place all ingredients except unbleached white flour in the bowl and mix them well by using hand. 3) Add unbleached flour ( just enough to hold ingredients together) to the bowl and mix them well. 4) Make shape as picture. 5) Bring water to boil in the pot. Place steamer with some leafy vegetable ( slice it if nessery) in the bottom of the steamer then place Shumais on top of leafy vegetable. This will prevent skin stack in bottom of steamer. 6) Steam for 10 to 15 minutes till done. 7) Serve them with Dipping sauce which simply whisk all ingredients in a small cup. *nice to accompany with steamed vegetables.

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Vegetable Burritos with Green Lentils These Burritos are hugely popular with everyone I serve them to. They’re “complete,” too, in that they contain, in one form or another, everything you need for the day—vegetables, beans, and grains. leftover Green Lentils from last night’s dinner ¼ to ½ cup (60 to 120 ml) spring water 1 tsp sesame, sunflower, or safflower oil ½ cup (60 g) carrot, cut into matchsticks (page 131 in book) 8 boiled green beans pinch sea salt 2 soft tortillas ¼ cup (60 ml) Tofu Mayonnaise (page 39 in book ) 1 cup (15 g) salad mix, loosely packed ¼ cup (40 g) naturally fermented sauerkraut (store-bought) ½ avocado, cut lengthwise into 6 slices 1 Tbsp Reduced Balsamic Vinegar (page 131 in book) Place the green lentils in a pan with a small amount of water (just enough to cover the bottom of the pan) over medium-low heat and warm slowly, stirring constantly. Set aside. In a separate pan, heat the oil over medium heat and sauté the carrot, green beans, and salt for 2 to 3 minutes. Add a small amount of water (1 to 2 tablespoons) if needed. Set aside. Warm up the tortillas in another pan or in a toaster oven. Spread the TOFU MAYONNAISE on the tortillas, then fill them with the salad mix, cooked vegetables, sauerkraut, and green lentils. Drizzle with Reduced Balsamic Vinegar, roll into burrito form, and serve

Images from MAYUMI’S KITCHEN published by Kodansha USA, Inc. Copyright (c) 2010, 2012 by Mayumi Nishimura. Photographs copyright (c) Akira Saito

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Brownies makes one 8 × 8-inch (20 × 20-cm) pan These brownies proved incredibly popular with Madonna’s backup dancers, whom I sometimes made snacks for while on tour. Brownies have since become a favorite birthday treat.

Fried Rice with Vegetables and Seitan This Fried Rice is a simple dish that will give you enough energy to carry through the rest of the day. The Sweet Vegetable Tea is nice and relaxing. 2 tsp sesame or other oil 1/4 cup (40g) diced onion 1/4 cup (30 g) diced carrot 1/4 cup (40 g) corn kernels 1/4 cup (70 g) diced seitan 1/4 cup (40 g) shelled edamame sea salt and black pepper to taste 2 cups (400 g) cooked brown rice, left over from last night’s dinner I/4 cup (60ml) spring water 1 tsp shoyu fresh chervil, for garnish Heat the oil in a frying pan over medium heat. One at a time, add the onion, carrot, corn, seitan, and edamame, in that order, and sauté each for about a minute. Season with salt and pepper. Add the cooked rice, spring water, and shoyu. Cover and cook for 2 minutes, then uncover and mix. Remove from heat. Transfer to individual plates and serve garnished with chervil.

DRY INGREDIENTS 1 cup (110 g) unbleached white flour or barley flour ½ tsp baking powder ½ cup (80 g) maple sugar ¼ cup (20 g) cocoa powder ½ cup (90 g) sugarless chocolate chips WET INGREDIENTS 2 Tbsp unsweetened soymilk ½ cup (120 ml) rapeseed oil or other vegetable oil ½ cup (120 ml) maple syrup 1 tsp vanilla sea salt, to taste Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Oil a Pyrex or other square ovenproof pan. Or, for easier cleanup, line the pan with baking paper. Place all DRY INGREDIENTS in one bowl and all WET INGREDIENTS in another. Mix well separately, then add WET INGREDIENTS to DRY INGREDIENTS and mix just enough to blend, using a spatula to prevent lumps. Transfer to the pan, place on the middle rack of the oven, and bake for 20 minutes (time may vary depending on the oven; test for doneness with a toothpick). When a toothpick or cake tester comes out clean, remove from oven. Allow to cool before cutting into squares and removing from the pan.

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Win a copy of the Book “Mayumi’s Kitchen” Email jacqui@freshvegan.eu write, “Win Mayumi’s Book” in the subject line plus your full name and address in the body of the email PLEASE NOTE: 2 of the recipes include fish

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Clearspring Noodles

then allowed to rest for a period to reach the right consistency.

in Asia and Pasta in Europe may look similar, however they have many differences. Japanese noodles tend to use softer wheat whilst pasta wheat is generally the harder, durum variety that grows in the Mediterranean region. Softer wheat gives noodles a lighter colour, a smoother, silkier feel and enables them to cook quickly, whilst harder durum wheat provides pasta with a more golden colour, a strong, elastic texture and a firmer bite.

Also, noodles generally contain salt, added to develop the softer protein and help bind the dough, whilst pasta is mostly salt-free. This means that noodles are cooked without the need for extra salt. Noodles were traditionally served in a hot or cold seasonal broth whilst pasta had a sauce added. Nowadays, though, fusion cuisine is offering all sorts of exciting new ways to prepare noodles. But the most important difference is how they are made: whilst pasta dough is generally extruded, much like squeezing a toothpaste tube, noodles are made to the “roll-and-cut” method. The “roll-and-cut” method This process is essentially the same as traditionally used by Japanese people in their own homes, and local noodle shops. It begins by adding salted water to freshly ground organic flour. The correct salt content is critical to bind the dough together and to make sure that the noodles stay fresh during the natural drying process. The dough is thoroughly kneaded,

It is then passed through a series of rollers to form long sheets of various thicknesses. The last roller has a cutter attached, which is adjusted to cut the dough into either thick or thin soba and udon noodles. The long ribbon-like strands emerging from the cutter are then chopped into two-metre lengths and placed into a special drying room. After naturally and slowly drying for at least thirty hours at room temperature, the noodles are cut and packed. The whole process takes four times as long as the modern method, which can be completed in a single working day. The benefits of long, slow production are providing the best possible flavour and digestibility. The Clearspring Organic Japanese Noodle Range Quick to cook, delicious tasting and easily digested, Clearspring Organic Udon and Soba Noodles are a satisfying and versatile food. They can be used all year round in a wide range of Asian and Western dishes, including piping hot noodles in broth, satisfyingly rich stir fries, and succulent summer salads. Clearspring Japanese Noodles are made to traditional recipes, and are all egg-free and certified organic. The range includes three varieties of thick, silky textured udon wheat noodles, and three types of thin, nutty tasting soba buckwheat noodles. www.clearspring.co.uk/

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Q

Your father took over Clearspring in 1993, how did the take over occur? and what had you been doing previously?

In the mid 1970’s well before the conception of Clearspring as a brand its founder, Christopher Dawson, was already interested in organic production and lived a macrobiotic lifestyle. He moved to Japan and for eighteen years he travelled extensively throughout the country, building up long-lasting and close working relationships with the finest traditional producers around the country and assisted them to convert to organic production methods. Clearspring is therefore able to offer a range of Japanese foods, that are not only delicious, authentic and healthy, but also produced according to sustainable and traditional production techniques.

Q

How do the products differ from the ones you started with and have the fact that people are more travelled now had an ifluence?

We started off selling authentic Japanese specialities and have now also included a comprehensive range of Organic Fine Foods. In many cases these have a Japanese twist such as our organic oatcakes with sea vegetables, our tamari roasted almonds and our fruit spreads which contain a seaweed extract to balance the fruit acidity and enables the fruit pectin to set. Primarily Clearspring was born out of a wish to build a global organic food brand, to protect and develop the production of authentic and artisanal foods, and to distribute such good foods worldwide. What motivates us is to increase consumption of wholesome, easy-toprepare, great tasting daily foods for optimum nutrition.

Q

Have you seen a rise in awareness for good quality products in not only the UK but the world?

Each product is carefully evaluated for purity of ingredients and ecologically sound manufacturing practices. Can you tell us an ethical company how you go about this process to bring the public a product that meets your standards and what do you look for? Before even starting a conversation with a potential new producer we check that all our brand promises are met, we never compromise on our standards: All Clearspring products adhere to the Brand Promise - No exceptions! Organic, premium quality Japanese, Oriental and European foods. Authentic and traditional recipes developed by master artisan producers. 100% vegetarian and vegan foods and ingredients. Wholesome and great tasting daily foods for optimum nutrition. No artificial additives, MSG, colourings, preservatives or added refined sugar. Ethically sourced foods which support producer communities. Made using environmentally sustainable and non-GM ingredients. Once these have been met we then progress to the next step where we look for great taste and fantastic ingredients. In fact we will often ship our own ingredients to our producers so we can guarantee the finest quality and flavour. For example our Clearspring oil is used to make the organic oatcakes and our double strength, gluten free tamari is used in our snack organic range.

Fresh Vegan talks to Maria from Clearspring

We have certainly seen a rise in the awareness of good food in the UK as well as abroad and we believe that there are a number of driving forces such as health, travel, organic production and the ever increasing number of passionate foodies. Clearspring being an organic and vegan company ticks most of these boxes. Veganism has recently emerged as growing in popularity fuelling the demand for a wide variety of vegan foods. As well as those who are making the permanent switch to a plant based diet, more and more consumers are identifying themselves as ‘flexitarian’, choosing to eat a vegetarian or vegan diet for a portion of their time, in order to pursue a healthier diet and lifestyle. Consumers are also increasingly looking for more exotic tastes in response to demand for foreign cuisine and Clearspring is perfectly positioned to take advantage of this trend with their huge range of Japanese specialities.

Q

Do you import straight from the origins of your products or do they come via Europe for example?

We source our products direct from our producers, roughly half of which are based in Japan while the other half are in Europe but in all cases we import straight from our producers. Clearspring believes that this direct relationship is vital for a successful, reliable and trustworthy partnership.

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Q

On your website I read the following, “Christopher and his staff travel around the world in search of high quality products that meet Clearspring’s exacting standards.

Q

I am fascinated and pleased to see that some of your products are made by traditional methods and that some are recipes dating back 200-500 years or more. Especially living in an age of processed foods that contribute to environmental damage and are not sustainable; can you tell us about the products that date back to 200-500 years and why this is? We have a whole range of Japanese products including our misos and tamari which are produced by fifth and sixth generations using product recipes and techniques handed down from father to son and grandson to great- grandson.

Emphasis of these recipes are on fantastic ingredients, labour intensive procedures, slow traditional aging, natural fermentation processes and the philosophy that authenticity takes time.

Q

Do you have your line or range as you would like or are there more products you see Clearspring adding in the future?

“We celebrated our 20th anniversary last year so this year is all about consolidating our range, launching new exciting products and getting our customers to actually try our products. Whether this is through the publishing of recipes or exhibiting at consumer shows in 2014 we want to focus on demonstrating that Japanese ingredients are not daunting and can be used very easily in everyday cooking.” We work with some amazingly creative and innovative producers and there are already some fantastic new organic products in the pipeline so watch this space!

Q

What is your favourite product you sell and how do you eat this?

“My favourite meal is a sea vegetable salad with buckwheat noodles, washed down with a cup of genmaicha tea. Sea vegetables are so versatile and contain all of the 56 elements that are essential for human health including calcium, iodine, iron and zinc, together with important trace elements such as selenium, which are often lacking in land vegetables due to over-working of the soil. I also love to cook Asian dishes such miso, sushi and tempura.

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Organic Japanese Skinny Soba Somen Noodles Quick to cook, delicious flavour and easily digested, Clearspring Organic Skinny Soba Somen Noodles are satisfying and versatile. Artisan family producers slowly air dry and mature these noodles to concentrate their flavour. They can be used all year round in a wide range of Asian and Western dishes, including piping hot noodles in broth, satisfyingly rich stir fries, and succulent summer salads. Clearspring Japanese Noodles are made to traditional recipes, and are all egg-free and certified organic. What makes them special? Traditional, slow dried organic noodles from Japan. Dried at room temperature rather than artificially dried at 60-80 degrees. Authentically made using the roll and cut method, not by the conventional force extruded method. Firm, smooth noodles, satisfying and versatile Ingredients: Wheat flour* (57%), buckwheat flour* (40%), sea salt. *Organically grown Product weight - 200g Health Benefits of Soba The Japanese, after centuries of eating noodles, have developed a deep respect for the health enhancing properties of soba. Soba noodles are made using buckwheat, which despite its name is unrelated to wheat and contains no gluten.

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The amount of buckwheat in soba varies from 40% to 100% and it gives the noodles their characteristic dark colour and rich, nutty taste. Buckwheat also provides significant health benefits. Buckwheat contains about 12-15% protein, including the essential

amino acid lysine which is lacking in most cereal grains. Buckwheat also contains lipids, the minerals iron, phosphorus and copper and vitamins B1 and B2. Buckwheat is very high in rutin, which is an essential nutrient, not found in other cereal grains, that helps strengthen capillaries and support a healthy circulatory system. Rutin belongs to a group of plant compounds called bioflavonoids that recent studies (1) have shown act as powerful antioxidants. Choline, another important micronutrient found in buckwheat, plays an important role in metabolism, particularly regulating blood pressure and liver function. As a neutralizing agent, choline can support the liver when it is overburdened by alcoholic beverages (2). It makes sense that soba noodles and broth are often served in Japan after big parties and at the end of an evening’s drinking. How to make Skinny Soba Somen Noodles To prepare bring 2L of water to the boil, add noodles (100g per serving) and stir. Simmer for 3 minutes then rinse briefly under cold water. Serve all year round in hot broths, chilled with a dipping sauce or with a dressing for a fresh summer salad. Producer’s Story Our supplier has been producing Japanese dried noodles for over a century and celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2006. Production Process The key to the great tasting noodles is to allow plenty of time when mixing the dough and drying the noodles. They use a custom-made

super mixer, which mixes the dough at low temperatures for an hour and a half which promotes rapid gluten formation. This process will create the firm texture the Japanese call “Koshi” and the finished product is similar in style to the very traditional handkneaded noodle (“Teuchi” udon). The drying process is also important and our producer uses a chain slow air dryer. This slowly air dries and matures the noodles to concentrate their flavour. Another advantage of using this type of dryer is that they can adjust the air speed for different kinds of noodles. Combined with their experience and craftsmanship, they are able to produce consistently good quality noodles throughout the year in different seasons, temperatures and humidity. Nowadays the majority of noodle producers make production efficiency a priority – one whole day is usually enough to mix, dry and pack the noodles. In contrast, our producer spends 2 days on thin noodles (e.g. somen and soba), and 3 days on udon and this is just the time taken to dry them!!


Organic Japanese Soba Noodles

Quick to cook, delicious flavour and easily digested, Clearspring Organic Soba Noodles are satisfying and versatile. Artisan family producers slowly air dry and mature these noodles to concentrate their flavour.

They can be used all year round in a wide range of Asian and Western dishes, including piping hot noodles in broth, satisfyingly rich stir fries, and succulent summer salads. Clearspring Japanese Noodles are made to traditional recipes, and are all egg-free and certified organic. What makes them special? Firm & nutty noodles Authentically made using the roll and cut method, not by the conventional force extruded method. Traditional, slow dried organic noodles from Japan. Dried at room temperature rather than artificially dried at 60-80 degrees.

dark colour and rich, nutty taste. Buckwheat also provides significant health benefits. Buckwheat contains about 12-15% protein, including the essential amino acid lysine which is lacking in most cereal grains. Buckwheat also contains lipids, the minerals iron, phosphorus and copper and vitamins B1 and B2. Buckwheat is very high in rutin, which is an essential nutrient, not found in other cereal grains, that helps strengthen capillaries and support a healthy circulatory system. Rutin belongs to a group of plant compounds called bioflavonoids that recent studies (1) have shown act as powerful antioxidants. Choline, another important micronutrient found in buckwheat, plays an important role in metabolism, particularly regulating blood pressure and liver function.

Takes 2 days just to dry the noodles Cooks in 5 minutes. Made from Semi wholewheat flour including the Aleurone layer which is rich in minerals, vitamins and dietary fibre Contains 40% buckwheat flour (57% wheat flour) Low fat, source of fibre

As a neutralizing agent, choline can support the liver when it is overburdened by alcoholic beverages (2). It makes sense that soba noodles and broth are often served in Japan after big parties and at the end of an evening’s drinking.

Ingredients: Wheat flour* (57%), buckwheat flour* (40%), sea salt. *Organically grown

How to make Japanese Soba Noodles

Product weight - 200g Health Benefits of Soba The Japanese, after centuries of eating noodles, have developed a deep respect for the health enhancing properties of soba. Soba noodles are made using buckwheat, which despite its name is unrelated to wheat and contains no gluten. The amount of buckwheat in soba varies from 40% to 100% and it gives the noodles their characteristic

a half which promotes rapid gluten formation. This process will create the firm texture the Japanese call “Koshi” and the finished product is similar in style to the very traditional handkneaded noodle (“Teuchi” udon). The drying process is also important and our producer uses a chain slow air dryer. This slowly air dries and matures the noodles to concentrate their flavour. Another advantage of using this type of dryer is that they can adjust the air speed for different kinds of noodles. Combined with their experience and craftsmanship, they are able to produce consistently good quality noodles throughout the year in different seasons, temperatures and humidity. Nowadays the majority of noodle producers make production efficiency a priority – one whole day is usually enough to mix, dry and pack the noodles. In contrast, our producer spends 2 days on thin noodles (e.g. somen and soba), and 3 days on udon and this is just the time taken to dry them!!

To prepare bring 2L of water to the boil, add noodles (100g per serving) and stir. Simmer for 5 minutes then rinse briefly under cold water. Serve all year round in hot broths, chilled with a dipping sauce or with a dressing for a fresh summer salad. Production Process The key to the great tasting noodles is to allow plenty of time when mixing the dough and drying the noodles. They use a custom-made super mixer, which mixes the dough at low temperatures for an hour and

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Organic Japanese Brown Rice Udon Noodles

Quick to cook, delicious flavour and easily digested, Organic Brown Rice Udon Noodles are satisfying and versatile. Artisan family producers slowly air dry and mature these noodles to concentrate their flavour.

They can be used all year round in a wide range of Asian and Western dishes, including piping hot noodles in broth, satisfyingly rich stir fries, and succulent summer salads. Clearspring Japanese Noodles are made to traditional recipes, and are all egg-free and certified organic. What makes them special? Traditional, slow dried organic noodles from Japan. Dried at room temperature rather than artificially dried at 60-80 degrees. Authentically made using the roll and cut method, not by the conventional force extruded method. Firm, smooth noodles, satisfying and versatile Ingredients: Wheat flour* (87%), brown rice flour* (10%), sea salt. *Organically grown Product weight - 200g Health Benefits of Udon The main constituent of Udon is carbohydrate. Carbohydrate is the nutrient found in rice, bread, and noodles, which changes to glucose and glycogen in the body. Glycogen becomes both a physical and mental energy source. Compared to other foods, Udon is digested very quickly and rapidly becomes a source of energy for our mind and body. Thus, Udon aids in increased performance when concentration and thinking are required. Udon is suited for lunch as a healthy afternoon energy source in place of coffee.

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In testing the effect of Udon, three different types of noodles: Ramen, pasta, and Udon, were served to three men separately and their body temperatures were checked. Right after eating the noodles, all of their temperatures rose. After 2 hours, the temperatures of the two men who ate ramen and pasta had decreased but the person who ate Udon maintained the increased temperature. Although all of the noodles were eaten hot, Udon helps maintain body temperature, and is effective for cold. This is due to Udon’s quick digestibility. The three types of noodles were soaked in digestive enzymes at the body temperature of 37.5 degrees Celsius. After two hours, only Udon was completely digested. It is digested at a speed three times as fast as beef. Therefore, Udon is recommended for people who have colds and/or weakened digestive function. How to make Brown Rice Udon Noodles To prepare bring 2L of water to the boil, add noodles (100g per serving) and stir. Simmer for 9 minutes then rinse briefly under cold water. Serve all year round in hot broths, stir-fries or chilled with a dipping sauce.

Production Process The key to the great tasting noodles is to allow plenty of time when mixing the dough and drying the noodles. They use a custom-made super mixer, which mixes the dough at low temperatures for an hour and a half which promotes rapid gluten formation.

This process will create the firm texture the Japanese call “Koshi” and the finished product is similar in style to the very traditional handkneaded noodle (“Teuchi” udon). The drying process is also important and our producer uses a chain slow air dryer. This slowly air dries and matures the noodles to concentrate their flavour. Another advantage of using this type of dryer is that they can adjust the air speed for different kinds of noodles. Combined with their experience and craftsmanship, they are able to produce consistently good quality noodles throughout the year in different seasons, temperatures and humidity. Nowadays the majority of noodle producers make production efficiency a priority – one whole day is usually enough to mix, dry and pack the noodles. In contrast, our producer spends 2 days on thin noodles (e.g. somen and soba), and 3 days on udon and this is just the time taken to dry them!!


Organic Japanese Udon Noodles Quick to cook, delicious flavour and easily digested, Organic Udon Noodles are satisfying and versatile. Artisan family producers slowly air dry and mature these noodles to concentrate their flavour. They can be used all year round in a wide range of Asian and Western dishes, including piping hot noodles in broth, satisfyingly rich stir fries, and succulent summer salads.

Clearspring Japanese Noodles are made to traditional recipes, and are all egg-free and certified organic. What makes them special? Firm, smooth noodles, satisfying and versatile. Authentically made using the roll and cut method, not by the conventional force extruded method. Traditional, slow dried organic noodles from Japan. Dried at room temperature rather than artificially dried at 60-80 degrees. Takes 3 days to dry the noodles Cooks in 10 minutes. Made from Semi wholewheat flour including the Aleurone layer which is rich in minerals, vitamins and dietary fibre. Low fat, source of protein Ingredients: Wheat flour* (97%), sea salt. *Organically grown Product weight - 200g Health Benefits of Udon The main constituent of Udon is carbohydrate. Carbohydrate is the nutrient found in rice, bread, and noodles, which changes to glucose and glycogen in the body. Glycogen becomes both a physical and mental energy source.

Compared to other foods, Udon is digested very quickly and rapidly becomes a source of energy for our mind and body. Thus, Udon aids in increased performance when concentration and thinking are required. Udon is suited for lunch as a healthy afternoon energy source in place of coffee. In testing the effect of Udon, three different types of noodles: Ramen, pasta, and Udon, were served to three men separately and their body temperatures were checked. Right after eating the noodles, all of their temperatures rose. After 2 hours, the temperatures of the two men who ate ramen and pasta had decreased but the person who ate Udon maintained the increased temperature. Although all of the noodles were eaten hot, Udon helps maintain body temperature, and is effective for cold. This is due to Udon’s quick digestibility. The three types of noodles were soaked in digestive enzymes at the body temperature of 37.5 degrees Celsius. After two hours, only Udon was completely digested. It is digested at a speed three times as fast as beef. Therefore, Udon is recommended for people who have colds and/or weakened digestive function.

the noodles. They use a custommade super mixer, which mixes the dough at low temperatures for an hour and a half which promotes rapid gluten formation. This process will create the firm texture the Japanese call “Koshi” and the finished product is similar in style to the very traditional hand-kneaded noodle (“Teuchi” udon). The drying process is also important and our producer uses a chain slow air dryer. This slowly air dries and matures the noodles to concentrate their flavour. Another advantage of using this type of dryer is that they can adjust the air speed for different kinds of noodles. Combined with their experience and craftsmanship, they are able to produce consistently good quality noodles throughout the year in different seasons, temperatures and humidity. Nowadays the majority of noodle producers make production efficiency a priority – one whole day is usually enough to mix, dry and pack the noodles. In contrast, our producer spends 2 days on thin noodles (e.g. somen and soba), and 3 days on udon and this is just the time taken to dry them!!

How to make Udon Noodles To prepare bring 2L of water to the boil, add noodles (100g per serving) and stir. Simmer for 10 minutes then rinse briefly under cold water. Serve all year round in hot broths, stir-fries or chilled with a dipping sauce. Production Process The key to the great tasting noodles is to allow plenty of time when mixing the dough and drying

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Organic Japanese Wide Udon Noodles Quick to cook, delicious flavour and easily digested, Organic Wide Udon Noodles are satisfying and versatile. Artisan family producers slowly air dry and mature these noodles to concentrate their flavour. They can be used all year round in a wide range of Asian and Western dishes, including piping hot noodles in broth, satisfyingly rich stir fries, and succulent summer salads.

Clearspring Japanese Noodles are made to traditional recipes, and are all egg-free and certified organic. What makes them special? Firm, smooth noodles, satisfying and versatile. Authentically made using the roll and cut method, not by the conventional force extruded method. Traditional, slow dried organic noodles from Japan. Dried at room temperature rather than artificially dried at 60-80 degrees. Takes 3 days to dry the noodles Cooks in 10 minutes. Made from Semi wholewheat flour including the Aleurone layer which is rich in minerals, vitamins and dietary fibre. Low fat, source of protein Ingredients: Wheat flour* (97%), sea salt. *Organically grown Product weight - 200g Health Benefits of Udon

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The main constituent of Udon is carbohydrate. Carbohydrate is the nutrient found in rice, bread, and noodles, which changes to glucose and glycogen in the body. Glycogen becomes both a physical and mental energy source. Compared to other foods, Udon is digested very quickly

and rapidly becomes a source of energy for our mind and body. Thus, Udon aids in increased performance when concentration and thinking are required. Udon is suited for lunch as a healthy afternoon energy source in place of coffee.

In testing the effect of Udon, three different types of noodles: Ramen, pasta, and Udon, were served to three men separately and their body temperatures were checked. Right after eating the noodles, all of their temperatures rose. After 2 hours, the temperatures of the two men who ate ramen and pasta had decreased but the person who ate Udon maintained the increased temperature. Although all of the noodles were eaten hot, Udon helps maintain body temperature, and is effective for cold. This is due to Udon’s quick digestibility. The three types of noodles were soaked in digestive enzymes at the body temperature of 37.5 degrees Celsius. After two hours, only Udon was completely digested. It is digested at a speed three times as fast as beef. Therefore, Udon is recommended for people who have colds and/or weakened digestive function. How to make Udon Noodles To prepare bring 2L of water to the boil, add noodles (100g per serving) and stir. Simmer for 10 minutes then rinse briefly under cold water. Serve all year round in hot broths, stir-fries or chilled with a dipping sauce. Production Process The key to the great tasting noodles is to allow plenty of time when mixing the dough and drying the noodles. They use a custom-

made super mixer, which mixes the dough at low temperatures for an hour and a half which promotes rapid gluten formation. This process will create the firm texture the Japanese call “Koshi” and the finished product is similar in style to the very traditional hand-kneaded noodle (“Teuchi” udon). The drying process is also important and our producer uses a chain slow air dryer. This slowly air dries and matures the noodles to concentrate their flavour. Another advantage of using this type of dryer is that they can adjust the air speed for different kinds of noodles. Combined with their experience and craftsmanship, they are able to produce consistently good quality noodles throughout the year in different seasons, temperatures and humidity. Nowadays the majority of noodle producers make production efficiency a priority – one whole day is usually enough to mix, dry and pack the noodles. In contrast, our producer spends 2 days on thin noodles (e.g. somen and soba), and 3 days on udon and this is just the time taken to dry them!!


Organic Japanese Soba - 100% Buckwheat Delicious versatile wheat free noodles with a rich, nutty buckwheat taste. It is known as ‘Juwari Soba’ in Japanese, meaning 100% soba. Ingredients: Buckwheat *Organically grown

flour*

(100%).

Product weight – 200g Health Benefits of Soba The Japanese, after centuries of eating noodles, have developed a deep respect for the health enhancing properties of soba. Soba noodles are made using buckwheat, which despite its name is unrelated to wheat and contains no gluten. This pyramid shaped grain comes instead from the seed of a broad leaf plant related to the rhubarb family which was first grown in Japan about 1,500 years ago. The amount of buckwheat in soba varies from 40% to 100% and it gives the noodles their characteristic dark colour and rich, nutty taste. Buckwheat also provides significant health benefits. Buckwheat contains about 12-15% of protein, including the essential amino acid lysine which is lacking in most cereal grains. Buckwheat also contains lipids, the minerals iron, phosphorus and copper and vitamins B1 and B2. In fact buckwheat contains as much vitamin B1 as brown rice and nearly twice the levels of B1 found in wheat.

are often served in Japan after big parties and at the end of an evening’s drinking. Clearspring offers three types of soba noodles: a classic Organic Japanese Soba (typically 40% buckwheat & 60% wheat) a special Organic Japanese Skinny Soba Somen and an exceptionally rich, Organic Japanese Soba - 100% Buckwheat that is wheat free. All noodles are made using organic ingredients and traditional methods including slowly air drying the noodles over several days. Decreases cholesterol Lowers blood pressure Reduces fat accumulation Promotes healthy bowel movements Fits a well-balanced and low-calorie diet Buckwheat is also a low glycemic index food and ideal for the GI diet. Cooking 100% Soba noodles As these noodles do not contain any gluten they are much more brittle than standard soba noodles and should be cooked gently. Add the noodles after your water has come to a boil, then add cold water to the pot periodically until cooked to avoid the noodles breaking apart. Stir- frying is not recommended. Enjoy it hot or chilled in dashi - a shoyu soy sauce kombu broth, with a dipping sauce or in refreshing salads. Alternatively wrap it in toasted nori to make delicious noodle sushi.

Buckwheat is very high in rutin, which is an essential nutrient, not found in other cereal grains, that helps strengthen capillaries and support a healthy circulatory system. Rutin belongs to a group of plant compounds called bioflavonoids that recent studies (1) have shown act as powerful antioxidants. Choline, another important micro-nutrient found in buckwheat, plays an important role in metabolism, particularly regulating blood pressure and liver function. As a neutralizing agent, choline can support the liver when it is overburdened by alcoholic beverages (2). It makes sense that soba noodles and broth

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How to make Soba Sushi

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Soba Sushi

A tasty, light alternative to traditional sushi with rice. Makes 24 rolls (4 to 5 persons) Ingredients 25g Clearspring Shiitake Mushrooms 2tbsp Clearspring Toasted Sesame Oil 2tbsp Clearspring Tamari Soya Sauce 250g Clearspring Soba 4 Clearspring Sushi Nori Clearspring Wasabi - to taste Method

1. 2.

Cook the soba as instructed on the pack. Drain and put them into a bowl of cold water.

Using the thumb and index finger, take some noodles from the bowl and make a 20-22 cm long and 2cm thick bundle. Leave it to drain on a clean tea towel. Repeat until no noodles are left in the water and ensure the bundles are all of a similar size.

3.

Soak the shiitake mushroom in cold water. Once rehydrated, cut the stem off and discard. Thinly slice the cap.

4.

In a saucepan, heat the toasted sesame oil and add the mushrooms. Leave to cook on a medium heat for a few seconds. Add tamari and cover with a lid. Turn off the heat and leave to one side.

5. 6.

Mix the wasabi powder into a paste with a little water.

Place a nori sheet on a sushi mat in front of you and place the noodles on it horizontally. Use as many bundles of soba noodles as necessary to cover almost the whole nori sheet, leaving 2 cm free at the top.

7. 8. 9.

Place a line of shiitake and a line of wasabi next to it. Roll using the same method as the rice sushi roll. Cut the rolled soba noodles in 6 pieces starting with the middle.

Use the end pieces of the roll as decoration. Recipe by Ohka-san

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Beyond Sushi New York

B

eyond Sushi is a healthy lifestyle brand offering a fresh approach to traditional sushi.

Husband and wife owners, Guy and Tali Vaknin have created a 100% vegan sushi eatery with two locations in Manhattan.

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“I wanted to offer patrons a unique and exciting ‘experience’ when dining at Beyond Sushi,” says Guy Vaknin, “an enticing and ethical way of eating well while nourishing your body and soul.”


A

t Beyond Sushi, we strive to promote an all-natural diet by pairing locally-grown, fresh ingredient together and crafting delectable works of art: Each bite being consistent with the last. Beyond Sushi commits to a sustainable and cruelty-free environment with an excellent customer service.

“Sushi, which originates in Japan is a dish that refers to a specially prepared rice, not the raw fish itself” This is commonly mistaken among frequent restaurant-goers. Each vegetable-and-fruit sushi gem at Beyond Sushi is wrapped with forbidden black rice or a six- grain rice medley and topped off with colorful tofu, fruit, and housemade veggie pureés. “You do not have to be vegan to enjoy our menu,” says Tali, ”It’s all about taking a moment to detox from your daily eating habits and enjoying something wholesome. After all, it’s a fun way of enjoying your essential fruit and vegetable servings.” Beyond Sushi 229 E 14th Street NYC https://beyondsushinyc.com

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I n t e r v i e w Q

: Your Rolled Sushi is unique in that it uses Nori inside rather than outside that we are used to seeing, does this have a name and why is this?

The reason we put the rice outside because it allows us to put more ingredients in the rolls. Most of the flavours come from the ingredient inside and not the rice. It makes our food more interesting.

Q

: Beyond Sushi – The Green Roll, what does this mean?

We offer something very different from the usual sushi rolls, hence the name Beyond Sushi. We stand for a green company by using biodegradable packaging and recycling building materials. We’re also vegan so we don’t use any fish or animal products in our business, which benefits the environment and helps lessen overfishing. We want to be healthy and green. And that’s what our name means.

Q

: Your signature roll uses six grains, and in this you use black rice can you tell us a bit more about where this comes from and why you decided to use this mixture? Black rice originated in Asia. It’s also called Chinese Forbidden Rice because it was only served to the emperor (since it was rare and highly nutritious). Black rice is gaining its popularity recently among vegans and vegetarians because it has more protein and dietary fibre in each serving than other types of rice. The high nutritional value was the first reason that I chose to use it. For the six-grain rice mixture, I like to use barley and rye berries because of their texture. It tastes very different when it’s cooked in the mixture.

Q

: How do you make sure your product is as Earth friendly and sustainable as possible?

We try to buy local produce as much as possible. Also, our packaging uses recycled materials and is biodegradable.

Q

: You opened in 2012 and already have your 2nd location, what is next for you.

A third location is coming very soon. Probably a fourth location is right after that. And let’s not even talk about Beyond Tacos.

FV

: Ooh Beyond Tacos, we are really loving the sound of that. Exciting.

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Green Machine

Six Grain rice, English Cucumber Asparagus basil marinated veggies topped with jalapeno wasabi

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Mighty Mushroom Six Grain rice, Enok Tofu Shiitake Micro Argula Topped with Shiitaki Teriyaki

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Nutty Buddy Buckwheat Noodles Cashews Carrots Cilantro Japepeno Peanut Butter Avacado Sesame oil Tofu Romaine Served with Sweet Soy Mirin

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Spicy Shroom Buckwheat Noodles Enoki Romaine Teriyaki braised shiitaki Grilled Portabella Pickled Ginger Cashews Served with Shiitaki Teriyaki

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Verde Salad Carrots Cashews Romaine lettuce Asparagus Seaweed salad Sliced nori Avocado Sauce... Chili Mango Carrot Ginger, and Sweet Soy Mirin

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BEYOND SUSHI SIX-GRAIN RICE This recipe requires soaking the rice overnight, so plan ahead! The blend is not gluten free. Ingredients: Beyond Sushi Six-Grain Rice Blend Pearl Barley Hulless Barley Rye Berries Red Rice Short Grain Brown Rice Black Rice 4 1/2 oz Rice Wine Vinegar 2 1/4 oz Agave 1/3 Fresh Squeezed Lemon 1/3 Fresh Squeezed Orange 1/3 Fresh Squeezed Lime 2 2/3 cup Cold Water

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Preparation: Portion in a large bowl and soak in water In a separate bowl, mix together: Rice wine vinegar, Agave and all of the citrus juices.

After rice finishes cooking, take: Rice wine vinegar, Agave, Citrus juices and mix in with the rice

Refrigerate both bowls overnight

This makes a great rice bed for your green salads or nutritious and flavorful rice for your own healthy sushi rolls.

Day Two: Drain & Wash grains thoroughly and place in a rice cooker Add the 22/3 cup of cold water Cook for 50 minutes and remove rice from cooker and place in a large bowl to cool down

Finished & ready to serve!

Beyond Sushi have been voted 8th best vegetarian/Vegan Restaurant in New York www.beyondsushinyc.com/


Zen Salad Avocado English cucumber Mango Romaine lettuce Portabella Cashews Cilantro Sauce... Chili Mang Carrot Ginger Jalape単o Peanut Butter

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Vegan Miam

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Rika

is the recipe developer, food blogger and parttime photographer behind vegan miam. She runs a vegan food and travel blog with her photographer and partner Doni. Rika + Doni are based in Oregon, but living elsewhere as often as possible. The term “miam” is just a way of saying ‘yummy’ in French and represents their desire to discover decadent vegan cuisine and recipes around the world together. Follow vegan miam on Bloglovin’, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr and Twitter Visit the website... www.veganmiam.com 73


About Japanese Curry, or Curry Rice You may have seen these boxes of instant Japanese curry roux everywhere, it’s definitely convenient to prepare. However, it is better to make your own Japanese curry from scratch, knowing the ingredients you use and making it absolutely tastier, plus why not make it also vegan and of course with a gluten-free option? Japanese curry is one of Japan’s most popular meals, when served over rice, it’s also known as karē raisu. Traditionally a Japanese curry uses three core vegetables potato, onion and carrots along with a ‘meat’, but I believe a Japanese curry is delicious when it’s vegan and made with an assortment of vegetables. Add deep-fried and breaded ‘mushrooms’, ‘seitan’ or ’tofu’ to make it a katsu-karē, which is a traditional Japanese deep-fried breaded ‘cutlet’ with curry sauce. For the curry powder, you can use any of the following: 1. S & B Oriental Curry Powder (available at Asian supermarkets) 2. I used Morton & Bassett Organic Curry Powder (available at big supermarkets) 3. Steenbergs Organic Curry Powder

About Mitarashi Dango Originated from the Kamo Mitarashi Tea House in Kyoto near the Shimogamo Shrine, Mitarashi dango is a popular Japanese snack consisting of mildly sweet glazed rice dumplings skewered onto sticks. Typically these dumplings are served 3-5 per skewer (traditionally 5). You can find them everywhere in Japan including convenience stores and supermarkets. This type of dango is easily made vegan and gluten-free. The savory and sweet caramelcoloured sauce is known as mitarashi sauce. The sauce pairs well with the bland, slightly sticky and chewy dango, or unfilled mochi dumplings. There are a few Japanese ingredients required to make this: mochiko (sweet rice flour), katakuriko (potato starch) and mirin (Japanese sweet rice wine) that you migh tnot be familiar with. Mochiko is a sweet rice flour (also called glutinous rice flour). It is readily available at Japanese and/or Asian supermarkets. I prefer the Koda Farms brand which comes in a small white box. Do not confuse glutinous rice flour with “gluten”, it is naturally gluten-free. Katakuriko is a Japanese potato starch, but also known as potato starch and used as a starchy thickening agent. Please note, potato starch and potato flour are two separate ingredients. Lastly, mirin is a versatile ingredient used in Japanese cuisine. It’s a sweet rice wine similar to sake but with lower alcohol content and higher sugar content and used in a mitarashi sauce. It helps to add a mild sweetness to sauces and glazes. Do not confuse “sweet rice flour” or “glutinous rice flour” with “rice flour”; they are distinctively different. If you choose to omit firm silk tofu, use 1/2 cup warm water or less depending on consistency of the mixture.

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Vegan Japanese Curry, or Curry Rice vegan, gluten-free option (see Notes) 4 servings

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons neutral oil (i.e., sunflower) 1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced 5 ounces carrots, cut into 1-inch chunks (about 3-4) 2 garlic cloves, crushed and minced 4 cups water 10 ounces Yukon Gold potatoes, cut into 1-inch chunks (about 2) 1 small Braeburn, Fuji or Gala apple, peeled, cored and grated (about 5 ounces) 2 teaspoons Oriental curry powder (see Notes) ¼ cup soy sauce or tamari 1 teaspoon salt ½ cup frozen peas and/or corn (optional) 2 tablespoons cilantro leaves, chopped (optional) 2 scallion greens only, chopped (about ¼ cup) toasted sesame seeds, for garnish (optional) For the Roux: 3 tablespoons neutral oil (i.e., sunflower) ¼ cup all-purpose flour (see Gluten-Free option in Notes) 2 tablespoons Oriental curry powder (see Introduction to Curry Rice) 1 tablespoon organic ketchup 1 tablespoon sweet soy sauce (see Gluten-Free option in Notes)

Method:

1.

Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil over medium heat in a large soup pot or Dutch oven and add the onions and carrots. Cook, stirring often for about 6-8 minutes until onions are translucent. Add garlic and continue to cook for another minute, until fragrant. Add the water, bring to a gentle boil, cover and reduce the heat to medium low and simmer for about 10 minutes. Carefully remove foam as it forms. When there is no more foam, add the ingredients in the following order: potatoes, grated apple, curry powder, soy sauce or tamari, and salt. Simmer about 25 to 30 minutes until the vegetables are nearly tender.

2.

Meanwhile, make the roux. In a small saucepan, heat the oil over low heat, add the flour and cook until slightly browned for 1 minute. Add the curry powder, ketchup and sweet soy sauce. Increase heat to medium and continue to cook for 1 to 2 minutes until the roux mixture is bubbling. Remove from heat immediately. Add a ladleful of simmering water (about ½ cup or more) from the “vegetables” pot into the roux and stir constantly with a whisk until the roux mixture is smooth. Add more if needed, then transfer the roux mixture to the “vegetables” pot. Stir constantly until the curry is smooth. Add the frozen peas/corn (optional) and simmer for a few minutes.

3.

Just before serving, stir in the cilantro and scallions. Serve over rice with sesame seeds.

Notes: Advance Preparation: Japanese Curry is best served the day it’s made, however this will keep for a couple of days in the refrigerator. For the curry powder see the intro to “about Curry Rice” Makes about ⅓ cup: 1 tablespoon mirin 1½ tablespoons maple syrup 1 tablespoon tamari 2 tablespoons lukewarm water 1 teaspoon potato starch In a small saucepan, combine all ingredients except starch. Bring to gentle boil over medium heat. Reduce heat to low and stir, about 2 minutes. In a small bowl, mix starch with 1 tablespoon water and add to pan. Stir with a wire whisk until mixture begins to thicken. Remove from heat immediately and set aside. Transfer to an airtight container and store for up to two weeks. Spicy version: Add ½ teaspoon ground Thai chili peppers or 2 red/green chillies (seeded & finely chopped) in the roux, add more if needed.

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Vegan & Gluten-Free Mitarashi Dango (Sweet Glazed Japanese Skewered Rice Dumplings) vegan, gluten-free Makes about 1 dozen dumplings, enough for 2 servings

Ingredients:

3½ oz (100g) Mochiko (sweet rice flour) 1 tablespoon katakuriko or potato starch 4¼ oz (125g) firm silken tofu 1 teaspoon vegan cane sugar, ground to a fine powder rounded ½ teaspoon salt 3 bamboo skewers black sesame seeds, for garnish (optional) For the Glaze (makes about ⅓ cup): 1 tablespoon mirin 1½ tablespoons maple syrup 1 tablespoon tamari 2 tablespoons lukewarm water 1 teaspoon katakuriko or potato starch

Method:

1.

In a large bowl, sift together the flour and starch and add sugar. Using your hands, mash the tofu and add to the mixture. Mix together well until dough is smooth and

soft, neither sticky or too dry. Divide the dough into 12 balls (about 1- 1¼ inches in diameter) and set aside.

2.

Fill a large bowl with cold water and ice cubes. Bring a medium pot of water to a boil and add salt. Cook in few batches, carefully dropping the dumplings, one by one, into the boiling water and cook until they float to the surface, 3 to 4 minutes. Continue to cook, about 5 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to remove dumplings and immediately transfer to the ice bath and let cool for 2 to 3 minutes. Drain and thread 4 to 5 dumplings onto each skewer. Heat a grill or grill pan (rub a little bit of oil on the pan). When it is hot, cook skewers, turning several times, until lightly charred or browned.

3.

Meanwhile make the sauce. In a small saucepan, combine all ingredients except starch. Bring to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat to low and stir, about 2 minutes. Mix starch with 1 tablespoon water and add to pan. Stir with a wire whisk until mixture begins to thicken. Remove from heat and set aside. To serve, arrange skewered dumplings on a plate and drizzle with sauce and black sesame seeds (for texture).

Notes:

Advance Preparation: Mitarashi Dango is best served the day it’s made, however cooked dumplings will keep in an airtight container for two to three weeks in the freeze. To use frozen dumplings, thaw at room temperature or microwave before grilling. To store your remaining dumplings in the freezer, pat them dry, separate and place in an airtight container with enough space to avoid your dumplings freezing together. Mochiko flour and katakuriko are readily available at Asian supermarkets. If not available, look for “sweet rice flour” and “potato starch.” Do not confuse “sweet rice flour” with “rice flour”; they are distinctively different. To omit firm silk tofu, use 1/2 cup warm water or less depending on the mixture. Where to find the ingredients in the UK: www.macrobioticshop.co.uk www.thekindfooscompany.co.uk

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“Happy Maki is all about high quality, forward thinking and healthy sushi with zero compromise in flavour”. The menu is half vegan and they believe passionately in offering people truly sustainable sushi whilst raising awareness of ocean fish stock issues and providing an alternative to tuna and farmed salmon or prawns.

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Su –shi means seasoned rice after all and not raw fish, they serve it as Futo Maki rolls which translated means “fat maki”. Maki rolls have the seaweed (nori) on the outside with the rice and fillings rolled up on the inside. Traditionally this roll is served sliced into pieces, instead they serve them whole for easy on the go eating and reduced packaging. With Happy Maki presentation and atmosphere is everything and they create from the glorious “Gloria” a fully renovated

1979 Renault Estafette.

“I saw Happy Maki at VegFest London 2013 and loved their food and their healthy fast food streetfood stall, and you know we love our Streetfood at Fresh Vegan Magazine! So I had to have Happy Maki in one of our issues, vegan streetfood stands are not all equal and really glad to see


We do a lot of the “Foodies Festivals”, mass participation sports events such as “Run To The Beat” and I’ve dabbled in the small music festival scene. A lot of the time its the city just as much as the event that makes a difference, for example I love going to Bristol they just seem to get it. The best way to keep track of where we are going to be is to follow us on twitter @thehappymaki and we will of course be at London Veg Fest 2014. Looking forward I would like to do more of the larger festival circuit next year with a fully vegan menu.

Q.

Where did you learn how to make sushi as the rice is an art?

It’s all about the rice and if it is not spot on it really affects the quality of the sushi. When I decided to start the business I went on an intensive training course in London with “Your Sushi School”. This taught me what I should be aiming for and how the rice should look and taste.

“Gloria” Q.

So Anna tell us what made you decide to make half your menu at Happy Maki vegan?

The motivation behind starting Happy Maki came from a love for the ocean and concerns over ocean fish stocks. Sushi is growing hugely in popularity world wide so I wanted to show people that it didn’t have to include fish. When experimenting with fish free menu ideas vegan rolls came naturally to me. I think with sushi the key is fresh, light and clean flavours that are much easier to achieve when not using cooked meat or dairy products. My first ever event was Veg Fest in Bristol 2013 and I loved catering for this audience. Vegetarian food is my personally preferred cuisine and I strongly support the important environmental arguments for a plant-based diet. The health of the ocean is hugely affected by the meat and dairy industry so a meat only menu just wouldn’t make sense. With all this in mind it is very important to me that our menu is half vegan and also that our meat options are meat light. Looking forward I would love to make Happy Maki a fully vegan business it’s just finding the right events to make it work.

Q.

Do you feel it encourages non vegans or vegetarians to try these options who may not have ordinarily? Yes I definitely believe that our vegan wraps, especially the Thai Sweet Potato option, it attracts just as many meat eaters as it does vegetarian and vegans, which is really great to see. When this is chosen I normally ask whether the customer is meat free or not, I’d say it’s about half and half which is really encouraging. I also believe that people choose us when they are looking for a healthier option, which is more and more is being associated with vegan and vegetarian food. There is also a mixed box on the menu which means meat eaters try the vegan option too and they are always pleasantly surprised, it’s all about changing opinions slowly but surely.

Q.

Do you do streetfood events or are you more of a festival gooer? Where can the general public find you in other words .

I am still trying to fine tune where our ideal market is. I have spent the first year and a half going to as many different types of events as possible.

It took me a while to crack as it depends on a lot of factors such as the rice cooker you’re using, the amount of rice you’re cooking and the amount of time you leave the rice on to steam. Through trial and error I found the perfect start to finish method, its nice to open the rice cookers each time and not be scared of what I’m going to find!

Q.

How is prepping for a hand-made product like this at events?

It’s very time intensive both before and on event days. Even something like the avocados making sure they are the right ripeness and of a good quality requires good planning. There is a lot of chopping involved and there is only so much you can do before hand as it’s important that all ingredients are as fresh as possible. On the event days I am usually the first on site, washing and cooking all of the rice. During the event our sushi is all hand rolled to order. There is a limit to the speed at which we can work especially considering there are over ten tantalising ingredients in each roll. However I have always found that people are willing to wait that extra minute or two for good food that is freshly prepared right in front of their eyes. This also gives me valuable time to chat to every customer, which is one of my favourite parts of the job.

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Thai Sweet Potato Sushi serves 4

Ingredients. Sushi Rice, Nori Sushi Rice Seasoning 1 large Sweet Potato Desiccated Coconut 1 Cucumber 1 Ripe Avocado Corriander 1 Red Pepper Teriyaki Sauce Optional Wasabi Pickled Ginger. Equipment Pot with lid/ rice cooker Wooden/ plastic dish to mix rice in. Wooden/ plastic spoon to mix rice & seasoning. Bamboo rolling matt Clingfilm Sharp knife . Step 1 : Peel and chop the sweet potato into large chips. Roast - 40 minutes at 200 (alternatively you can deep fat fry them for 5 minutes) Place a cup of desiccated coconut onto a baking tray and roast for 4 minutes or until golden brown. Step 2 : Wash 2 cups of Sushi rice until water runs clear and place in a pot with 2 cups of cold water so a one to one ratio of rice to water. Put the cooker on full heat for 5 minutes after which you should hear the water boiling. Turn heat down low and leave rice to simmer for a further 15 minutes – at no point should you remove the lid. Once the 15 minutes is up turn the heat off and leave the rice to steam for a further 15 minutes. Step 3 : Whilst the rice is cooking you can prep the fresh veg. Cucumber: Cut to the length of the Seaweed (longest side), half and then quarter the cucumber length ways, deseed and chop each quarter into a further 3 long

pieces. Peppers: De-seed, chop in half then quarters then thirds lengthways as above. Avocado: Cut in half and remove stone, cut into quarters. Peel skin from top to bottom and further chop the thirds into 5 slices. Step 4 : Remove the rice from the pot and place in a non-metallic container using a non metallic spoon. If there is rice stuck to the bottom of the pan don’t worry, just leave it as you don’t want chewy rice in your sushi. Step 5 : Add half a cup of sushi rice seasoning and mix this into the rice breaking up any balls and ensuring all grains are coated with a the vinegar creating a sheen on the rice. (N.B. If you are using rice vinegar mix half of cup of this with 2 tablespoons of sugar and two teaspoons of salt in a pot on medium heat until all solids are dissolved to create your own sushi seasoning) Step 6 : Let the rice cool to room temperature, this process can be speeded up by fanning the rice but do not put it in the fridge! Preparing the sushi: 1. Cover the bamboo mat in cling film. 2. Place the seaweed rough side down with the longest side at the bottom. 3. Dip your fingers in a bowl of water with a splash of rice vinegar and shake off excess drops this is help stop the rice sticking to your hands. 3. Take a tennis ball sized amount of rice and spread this evenly across the seaweed covering all the green apart from a one inch strip along the top of the sheet. 4. Lay the sweet potato out along the centre of the rice and add the other ingredients, cucumber, red pepper, avocado and coriander on either side –

place the cucumber furthest away. 5. Sprinkle a generous amount of roasted coconut on top of the ingredients. Rolling the sushi: 1. Ensure that the bottom of the seaweed is lined up to the bottom of the bamboo. Place both thumbs underneath the mat and your forefingers on the cucumber to hold the fillings in place. 2. Aim to get the edge of seaweed closest to you rolled over to meet the top edge of the rice. 3. Once rolled into place squeeze tightly on the ingredients using your thumb and fore fingers. I find trying to create a square roll is a lot easier as you can use the surface to help shape the base and your fingers to shape the sides and top. 4. Take the bamboo off and examine the shape of the roll, if you’re happy roll the Maki away from you so that the strip of nori that is still exposed is now on the bottom of the roll. 5. Use the bamboo matt to finally reshape. 6. Cut the Sushi into slices, using a sharp wet blade. Let the knife do the work and don’t put to much pressure on the sushi with your non-cutting hand. 7. Each roll should produce 10 pieces, and try and ensure that these are cut to the same width. Don’t worry if the ends collapse slightly, it happens and they still taste the same! 8. Serve with dipping teriyaki sauce , wasabi and ginger. N.B. If your roll falls apart when you cut it you may have used too much filling – it is essential that the bottom rice edge meets the top rice edge to create a seal. You should see a perfect ring of rice around your fillings.

Email: contact@happymaki.co.uk Web: http://www.happymaki.co.uk Phone: 07737230468

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Aux vivres Montreal QC Canada Our goal We support At Aux Vivres, we have been steadily increasing our use of organic produce and grains; we strive to balance including organic ingredients with supporting local farms, in order to minimize our carbon footprint.

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Therefore, we occasionally choose local produce over organic produce that has to be shipped from thousands of miles away (for instance, carrots raised by a local Québec farmer instead of organic carrots from California).

Offering locally grown food, which helps enable a sustainable local food economy, and a viable living for Québec farmers. Including organic proteins like tofu and tempeh and super grains like organic rice and quinoa as the foundation for our “bowls” menu. Never using genetically modified ingredients or artificial preservatives.


The Boys

“At Aux Vivres, we draw real energy and inspiration from our team of talented, creative and friendly young Montréalers. Our employees, hailing from Quebec and abroad, are dedicated to making and serving high quality, creative meals in a warm, vibrant atmosphere.” 83


Q

How long have you been running Aux Vivres?

For 5 years now.

Q

What does the name mean?

The food that you need to survive

Q

How long has Aux Vivres been running and what was the idea behind this? 1997, The Idea was to promote healthy vegan food. We see our self 84 as a comfort food restaurant

that introduces people to something different.

Q&A

Q

We have all sorts of dishes, from the Macro bowl served with sea weeds, to the AuxVivres burgers served with potatoes wedges

People all over the world love to know where there are great vegan restaurants, fast food and cafes, it creates a great network and creates new businesses by inspiring people, are there many vegan food locations where you are?

We can offer a variety of choices that will welcome meat lovers and hardcore vegan. Ultimately, we wants to give the best taste combine with a great service!

They are more vegan business opening every years but still most of them or located in the same area, Le Plateau, Le Mile-end and Downtown.

It is a very slow process but it is getting more and more in demand.

Q

What is the favourite dish

The dragon Bowl with Tempeh: a lot of veggies, carrot, beets, red cabbage, sprouts, brown organic rice, oraganic tempeh from http://noblebean.com/ and our famous dragon sauce mostly made out of nutritional yeast.


The Dragon Bowl

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Preparing the Sushi Quinoa Prepping your veggies

Making the rolls

Ingredients

Step 1

You want to prepare this first, it takes a while to cook and a while to cool down enough to handle without burning yourself.

Red Quinoa -1 cup Water -2 cups Seasoned rice vinegar -2 tbsp

Method

I like to use traditional vegetables in my sushi rolls but don’t be scared to throw in anything you might like. here are some of my go to classics.

Ingredients

Carrots -1/2 large Cucumber -1/4 large Avocado -1 Kale sprouts -1 handful

Bring 2 cups of water to a boil and add the red Quinoa. Lower the heat to a simmer, cover and wait 20 minutes.

Roll. Starting from the bottom, lift the sushi mat and fold over the nori so that all the veggies, Tempeh and sushi quinoa are inside the roll. Lift the mat and continue to roll forward. If you have any trouble, youtube is a great teacher for these types of things.

Tempeh is a delicious source of protein but needs to be marinated accordingly to get the right flavour for this recipe. Here’s a quick marinade to bring your Tempeh to the next level. You can either grill, steam or bake the Tempeh to get it cooked up. I like to steam it for 20 minutes and then touch it quickly on the grill to get some colour and extra flavour.

Whisk together all ingredients except Tempeh. Cut the cooked Tempeh into strips and add them to the marinade to let them soak. You can soak them anywhere from 5 minutes to overnight. This all depends how much time you have on your hands.

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Add 1/2 cup of the sushi Quinoa on the nori sheet and spread it out evenly on 3/4 of the seaweed from the bottom to the top. Leave a little space on top of the nori with no quinoa, this will make it easier to roll in the end.

Step 4

Preparing the Tempeh marinade

How to

Step 2

Add your prepped veggies and cooked / marinated Tempeh

Transfer the Quinoa into a separate bowl to cool and mix in the rice vinegar.

Wheat free Tamari -1/4 cup Water -1/4 cup Onion powder -1 tbsp Sesame oil - 1/2 tsp Tempeh (cooked) -1/2 brick (120g)

Place your nori sheet on the sushi mat with the shiny side down.

Step 3

After the 20 minutes, shut of the heat and remove the cover.

Ingredients

Now comes the fun part. Rolling them might seem difficult at first but no matter what they look like, they are guaranteed to taste great!

Step 5 How to

Eat.. Some garnish and sauce ideas: Wasabi veganaise: Add desired amount of wasabi powder to your veganaise. We make our own but you can easily find this stuff at a grocery store.

Slice the carrots into thin matchsticks or shred them with a box grater. Whatever is easier for you.

Pickled vegetable salad: Grab all the leftover bits of chopped veggies you have and add little rice vinegar, fresh green onions and some black sesame seeds.

Slice the cucumber into small matchsticks. I tend to only use the harder outside part for the rolls and I keep the softer inside part for my salad.

Boom, a side salad is born!

Cut the avocado into slices and add a little splash of lemon juice to keep them from turning brown. Wash your sprouts and they are ready to go.

Ginger and lemon Tamari: Tamari can be very salty so add a little fresh lemon juice and a couple drops of fresh ginger juice to have a perfect dipping sauce for these rolls.


info@auxvivres.com

www.auxvivres.com

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Vegan in Africa

Luke Berman has been vegan for over 7 years and is passionate

about wildlife conservation, animals and specifically primates. Currently out in Kenya he is volunteering with Colobus Conservation as a filed researcher for six months, following the rare Angolan black and white colobus monkey. When he returns to London in September he will begin his masters in Primate Conservation at Oxford-Brookes University. Luke is also an ambassador at Wild Futures and runs their London group to raise vital funds and to work to stop the legal primate pet trade. He loves to cook, especially making vegan versions of traditionally dairy rich meals to show people how easy (and tasty) a vegan’s cuisine can be.

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A vegan in Kenya, what could I possibly eat? of the common mans price range. Products like Kimbo (like vegetable Lard) are found in every house, which is based on vegetable oils; mainly corn, soy and palm.

Kenyan Dishes

As I am in a coastal region where Coconuts grow abundantly, it is used in a lot of dishes, whereas further inland it is not, due to price and availability. There were a lot of dishes I could have choose from, but I have gone for the ones that are eaten every days by all the local people.

Ugali

No Kenyan meal would be right without Ugali, this is a very simple staple throughout the country that people say is made best by west Kenyans. It is Maize Meal (or Unga wa Sima) mixed with boiling water until you get a thick porridge that sets into a cake. It is the centre piece of the meal placed in the middle of the table; you take a bit with your hand and roll it into a ball, then using your thumb, make an indent and use it to scoop the food.

Not only were they right but most people in Kenya eat a majority vegan diet. This is mainly due to the climate enabling them to grow all sorts of fruits and vegetables locally and the price of animal products is usually too high for the common man.

Omari has been the chef at Colobus Conservation for 3 years and gets to make a range of classic Kenyan dishes with some European ones as well. He has always loved to cook and has a great interest in pastry cooking like breads and black forest chocolate cake. His favourite cuisine is British as he learnt a lot of what he knows under the chefs at the hotels in Diani, a popular tourist destination. In the morning he likes to have black tea with ginger with Mandazi and when he gets home it’s Ugali with anything; usually Sukuma Wiki.

Recipe Serves 4

Ingredients

Ingredients

Method

This is down to the fact animal products are more expensive and therefore out

Recipe

Serves 4

Canned beans can be used, but using fresh beans always tastes better. Soak the beans overnight in a lot of water.

Method 1. Put beans, salt, and water in a pot

This means I could walk into any local restaurant and order many dishes that are vegan; not bad at all.

Interestingly in the UK I would struggle to sometimes find basic vegan cooking ingredients, but here every little wooden shack has something I can use.

One thing I did know about African cuisine was that at some point beans would be included, and I love beans. This is a simple and a tasty dish to be served alongside Ugali, as it is perfect for soaking up the sauce.

Ingredients: 1 cup dried red kidney beans (soaked overnight) ¾ cup coconut milk ¼ cup finely chopped onions 1 tbsp. crushed ginger 1 cup chopped tomatoes ½ tsp. salt ¼ cup additional coconut milk 1 to 3 tbsp. vegetable oil

Our Chef

When I was inquiring about coming out to Kenya for six months I was concerned about what I could eat, I mean I did not know much about Kenyan cuisine; but I was assured that it was not going to be a problem.

Maharagwe

3 to 4 cups of Water 4 cups of Maize Meal 1. Boil 3 cups of water and then add the Maize Meal, constantly stirring to avoid lumps. 2. Add more water or Maize Meal till you get a thick porridge consistency. 3. When ready turn pot upside down onto a plate, it should hold its shape.

(water should be about 1 inch above the beans) and bring to a boil. 2. Once the beans boil, cover the pot and simmer on medium-low heat. Add water as needed to maintain the level. 3. When the beans are almost cooked (a good 1 - 2 hours), heat oil in a different pan, sauté onions, and stir until brown. Stir in ginger and cook for 1 minute. 4. Add tomatoes, lower heat to medium-low, and cover the pot. Simmer until the tomatoes soften. Use a cooking spoon to press the tomatoes while cooking to soften them quickly. 5. Add coconut milk and beans. Continue to cook until soft. 6. If the water cooks away before the beans are cooked, add the extra coconut milk. 7. The liquid should be at the same level as the beans when the beans are ready to serve

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Sukuma Wiki Sukuma Wiki

Sukuma Wiki is one of my favourites, especially as it uses kale which is so good for you and I always like finding out new ways of cooking it. Again this is traditionally eaten with Ugali and is eaten daily.

Recipe

Serves 4

Ingredients

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3 tablespoons of Oil 1 Onion 1KG of Kale (can be Spinach) 2 cups of chopped tomatoes 1 cup of veg stock Salt and Pepper Corn flour (if thickening is required)

Method

1. Heat the oil over medium-high flame in a large, heavy-bottomed pot. Dice up the onion; add to the pan and sautĂŠ until translucent. 2. Next add the Kale (Spinach) in batches, sautĂŠing each addition until wilted. 3. Then add the tomatoes, stock, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, and then reduce heat to low and simmer gently until tender, from 20 to 30 minutes. 4. Adjust seasoning, add the corn flour mixed with a little water if it needs to be thickened, should only be a bit of broth left with the dish, mainly served dry.

Variation

Use coconut milk instead of stock


Kachumberi

Kachumberi

This is a really simple and tasty salad that incorporates some exciting ingredients that I would not have thought of putting together. What you are left with is a really zingy salad that can be adapted for how hot you like things.

Recipe

Serves 4

Ingredients 5 tomatoes, thinly sliced 2 small onions, thinly sliced 1 red or green chilli, de-seeded (or not depending on how hot you like it) and cut lengthways into fine slivers Large handful of coriander, finely chopped Juice of 1 lime 3 tbsp olive oil Black pepper Method

1. Place the tomatoes, sliced onions,

chilli and coriander into a large serving bowl.

2. Mix together the limejuice and olive oil and toss this mixture through the salad.

3. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper and serve immediately. This is the traditional version, but shredded cabbage or carrot can be added.

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Ndizi za Nazi (Bananas with Coconut) This for me is the perfect dessert, healthy, quick, tasty and incorporating two of my favourite ingredients, Bananas and Coconut. I had never boiled bananas before making this dish and now it is all I can think about; great instead of instead of sugary, processed rubbish

Recipe Serves 4

Ingredients

4 very ripe bananas (showing a lot of black/brown colour 1 cup of coconut milk 1 Teaspoon of freshly ground Cardoman Corn Flour

Method

1. Boil a pot of water. 2. Leaving the bananas in their skins cut the top and bottom off and place them in the water; remove when colour is golden and have gone soft (5-10 mins) 3. Meanwhile put the coconut milk on to boil, add the Cardoman and then the corn flour (first mixed with a little water) to thicken up the consistency to a thin cream. 4. When bananas are ready take them out and slice them length ways in half, then pour the coconut milk over them. 5. You can serve the bananas in the skin or out and in a big dish or on individual plates; two halves per person.

“There was so much more I could have included like their take on Chapati’s, the lovely Mandazi (like an unsweetened doughnut), Green Grams, Coconut potatoes and Coconut or Pilau Rice” Drinks

Black tea with Ginger or a Masala spice mix (Nutmeg, Cinnamon, Cloves).

Common Beers

Tusker and Whitecap both Vegan.

Cider

you have Savannah verified Vegan.

Soft drinks

Stoney (like Ginger Ale) Crest (like lemonade). Why not have a Kenyan food night with friends and family and show them how tasty simple vegan food can be. Please do let me know about how your evening went, what you like, what you didn’t and any improvements. lberman101@gmail.com www.lukemberman.blogspot.com

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The Natural Woman

by Marlene Watson-Tara

Nothing is as important as a sense of humour when it comes to aging ‘naturally’. I personally prefer to look at the process of aging as a journey towards wholeness where all aspects of our being are cultivated and balanced. Make no mistake women like to feel beautiful. The women’s beauty industry is a mega billion dollar empire. Still, there is more to beauty than cosmetics, clothes, perfumes and accessories. Natural women hold the key to real womanly beauty. What is a natural woman? The definition is as wide and deep as the person themselves. Being comfortable in your own skin so to speak, and feeling a deep connection with something bigger than yourself, is how I define a natural woman.

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For me, that has always been the deep connection I have felt with nature since I was a child. You may have heard the expression or even categorized someone as, ‘she is so natural’. That describes women who are comfortable in who and what they are. They can be versatile. They can be driven. They come from all walks of life but they know deep within who they are. No matter what they are and do, natural women are always themselves. The most beautiful women always are. It’s also a woman who lives her life in a way that sees her take responsibility for her own health by adopting a lifestyle that creates good health and equilibrium in a natural way.

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atural women have an aura about them. It flows effortlessly from them. They are not afraid of their emotions. They prefer to be guided by Mother Nature’s remedies than succumb to various

types of medication or hormonal treatments. Without a doubt, women have unique health issues to manage. Hormonal imbalance can contribute to a host of problems including weight gain, unstable mood or a stressful temperament. Hormones are a powerful force in both our physical and emotional life but they can be influenced by diet, exercise and state of mind. Now you can learn the secrets of “Happy Hormones” and how they affect our day to day life What are hormones? A hormone is a chemical released by a cell or a gland in one part of the body that sends out messages that affect cells in other parts of the organism.


Only a small amount of hormone is required to alter cell metabolism. In essence, it is a chemical messenger that transports a signal from one cell to another. All multicellular organisms produce hormones; plant hormones are also called phytohormones The reason why I love what I teach, is the fact that Traditional Chinese Medicine and Macrobiotics both recognise that good health is the key to long life. Rather than seeking an elusive ‘Fountain of Youth’, it combined various health practices to promote well-being, with both body and mind, into old age in a natural way. The Jing, our original essence, is a core focus for health and longevity. I designed my Natural Woman Programme to explore ways to nourish and control ...the Jing and create ‘happy hormones’. Lifestyle habits and environmental influences can weaken and deplete this essence or vitality and create hormone imbalance, something all the more relevant in our modern times. There are so many practical approaches to learn for our personal wellness that can easily be adapted into our everyday life. Key lifestyle and dietary guidelines should be our main focus. Learning simple but special exercises and a powerful set of home remedies as well as cooking specific dishes to support adrenal exhaustion, which will help to preserve our Jing are of key importance. All of the fore-mentioned definitely work and will enrich your life. Making decisions about your health takes on a whole new meaning when you know what you want to do with your life and who you want to be, doesn’t it? Let’s talk about diet a little bit. I’ve studied eastern nutrition, different diets from other cultures, and various other studies for 35 years. You will probably know that eating a wholefoods plant based diet keeps your

blood sugar from spiking. Rapid changes in blood sugar levels stimulate cravings, which lead to weight gain, and increase the likelihood of systemic inflammation, which leads to chronic degenerative diseases. .

food feels good in the moment, but man alive does it mess with your hormones!!! And it really doesn’t support the person you ultimately want to be , a happy, whole individual with a satisfying life.

You can also avoid the hormone disruptors by eating a wholefoods plant based diet and eating only foods that nature intended. I’m sure you also know it’s almost impossible to stay fit, healthy and trim without exercise, and that even a little exercise goes a long way.

It is no secret that relationship crises are a common side effect of hormonal problems. Usually this is attributed to the crazy-making effects of the hormonal shifts occurring in a woman’s body at a time of menstruation or transition to peri-menopause and menopause.

Those who know me will testify that I have

“Nothing is as important as a sense of humour when it comes to aging naturally” always been in love with exercise and have taught many different forms over the years. From teaching aerobics and being the ‘Jane Fonda’ of the 70’s in Scotland with matching head band and leg warmers and a Farah Fawcett hairdo, lordy! The things we do! Ultimately, reaching and maintaining healthy body composition and vibrant health through the right food choices and exercise happens in both your mind and body. What you eat—and when—affects your emotions and spirit as well. Ignoring the emotional component of weight gain (or loss) can sabotage you when you’re in the midst of the diet wars. Bingeing on ‘junk’

I am sure many of you will have experienced this familiar scenario at the ‘time’ of the month.

So how can we balance our hormones through food? Phytoestrogen (plant oestrogens) are a class of compounds found in plants that, in humans, have a similar effect to oestrogen. Phytoestrogens include such compounds as isoflavones. Phytoestrogen rich natural foods include soybeans, flaxseed, linseed, most wholegrains, mung beans, alfalfa sprouts, cabbage, broccoli, berries and seeds. Tofu, green leafy vegetables also help towards keeping our hormones balanced. Miso and tempeh provide enzymes and phytoestrogens. Sea vegetables build bones and provide vitamins and minerals in abundance. The list is extensive but most of us never learn how to be in control of our health destiny and live a long healthy life. We live in a society that believes that we protect our health with access to medical care and drugs; it doesn’t work. It has been made cheap and easy to eat poorly, and the ‘myth’ abounds that it is more difficult to eat healthfully but it’s not true. We can only win with our health if we look to what nature provides, not with more money put into medical interventions and drugs, but by unleashing the powerful tools found in our kitchens.

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What makes us ‘tick’ in a simple and practical way?

I love to laugh

and I hope you will see the humour in many of my messages. As women, it is not part of our biological makeup to value a specific ideal body shape or role as we age. These are definitely culturally determined as you will see in magazines.Everyone looks like a supermodel. As our perceptions shape our emotions they affect our physiological, psychological and spiritual well-being. Since what we think and feel about ourselves exert an energetic influence on both our psyche and soma, try and make these thoughts all wonderful.

suffer from which shows up as hormone imbalance, fatigue, sluggish metabolism, and an urge to eat all the time. Just like the rust on a car, our bodies rust on the inside too. Numerous studies have shown that a wholefoods plant based diet neutralizes acid overload bringing your alkalinity into perfect balance and paving the way for truly astonishing health improvements in your life. This way of eating also balances our hormones which are key to health and happiness. Natural healing starts in the kitchen It’s never fun being told what to eat – we all know that we should be eating more fruits and vegetables and cutting

It’s good to remind ourselves at this point that the body is a community of cells – these cells are connected by body fluids and energy – the energy of the body (the chi) nourishes and connects all body functions. Please make it a number one priority to love yourself no matter what so you have healthy chi flooding your body daily. Are you a Plum or a Prune? When you were a new born baby, you were at the height of your health. Your arteries were clear, your skin perfect and everything in your body was operating at peak efficiency. I like to use the analogy of a plum and a prune because it fits so perfectly and makes such sense to me. We are luscious little plums when we are born but dry out as we age which is a natural process of aging (but much earlier) that we should. This is due to lack of hydration and eating a typical western diet that is filled with processed foods. Our cells become starved. But, it’s not all bad news. We can reduce and remove the dried out condition and acid overload that we

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down on sweets and meats, reducing our intake of salt, sugar and saturated fat and boosting our consumption of fibre….. When your body is well nourished your appetite goes down, chronic hunger is often a sign your body is starved of nutrients!!! There is lots of convincing scientific data testifying to that, but it doesn’t work unless the food is tasty and varied. That is why a big part of being a natural woman is focused on cooking. Preparing and cooking delicious meals can be easy, fun as well as rewarding.

For superior health, natural wholefoods such as green vegetables, fresh fruits, seeds and nuts, whole grains and beans or legumes should all be consumed each day. To achieve adequate micronutrient density both animal products and processed foods if you use them must be restricted to much lower levels than they are now, and eventually eliminated. Without a doubt both cause hormonal imbalances. The most amazing and satisfying aspect of promoting a natural high micronutrient diet style, and utilizing it as natural medical therapy is watching hormonal imbalance and many diseases melt away. People faced with health challenges can often improve and even obtain complete recoveries from autoimmune diseases, digestive disorders, type 2 diabetes, headaches and heart disease to name a few, via nutritional excellence. The human body is a miraculous, self-healing machine when the optimal nutritional environment for healing is realized. If we live and eat in perfect harmony with Mother Nature we live in a more enriched way of being. When we watch nature’s energy rising and falling through each season it should be a guideline to all of us how we can best cope with the food that becomes available, preferably grown locally. In my natural woman home remedies menu in this article I have included something to nourish you from the inside and a delightful treat for the outside. Enjoy both. In my ‘Natural Woman’ residential workshop you can experience a gentle and relaxing get-away at the same time. Aretha Franklin (you make me feel like) a natural woman will be singing her heart out at our welcome dinner! Not in person however!


“Food is the most intimate thing you can buy...Unlike clothes and shoes that dress the outside, food goes into your body and builds who you become.” – Ani Phyo The Natural Woman Course is a great way to have lots of fun, make new friends and learn how your body loves all that nature has to offer us. We will also cook together delicious and nutrient dense specific dishes and make some super home remedies to keep our hormones balanced.

Rejuvenate Your Skin with a Simple Seaweed Mask This simple facial mask will leave your face feeling incredibly soft, smooth and looking absolutely radiant. This mask contains kelp, coconut oil, and aloe vera. Seaweeds have been traditionally used to detoxify the body both internally

and externally. They are rich in nutrients which help to both tone and nourish the skin. Seaweed contains mineral salts that can help the skin to hold its moisture better, which helps to smooth fine lines. Sea vegetables deliver incredible minerals and trace minerals; this creates an alkaline environment in the body which delivers good health. You know there is collagen in the skin, right! And everyone is looking for great looking skin. It was recently reported that wakame, which is what I use in my daily diet and is one of the popular sea vegetables used in making miso soup has an inhibitor of the substance that breaks down the collagen. So, this food keeps the collagen strong, another of nature’s treasures for us to incorporate into our natural woman lifestyle.

Coconut Oil

an excellent moisturizer and skin softener. Virgin coconut oil comes straight from the source of fresh coconuts. It’s affordable and easy to use, rivaling conventional moisturizers that contain chemical additives and preservatives. All-natural virgin coconut oil is loaded with antioxidants that keep the skin smooth and supple.

Aloe Vera has been known for its amazing healing properties for centuries. It has been used to help heal burns, eczema, sores, acne, insect bites, and more. It’s an antiseptic, highly lubricant, and penetrates deep into the skin.

Benefit from these ingredients by creating this simple mask: 1 tbsp. Kelp powder ½ tbsp. Coconut oil ½ tbsp. Aloe vera gel (99.9% pure) Mix all ingredients in a bowl and apply to a clean face. Leave the mask on for 15 minutes and rinse with lukewarm water. To enjoy glowing, healthy looking skin, use this mask twice a week. I promise you will enjoy this mask and make it a regular part of your beauty regime.

“Let Food Inspire a New You”

“A natural life, when all is said and done, really will achieve astonishing results that medicine cannot rival. Clean air and water, nutritious food, moderate activity, a little walk in the sunshine and a good night’s sleep is all you need. ‘Magic is believing in yourself’ If you can do that you can make anything happen... Enjoy being a Natural Woman” www.marlenewatsontara.com/

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The Hormone Balancing Food Plan

• Eat at least 3 meals a day plus 2 snacks • Focus on Portion size, not calories – chew well • Maintain a constant blood sugar level • Eat natural foods rich in Phytoestrogens • Include good sources of vegetable protein: Beans, Tofu, Tempeh, Seitan • Drink Filtered Water, Kukicha, Sencha Green Tea or Herbal Teas, • Eat a wide selection of Cooked and Raw Foods • Lightly cooked fresh vegetables and Vegetable Juices • Dark Green Leafy vegetables • Sprouted Seeds such as Alfalfa and Mung Beans • Pressed Salads and Pickles • Colourful fruits in season • Almonds, walnuts, sunflower and pumpkin and sesame seeds • Kidney and other types of beans • Seaweeds • Shitake and Maitake Mushrooms • Miso/Shoyu/Tamari • White meat fish (unless vegan/vegetarian, like me) • Wholegrains, Short Grain Brown Rice, Millet, Quinoa ,etc., • Soba & Udon Noodles • Naturally sweetened desserts (occasionally) using barley malt or rice syrup • Go Organic • Have Good Fats and Oils

Eat Hormone Friendly by eliminating the following foods from your diet. • Refined Carbohydrates • Processed Foods • Alcohol and Caffeine • Non-organic fruits and vegetables • MSG Soy Sauces • All commercial seasonings • Coffee (try grain based) • Sugar laden drinks and juices • Meat • Dairy • Sugar

My suggestion to you all regarding soya would be to use it as a fermented product as in miso, tempeh, shoyu (natural soya sauce) and avoid soya milk, soya yoghurt, soya cheese and many of the other processed soya products that we have now in supermarkets and natural food stores. Soya beans are hard to digest hence the reason why it is best to use them when fermented. The only way I use processed soya beans are in tofu. I occasionally use soya milk in puddings as it has a thicker consistency than rice milk. In cereals however I use rice or almond milk. You will find more information on the subject of soya on Fresh Vegan Blog post

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Millet & Tofu Bake with Pressed Chicory, Radish & Cucumber Salad ½ cup millet (already cooked) ½ pack of tofu marinated overnight in a little fresh ginger juice/shoyu/garlic 1 onion finely sliced 2 medium carrots finely sliced half-moons 1 tbsp. sunflower seeds 2 tbsp. shoyu 1 tablespoon brown rice vinegar 1 tsp sesame Oil Sauté the onions and carrots in sesame oil for about 5 minutes or until soft. Remove the tofu from the marinade and crumble with your hands into a bowl. Add the onions, carrots, and millet and sunflower seeds. Add the shoyu and brown rice vinegar. Mix together and transfer to an oven proof dish. Bake for 20 minutes on a medium heat.

Pressed Salad Cucumber finely diced Chicory finely sliced Radishes sliced half-moon ½ tsp sea salt 1 tsp. umeboshi Vinegar Combine the ingredients together in a salad press and close and press the salad for one hour. If you don’t have a salad press simply place ingredients in a bowl, cover and place a heavy weight on top. Serve the tofu bake in a small bowl garnished with the pressed salad and sprinkle with black toasted sesame seeds. (The bake is supposed to be crumbly) Marlene is a regular contributor to the fresh vegan blog: www.freshvegan.eu/blog/ Or go to her website For details of her “Natural Woman” Workshops: www.marlenewatsontara.com/

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Soba Salad with Asian-Style Dressing by Marlene 1 pack soba noodles 1 pack tempeh, cut into one inch cubes 1 tbsp. finely diced fresh ginger 1 tsp shoyu 1 tsp mirin ¼ cup spring water ½ cup carrot cut into matchsticks 1 cup bean sprouts ½ yellow bell pepper, cut into thin strips 2 spears asparagus, cut into 3 inch strips ¾ cup shredded purple cabbage Toasted white sesame seeds, for garnish

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Asian-Style Dressing 3 tbsp shoyu 3 tbsp mirin 2 tbsp brown-rice vinegar 1 cup spring water or vegetable stock 1 tsp sesame oil Make dressing by warming the shoyu, mirin, brown rice vinegar and water or stock in a pot for a few minutes over medium heat, do not boil the mixture. Set aside to cool, then add the sesame oil and whisk thoroughly to blend.

Boil the soba according to the packet instructions, drain and rinse under cold water. Fry the tempeh in an oiled pan along with the ginger over medium heat for 2 to 3 minutes on each side.

Bring a small pot of water to a boil and pop a steamer basket on top. Steam the carrots, bean sprouts, bell peppers, asparagus and cabbage for 3 or 4 minutes. You want them still to have a ‘bite’

Remove from the heat, allow to cool for a minute or so, then add the shoyu, mirin, and water and cook on a low heat for 3 to 5 minutes, or until all the liquid has been absorbed.

Transfer the soba to serving dishes or bowls. Arrange the ingredients on top of the noodles and pour the dressing over. Top with sesame seeds.


Sarmado Sibley is unique

Interview by Day Radley

In

many ways. He is one of the few raw food chefs I have met who is classically trained and worked in traditional (i.e. non raw food) kitchens. He is also one of the calmest, kindest chefs and with a great passion for his craft. My years of working in kitchens made me form an idea of what an A-typical chef is - angry, stressful, negative and ego-led. Sarmado is entirely the opposite. He speaks about raw food with the greatest conviction and passion for his cuisine that is not only delectable but also entirely nutritious.

Sarmado

started his career at the young age of 15, working as an apprentice in a Michelin Starred restaurant in West Sussex in the UK. His dedication to the culinary arts enabled him to rise quickly to Head Chef in just five years. He went on to have a prestigious career in traditional kitchens, managing catering operations for large corporations and as head chef for A-lister events. In 2005 Sarmado visited India. This visit changed the course of Sarmado’s life. He found meditation and spirituality. This had a profound effect on his own inner personal development and it fed into how he approached his craft. The vegetarian food and Ayurvedic nutrition of India excited him, sowing the seeds of a mindset change of what food could be; healing, nutritious, flavourful and compassionate. The next year Sarmado experienced raw food in Thailand. With this he found more inspiration and a love for creating food that he had not felt for many years. He transitioned to vegan and raw, experimenting at home and teaching his friends. Sarmado said goodbye to traditional kitchens to set up Rawlovelife, offering 1-2-1 coaching, workshops, personal chef services and product development. 101


How long have you been a chef/ vegan chef?

I began training as a professional chef when i was fifteen as an apprentice in a Michelin starred hotel & restaurant here in the UK. It wasn’t until I was living in India nine years ago that I started getting excited about vegetarian food. It took a couple of years from that time until I fully embraced veganism. That was seven years ago.

How did you become a vegan chef?

I signed up for a raw food workshop which totally transformed my outlook. It was like a light bulb moment, I hadn’t felt that inspired about food for a long time. I started experimenting at home and sharing with friends who then asked me to start teaching them.

What training did you have?

Do you see the industry changing, regarding veganism?

Q&A

Veganism or working with plant based nutrition is a radically different approach to the conventional or classical chef training. It’s relatively new to most chefs and requires a shift of mindset. You have to research chefs and restaurants, use guides and the internet and also network in raw / vegan circles. The opportunities are out there if you connect with those that are living & working this lifestyle.

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I started writing to vegan chefs and going to workshops and events like Vegfest here in the UK.There’s also lots of great restaurants opening here now & magazines where you can contact the owners of businesses promoting veganism.

Sarmado Sibley

My training was in Michelin starred restaurants where the thought of a vegetarian being in the restaurant was a horror to the chefs. All of the food there was centred on meat, dairy, sugar and wheat so I had to start again and learn; educating myself in all things vegan. It’s the best thing I ever did. I attended as many workshops, talks and retreats as I possibly could.

What difficulties did you experience?

How did you overcome them?

Absolutely There is so much information now appearing in the mainstream media on the benefits of a plant based diet. Scientifically it’s proven how adopting this way of eating affects every aspect of our lives. New products are appearing on the shelves and people’s consciousness is shifting. Consumers are becoming so aware of what we’re doing to ourselves and the planet. They’re demanding a change and it’s exciting.

How do you think the industry should change?

There have been times when I thought that began vegan was something separate and it’s really not. We have the potential to make it something that’s healthy, sexy and cool. Making in-roads to conventional food businesses & restaurants with fashionable alternatives to what’s currently being served is the way forward. Again it’s back to networking..

What advice would you give an aspiring vegan chef? Read up on as many websites, books and materials you can get your hands on. The internet is great for this and then start actively contacting those you’d like to work or train with.


Lemon hemp seed milk

Maple Goji Living Granola Makes 10 cups of granola Ingredients 1 apple 1 & 1/2 cups date paste 1/2 cup maple syrup 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons orange zest 1 tablespoon vanilla extract 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 teaspoons Himalayan salt 1/2 cup sunflower seeds (soaked for 2 hours) 2 cups almonds (soaked for 4 hours) 3 cups pecans (soaked for 2 hours) 1 cup pumpkin seeds (soaked for 2 hours) 1 cup goji berries Method In a food processor place the apple, date paste, maple syrup, lemon juice, orange zest, vanilla, cinnamon, salt and a quarter of the sunflower seeds and grind until completely smooth.

Transfer the mixture into a large bowl. Add the remaining sunflower seeds, almonds, pecans and pumpkin seeds to the food processor. Coarsely chop the nuts and seeds in a few pulses. Add them to the bowl with the apple mixture, add the goji berries and mix well. If using an oven spread the granola on baking parchment and bake on the lowest setting for 10 hours or until completely dry. If using a dehydrator spread the granola on teflex lined dehydrator trays and dehydrate at 115 degrees for 6-8 hours. Break the granola into pieces and, once completely cooled, store in an airtight container. To maintain freshness store the granola in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks

Ingredients 6 cups whole hemp seeds 6 cups filtered / mineral / spring water One lemon Sweetener of choice ( dates or maple syrup) Method Soak the whole hemp seed overnight with the peeled zest of lemon In the morning rinse off. Place in the blender with the water and and process until the seeds are well broken down. Pour the contents through a nut milk bag and then it’s ready to serve. Use for mylk shakes, smoothies or over the granola.

Find Sarmado Sibley at: www.rawlovelife.com/

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Sunday Brunch

Organic Corn cakes aubergine bacon chilli tomatoes & marinated mushroom

Equipment required: Dehydrator, Food processor Ingredients 2 cups organic corn (ideally fresh from the cobs) 1/4 tsp Himalayan pink salt One medium sized peeled aubergine 1/4 tsp cumin powder 1/8 tsp smoked paprika 2 dsp olive oil 2 dsp Himalayan pink salt 4 Organic roma tomatoes 1 small chopped red thai chilli 1/2 tsp Himalayan pink salt 1/2 desertspoon olive oil 2 portabello mushrooms 2 desertspoons braggs liquid aminos Corn cakes Process the corn and salt together until smooth. Spoon onto dehydrator sheets and make 2� rounds. Dry for 4 hours on one side and then turn over and dry for another 2 hours until chewy Aubergine bacon After peeling the auberine cut into thin strips lengthwise and sprinkle with salt in a shallow dish. This will allow the bitter juices to be removed. Wash in filtered water and dry off. Mix the rest of the ingredients together and cover aubergine. Leave to marinade for 4 hours. Place the aubergine onto dehydrator sheets and dehydrate for 6 to 8 hours or until chewy. Chilli Tomatoes Slice the tomatoes and sprinkle with Himalayan pink salt & chilli. Place onto dehydrator sheets and dry for four hours. Drizzle with olive oil. Marinated Mushrooms; Peel and score the mushrooms with crosses on the flat side. Marinade in braggs liquid aminos for two hours. Place in the dehydrator for two to three hours or until soft. Additional notes & tips All of the vegetables can be dehydrated and stored for three days in the refrigerator and warmed n the mornings for two hours before serving.

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J

acqui reviews the book, talks to the authors, and shares some of the recipes with you I was excited and pleasantly surprised when this book arrived at Fresh Vegan HQ. After opening the package the first thing that struck me was the size and the bright vibrant matt cover which feels organic and pleasant to touch. At first I thought this would be great for the festive season and I’d put it in the last issue of 2014, but then I decided it’s great for anytime, given we all have parties, birthdays, celebrations and some of these dishes with a salad or some grains would be a meal in itself, and very easily adapted for your eating preferences. There is a comprehensive and full list of all the ingredients you will need, as well as full descriptions which is particularly great for new and transitioning vegans, as not everyone is familiar with the foods we so often take for granted, a that nice touch that I really liked. ! Recipes are clearly laid out and most of them have both the list of ingredients, and the “how to” on the same page, which makes for easy reading. There are also symbols on the pages for making ahead, quick and easy, gluten free, again really handy. I thoroughly recommend this book as a simple, quick and easy to prepare finger foods treasure trove, with fantastic ideas.

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Jacqui speaks to the Authors TAMASIN NOYES

is the author of American Vegan Kitchen, Grills Gone Vegan, Vegan Sandwiches Save the Day!, and Whole Grain Vegan Baking. She has worked as a committed cookbook tester for many wellknown vegan cookbook authors (such as Isa Chandra Moskowitz, Terry Hope Romero, Robin Robertson, Dynise Balcavage, and Kelly Peloza). She has also cooked in several restaurants

CELINE STEEN

is the co-author of 500 Vegan Recipes, The Complete Guide to Vegan Food Substitutions, Hearty Vegan Meals, Vegan Sandwiches Save the Day!, and Whole Grain Vegan Baking. She is the founder of the award-winning blog “Have Cake, Will Travel”,www.havecakewilltravel.com which brings in an average of 15,000 hits a week.

Can you tell our readers about yourselves and why you came together to write this book? Tami: As an author, I’d been an admirer of Celine’s books and blog for quite a while, and we struck up a friendship online.

It was a lot of fun having a co-author to bounce ideas off, and I think it makes for a complete book.

It took me that long to make the connection about the horrors of the dairy industry, which is a little embarrassing, but also shows that it’s never too late.

So we wrote a couple more books together, and then happened upon the finger foods Celine: I was an on and off vegetarian in the 90s. idea. We’re all really kids at heart, and it’s fun to I’ve always felt a strong kinship with animals, play with your food and eat with your hands. but it still took until 2005 for everything to finally click: The food I was eating was hurting When it’s fantastic vegan food, all the better! the animals I felt so strongly about.

Tell us about your backgrounds in food and catering?

Tami: Way back, I worked in a chain restaurant, and also an independent one.

After meeting a vegan couple and doing some research of my own, I realized that going vegan wasn’t as impossibly hard as I feared, far from it. I haven’t looked back since, and wouldn’t have it any other way.

But the best food experience I had was at a tempeh restaurant back in the mid 1980s. It was actually a tempeh company that also had Where currently are your homes? a café. I started making breads for them, and eventually worked in the kitchen. Celine: I have no background in the food industry; all I know about food and cooking, I learned from my mom, from personal experience, and from the many cookbooks or books related to the science of cooking and baking that I read along the way.

Are you both Vegan? And when did you become Vegan? Tami: I went vegetarian back in 1980. I became what I call a committed vegan in 2004.

Tami: I live in Ashtabula, Ohio, which is a small town in a big state. It’s mostly rural which makes for some great farmers markets. We’re about an hour away from Cleveland, which is becoming more vegan-aware all the time. Celine: I live in Southern California, in a smallish city not especially known for its vegan-friendliness. Thankfully, Los Angeles isn’t too, too far, with its many vegan food establishments.

Before long, we were bouncing around book Vegan Finger Foods is available in all good ideas, which lead to Vegan Sandwiches Save Between 1980 and 2004, we had periods of Booksellers - Support your local book shops the Day, our first book. being vegan, but also sometimes ate dairy.

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Recipes from the book

Baked Jalapeños Creamy filling is hidden by a crunchy coating, all inside a spicy jalapeño, making an easy snack with layers of flavor and texture. If desired, serve these with the Rasta Salsa (page 16 of the book). Safety first: Wear plastic gloves when handling the peppers! Yield: 16 to 24 pepper halves, 2⁄3 cup (200 g) filling

For the filling

1⁄2 cup (70 g) raw cashews, soaked in 1⁄2 cup (120 ml) water for 3 hours, drained 1⁄2 cup (131 g) cooked navy beans 2 tablespoons (30 ml) vegan dry white wine 2 tablespoons (30 ml) fresh lemon juice 1 tablespoon (8 g) nutritional yeast flakes 2 teaspoons ume plum vinegar 1 teaspoon light miso 1⁄2 teaspoon onion powder Salt and pepper, to taste

For the peppers

Nonstick cooking spray 8 to 12 medium-size whole jalapeño peppers 2 cups (56 g) organic cornflakes, crushed 1⁄2 cup (40 g) whole wheat panko crumbs Rasta Salsa, for serving

To make the filling:

Combine all the ingredients in a blender or food processor, and process until completely smooth. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour for the flavors to meld. Taste and adjust the seasonings. This can be made up to 4 days in advance. Store covered in the refrigerator. If baking right away, preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C, or gas mark 6). If preparing in advance, the peppers may be stuffed and coated, then refrigerated for 24 hours before baking.

To make the peppers:

Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking spray. Cut the peppers in half and remove the seeds. Fill each half with up to 1 tablespoon (17 g) filling, depending on the size of the halves. Stir together the cornflakes and the panko on a plate. Dip the filling-stuffed side of each pepper into the cornflake mixture, patting the crumbs to adhere to the filling. Bake the peppers for 20 minutes, until the crumbs are golden brown and the peppers are slightly deflated. Serve with the salsa.

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Corn fritters with tomato-thyme gravy

We like to serve these with Tomato Thyme Gravy, but if you’re short on time, just spike some vegan mayonnaise with hot sauce, and dip away! If you happen to have extra gravy, save it to pour over a tofu scramble, or use it as a dip with the Baked Frittata Minis (page 72 in the book). Yield: 16 to 18 fritters, 2 cups (470 ml) gravy

For the fritters

1⁄2 cup (60 g) garbanzo flour 1⁄4 cup (31 g) all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons (15 g) fine cornmeal (not corn flour) 1⁄2 teaspoon baking powder 1⁄2 teaspoon ground cumin 1⁄4 teaspoon dried thyme 1⁄4 teaspoon paprika 1⁄4 teaspoon fine sea salt Generous pinch ground black pepper 1 cup (135 g) frozen corn kernels, thawed 2 tablespoons (14 g) finely grated carrot 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon (4 g) minced chives, plus more for garnish, if desired 1⁄4 cup (60 ml) unsweetened plain vegan milk, more if needed High-heat neutral-flavored oil, for cooking

To make the fritters

Combine the flours, cornmeal, baking powder, spices, salt, and pepper in medium-size bowl. Whisk to combine. Stir in the corn, carrot, and chives, followed by the milk. The mixture will be sticky, but it should be shapeable. If not, add an extra 1 tablespoon (15 ml) milk.

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Pour a thin layer of oil into a large skillet. Heat over mediumhigh heat. Using a heaping

tablespoon (20 g) of the mixture, shape into a small patty about 11⁄2 inches (4 cm) across and 1⁄2- to 3⁄4-inch (1.3 to 2 cm) thick. Put the fritters into the oil and cook until golden, 4 to 6 minutes. Turn the fritters over to cook the second side, 4 to 6 minutes. Drain on a paper towel and serve with the gravy

For the tomato-thyme gravy

1⁄2 cup (80 g) finely minced onion 2 tablespoons (16 g) all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons (30 ml) olive oil 1 teaspoon dried thyme or 1 tablespoon (2 g) minced fresh thyme 1⁄2 teaspoon fine sea salt 1⁄4 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 can (15 ounces, or 425 g) diced tomatoes with juice, preferably no salt added 3⁄4 cup (180 ml) tomato juice 1 tablespoon (15 ml) Frank’s Hot Sauce, or more, to taste 2 teaspoons liquid smoke

To make the tomatothyme gravy

Heat the onion, flour, oil, thyme, salt, and pepper in a mediumsize saucepan over medium heat. Cook, stirring, for 3 to 4 minutes, until the flour is cooked. Add the remaining ingredients, and simmer over low heat for 15 to 20 minutes. The gravy may be made ahead, covered, and refrigerated for up to 48 hours. Heat over low heat to serve.


Tiny Tomato Pies A crisp whole-grain crust, packed with a spinach, basil, and tofu filling, all topped with a cherry … cherry tomato, that is. These little pies fly off the table at any gathering. Yield: 24 mini pies

For the crusts

Nonstick cooking spray 2 cups (240 g) whole wheat pastry flour 1⁄2 teaspoon fine sea salt 1⁄4 cup plus 2 tablespoons (90 ml) olive oil 1⁄4 cup plus 2 tablespoons (90 ml) cold water

For the filling

1⁄2 cup (20 g) packed spinach leaves 1⁄4 cup (10 g) packed basil leaves 2 tablespoons (18 g) raw cashews 2 tablespoons (20 g) chopped onion 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon (11 g) nutritional yeast Juice from 1 fresh lemon 8 ounces (227 g) extra-firm tofu, drained, pressed, and crumbled 1⁄2 cup (120 ml) unsweetened plain vegan milk 1⁄2 teaspoon fine sea salt Pinch ground black pepper 12 cherry tomatoes, halved Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C, or gas mark 6). Lightly coat a 24-cup mini muffin pan with cooking spray.

To make the crusts:

Stir the flour and salt together in a medium-size bowl. Drizzle in the oil, and stir with a fork to create crumbs. Add the water 1 tablespoon (15 ml) at a time, stirring with the fork, until it forms a dough. Scoop a generous 2 teaspoons of dough and form into a ball. Put in one of the muffin cups, and press to line the whole cup. Repeat until all the dough has been used.

To make the filling:

Put the spinach, basil, and cashews in a small food processor. Process until finely chopped. Add the onion, nutritional yeast, and lemon juice, and pulse again. Add the tofu, milk, salt, and pepper. Process until smooth. Fill each cup with about 2 teaspoons filling, using all the filling. Top each with a cherry tomato half cut-side down, and bake for 25 to 30 minutes. The tops will be golden brown, and the crusts should be done. Serve hot or at room temperature. 109


Vanilla Cream Tartlets It’s been proven many times before: No one can say no to an individually sized, portable tartlet! Especially not when the tartlets in question are turned into the life of the party dessert tray when decorated with beautiful fresh berries and dusted with extra vanilla-flavored sugar. Yield: 12 tartlets

For the filling

1⁄2 cup (60 g) vanilla-flavored powdered sugar (see Recipe Note), plus extra for garnishing 11⁄3 cups (192 g) Whipped Coconut Cream (page 163) 1⁄2 cup plus 2 tablespoons (163 g) Cashew Almond Spread (page 121) Zest from 1⁄2 organic lemon

For the crusts and garnish

Nonstick cooking spray 13⁄4 cups (210 g) whole wheat pastry flour 1⁄4 teaspoon fine sea salt 1⁄4 cup (60 ml) neutral-flavored oil 1⁄4 cup (60 ml) pure maple syrup 2 tablespoons (30 ml) cold water, as needed 1 package (6 ounces, or 170 g) fresh raspberries, rinsed and patted dry 1 package (4.4 ounces, or 125 g) fresh blueberries, rinsed, patted dry

To make the filling

Remove the vanilla bean from the sugar. Place the cream, spread, sugar, and zest in a large bowl. Scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean on top. Gently fold to combine so as not to remove the fluff from the whipped cream. Cover with plastic wrap, and store in the refrigerator for 2 hours or overnight to firm up.

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To make the crusts

Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C, or gas mark 4). Lightly coat twelve 3-inch (7.5 cm) tart pans with cooking spray. Stir the flour and salt together in a medium-size bowl. Drizzle in the oil and syrup, stirring with a fork to create crumbs. Add the water 1 tablespoon (15 ml) at a time if needed, stirring until a dough forms. Gather the dough on a piece of parchment paper or silicone baking mat. Divide the dough into twelve equal portions, each about 1 ounce (30 g). Pat each portion down into a 21⁄2-inch (6 cm) circle. Place the circle into the prepared tart pan, and press down on the bottom and just halfway up the edges, about 1⁄2 inch (1.3 cm). Repeat with the remaining dough. Prick the crust bottoms with a fork. Bake for 13 minutes, or until the crusts are light golden brown. Let cool completely in the pans, then remove from the pans before assembling. Add 2 tablespoons (35 g) of filling per cooled crust. Place back into the refrigerator for 2 hours to set. Decorate with berries before serving. Sift powdered sugar on top, if desired. These are best served freshly made.

Recipe Note: To make vanilla-flavored powdered sugar, combine 1 cup (120 g) powdered sugar with a split vanilla bean in an airtight container for 2 days. there will be 1⁄3 cup (40 g) left over after use in this recipe, and it can be used anywhere powdered sugar is called for.


We’ve taken a look at the best thing ever (also known as peanut butter cups) and gone one step further, replacing the chocolate candy bottom with a mini brownie. You’ll realize what a brilliant idea it was when you get your fingers on (and sink your teeth into) the resulting chewy, super rich goodness!

Brownie Nut Butter Cups

Yield: 34 mini brownie cups

For the brownies

Nonstick cooking spray 4 ounces (113 g) vegan chocolate, chopped 3 tablespoons (42 g) solid coconut oil 1⁄2 cup (120 g) blended soft silken tofu or plain vegan yogurt 1 cup (200 g) coconut sugar 1⁄2 teaspoon fine sea salt 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract 11⁄4 cups (150 g) whole wheat pastry flour

For the filling

3⁄4 cup (192 g) creamy natural almond or peanut butter, at room temperature Pinch fine sea salt 2 ounces (57 g) vegan chocolate, chopped

To make the brownies

Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C, or gas mark 4). Lightly coat thirty-four cups of two mini muffin pans with cooking spray. Place the chocolate and oil in a microwave-safe bowl, and heat in 1-minute increments, until the chocolate is melted and can be easily stirred. (Alternatively, place the chocolate and oil in a small saucepan and slowly warm over low heat until melted.) In a medium-size bowl, combine the melted chocolate with the tofu, brown sugar, salt, and vanilla. Sift the flour on top, and stir until well combined. Place about 21⁄2 teaspoons brownie batter per cup, filling each cup two-thirds full. Bake for 12 minutes. The brownies will look a little wet, and will slightly collapse while cooling; this will create the indentation for the filling. If your brownies don’t collapse within a few minutes, use the curved back of a 1⁄2 a teaspoon to indent. Let cool in the pans on a wire rack, then refrigerate for 45 minutes, to easily remove from the pans. In the meantime, prepare the filling.

To make the filling: Combine the nut butter with the

powdered sugar and salt in a small bowl. If your nut butter is on the thin side, add a little extra powdered sugar to thicken. Set aside. Remove the chilled cups from the pans, and place 1 teaspoon filling per indentation. Sprinkle a tiny handful of chocolate on top, pressing down slightly. Serve chilled. Leftovers may be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

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Organic Adventures with Veganbnb Travel THE ONLY TOUR COMPANY DEDICATED TO QUALITY VEGAN TRAVEL IN SPAIN AND GUATEMALA

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Patxi tells me proudly ... “This variety of lettuce is thirty five years old, it was originally planted by my grandfather and has been left untouched ever since, no pesticides, chemicals or genetic modifications and it is one of our most sold products�

I often take my guests to stroll around the wonderful organic market in Malaga which is held on the third Saturday of every month and it was here during my weekly shop that I met Patxi and Marcela, Managers of this beautiful organic finca.

I am on a beautiful organic farm called Finca Bala Gopal which is nested just beyond a small village in the Guadalhorce valley, an area recognized for its organic produce.

As we sit down under a blackberry tree sipping on cool homeade lemonade, I chat to Patxi and Marcela about their lifestyle and the economy of organic farming in Spain

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Patxi has over twenty crops and medicinal herbs growing on the finca, some that are familiar such as, radish, beetroot, watermelon and strawberries and other leser known somewhat exotic crops like amaranth, and moroccan lettuce .


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Marcela who previously worked in the city is the first to say that farming is an incredibly rewarding profession but certainly not for those looking for the stability of a 9 to 5 job, as we talk she is carefully placing cuttings in small biodegrade pots they make themselves on the farm ready to be planted later that afternoon. Patxi runs me through their daily routine; watering, planting, weeding and soil maintenance, this is already a full days work and we must not forget that the crops actually need cropping every Friday ready to be packed

machine; hand held and driven by a wheel, a V shaped device simply digs into the ground, which propelled by movement, takes with it any unwanted weeds or plants, brilliant! A similar hand held machine is also used to sow the seeds for some crops, others are hand sown. One of my projects, Looking Behind The Label is a concept I created designed to promote conscious consumerism by connecting producers to consumers,

“To become certified as organic in Spain is a three year process, during which time the land must be free of any chemicals or pesticides”. up and taken to one of the local organic markets that they attend each Saturday and Sunday.

integrated into some of my trips in Spain and Guatemala

To become certified as organic in Spain is a three year process, during which time the land must be free of any chemicals or pesticides.

I introduce the concept to Patxi and Marcela and make a few surprising discoveries! Marcela explains how olive oil from Morocco is being sold as Spanish and oranges from Argentina are being labelled as organic but have dubious origins,

Due to the abstinence of any pesticides used on the Finca Bala Gopal’s land, weeds are manually removed using a simple but incredibly effective non mechanized

‘if you really look behind the labels, there is more

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than meets the eye’ she says which for me just confirms the need to establish, or in some cases, re establish the connections between producers and consumers. As my lemonade comes to an end I look over at the enormous box of organic goodies Patxi and Marcela have kindly given me, I think to myself that I must get back to Malaga as its warm and lettuce

Most of us go on holiday go on holiday, myself included for the same reasons; to relax and wind down, for a break in routine, to explore, to learn about different cultures, have new experiences and to return home with the feeling that the travel experience has added some kind of value to our lives. I believe that everyone should have far more than a suntan as a reminder of their holidays and after

“Most of us go on holiday go on holiday, myself included for the same reasons; to relax and wind down, for a break in routine, to explore, to learn about different cultures, have new experiences and to return home with the feeling that the travel experience has added some kind of value to our lives”. prefers to be cold but ask one last question;

many years working in the tourism industry,

‘what is the difference between Organic and Ecological as I often see products in the supermarket marked as ecological and others as organic?’ ‘Only buy organic produce Emma,’ ‘Any particular reason patxi? ‘Because we only sell organic produce’

I am dedicated to adding value to travel and on a larger, more worldly scale, would like to create an environment where we understand not only the price of things, but the value.

well, that answered my question didn’t it!

Veganbnb Travel offer small group trips from four to ten days in Spain and Guatemala For more information visit their website www.veganbnbtravel.com

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An Interview with Shushana Castle on RETHINK FOOD: 100+ Doctors Can’t Be Wrong “Where do you get your protein?”, “What about iron?”, “How do you get calcium?”: we all know those questions.

I interviewed Shushana about RETHINK FOOD, and about the connection between nutrition and disease.

I, like many vegans, can’t count the number of times I’ve been quizzed about the nutritional value of my diet. I am also, like many vegans, acutely aware that the root of these questions lies not in nutritional science or medicine, but mostly in the combined efforts of the meat, dairy, and egg industries who, over the last 50 years or so, have spent millions of pounds convincing generations of people that meat is nourishing’, that cows’ milk is ‘the perfect food’, and that we should all ‘go to work on an egg’. !

Shushana, you’ve been a vegan for a While I was growing up, my mother long time. Why did you had fed me massive quantities of make the switch? gorgeous fruits and vegetables, nuts and legumes, so this was I stopped eating and using animals instilled in me from an early age. for ethical reasons. In 2005, I I decided to make the switch and discovered the horrific truth about eliminate all animal products from

Q.

ethical action. I had also always been interested in nutrition and, by the time I started learning about the ethics of veganism, already ate mostly plant foods.

I also had many friends and family members who had had cancer and other diseases go into complete remission when they went plantbased, and I felt that these were incredible stories I needed to share. My mother, for example, developed a serious eye condition at the age of 81, and the doctors told us she needed surgery. However, after she removed meat and dairy from her diet, her vision returned within a few weeks, and she cancelled the surgery! We were amazed, and so was my mother’s doctor. Witnessing people cure themselves of disease showed me that nutrient-rich plant foods are the answer to many chronic and severe illnesses and conditions. Amy-Lee (co-author of RETHINK FOOD) had similar experiences with her family, so we were both compelled to write about the power of plant nutrition. !

Fortunately, there now exists a movement seeking to reclaim nutritional truth. In recent years particularly, hundreds of doctors, scientists, and authors have highlighted how unnecessary animal products are for human health and, more importantly, how they are in fact directly connected to numerous serious chronic diseases and conditions, from obesity and heart disease, to diabetes and cancer. Shushana Castle continues this legacy with her new book, RETHINK FOOD: 100+ Doctors Can’t Be Wrong. Along with her co-author, AmyLee Goodman, and over 100 contributing doctors, scientists, and nutritionists, Castle reveals the truth about both plant- and animalbased diets, describing firstly how animal products are the primary cause of almost every chronic disease, and secondly how plant foods are the foundation of truly excellent health and healing.

A few years after going vegan, I began reading seriously about the medicinal properties of plant nutrition. I soon became wildly impassioned to share the all amazing facts I had learned.

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farming and the miserable cruelty, my life, including meat, dairy, and suffering, and squalor inherent in eggs. animal production. What inspired you I feel very strongly that raising to write RETHINK animals simply to eat or exploit FOOD? them is not (and can never be) an

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You have so many established medical contributors involved in this book - I already knew some of them like Neal Barnard, T. Colin Campbell, Caldwell Esselstyn, Michael Greger - all of whom advocate a fully plantbased diet. How important was it for you to involve these people and why? For a long time I shared everything I knew about nutrition with just about everyone I came into contact with; I could not stop talking about my newfound knowledge. I kept

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reading very weighty scientific papers and journals that proved the science behind plant-based diets and their benefits.

and cancer, and how plant nutrition A lot of people mistakenly think that benefits of exclusively plant-based can put the same disease into full these nutrients are lacking in vegan nutrition. ! remission. diets, but our doctors show that this I know you also have is completely false! They also cover some athletes in RETHINK FOOD covers cancers many of the benefits of plant foods. From my encounters with sufferers of the breast, ovaries, colon, For example, they discuss the RETHINK FOOD. Does of chronic disease, I learned that prostate, lung, and more. There effects of various phytonutrients: the same go for them - do they most did not want to tackle scientific is a For Men Only chapter, and a amazing compounds which act as find that plants help and animal journals themselves, and that my For Women Only chapter, and a antioxidants, calm inflammation, products harm? divulging the research I had read paediatric chapter discussing both and boost DNA repair and was not always compelling enough the benefits of plant-based nutrition immunity. Absolutely. We have stories (I am not a medical doctor). from world class vegan athletes, and the dangers of animal products, especially milk, for children. My personal favourite chapter is including John Salley (All-Star NBA I felt an urgent need to compile “The Dangers of Dairy”, in which champion), Steph Davis (famous the latest research from the most The chapter on inflammation our vegan doctors, Justine Butler, rock climber and base jumper), esteemed experts of plant-based describes how meat and dairy are Kerrie Saunders, Gilbert Manso, Christine Vardaros (a super pro health and nutrition, and to give the cyclist), Andy Lally (a renowned benefit of their knowledge to the NASCAR driver), and Fiona Oaks general public. I wrote RETHINK (a champion marathon runner). FOOD with interested and intelligent lay(wo)men in mind, so Right across this broad spectrum it’s both easy to read and strongly of sports, all of these athletes have Fresh Vegan readers are offered a science-based. reaped the benefits of a plantbased diet, as they explain in the 25% discount on the book with the Since the book covers so many book. They credit their energy promotional code ‘KP3Z2DXF’ different topics, my hope is that levels, performance, and recovery vegans and non-vegans alike can times to their nutrientpacked Visit the RETHINK FOOD store refer to it as a complete reference plant based diets, and have really www.createspace.com/4700521 guide, and in fact it has already amazing stories to share. been called the new ‘epic read on nutrition’. Some people advocate eating ‘mostly plant Which areas of health based’; they will, for does the book cover? example, eat only plants in the Are there any health week but add meat or dairy in at issues you found which were causally linked to inflammation, and David Ryde, show exactly the weekend. Can people still be surprisingly related to diet? which in turn is shown to be the why the milk of other species healthy doing this? genesis of virtually every chronic does not belong to humans. RETHINK FOOD includes a lot disease. RETHINK FOOD also They describe the inflammatory In a word, no. Firstly, there’s the of information and in great depth. discusses erectile dysfunction, and bone dissolving effects of ethical side to it. There’s a horrible It covers cardiovascular and fatigue, fibroids, eye health, and dairy, and how it directly causes violence inherent in confining and heart disease, obesity, diabetes Alzheimer’s, all of which are again, osteoporosis; they also highlight killing a living being, and I don’t - the diseases that many people shown to be strongly linked to meat how the natural growth hormones think it’s healthy to encourage this. associate with eating animal and dairy intake. contained in cows’ milk can cause severe damage in growing human Then, there’s the nutritional products. We also wanted to disprove the children. argument.All the evidence suggests There is a whole chapter on cancer, health myths that circulate about that even in very small amounts, which includes contributions from the vegan diet, so RETHINK I also love the chapter called “Strong animal foods cause very serious over 15 cancer specialists, all of FOOD sets the record straight Bones, Power Joints”, which was damage to our system. Even a single whom describe the relationship about several much-debated written by a number of orthopaedic meal of animal products stimulates between various cancers and diet. topics, including protein, calcium, surgeons who are, again, emphatic an inflammatory reaction, rapidly about the dangers of dairy to bone altering our intestinal flora, and They discuss the link between and iron. meat and dairy health, and the bone-building hardening our arteries. After such

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a meal the body will spend 5 to 6 for all the amazing plant based hours just trying to combat all of nutritional powerhouses - the leafy greens, grains, nuts, seeds, fruits this. and vegetables. We also have absolutely no need to deal with this; there’s no protein Our bodies are designed to thrive on or nutrient that we need to get these foods. Why would you want from animal foods. We can find to replace foods that protect your proteins in legumes, nuts, grains, health with foods that aggressively vegetables and fruit, and these put stress on your system? ! also contain hefty amounts of fibre, which we need to keep our Do you have any digestive systems healthy. advice for people who are vegan and who Meat and dairy products have want to boost their health? zero fibre and, as I said, cause inflammation and a whole host of Vegans are, generally speaking, problems for the body to clear up. far healthier than the average These foods do not lead to good omnivore, simply because they’ve health, and there’s no nutritional cut out all the damaging animal need for us to eat animals. products. A recent study by Dr. Michael Greger found that the Consuming animal products arteries of sedentary vegans had excludes the plant foods which far fewer fatty atherosclerotic are so crucial to excellent health. deposits than even very highly The more meat, dairy, and eggs trained, omnivorous long-distance you eat, the less room you have runners.

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This is representative of the health advantage that vegans have over meat-eaters. That said, it doesn’t mean we can rest on our laurels. We still need to think about what we eat and be sure to incorporate a wide range of fresh fruits and vegetables; we should be eating as much fresh produce as possible at every meal.

energy levels for longer. RETHINK FOOD is available now. For more information, check out www.rethinkfoodbook.com. RETHINK FOOD is also on leading online book sellers

It’s also important to avoid processed foods. Things like white flour and sugar really don’t have any nutritional value at all. Whole grains like quinoa, brown rice, barley, oats, whole wheat and whole spelt are far more nutritious because they contain vitamins and Emily Wilkinson is a writer and minerals not found in their refined lifestyle coach living in Glasgow; counterparts. see www.veganlass.com for more information. They’re also full of fibre and place lower on the glycemic index, which means they’ll be absorbed by the body more slowly, and sustain

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“Every doctor, medical student, and patient should read this book because plant- based nutrition is the future of medicine. This medicine saves lives and prevents diseases. Today our villain is the healthcare crisis and the hero is plant nutrition.” —PHILLIP TUSO, MD “As the title of this book so aptly states, the time has come for scientists and physicians who want to effectively —MICHAEL KLAPER, MD treat the cause of diseases – not just to deal with symptoms - to rethink food.”

W

e have been led to believe that meat and dairy are the foundation of good health. This is a myth and the science can no longer be ignored. Rethink Food brings you 100+ doctors from around the world who substantiate why all animal based products are damaging to our health and should be completely removed from our plates. Our meat and dairy diets are the primary cause of our alarming rise in chronic health problems and disease. We are turning to prescriptions for answers, but they do not address the root cause of diseases. The truth is our health is not completely dictated by our genes. Rethink Food’s doctors conclusively prove that we have the power to reverse and prevent today’s leading health problems simply by choosing a whole food plant-based diet! Plus as Rethink Food’s top professional athletes show, achieving peak performance and winning gold depends on being powered by plants.

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF FOLLOWING THESE 100+ DOCTORS’ ADVICE? • • • • • •

Reversing Heart Disease & Type 2 Diabetes Preventing & Helping Bring Cancer into Remission Eliminating the Need for Medication Weight-loss Stays Off Rejuvenating and Radiant Skin Strong Healthy Bones

• Eliminating Joint and Arthritic Pain • Lowering Blood Pressure and Cholesterol • Eliminating Acid Reflux, and other Gastrointestinal Problems • Slowing Cognitive Decline • Great Energy and So Much More!

RETHINK FOOD EMPOWERS YOU WITH A TASTEFULLY SIMPLE SOLUTION FOR A HEALTHIER, STRONGER, AND SMARTER YOU! AMY-LEE GOODMAN is a Wellesley College graduate and co-founded the plant-based food company Zibble Inc that partners with non-profits to frost a better future. She loves to travel and lives in New York. SHUSHANA CASTLE worked in the financial sector for 25 years and sits on numerous environmental boards. A self proclaimed super foodie, she loves hiking and splits her time between Houston and Telluride. AMY-LEE and SHUSHANA are passionate about spreading the truth regarding healthy foods and helping to improve lives. Their next book, “The Meaty Truth: The Stinking Facts About Our Food” releases Fall of 2014. Visit: www.rethinkfoodbook.com Two Skirts Productions, llc

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Win

A copy of “Rethink Food” by emailing to: jacqui@freshvegan.eu and quoting Rethink Food Book Competion in the subject line, please include your Name and Address in the body of the email

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Jane

Mathew

Clea 127


Veganuary: the global campaign that is inspiring 100,000 people to go vegan in January Veganuary’s founders, Matthew Glover and Jane Land, came up with the idea for Veganuary in 2013. They knew that other month-long pledges existed, but felt they could do one differently, and perhaps more successfully, by focusing on the month of January - a time for resolutions and new beginnings. Matthew and Jane are passionate and committed vegans who are dedicated to improving the life of animals. They launched Veganuary in the UK this year and, buoyed by its success, are taking it to the world for 2015. Veganuary.com is being rebuilt and will launch in September (2014). The new website will contain everything that this year’s Veganuary participants said they wanted most; a vegan product directory, an extensive, vibrant recipe section, eating-out guides, and useful information on animals, the environment and health. Case studies of vegans from all walks of life will also feature; stories from chefs, athletes, celebrities, politicians and everyday vegans will inspire new participants to take up the 31 day challenge. “If you can identify with someone who is already vegan

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then you’re more likely to feel that it is a viable option”, says Matthew Glover. “Stories from successful individuals challenge the misconceptions that still exist around being vegan.

easy and fun being vegan can be. Veganuary.com will be an essential resource throughout their month-long journey. It will provide not just the ‘why’ but the ‘how’ as well.

We’re especially keen to see how people react to the amazing tales from vegan sports stars.

“How to be vegan is the most common stumbling block for new vegans”, says Jane Land.

The idea that vegans are strong and healthy, with energy to burn, will appeal to a demographic that may have never previously considered it as a possibility.”

“People are naturally empathetic and no one enjoys the fact that they’re playing a role in animal suffering on a massive scale. However the transition from

If you can identify with someone who is already vegan then you’re more likely to feel that it is a viable option”, says Matthew Glover. “Stories from successful individuals challenge the misconceptions that still exist around being vegan. Veganuary is a global campaign and the website is being built to be available in different languages, with information specific to particular countries and regions. As Veganuary grows across the world, so too will the website. Veganuary wants to lead the charge in establishing veganism as a social norm. In trying it for a month, people have the chance to experience first-hand how

omnivore, or even vegetarian, to vegan can be a lonely one. Even with all the will in the world, without practical help it can feel hard and somewhat isolating. Not everyone is lucky enough to have an active vegan community in their area, or know other vegans who can lend support.” This is where Veganuary comes into its own, and really

differs from other month-long pledges. Encouraging people to collectively go vegan in the same month creates an immediate sense of community, and transforms an individual journey into a group one. In January 2014, Matthew and Jane were amazed to watch the Veganuary group on Facebook develop, for example. “We didn’t have to run it”, says Jane. “It ran itself. The participants made the group their own. Reaching out to each other - asking advice on products, whether you could substitute this ingredient for that ingredient in a recipe… even shopping and travel tips. It was so great to see!” The Veganuary team have taken this sense of community and poured it into the development of their website. Within all of the site’s sections visitors will have the ability to rate and comment, highlighting their favourite recipes, products and information for others so that others may benefit. “Over time, the best products, recipes and vegan people stories will float to the top”, says Matthew. “These will then scroll along the home page enabling new visitors to see the bestrated first. This will not only enhance visitor experience, it will help establish veganuary.com as a truly trusted resource for vegans across the globe.”


At the end of January this year, a survey was sent to all Veganuary participants via email. This information was collated and presented online and in e-newsletter. These statistics have helped to shape the campaign for Veganuary 2015, the website development and are vital in showing the Veganuary team on where to focus their efforts. “These statistics are absolutely imperative to our ongoing success“, says Clea Grady, Veganuary’s Marketing Manager. “We will undertake similar surveys at the conclusion of every January and are looking to implement another threequarters of the way through the year, in order to track progress further. We’ll not only be able to review and assess a particular year, but will also be able to make assessments year-on-year.

half of this year’s target coming from there. It’s so important, therefore, that we have the support of the movement over there as we really need them to help us spread the Veganuary word. The fact that we’d done extensive research into this year really gives weight to the decisions we’ve made for 2015. We were overwhelmed by the level of support we received

The team wants to make their website the go-to place online for vegans everywhere; where all the information anyone will ever need to be a happy and healthy vegan can be found in the one place. They’re teaming up with food

The target for 2015’s Veganuary is 100,000 participants from all over the world, with the UK, the USA and Australia being the main focus. Spain, Latin America and Germany will then become priorities for 2016.

The team have just returned from Los Angeles, where they unveiled Veganuary’s new branding and campaign plans at the Animal Rights National Conference 2014.

at the Conference, and the statistics went a long way in demonstrating how serious we are about Veganuary’s continued success.” The target for 2015’s Veganuary is 100,000 participants from all over the world, with the UK, the USA and Australia being the main focus. Spain, Latin America and Germany will then become priorities for 2016.

“The second highest number of 2014 participants came from the States”, says Clea. “And we see

“We believe that veganism is the biggest social justice movement in the world today”,

This information will be openly available, and will be of great use to the animal rights movement as a whole.”

says Matthew. We are dedicated to reducing the suffering of animals, and want to inspire people from as many countries as possible to try vegan for the month of January.”

bloggers, health experts and activists from all over the world to include practical, useful and relevant information. The idea is that, at the end of January, participants will have everything at their fingertips should they want to make the change to vegan a permanent one. So what can you do if you’re interested in helping Veganuary become a worldwide phenomenon?

“We want to talk with as many people as possible!” says Clea. We’re under no illusions as to how big this project is. Content creation for a site this big is a massive task, so we’re looking for anyone who specialises in vegan products and recipes to come forward with submissions. We’re also keen to keep content relevant and current, so we’d love to hear from bloggers who are keen to write regular guest posts. If you’re vegan and want to share your story then please also let us know.” With less than six months until the end of 2014, the team at Veganuary have a lot to achieve. They’re confident, however, that 2015 is going to be something very special indeed. “There really is a reason for everyone to try vegan in January”, says Matthew. “Whether people are motivated by a love of animals, or have concerns about their health or the environment, we’re going to ensure that we have the support networks in place. The uptake in new vegans following Veganuary 2014 was fantastic, and we’re determined that the statistics for 2015 will not only be bigger, they’ll be far, far better.”

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Festivals


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Accredited Diploma In Hypnotherapy The Next Fully Accredited Hypnotherapist Training Starts 10th October 2014 If you would like to know what this involves then please contact me directly for a full course outline, including course structure, and price.

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Connecting vegan chefs worldwide www.facebook,com/theveganchefnetwork

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We are proud thatFresh Vegan Magazine has been nominated for “Best Publication at the Vegfest awards 2014 at London in September. We need the support of our fans, followers and readers to confirm to the world that what we are doing may in some small way be “changing the world, one plate at a time”. Thank you for your support and your vote... Jacqui and Ron

Vote for Fresh Vegan Magazine www.vegfest.co.uk/vote

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Gluten free soy free vegan Available in Waitrose and Booths www.DeesWholefoods.co.uk

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All things are connected like the blood that unites us. We do not weave the web of life, we are merely a strand in it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.�

Chief Seattle

Issue 4 Fresh Vegan Magazine  

Whats Inside Fresh Vegan Magazine Issue 4 Issue 4 Would seem our biggest issue yet! Seeing food from Japan with original Japanese recipes a...

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