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Koa Rothman, Tahiti Photo: Ben Thouard

August V8#8 • FREESURFMAGAZINE.COM

Free in Hawai‘i

Summer Heat four comps, two days, and one epic swell Don’t read this We’re letting the photos speak for themselves


PHOTO NOYLE/AFRAME


a n a l o g c l o t h i n g .co m


Photo: Russo


KOOKBOX AND JOEL TUDOR TAKE A UNIQUE APPROACH TO CLASSIC SURFBOARD DESIGN. INCORPORATING RADICAL OUTLINES, BOTH OLD AND NEW, COMBINED WITH A MILITARY AESTHETIC DRAWN OF THE ’60S AND ’70S. KOOKBOX SHAPES, TINTS, AND GRAPHICS ARE BORN OF THIS INSPIRATION AND GROUNDED IN FUNCTIONALITY. FOR ALL THESE REASONS, IN ADDITION TO JOEL’S 15-PLUS YEAR HISTORY WITH VANS, IT SEEMED ONLY NATURAL THAT THIS COLLABORATION WAS BORN. ENJOY.

vanssurf.com

©2011, Vans Inc.


Free Parking

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When you can’t surf, you can always ride the lightning. Photo: Reid Shimabukuro

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Contents V8#8 August 2011

36 shaping bay Five things you should know before ordering your next board.

40 Aperture Not a big fan of the written word? Well, lucky for you we’re letting our photos do the talking in this extended gallery.

50 One Weekend in July At the tailend of the first week of July, Honolulu was ripe with jerseys and heat horns as three separate contests got underway. We ran wild trying to cover them all in this 72-hour feature.

Unidentified, digging into a bowl of home cookin'. Photo: Heff

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Th thirst’s

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Find Longboard on tap and in bottles throughout the Islands and the West Coast

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V8#8 August, 2011

Free Parking Thought lightning doesn't strike twice? Think again. 12

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Contents

nt cer

Check out our Pubs!

Ed Note Is anyone else sick of surfers? 20 Shoots Quincy Dein, altering his settings. 22

KOna Brewery & pub 75-5629 Kuakini Hwy Kailua Kona, HI 96740 • 808-334-BREW (2739)

Howzit Outtakes getting full takes. 24

KoKO mARINA PUB 7192 Kalaniana’ole Hwy Honolulu, HI 96825 • 808-394-KONA (5662)

Get

20 off

When you spend $50 or more.

Must present coupon upon purchase. Excludes alcohol, tax, gratuity, & retail items. Not to be combined with any other discounts or promotions. Valid Mon-Thurs at Koko Marina location only.

Join us at the Koko Marina Pub! free surf coupon

Expires 12/31/11

The Golden Groms Three of Hawaii’s finest young surfers dominate at the national level. Get to know them here. 28 Sight/Sound If there’s one surf film you watch this summer, make it Sight / Sound. 30 Stuff We Like Glasses, travel backpack, a giveaway, and so much more. 32 Sounds Why you should be listening to Zee Avi this summer. 32 Carissa Moore Surfing’s youngest world champion. 34 Open Canvas Ryan McVay and an open canvas collide. 58 Freeplugs Editorial, at a discounted rate 60. Closeout Mark Healey does it again. And again. 68

Carol Oliva

Up!


V8#8 August

Koa Rothman Photo: Ben Thouard

Editorial Publisher Mike Latronic Editor Jeff Mull Photo Editor Tony Heff Art Director Richard Onaha Hutter

Free Thinkers

Clark Carroll, Daniel Ikaika Ito, Ryan Kelly, Albee Layer, Janna Irons

Staff Photographers Eric Baeseman, Brandon Ells, Tony Heff, Mike Latronic, Tyler Rock

Contributing Photographers Nathan Adams, Erik Aeder, Kirk Lee Aeder, Jamie Ballenger, Brian Bielmann, John Bilderback, Tom Carey, Vince Cavataio, Mike Coots, Kanoa Dahlin, Hilton Dawe, Patrick Devault, Willi Edwards, Grant Ellis, Paul Fisher, Isaac Frazer, Pete Frieden, Jeff Hall, Enich Harris, Noah Hamilton, John Helper, Rick Hurst, Ha'a Keaulana, Ehitu Keeling, Kin Kimoto, Ric Larsen, Tracy Kraft Leboe, Bruno Lemos, Mana, Mike McGinnis, Ikaika Michaels, Allen Mozo, Zak Noyle, Carol Oliva, Pake Solomon, Kaz Sano, Epes Sargent, Bobby Schutz, Batel Shimi, Pat Stacy, Vince Street, Spencer Suitt, Bill Taylor, Steve Thrailkill, JP VanSwae, Jimmy Wilson

Sales Director of Sales and Marketing Sean Wingate Advertising Executive Shaun Lopez Advertising Executive Chris Latronic Business Coordinator Cora Sanchez Executive Assistant Siri Masterson

Advertising Inquiries Sean Wingate swingate@freesurfmagazine.com 808-429-8460 FREESURF MAGAZINE is distributed at all Jamba Juice locations, most fine surf shops and select specialty stores throughout Hawai‘i. You can also pick up FREESURF on the mainland at Barnes & Noble and Borders bookstores and select newsstands. Ask for it by name at your local surf shop! Subscribe at freesurfmagazine.com Other than “Free Postage” letters, we do not accept unsolicited editorial submissions without first establishing contact with the editor. FreeSurf, Manulele Inc. and its associates is not responsible for lost, stolen or damaged submissions or their return. One-way correspondence can be sent to P.O. Box 1161, Hale‘iwa, HI 96712 E-mail editorial inquiries to info@freesurfmagazine.com Catch Billabong Surf TV Mondays at 1:30pm, Tuesdays at 2pm and 7:30pm, Wednesdays at 1:30am, Thursdays at 4:30am and 4:30pm, Fridays at 12:30pm and Saturdays at 3:30am and 9am and Sundays at 7:30am. And don’t forget Board Stories on Mondays at 2pm, Tuesdays at 5pm and 8:30pm, Wednesdays at 2:30am and 9:30am, Thursdays at 5:30am and 5:30pm and Saturdays at 2:30am and 7:30am and Sundays at 9:30am and 4pm. A product of Manulele, Inc. 2011


Maui

Whalers Village, Ka’anapali Front Street Lahaina Cannery Mall South Kihei Shops At Wailea

Big Island

Kona Inn Shopping Village Kings’ Shops Waikoloa

Oahu

Outrigger Waikiki Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Walk Sheraton Princess Kaiulani

Kauai

Poipu Shopping Village Anchor Cove


Editor’s note cultural ponderings

Daniel Jones, not your typical surfer. Photo: Baeseman

No Longer a Surfer I have a confession to make that I’m sure most of you won’t like hearing: I’m not a huge fan of “surfers.” There, I said it. In print. Oh God. But it’s okay, really, I can explain myself. I grew up surfing. Idealizing it. Obsessing over it. And just like every other rabid grom from Coolangatta to Hanalei, I had images of Slater, Machado, Ross Williams, and Tom Curren plastered across my room. I lived, breathed, and ate it all up with an unyielding appetite. Surfing was at the core of who I was. I felt like if I was anything in life, I was undoubtedly a surfer. But then something strange started to happen to me. Around the time I turned 18 and graduated high school, I moved away from the small town I grew up in on Kauai and headed west. First to Honolulu for school and then to California for work, eventually moving back to Town a few years back. Through it all, surfing continued to play a dominant role in my life. But along the way, my interests changed. I started doing other things with my free time—open-ocean swimming, running and, wait for it, reading things other than surf magazine. My life had turned the pages to a new chapter. Granted, I continued to surf nearly every day, but my horizons had been broadened. Surfing no longer solely defined me. Yes, I surfed, but didn’t really feel like just a “surfer” anymore. With this new development, I found myself heading down to my local peak where I would go through the obligatory whatsups with other surfers. Strangely, things started to bother me. Like the accent. That odd,

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undefined accent that you pick up after ordering your first custom board or threading your first tube. You know exactly what I’m talking about. “Surf is sooooo siiiiiiick out here right now, huh?” Cringe. And it didn’t stop there, either. There was our collective obsession with music that seemed to fit the time. (See Sublime in the ’90s, Pennywise throughout the Momentum age, Jack Johnson during the early 2000s, and the electronic pop that dominates today’s soundtracks). There was also the way we pretended like we knew all about the inner workings of surfboards. (Seriously, how many times have you picked up a board and gone through the motions to make it appear like you’re in tune with the rocker and foil? Be honest now.) To me, it all felt, for lack of a better term, fake. It was as if we were all dealt the same character to play when we started surfing. Why? How many other sports have forged a single identity? All of it left me with the revelation that we’re doing ourselves a great disservice by shrinking into some role that we think we’re supposed to play. The surfer. So what am I really driving at here? It turns out, it’s pretty simple. By all means surf. Every day if you can. But if you secretly hate Passion Pit and MGMT, say so. And honestly, it’s totally cool if the thought of riding alaias makes your stomach turn. Above it all, let your real personality take center stage. Be someone who surfs, not just a surfer. —Jeff Mull


sections Shoots

f11.0 2.5 iso 50

p h o t o:

Quincy Dein

“I woke up to the sound of driving rain pelting the side of my tent. I stumbled through the wet, grassy field to the edge of the ocean and set up my tripod overlooking the jagged lava coastline. This image was taken just before sunrise on a very stormy morning on the remote east side of Maui. The ocean was extremely rough, and the clouds a dark steely blue gray. I used a long exposure to show the motion of the water rushing over the lava. We never scored any waves on this trip, but the landscapes were amazing.” —Quincy Dein

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sections howzit

/ caught in the act

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4 All Photos Heff

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For this month’s column, we brought a lens with us as we distributed our June issue throughout Oahu. Make sure you check out all of the shops that carry Hawaii’s favorite surf magazine. And as the adage goes, support local surfing. 1. Volcom Waikiki 2. Rip Curl Ala Moana 3. Diamond Head Cove Health Bar 4. Hawaiian Fire, Kapahulu 5. Surf Garage, Moilili 6. Drift Surf, Ala Moana 7. The woman that keeps the gears at FREESURF moving, Siri Masterson 8. San Lorenzo Bikini

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KELIA MONIZ

Hawaii’s Biggest and Best Selection of Surf Gear WAIKIKI

Photo: Heff/Manulele

Nose Rider Model by Eric Arakawa: 9’ X 21.65” X 2.69”

Ala Moana Center

808-973-6780 www.hicsurf.com


sections Sharks Love Metal

AC/DC Keeps Sharks Mellow People are always looking for ways to keep sharks, especially great white sharks, at bay. Although Australians are known to be vibrant, living up to that statement, Matt Waller has been experimenting with different ways to bring great white sharks to him using music. Recently, he has found that great whites are very fond of AC/ DC, particularly the songs “Shook Me All Night Long” and “Back in Black.” Although he is ademant that he is not a scientist, Waller thinks that the shark’s connection to music is due to the long frequencies. Because sharks don’t have ears they can feel the vibrations through the water. Waller says that when he plays the music underwater, the sharks approach the submerged cage calmly and rub their faces against the speakers. Waller had originally started experimenting with different ways to attract the sharks without using chum in order to be more environmentally friendly. He had the idea to use music and decided to stick with Australian bands. Though it should be noted that no other bands had the same effect as AC/DC and their two previously mentioned songs. Waller decided to expand his music library to include bands with low frequencies such as Led Zeppelin and the White Stripes to see if they have the same effect. Despite the fact that Waller does not consider him self a scientist, many scientists are following his experiments closely. If this method proves to be effective, it could be used around the world in place of chum, which would create a much more environmentally friendly way of attracting sharks. But if you happen to have a waterproof ipod, unless you’re looking to have a run in with some great whites, don’t be blasting “Back in Black.” —Tien Lee


sections

Heff

Heff

spotlight

Tatiana Weston-Webb

Mahina Maeda

Tatiana Weston-Webb is quickly becoming one of the most talked about young female surfers of her generation. Exploding onto the scene with a win at the Women’s Pipeline Pro late this spring, WestonWebb has been laying all of the groundwork for a very successful career in surfing. This summer alone, she’s won nearly every contest she’s entered, including two wins at the US Championships, one at the NSSA Nationals, and another at Rip Curl’s GromSearch at Kewalos. To cut to the chase, if you want to know who’s going to be the driving force behind women’s surfing in Hawaii in the next decade, look no further than Kauai’s Tatianna Weston Webb.

Calling the wave-sodden stretch of Sunset Beach home, the North Shore’s own Mahina Maeda has had a breakout summer this year. Over the course of a few short months, Maeda competed with Team Hawaii at the ISA World Junior Games in Peru where she helped her team earn a copper medal. Following that triumph, Maeda jumped the pond to California where she put on a blistering performance at the US Champions at Lower Trestles and won the Girls’ Under 14 division. Next up, Maeda found her footing once again at the NSSA Nationals by placing third in both the Open Women’s and Open Girls’ divisions. And if that competitive tear wasn’t enough to solidify her reputation as one of Hawaii’s top young female surfers, Maeda recently placed second at the Rip Curl Grom Search at Kewalos

February 15, 1998 - Sunset Beach, Oahu

Baeseman

May 9, 1996 - Princeville, Kauai

Seth Moniz September 8, 1997 Honolulu, Oahu

A central figure in the Moniz family’s surfing dynasty, young Seth has proven himself to be a focal figure amongst his budding generation time and again. In an age when nearly every prominent junior is equally adept at high-speed carves and airs, that’s truly saying something. Throughout this summer, Seth has made his presence felt by claiming a very prestigious win at Lowers for his monumental performance in the Under 14 division of the US Championships. To boot, Seth also put on a clinic recently where he claimed top honors in the Under 14 division of Rip Curl’s GromSearch where he displayed some of the most progressive airs we’ve ever seen a surfer his age pull. Expect plenty of big things to come from Seth in the future.

Twitter is the new Facebook // Long live the summertime pool party // Honolulu is the true “Surf City” // The Dream Tour is

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sections Movie review

Sensory revelry

xx

SIGHT/SOUND, featuring Chris Del Moro, Kassia Meador, Alek Parker, Ryan Burch, and Tyler Warren (among others), is Mikey DeTemple’s ode to the “elegant and raw” unpredictable order that is surfing. It begins with an ’80s techno beat on downers and marries tightly cropped, slow-motion barrels and affecting head-on action with blazing sunsets. From longboards and lord bords to bodyboards to power hacks, there is literally something for everyone in SIGHT/SOUND. DeTemple was heavily influenced by the surf films of yore and SIGHT/SOUND is definitely a throwback to the days when films looked like they were shot with, well, film, and editing a movie was nearly as time-consuming as writing one. The filmmaker’s New York roots are inescapable (as they should be) and plainly visible. Not only did he include intimidating footage of unlabeled Empire State point breaks going off, he wanted to include something reminiscent of arduous East Coast wintertime sessions, which turned out to be Nova Scotia in—of all times—April. The result was a series of booties, hoods, and mittens perching on noses and dancing, with impressive control, against deep green walls. Though DeTemple and company are primarily known for their longboarding expertise, they broke out the shorties and proved that while they may choose to ride logs, it’s certainly not because they have to. Kassia Meador, for instance, is formidable on a shortboard. Icy New England and aqua Caribbean, old school cruising, and progressive airs—it’s all tied together by DeTemple’s stylish aesthetic. The video quality is excellent, the coloring is stunning, and the editing is flawless. The soundtrack (DeTemple’s favorite part) is soulful, but at times, upbeat. Above all, it is indie. DeTemple wanted to be sure you hadn’t heard his accompaniments a hundred times before viewing the film, but if his last film, Picaresque, is any indicator, it’s music that you’ll probably start hearing a lot. Many of the songs on Picaresque’s soundtrack were hijacked by mainstream advertisers, so yeah, DeTemple has a pretty good ear. In fact, even the environmental audio—the grate of wax application, whooshing water, and footsteps in high grass—is impeccable. Wipeout footage is an art form in and of itself; there’s a big difference between sloppy almosts and ferocious, unavoidable falls. A good wipeout can inspire sympathy and admiration at the same time. The crashes in SIGHT/SOUND succeed in that respect and also manage to seem sort of playful. The film, at its core, is fun. It inspires serious surf envy and makes you smile. And that’s pretty much the point, isn’t it? DeTemple handpicked the entire crew based on their capacity for froth and ability not only to attract, but to retain the eye. He’s called Chris Del Moro one of the best surfers imaginable. Link that with a dash of rarely seen, bombing New York and hypnotic tidal time-lapses and you’ve got yourself a really fantastic and enjoyable film. —Casey Butler

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LaVecchia

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sections

play list

Currents

Music Review

Zee Avi Ghostbird

Zee Avi is a young female singer/songwriter now living a long way from her home on the island of Borneo. Yet another talented musician currently calling Brooklyn home, Avi’s new album, Ghostbird, is the follow up to her popular, self-titled album. Recently, she made the cross-country trip to Los Angeles to record at Jack Johnson’s Solar Powered Plastic Plant studio. With the support of Johnson’s Brushfire Records, Avi can expect widespread success moving forward. At the forefront of her strengths stands her beautiful voice, smooth guitar work, and her ability to leap from one genre to another. “Swell Window” is a guitar inspired comparison of waves and chance. On the song titled “Madness,” she channels Billy Holiday on a classic jazz track. “Concrete Wall” allows Avi to collaborate with Cut Chemist, a unique pairing that bodes well for both artists. Look to artists likes Cat Power, Norah Jones, or even Colbie Caillat for a a comparison. Grab yourself a copy of the album, sit back, pour yourself a glass of wine, and let Ghostbird keep you company while the sun sets. —Jordon Cooper

A quick sampling of beats from the FREESURF office “This Must Be the Place” Talking Heads “Heartbreaker, featuring John Legend” MSTRKRFT “Oh, La Brea” Man Man “Kanske Ar Jag Kar I Dig” Jans Lekman

Stuff we Like From your feet to your towel, you’d be wise for draping yourself in this collection.

Dragon Giveaway

“Die Happy, Die Smiling” Maps “MoneyGrabber” Fitz & the Tantrums “The National Grid” Bachelorette “Tonight” Koop

1.

2.

“Four” Miles Davis Quintet

1. RF1 Shoes Quiksilver.com 2. Electric Backpack - Drill Surf Pack ElectricVisual.com

“Rope and Summit” Junip

3. Sometimes, we need to laugh. And right now is one of those times. Want to win these shades? Send your funniest joke to jeff@freesurfmagazine.com. Best joke wins the glasses.

3. Electric Glasses - Jailbreak ElectricVisual.com 4. Kamehameha Surf Team Towel x Fitted FittedHawaii.com

4.

dead // But events in New York and San Francisco are still all sorts

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To access this playlist online, and other music happenings, go to Freesurfmagazine. com/blog


sections

Bonnarme / Aquashot

Carissa wins world title

The Maiden Victory Carissa Moore Secures Her First World Title

As we were going to press on this issue, we watched with anticipation as Carissa Moore became the youngest world champion in surfing’s history. With a complete domination of the World Tour in 2011, Moore moved into surfing’s history books when she placed second in the finals at the Roxy Pro in France to Steph Gilmore, securing enough points to clinch her first title. “I dreamed of surfing at this level my whole life since I was a little kid and I don’t think you can ever expect or anticipate the feeling,” Moore said from the podium. “It’s amazing. There is no place I would rather be right now.”

From the moment we first saw her tear apart Kewalos as a young girl to working with her as our guest editor a few years ago to winning this title, we’ve always been proud of Carissa Moore. She represents the best of Hawaii and is the ambassador that this sport needs. “I have had this goal written on my door and it has been waiting there for a long time to be ticked off. I can’t wait to go home and cross it out,” Moore said. We have a feeling this will be the first of many championships. On behalf of the entire FREESURF staff, congratulations Carissa. You earned it.

of awesome // Buy your shaper a beer // Get your glasser a keg // Riding a board without fins doesn’t make you a soul surfer //

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inside the bay

All photos: Heff

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inside the bay 38

The North Shore’s own Jon Pyzel breaks down five key elements of design that every surfer worth his salt should know. If you want to get the most out of your next board, you’d be wise to take some notes.

Rocker/Outline

Concave

Rocker is the bottom curve of your board, running from nose to tail, and combines with the outline of your board to create the primary performance characteristics. To break it down, the basic rules for understanding rocker are pretty straight forward. The more curve you have, the slower, but easier to turn (or loose) it will be. A straighter rocker will yield a faster but harder to turn (or tight) board. Think of a flat piece of wood being pushed across the water—it has very little resistance and will gain speed easily in a straight line. Conversely, imagine a bowed piece of wood in the same way—it’ll mover slower over the surface and lose its speed quickly. It’ll also easily change directions. The same theory holds for your board’s outline: curve will create a looser board while a straight outline will yield a tighter ride. A good shaper will design a board for different types of waves by combining the outline and the rocker curves to produce the most speed and maneuverability possible. At a hollow, pockety type of wave you could ride a board with more rocker and more curve in the outline (like a round pin), because the wave itself will help generate boardspeed. At a mushy, flatter-faced wave, you would be better off with a flat (low) rockered board with a wider nose and tail that creates its own speed and helps make the most of weaker conditions.

This is the term for the contour running across the bottom of your board from side to side. Concave refers to center of the bottom of the board. Today, almost every shortboard is made with concave, sometimes combined with a bit of Vee in the tail area. One of the most important design characteristic of modern surfboards, concave helps create speed and can affect board performance in several different ways. Foremost, it creates pressure and lift under your board as water is pushed through and across the bottom of the board. This effect will give your board a little extra “squirt” when pushing through a bottom turn or cutback. Second, and very importantly, concave running through a board’s bottom actually creates two different rockers in one board. Concave makes the stringerline rocker flatter (adding even more speed) while keeping the rail-line (outline of the board) rocker nice and curvy, allowing you to harness that speed into controlled turns. You’ll often find some double concave between the fins of a board, which helps to break that area into two surfaces and keep the board loose. A little bit of Vee (reverse concave) off the tail of a board can help to relieve some pressure in hard turns, which makes a board a bit more user-friendly and easier to handle.

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Fins Since most shortboards now have removable fins, you have a great chance to change the way your board rides for different conditions. The term “rake” refers to the amount of curve a fin has and measures how far the tip curves back past the base of the fin. The basic rules for understanding rake are exactly the opposite of rocker: straight (less rake) is looser and a curvy fin (more rake) is tighter. However, keep in mind that the looser/ slower and tighter/faster rules always remain the same. If you want more drive and speed, you’ll need fins that are bigger with more rake and have a longer base to push off, but have less flex throughout. If you want fins that offer enhanced turning characteristics, you’ll need to look for fins that are smaller (less area), have less rake (more upright), narrower at the base, and are more flexible (especially towards the tip).

Short(er) boards The last few years has seen surfers around the world riding a variety of shorter boards in a variety of conditions. This shift began with a few wellknown surfers becoming a little bored with conventional equipment and wanting to change things up a bit. Today, you have nearly every shaper in the world offering up some sort of shorter, wider, and slightly thicker designs. Most of the boards that are meant to be ridden in small- to medium-sized waves feature a flatter nose—known as entry rocker—for easy speed and faster paddling. Most of these cuts typically have wider nose and tail measurements than your standard shortboard. They also need to be a bit wider than your shortboard as well to help compensate for the loss of volume that comes with the lack of length. That lack of length can cause a board to lose a lot of its drive and feel too loose. But by widening up the nose and tail, the boards have a straighter, more parallel outline, which tightens up the board and adds drive back into the equation.

One of the most interesting things to come out of this new Shorter Board revolution, is that the world’s best surfers are now riding boards that actually work really well for all levels of surfers and in a wide range of waves.

Magic vs. Random You’ve probably heard about The Board. If you’re lucky, you may have even had one. It works amazing all of the time and feels like it does whatever the rider wants it to do. Simply put: it’s the board that you don’t even feel under your feet; it’s just a part of you. It has that something special that all of those other boards lack, that “magic” something. If you’re fortunate enough to have come across this board, all I can say is hold onto it! No matter how yellow it’s getting, no matter how many times you’ve fixed the tail cancer it’s sure to get, no matter how bad you need the money for next month’s rent, just hold onto it. Because getting another one of those boards can be more complicated than you think. Despite what you hear, there’s still a lot of shaping that goes on by hand. It’s true that most shapers are now using a computer to design and cut (or pre-shape) their boards, allowing us to re-create designs with amazing accuracy, but when all is said and done, it’s not a machine that finishes the board. After a board is cut, we finish-shape the blank by hand and work carefully to maintain consistency in every board. The board then gets glassed by hand, fins put on (or boxes/plug put in) by hand, sanded by hand, and finally picked up and ridden by you. All the people building your board have probably been doing their job for a long time, and are quite skilled at what they do, but they are only a part of the equation. Other randoms include the weight of and type of blank (also hand-poured), the type of stringer and flex in that wood, the type of fiberglass, the amount of resin used, the temperature of the glassing room, fin placement and angle, how much resin the sander takes off, and where he keeps a nice edge, etc. All of it very hard, if not impossible, to duplicate. So remember what I said: Hang on to the magic ones. F RE E SUR F M A G A Z I NE . C O M

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Keanu Asing. Photo: Heff

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Ross Williams. Photo: Baeseman

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Benji Weatherly. Photo: Ehitu Keeling

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Derek Lyons Wolfe. Photo: Seth Johnson

Imaikalani DeVault. Photo: Pat DeVault

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Kekoa Bacalso. Photo: Baeseman

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Zeke Lau. Photo: Baeseman

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Danny Fuller. Photo: Ha‘a Keaulana

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CJ Kanuha. Photo: Baeseman

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Keala Naihe. Photo: Baeseman

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A Weekend in

Who Says You Can’t Run Three Events in Tw

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July Photos: Heff

Two Days?

Clockwise from above: Duane Desoto, gone fishin; Duke, standing vigil; Team pride; Empty Bowler; Kaulana Apo, finding gold at The Grom Search. Photo: Stephane

O

n a sweltering weekend in early July, the reefs from Queens to Kewalos were bombarded by a trifecta of events. Within 48 hours, the Oakley Surf Shop Challenge, the Aloha Boardshop Fish Fry, and Rip Curl’s GromSearch had all blared heat horns and crowned winners. With plenty of swell on tap, we set out on a mission to cover all three events in two days. A few notepads and memory cards later, we found ourselves sitting on a feature. Here’s our weekend in July.

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A Weekend in July Oakley Surf Shop Challenge/Ala Moana Bowls

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mid a building 5-foot swell, stiff offshore winds, and a scorching sun, 10 teams congregated at Magic Island for the Oakley Surf Shop Challenge. Unique with its team format (each team is composed of two shop employees and two teamriders) the event pits local surf shops against one another and leaves the winning team swimming in a year’s worth of bragging rights. With the record-breaking 10 teams amassed, the scaffolding set, and the heat horns primed, everyone was chomping at the bit to start the event. From the outset of the first heat, it was clear that this event was going to be one to rembember. With a bevy of Hawaii’s

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top surfers competing at this year’s contest, the likes of Pancho Sullivan, Kekoa Bacalso, Makua Rothman, Mark Healey and others ensured that they capitalized on the perfect surf and empty lineup on offer at this unique contest. Heading into the event with four consecutive wins, all eyes were pinned on team Town & Country to repeat their past performances. But with the aforementioned slew of talent sprinkled throughout each of the teams, it truly was anyone’s win for the taking. And as the first heat got underway and the swell continued to stack, it instantly became clear that this event was going to be one to remember. In the first five minutes alone,

double-section tuberides were raining down on the event like it was going out of style. “I just can’t believe how good it is out there right now. I don’t usually surf out here a lot because of the crowd, but to have it like this with just a few other guys out is amazing,” said Pancho Sullivan, who competed for team Surf N Sea and found himself barreled a half-dozen times at the event. “Right now I’m not thinking about winning or losing the event, I just want a chance to surf out there again.” As the event progressed into the final round, the 10 teams that began the event were whittled down to five with Town & Country, HIC, HI-Tech, Surf N Sea, and Blue Hawaii all vying


Kekoa Cazimero, en route to leading HIC to a team victory; Ola Oleagram, tearing Bowls a new one; the Goodwill Games; Makau Rothman, barreling through Bowls for Team T&C. All Photos: Heff

for the win. Out to sea, well overhead tubes continued to detonate on the reef and explode into the channel. The swell continued to build and so did the anticipation. As the horn blew and signaled the start of the final heat, the surf kicked into fifth gear and gave way to a phenomenal display of surfing, as almost every surfer in the event—both shop employees and team riders alike—were able to tuck into the tube at least once. As has become tradition, Town & Country was looking to be the team to beat with team leader Travis Hashimoto, Dustin Quizon, Makua Rothman, and Geoff Wong all ripping. But just behind them, nipping at their heels,

stood a hungry team HIC. Composed of Kekoa Cazimero, Joel Centeio, Merv Kuahiwinui, and Devin Jamie, HIC was looking like they could steal the win this year. As the clock ticked down, a solid set washed through the lineup that saw a number of surfers snag near-perfect scores. Barrels, high-speed carves, and elevatordrop floaters streamed through all at once. With a last-minute shift in the points, it seemed as if any of the remaining teams could have claimed the win. With the final heat horn blowing, contestants showered off and met up for a post-contest party later that night where the winners were announced. With a narrow margin

and led by the top-shelf surfing from Kekoa Cazimero, it was announced that team HIC had won the event and claimed the title. In a fitting move, Town and Country, the reigning champs, drenched HIC in champagne. “This was such a fun event and I’m so stoked that we were able to win this year,” said Kekoa Cazimero. Bowls is one of my favorite waves and I can’t believe we got to surf it pretty much alone when it’s this good. We’re really stoked and are definitely looking forward to competing at the national games in Huntington. I still can’t believe how fun the surf was.”

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A Weekend in July

Aloha Board Shop Honolulu Fish Fry Presented by Oxbow / Queens

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he First Aloha Boardshop Honolulu Fish Fry presented by Oxbow took place on the weekend of July 9 through the 10 at Queens in Waikiki. Throughout the event, the famous surf spot that had been home to legends like the Duke and Paul Strauch smiled at the competitors with clean, 2- to 3-foot conditions, light winds, and sunny skies. It was nothing short of picturesque, the perfect backdrop to any “Aloha From Hawaii” postcard. At 6 am on Saturday morning the judges’ stand cast its shadow and the sponsors’ tents dotted the outlining skirts of sand. Passer-bys watched as one by one, peculiar groups of giddy surfers sauntered through to sign-up area for the opening team competitions. If there’s one thing you can draw from this event, it wasn’t about winning, but enjoying a carefree event with a few friends and some retro shapes.. By 7 am, the first team, entitled Ex-Boyfriends, paddled out to the lineup. This set the bar for an array of colorful team names to follow throughout the rest of the event, including top crowd favorites, Longboaders Suck, organized by China Uemura himself, and Abunai, which in Japanese means dangerous. ASP Longboarder Champion Duane Desoto and his son were on hand to represent Oxbow’s team. When asked by the local media what the event was all about, Desoto stated, “It’s really all about having fun and enjoying being in the water and everything surfing is about. It’s great for everyone to get together and hangout with the kids and families and not stress about competitions.” Desoto’s comments were as flawless as the conditions. Who could stress about competing when riders were raffling to see which “fish tail” board they would ride in each heat? “Surprise! You get board number nine! Now go get em!” Free gelato, sunscreen samples and cases of Red Bull added to the festivities and kept the crowd moving. By the second day of competition on Sunday afternoon, the few teams left standing, along with the brave individuals who took on the challenge alone, had a permeating glow of both sun burn and excitement overload. It’s safe to say that the event was a huge success. When asked about next year, Jordan Wong, a team competitor and Oxbow representative stated, “It’s going to be even bigger.” —Amber Vega

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Photos: Heff

Clockwise from top: We like our fishes fried; the best fishing partner we've ever seen; no, this wasn't shot with a fisheye; gentlemen, draw your fishes; a three-pronged approach. Photo: Stephane

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A Weekend in July Rip Curl GromSearch / Kewalo Basin

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hen Rip Curl set up shop at Kewalo Basin for their annual GromSearch event in Honolulu, it would have been difficult for anyone to predict just how stratospheric the level of surfing would be. Without fail, the bar seems to get raised every year. The kids punt higher, the airs grow more tweaked, the rail work becomes ginsu-sharp—all of this and most of the groms are barely teenagers. At the forefront of this new, progressive generation stands the Moniz clan. With one of the strongest surfing pedigrees behind them, it seems that the entire family was literally born to usher surfing into new realms. For this year’s GromSearch, both Isaiah and Josh were carrying the family name to the podium. In the under 14 boys’ division, Josh Moniz took hold of his competition from the opening heat all the way to the final where he claimed top honors and as well as $100 for the H20 Overdrive Maneuver of the Event for a massive frontside air-reverse. Keeping the momentum within the family, older brother Isaiah utilized his bottomless familiarity with Kewalos to drop a near-perfect ride that would lay the groundwork for him to take the win in the Under

16 division. “I spend every day out here at Kewalos,” said Isaiah. “It feels good to be at your home break with waves and perform. The best is getting the invite to Nationals in San Francisco. It is going to be rad.”
 As Isaiah alluded, winners from each of the GromSearch events are awarded slots to compete at the GromSearch Nationals held in concurrence with Rip Curl Search event in San Francisco later this year. On the women’s side of the event, Kauai’s Tatiana Weston-Webb continued to hold her stride as she found herself once again standing victorious on the podium. Prior to her win here, Tatiana brought her surfing to the national level where she won a US Championship and placed second on the Open Women’s and Explorer Girls’ divisions at the NSSA Nationals in Southern California. To boot, Weston-Webb is also a women’s Pipeline Pro champ as well. Along with the Monizes and Noa Mizuno, who won the Under 12 division at GromSearch, Weston-Webb will be competing in San Francisco this fall. The next stop for Rip Curl’s GromSearch will go down at New Smyrna Beach, FL on August 13 and 14.

Without fail, the bar seems to get raised every year. The kids punt higher, the airs grow more tweaked, the rail work becomes ginsusharp—all of this and most of the groms are barely teenagers.

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Opposite page clockwise: Isaiah Moniz; Kaulana Apo; Tent city; Kain Daly. This Page: Josh Moniz, flaring. Photos: Heff

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open canvas Ryan McVay

The Evolving Brush There are hundreds of thousands of us who form our lives around the Holy Trinity of action sports. Simply put, our lives revolve around three things: surfing, skating, and snowboarding. But how many of us are able to fund our lifestyles through another equally tricky medium—art? Recently, we got to talking with Ryan McVay, an ex-pro snowboarder who gave up the powder for the brush. Born in Oregon, Ryan grew up outdoors and on the slopes. Innovative at a young age, he began building his own skate and wakeboards as early as 7 years old and became a cyclical boardrider, snowboarding in winter and skating and surfing in spots like Winchester Bay (a Great White Shark breeding ground) during summer. In his 20s, McVay competed throughout the Western United States in various snowboarding competitions, picking up sponsors along the way and finding a nice degree of achievement. While on the competition circuit, he tested his hand at Scientific Glass Blowing and successfully started selling his pieces to help pay for trip expenses. “Through injuries I realized that my art was necessary,” says McVay, “later I moved to Maui with a backpack and just started exploring.” Comfortably slipping into the art scene on the Valley Isle, McVay almost immediately scored a coveted place at the Four Seasons (now the Marriott) Gallery and later with 555 on Front Street. There, he started interacting with high-end clients on a regular basis and “expanded my style because I could see what clients liked,” he says. Taking a break from blowing glass to build a studio in Kula, McVay shifted his focus to painting. At first look, Ryan McVay’s paintings hark of MC Escher met Salvador Dali with softer colors and a gentler, way less psycho touch with further explorations revealing an array of motifs and sometimes complicated messages. One piece, “Timeless” took him seven years to complete and represents a 10,000-year span of time and, as he states, “It’s also about organized religion and how much bloodshed it has caused.” As one of the only American Surrealists of our modern time, this self-taught artist hopes for longevity: to be remembered not only now but for hundreds of years to come. Surfing when he can and raising his family Up Country, he teaches private glass blowing lessons, art classes, and takes on apprentices when he has time. “All my friends have been a huge support. Magic constantly happens in my life and I’ve been able to manifest everything I wanted. I’m aware of the now, I have faith, and I follow the flow.” Currently, McVay has plans to take his art to galleries in Japan and on the mainland, and is exploring new galleries on Oahu. —Siri Masterson

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Free plugs Leila Hurst Wins Nationals Kauai’s Leila Hurst has been on the surf world’s radar for quite some time. In the water, Leila’s approach is as smooth and graceful as her presence is on land. Recently, when we heard that she won an Open Women’s title at the NSSA Nationals in Huntington, one of the most prestigious events for American and Hawaiian surfers, we were left with the realization that the victory truly couldn’t have come to a more deserving person.

In her final year competing in the NSSA, Leila Hurst finished the season strong with an Open Women's win.

Going into the event as the top-ranked Hawaiian women, Leila already had a few national titles to her name. Looking toward the games, this would be Leila’s final year competing at the amateur level, and she had her eyes and hopes focused on one thing: the crown jewel of her NSSA career—an Open Women’s title. Although the surf at Huntington proved to be a bit anemic for the event, there was still enough swell on tap for Leila to put on a solid showing throughout the games. In the final, Leila found her footing and her characteristic approach in the lineup coupled with her sharp heat strategy proved to be too much for her competition to overcome. Her dream had been realized as Leila would go on to take the win. And if that wasn’t enough, she would go on to win the Explorer Division as well. “I was really hoping to walk away from NSSA with a strong finish and an Open Women’s title under my belt. The waves were not exactly perfect, but patience was key,” said Leila after her win. “I only caught four waves in my 30-minute final. The waves were very slow, but I don’t have an complaints, I’ll take a win anytime.”


Free plugs Storm Surfing Banned in Taiwan As surfing continues to take root throughout the world, some countries are still coming to grips with the nuances that surround the sport. Recently, Taiwanese authorities have banned surfing during major storms, citing potential hazards. In reaction to the ban, a defiant group of some 200 surfers has vocally opposed the ban and continues to surf during story, despite it being declared illegal.

According to the Taiwanese government, surfing during storms is now considered to be illegal. “Typhoon swells are probably the best surfable waves in Taiwan, even though the coast guards and the media hate us for being in the water during that time and often make a big scene of it,” said Chris Hsia to the news agency GlobalPost.com. According to Hsia, the media has sensationalized typhoon surfing and giving the non-surfing public the wrong impression. “The thing they don’t understand is that we are living on an island, so of course people will get in the ocean,” Hsia said. The ban speaks to a disconnect between an adventurous younger generation and a cautious older one. “We are preventive in nature, not interested in seeing disasters strike and then responding to them,” said Chen Chengwen, disaster prevention officer with the fire department in Taitung County, where a long Pacific coastline attracts scores of typhoon surfers. If this doesn’t make you appreciate living in Hawaii, nothing will.

Steph Gilmore Honored with ESPY As one of the most winning female surfers ever, Stephanie Gilmore recently added an ESPY award to her ever-growing list of achievements. Presented by ESPN, a press release described the

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Free plugs event’s and Gilmore’s win as a huge achievement for the four-time world champion. “Considered one of the most prestigious sports ceremonies in the world, the ESPY’S recognizes Excellence in Sports Performance, and winning a category is generally considered to be a sports achievement of its own. For the first time, second time nominated, Gilmore won Best Female Action Sports Athlete, ‘a deserved win,’ said ESPN.” Unfortunately for Steph, she couldn’t attend the awards ceremony as she was busy with a few more pressing things: most notably, winning the Roxy Pro France.

Zeke Gets Nuts Coming straight out of Kam Schools with a vengence, our boy Zeke Lau recently took home the biggest win of his burgeoning career when he won a 4-star QS event in El Salvador, trumping Australia’s Mitch Crews. While on summer break from Kamehameha, it feels like you can’t turn your head—or turn on a webcast—without hearing something from Zeke. He’s in the mags, he’s at Kewalos, he’s on the podium—the kid seems to be omnipresent these days. “It just felt so good when I got here, the waves are good and I just stayed relaxed,” Zeke said. “It’s a bounce back, I’ve had some ups and downs and I just wanted to get back on it and just relax and surf.  I just had so much fun.  Mitch surfed so well and I wanted to surf against him in the Final.” After his win, Zeke and his newly minted travel partner, Jason Shibata, headed back home to Paradise where they dined on the massive ramps at Town that honed their surfing. But the travel bug continued to call on Zeke and off he went to Puerto Escondido, chasing rating’s points and warm Mexican tubes. Fret not, dear reader, we’ve got our eyes honed on Zeke and have nailed a few stellar photos that will leave you weak in the knees. Stay tuned for our next issue to be blown away.

OG HB Beachboy Chuck Linnen, one of the original “HB Boys of 55” and an iconic member of the So Cal surfing community, will have his hand and footprints immortalized in cement on Friday, August 5 at 10:00 a.m. in front of Huntington Surf & Sport (corner of PCH and Main). Famed sports announcer/commentator David Stanfield and five-time U.S. Surfing Champion Corky Carroll, a mentee of Linnen, will serve as Masters of Ceremony.  The Surfers’ Hall of Fame induction ceremony pays tribute to those individuals who have made an indelible mark on the sport, industry and culture of surfing.  Annually, tens of thousands of visitors to Huntington Beach’s downtown area literally walk in the footsteps of surfing superstars and legends from several eras including Laird Hamilton, Andy Irons, Jack O’Neill, Corky Carroll, Robert August, Bob Hurley, Sean Collins, Kelly Slater, Lisa Andersen, Pat O’Connell, Al Merrick, Shaun Tomson and Rob Machado who are already immortalized.  A longtime Huntington Beach surfer, Chuck rode his first wave in 1954, was a men’s finalist at the 1958 Oceanside Invitational and competed in his first U.S. Championships in 1959, held in his hometown.  Linnen was among the first wave of California surfers to travel to the North Shore in the early 1960s and was a finalist at the 1961 world contest held at Makaha. He also competed at the 1964 world contest in Peru


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and was runner-up at the Malibu Masters event in 1973. Linnen helped shape the culture and character of Huntington Beach as a mentor and role model to local surfers—teaching future legends like Corky Carroll how to “shoot the pier.”  “The first time I saw Chuck was the first time I surfed the pier in about 1957,” said Corky. “I was too chicken to shoot the pier. Chuck saw this and coached me on how to do it. I didn’t know who he was and I asked somebody else in the water and they said, oh, that’s Charles. He is one of the best guys out here.”

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The “surf king” as many called him was a member of the Huntington Beach Surfing Association and "The Boys of 55" surf club. Back before there were surf contests at the pier, surf magazines, surf movies and surf shops in Huntington Beach, a bunch of surfers including Chuck, who loved the waves at their Huntington Beach pier got together to form the HB Pier Surf Club. They were the pioneers of “Surf City” long before Jan & Dean sang about it and they laid the groundwork for Huntington Beach to become one the greatest surf communities in the world. “Chuck Linnen is a home grown Huntington Beach Surfing legend, former lifeguard and a friend to many in our great city,” said Surfers’ Hall of Fame founder Aaron Pai. “We are honored and extremely excited to induct him into the Surfers’ Hall of Fame.”    Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:

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closeout Tavi goes mad

With one of the most talked about swells of the season turning Cloudbreak into an aquatic testing ground, some of the world’s most adept and daring surfers redefined the limits in big-wave paddle surfing. With multiple-section tuberides on 20-foot waves becoming the standard, surfers like Mark Healey (pictured here) changed the game forever. We’ve got the goods on this historic swell and we’re dropping them in all their glossy glory in our next issue.

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Sequence: Lemos

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