Page 1


2

fall 19


fall 19

3


22

c o n t e n t s in th e h o m e

06 personal chefs for the holidays With a little hired help, you can have your cake and eat it, too.

10 it doesn’t have to be magic Local professional organizers help clients find inner peace through outer order.

putting maryland wine on the map Three winemakers all knew there was something special waiting to be tasted in the Maryland soil.

aro u n d th e h om e

14 winter gardening Even as the seasons change, there’s still plenty to do out in the garden.

18 staying healthy this winter Braving the winter chill could aid your health and well-being.

away f ro m h om e

30 savory seafood All crabs are not created equal.

36 healthy holiday travel tips Stress and sickness shouldn’t be part of your reason for the season.

38 what we love right now

4

fall 19

recurring

45

48

rally ho!

backstory

Classic car hobbyists all across the county share their passion.

Make charming seasonal crafts from your autumn garden.

PHOTO: GETTY

Seasonal drinks, weekend events, and everything pumpkin

cove r


PUBLISHER

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Geordie Wilson

a

Eli Hoelscher

h e l l o

from the editor

REVENUE DIRECTOR

Connie Hastings

Hannah Chenoweth Amanda S. Creasey Jeanne Marie Ford Gina Gallucci-White Christie Wisniewski

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Bill Green Dan Gross

passions, each one representing a different corner of the local

Anna Joyce

Consider the triumphant tale of Maryland wine, which started as an

WRITERS

DESIGN

How do we define Frederick County? Is it truly just the arbitrary bounds of a map? Of course not. In this issue, you’ll get to know a range of people chasing their cultural landscape.

unthinkable prospect and now has vineyards bringing home medals for their Frederick terroir. Or there’s the best seafood restaurants in the county, which can stand with any across the state thanks to their commitment to quality. For editorial queries or suggestions, contact Eli Hoelscher, ehoelscher@sunflowerpub.com. For advertising queries, contact Connie Hastings, chastings@newspost.com.

What strikes me as uniquely Frederick across these stories is the force of the community in these very different pursuits. It doesn’t matter if someone’s vision involves deftly organizing attics or selecting nuanced grape varietals—everyone we talked to is here because they’re driven by the friends, neighbors, and colleagues

Spires Magazine 351 Ballenger Center Drive Frederick, MD 21703 (301) 662-1163

they have around the county. Community is an inextricable ingredient in each of these passions, and Frederick County wouldn’t be what it is without it. Fall is a great time to reflect on who we are and what we’ve accomplished. It is harvest time, after all—and as you’ll see in the pages before you, there’s so much in Frederick ready to be enjoyed.

Spires Magazine is a collaboration of The Frederick News-Post and Ogden Publications’ city/regional magazine division. PUBLISHER Bill Uhler DIRECTOR Bob Cucciniello PRODUCTION MANAGER Jenni Lieste GROUP EDITOR Jean Teller EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Eli Hoelscher COPY EDITOR Leslie Andres All material, including text and photography, are copyright Ogden Publications. The use, reprint or distribution of any material without express permission is forbidden.

Eli Hoelscher

ON THE COVER Mike Locke with his 1937 Ford five-window custom coupe in Middletown Park. He is the Golden Gears vice president and says he has owned more than 40 cars over the years. Photograph by Bill Green.

fall 19

5


Personal chef Anna Hattauer prepares Parmesan fish, which is baked with chipotle seasoning and Old Bay sauce, then topped with green onions.

6

fall 19


in

THE HOME

Personal Chefs for the Holidays With a little hired help, you can have your cake and eat it, too.

PHOTOS: BILL GREEN

A

s the holidays inch closer, people find their to-do lists grow longer and longer. Yet cooking a holiday meal doesn’t have to be one of the items stressing you out. Whether working a small family gathering or a party for friends, personal chefs can offer a muchneeded reprieve from working in the kitchen this holiday season. After discussing clients’ wants, needs, and restrictions, these chefs travel to homes to prepare a customized menu and even clean up afterward. “I see a lot of people asking for hors d’oeuvre parties (around the holidays),” says Anna Hattauer of the Monrovia-based Culinary Chick Personal Chef Services. “They want cocktail parties. I don’t see a whole lot of ‘I want to sit down with 15 people and have a plated dinner.’” Many of her clients want to have an informal get-together where people can carry their plates as they mingle. While her menus are customizable, some of her most requested hors d’oeuvres are bitesized quiches, chicken skewers, empanadas, and Fireball whisky-infused BBQ meatballs. Personal chef Chris Spear of the Frederickbased Perfect Little Bites notes his holiday menu typically features fall- and winter-inspired foods geared toward entertaining, including hot appetizers such as mini crab cakes and canapés. “I definitely look at whatever holiday or season

it is and try and gear the menu around that,” he says. By hiring a personal chef at the holidays, folks don’t have to be preoccupied with cooking, according to Spear. “You can free up your time to spend time with your friends or family,” he says. “You don’t want to be stuck in the kitchen when people are coming over. You want to be entertaining and having a good time. Plus with me, I do all the cleanup. Everyone does it a little differently, but I bring all the china and silverware. I bring all the cooking pots and pans. … When I am done, I am going to pack up all my dirty things and take them out with me—you are not going to be spending the next three hours cleaning the kitchen.” After years of cooking for friends and family, Hattauer left the corporate world and decided to pursue a culinary career. Graduating from Frederick Community College, she knew she did not want to open or work in a restaurant. “I didn’t want to manage,” she says. “I wanted to cook. ... I didn't want to work for somebody else. I wanted to be my own boss and show my creativity, not somebody else’s.” Her clients vary from those who do not like or know how to cook to those without the time. Some of her clients have special dietary needs, so she makes a menu that works for them. “I like

Story by Gina Gallucci-White fall 19

7


in

THE HOME

helping people who otherwise could not do these things on their own,” she says. “I love meeting people. I love working with people, and I enjoy when they say, ‘Oh, man. I love this. I love your food.’ They are happy. I like to make people happy.” From a young age, Spear recalls watching his mother prepare meals for their family. “We were having real dinners at home, which was nice,” he says. “I always enjoyed being around in the kitchen. When it was time to get a job as a teenager, I wanted to start in restaurants. I did, and that is all I have ever done. … It is definitely a creative outlet. I don’t know what I would do if I was not doing cooking.” Both chefs offer a customizable experience and send out questionnaires to clients to better understand the types of cuisine they prefer. Budget and seasonality are taken into account when putting together a menu. “I always try to get my customers to come out of their comfort zone a little bit,” Spear says. “Not necessarily a whole meal, but it doesn't always have to be Caesar salad, filet -Anna Hattauer mignon, and cheesecake. Maybe try something interesting. Around the holiday times, if you are bringing people over that don't live with you, it might be a good time to show off a little bit.” Those considering a personal chef should inquire about services well ahead of time. Spear has had people contact him less than two weeks before an event and sometimes just days before Valentine’s Day. Spear also encourages clients to vocalize their likes and dislikes. “A lot of people will tell you, ‘We like everything,’ and then I will spend a lot of time doing a menu proposal. Then they look at it, and they say, ‘I don’t really care for eggplant.’ … That’s why I always try to get that out of people up front.” Depending on their requests, people should also have a realistic budget. “The cost is going to sometimes be higher than going to a restaurant,” Spear says. “You have to understand when I go out, you are my only customer tonight.” Hattauer usually gets a lot of people who joke with her that they will hire her once they win the lottery. Many of her clients request weekly meals that can be reheated in the microwave or oven after work. “A lot of people don’t realize it is not always (just) for the rich and famous,” she says. “It’s something everyday families can do.”

“A lot of people don’t realize it is not always (just) for the rich and famous.” Personal chef Chris Spear prepares food in his home kitchen.

Perfect Little Bites perfectlittlebites.com

8

fall 19

PHOTOS: DAN GROSS

Culinary Chick Personal Chef Services culinarychickpersonalchef.com


fall 19

9


“The truth is, stuff isn’t just stuff—it’s charged with emotional ties.”

“As Americans, we have more stuff than most, and it can get completely overwhelming.”

10

fall 19


in

THE HOME

It Doesn’t Have to Be Magic Local professional organizers help clients find inner peace through outer order.

W

PHOTOS: GETTY, DAN GROSS

Carolyn West, owner of Organize Me!, declutters a closet using baskets and shelves.

Story by Hannah Chenoweth

hen it comes to tackling clutter, starting is often the hardest part—and a growing number of Americans are calling for backup. Professional organizers can help lighten the load considerably, providing a dose of perspective, practicality, and, let’s face it, much-needed accountability to the entire process. Marie Kondo may have introduced us to the psychological benefits of decluttering with The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, but she’s not the only organizational guru in town. Since 1995, the membership of the National Association of Productivity & Organizing Professionals has skyrocketed from 834 to more than 4,000. Professional organizers are a rising force in Frederick, too: A quick Google search will turn up a number of locals for hire, available for projects both big and small. So, what exactly is a professional organizer, and how do they work their magic? We talked to a few Frederick-based pros about the services they offer, the most common trouble spots they come across, and what they really think about the KonMari method.

friend for helping with home projects before she realized that “professional organizer” was even a job title. She launched her business in 2016 and has since helped hundreds of clients with all kinds of projects, from organizing the kitchen pantry to downsizing entire estates. West says her approach depends entirely on each client’s wishes; some want to be intimately involved in the process, while others prefer to let West handle the heavy lifting. Either way, her goal— to help people help themselves and take control of their mess—remains the same. Hands-on Help Organizing, Vicki Senires’ one-woman business, has a similar origin story. Senires, known for her organizing skills, helped numerous friends of her aging mother downsize their homes as a courtesy; now, she feels fortunate to get paid to do what she loves. “The truth is, stuff isn’t just stuff—it’s charged with emotional ties. As Americans, we have more stuff than most, and it can get completely overwhelming,” she says. “It’s always easier to get projects done with hands-on help, which is what inspired the name of my business.”

From Overwhelmed to Orderly Carolyn West, the sole owner and operator of Frederick-based Organize Me!, says that clients should never feel embarrassed about their clutter—she’s seen it all, and is far from fazed. A lifelong neatnik, West was the go-to

Common Organizational Hurdles Despite the diversity of projects they work on, both West and Senires say that a few common themes pop up with their clients. “Almost every home has a dumping area,” West says. “Whether it’s a table, a chair, or an fall 19

11


in

i t

yo u r s e l f

THE HOME

t r y

Vicki Senires of Hands-on Help Organizing

12

fall 19

it may as well be gone. Getting rid of it isn’t the end of the world.” Though West and Senires value certain aspects of Marie Kondo’s philosophy, both organizers agree that the KonMari method of tidying and minimizing isn’t necessarily realistic for most American families. “I think she has some great ideas for helping people get their lives in order, but peace and order can definitely be achieved at a less extreme level,” Senires says. In Pursuit Of Peace, Not Perfection It’s important to realize that professional organizers are neither fairy godmothers nor maids—the power ultimately lies within you to maintain harmony in the home with good habits. “What’s unique about this profession is that there’s nothing better than someone saying, ‘I don’t need your services anymore,’” West says. Both West and Senires also emphasize that the goal isn’t a pictureperfect, Instagram-ready home: It’s to help you enjoy your life more. “The bottom line is, it’s stressful to be disorganized,” Senires says. “Minimizing the mess of clutter is freeing; it creates a sense of relief, rather than additional stress.”

• Consider the essentials: the items you actually use the most. Start by packing the nonnegotiables. • Evaluate the items that bring you comfort: These need to be accessible and visible in the new environment. Figuring out what those items are, of course, also filters out things that are causing you stress. • Take care of the outdated gadgets you’ve accumulated once and for all; many stores, such as Staples, will actually dispose of them for free. E-End is a local electronic-recycling center that West often recommends to clients. • If you have children, use their input as motivation. Chances are that they don’t have the same attachment to the sentimental items you’re hanging on to, and can help you be realistic with what to keep or discard. • Designate a specific box or tote for mementos to avoid going overboard, like when an entire room is used for storage.

Organize Me! organizemefrederick.net 240-242-7152 Hands-on Help Organizing Facebook: Organizinghandshelp 301-651-6300

PHOTO: BILL GREEN

entire room, clutter starts to snowball and becomes an enormous source of stress that feels too daunting to tackle.” Staying on top of the little things makes a massive difference—that is, shredding junk mail once it arrives, or filing bills in a folder instead of letting them stack up. Everything should have a home and a place it belongs, even seemingly harmless items such as your keys and wallet, West says. Another hang-up, unsurprisingly, is parsing through the sentimental, which emphasizes the importance of bringing in an objective third party to act as the voice of reason. Senires has seen clients cling to items such as old wedding dresses or broken china out of guilt, and says that a big part of her job is simply giving people the permission to let go. “When you reach a point where you’re moving things from place to place because you don’t know what purpose they serve, it’s time to reexamine your reasons,” Senires says. “It will give you peace of mind to let it go—and more space in your home, on a practical note.” Often, Senires says there’s a family historian who ends up saddled with the majority of heirlooms and mementos; she suggests dispersing items more evenly among relatives to relieve this burden. Plus, “If it’s been in storage forever and you haven’t looked at it, the truth is that

Tips for Downsizing


fall 19

13


Winter

Gardening Story by Christie Wisniewski

14

fall 19


around

THE HOME

Even as the seasons change, there’s still plenty to do.

C

PHOTOS: GETTY

ooler weather may mean bonfires, scarves, and comfy sweaters, but it also means it’s time to prepare the plants that you’ve lovingly tended over the summer for the coming winter. Winters in Maryland can bring harsh temperatures—especially in January and February—so any gardener should be aware of what plants can tolerate and know how to keep them happy over the winter months.

Bringing Plants Indoors Typically, Frederick’s first frost occurs around mid-October; gardeners should plan to bring in any plants that will not survive winter weather before then. Most tropical plants do not tolerate weather below 45 degrees Fahrenheit, so the palm tree that’s been sitting on the deck for the past few months will need to be brought inside. Certain herbs need to come inside before nighttime temperatures consistently drop to the mid to low 30s, but rosemary, oregano, marjoram, sage, tarragon, and thyme typically survive Maryland winters outdoors. Some other cold-hardy plants like hostas, coneflowers, and black-eyed Susans can also survive, springing back to their glory when the weather turns warm again. Before bringing plants indoors, check them for bugs and other pests. Some larger pests like caterpillars and grasshoppers can be removed by hand or with a quick spray of the hose. Mealybug or scale infestations can be treated with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol. Alternatively, mix one tablespoon of liquid castile soap with one quart of water and spray it onto the affected plant. Keep infested plants away from healthy plants until the pests have been removed. Garden plants need to be transplanted into adequately sized pots before being brought indoors. Be careful to not damage the roots of the plant when digging an herb for transplant. Also, make sure plants are placed in an area of the home that receives enough sunlight for them to stay happy. Some herbs like mint and cilantro fare well in shade, but other herbs like basil and lavender prefer sunny spots. If kept inside in favorable conditions, annual herbs and flowers can continue to grow through the winter. In spring, perennials can be replanted after the last frost—typically in late May. Pay attention to local weather reports to learn when it is safe to begin bringing plants outdoors again for the season.

WINTER GARDENING CHECKLIST • Make sure you’ve picked any remaining fruits, vegetables, and flowers in your garden; compost dead flowers and rotted produce.

• T rim dead leaves and remove any dead plants from the garden.

• Bring cold-sensitive plants indoors; double check for bugs and pests.

• T ransplant plants into pots to bring indoors.

• S pread compost over garden for nutrients.

• Mulch to protect soil and remaining plants.

• Neatly store your gardening tools in a dry, covered spot.

• S tart planning next year’s garden!

fall 19

15


around THE HOME

Sage and a handful of other herbs fare well outdoors during Maryland winters.

LOCAL GREENHOUSES OPEN DURING WINTER The Dutch Plant Farm (open year-round) 151 Baughmans Lane, Frederick thedutchplantfarm.com Potomac Garden Center (closed January and February) 8710 Fingerboard Road, Urbana potomacgardencenter.com

fall 19

Planning for Next Season It’s never too early to plan for your biggest, best garden yet. At the end of the season, reflect on what went well—and what didn’t. Is there an herb you’ve always wanted to try growing? Do you need to figure out a better way to keep pests out of your pumpkin patch? Also, make a list of seeds, plants, and replacement tools to buy so you’re prepared when spring rolls around.

PHOTO: GETTY

16

Winterizing Your Garden Any avid gardener knows that the end of summer doesn’t mean the end of gardening. In addition to bringing cold-intolerant plants indoors before the first freeze, winterizing the garden will protect the soil and the remaining plants. Before the coldest temperatures arrive, lay down mulch in any garden beds with remaining plants. While springtime mulching helps the soil retain moisture and will suppress weeds, mulching before winter helps shield plants from harsh winds, as well as repeated freezes and thaws. Mulch also insulates the soil and shields the ground from the warmth of the sun, which keeps plants in dormancy until springtime.


fall 19

17


18

fall 19


around

THE HOME

Stay Healthy This Winter Resist the urge to spend time outside only during warm months, because braving the winter chill could aid your health and well-being.

W

PHOTO: GETTY

arm breezes and cheerful sunshine beckon us outside throughout summer. By contrast, those dreary winter months can make us yearn to hibernate indoors until spring. Who doesn’t love cozying up by the fire, snuggling in soft blankets, or hunkering down for a movie night? Although it may be tempting, it’s important to fight the desire to hide away all winter. Regular outdoor activity, especially when it’s cold, offers crucial benefits to our mental, emotional, and physical health.

Mental and Emotional Health Instead of curling up on the couch this winter when you feel tired, cold, or worn down, try going outside for a walk. One study conducted by scientists in Finland found that people who spend more time outside in green spaces have a more positive perception of their own general well-being. Researchers have also found that forests, parks, and fresh air kick our brains into high gear, improving creativity and boosting our sense of novelty. Engaging in outdoor activity has also been shown to improve concentration. Children who play outside

regularly are less likely to exhibit symptoms of ADHD, and, according to an article published by Harvard University, exercising outside mitigates ADHD in children who manifest its symptoms. Ellen StuartHaentjens, a Ph.D. candidate in biology and integrative life sciences at Virginia Commonwealth University, sees firsthand the positive effects of the outdoors on her students. “Whenever I take students into the field with me, even in the dead of winter, they are happier and more receptive to learning.” Stuart-Haentjens isn’t the only one to note these positive effects of the outdoors. Attention Restoration Theory suggests that walking outside—as opposed to indoors on a treadmill, as our default during winter months might be—increases creativity and ability to focus when compared with sitting inside, walking inside, or sitting outside. During winter, some people suffer from mild to moderate seasonal affective disorder brought on by lack of sunlight, which can disrupt sleep patterns and serotonin levels. Symptoms include increased irritability, lethargy, oversleeping, and a change in appetite, among others. Severe winter depression

Story by Amanda S. Creasey fall 19

19


around

20

fall 19

i t

Immune SystemBoosting Recipe Herbal Tonic Soup This savory vegetable soup is a traditional way of incorporating astragalus, garlic, and mushrooms into your diet for medicinal benefits. Ingredients • 1 ounce dried astragalus root, sliced • 1/2-inch piece fresh ginger, slivered • 1/4 cup brown basmati rice • 8 cups vegetable or chicken stock • 1/2 cup onion, chopped • 1 cup winter squash, chopped • 1 cup shiitake and/or maitake mushrooms, sliced • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil • 1 cup corn, fresh or frozen • 2 tablespoons light miso, or to taste • 8 medium cloves garlic, minced • 1/4 cup fresh parsley, minced Directions 1. Simmer astragalus, ginger, rice, and stock in a heavy covered pot for 1 hour. 2. Sauté onion, squash, and mushrooms in olive oil for 5 minutes, or until vegetables soften. 3. Add sautéed vegetable mixture to the soup pot, cover, and simmer 30 minutes. Add corn; simmer an additional 10 minutes. Remove astragalus. 4. Dilute miso in a small amount of broth and add to soup. Thin soup with additional broth if desired and add more miso to taste. 5. Add garlic and parsley, let stand for 5 minutes, and serve. Serves 8 to 10. —Recipe by Laurel Vukovic

PHOTO: GETTY

Physical Health Scientists at the University of Essex found that people who exercise outside are more enthusiastic about their fitness routine— and thus more likely to stick with it. In other words, those of us who plan to be gym rats from November to March are at a higher risk of losing our mojos and packing on the winter pounds compared with those of us who hit the trails, slopes, and sidewalks. Just 20 minutes in the fresh air can be the equivalent of one energizing cup of coffee. If you replace a 20-minute nap with a 20-minute walk or run in the brisk air, you’ll feel just as (if not more) awake—and you will have burned a few extra calories. It’s important for children and seniors to get outside in the winter, too. American children spend an average of six hours a day on sedentary activities, such as playing video games or watching TV. Outside, kids can replace these activities with sledding, ice skating, snowball fights and snowmanbuilding. Average American adults spend 90 percent of their lives inside, and the amount of time we spend indoors increases as we grow older, which is unfortunate, considering that daily time spent outdoors may help older people stay healthy longer. In one study, participants who, at age 70, went outside every day regardless of the season experienced fewer instances of sleep problems and fewer aches and pains at age 77 than participants who spent less time outside. It might come as no surprise, then, that spending time outside has also been shown to help with pain management and the healing process. One study from the University of Pittsburgh found that spinal surgery patients suffered less pain, experienced less stress, and used fewer painkillers if they were regularly exposed to natural light. Stuart-Haentjens works outside year-round. “After the field season,” she says, “I’m always in better shape, as are many of my colleagues. When you spend your days tromping around a forest, wetland, or other ecosystem, how could you not be?”

t r y

affects 4 to 6 percent of people and requires professional counseling or medical attention. But for those with mild SAD, spending time outside is a simple and inexpensive way to cope, as natural light and regular exercise may help reduce negative emotions. Stimulating outdoor activities can also boost mood and reduce stress. One study found that the impact of daily stress was lowered in those who live and work near green spaces.

y o u r s e l f

THE HOME


fall 19

21


Putting Maryland

Wine On the Map Three winemakers all knew there was

something special waiting to be tasted in our state’s soil.

STORY BY JEANNE MARIE FORD PHOTOS BY BILL GREEN

22

fall 19


Nick Cuneo and his friend’s dog, Burt Reynolds, enjoy a visit to Big Cork Vineyards beside rows of ready-toharvest grapes.

fall 19

23


away

FROM HOME

Big

Cork Vineyards began with a vision and a dream, director of development and marketing Amy Benton says. Coowner Randy Thompson wanted to share the spectacular view from his family’s Rohrersville soybean farm. He and his wife Jennifer loved wine. They loved traveling. Although they knew nothing about growing grapes, they decided to open a winery. The Thompsons recruited Dave Collins, a winemaker from Virginia’s esteemed Breaux Vineyards. Together, the three created the vision for Big Cork that has come to fruition today. Home winemaker Vince Perrotta heard good things about the up-and-coming winery, whose first vintage was the 2011 Malbec. Perrotta volunteered to work in production in hopes of improving his own wines. He was offered a job in the tasting room, which opened in 2015. More than four years later, he’s still there. Perrotta says most wineries initially use an existing building, such as an old barn, for tastings. “The building is usually secondary to the wine,” he says. “But because the Thompsons convinced Dave Collins to come here, they were very confident that the wine was going to be excellent. They said, ‘Let’s just roll the dice and build a nice building that we can open with.’ It proved to be a safe bet. People come to this very rural area of the state, and all of a sudden you’re presented with this beautiful Napa kind of feel that’s warm and welcoming.” Jennifer Thompson worked with Frederick design studio Pure Home on every detail of the tasting room. The building’s sightlines were intentionally designed so that cars are unseen by visitors, leaving only expansive mountain views. Outdoor space is abundant, including a casual patio with flat-screen televisions for watching sports and a

24

fall 19

In 2017, Big Cork commissioned a portrait—made from more than 15,000 corks—of winemaker Dave Collins.

climate-controlled tent area for more formal affairs, such as weddings and parties. Smaller events are often held in the production room, with retractable chandeliers descending from the ceiling to transform the space into an elegant dining room. Four ticketed concert events with nationally known artists are held each year. The Thompsons are avid supporters of the arts. In 2017, they commissioned a portrait—made from more than 15,000 corks—of winemaker Collins from Michigan artist Scott James Gundersen. The main draw of Big Cork, of course, is the wine. The vineyard currently has 40 acres under vine with 16 different grape varieties. Three experimental Russian grapes are proprietary to Big Cork, known only by their alphanumeric codenames; they’re used to make a unique blend called Russian Kiss. Big Cork isn’t afraid to take chances. The 2016 nebbiolo won a silver medal in the London International Wine Festival. For a small winery in Maryland, Perrotta says, this is “a big deal.”


This restored 1952 International pickup truck is an icon at New Market Plains Vineyards.

A selection of awardwinning wines on display at Linganore Winecellars

fall 19

25


Big Cork Vineyards 4236 Main Street, Rohrersville bigcorkvineyards.com New Market Plains Vineyards 11111 West Baldwin Road, New Market newmarketplains.com Linganore Winecellars 13601 Glissans Mill Road, Mt. Airy linganorewines.com

“Wineries have to balance out what grows well and what people know. Either way, you’re going to be educating people.” New Market Plains Vineyards

Susan Wilson’s family has owned New Market Plains since 1760; the land was originally part of the estate of her ancestor, Nicholas Hall, Sr., co-founder of the town of New Market. Susan had a career as a librarian. Her husband, Howard, was an airplane mechanic. When they inherited a portion of her family’s farm, they had no idea what to do with it. They wanted to preserve the historical buildings and ensure that the land remained productive. They ultimately hit upon the idea of starting a vineyard. “We started growing grapes in 1995,” Susan says. “We did it by hand then, with an auger and a tractor and a shovel.” “We planted 5 acres the first time and learned a lot about what not to do,” Howard adds with a laugh. The Wilsons eventually hired world-renowned viticulturist Lucy Morton to advise them. “She came for a day, and we dug 6-to 7-foot-deep pits so she could go down and look at the soil structure,” Howard says. At the end of that day, he asked if she wanted to see the old vineyard; she declined. According to Morton, it was planted in the wrong orientation—it needed to be torn out. 26

fall 19

New Market Plains Vineyards owners Susan and Howard Wilson

Common wisdom at the time held that Maryland grapes would not produce good wine. But Morton’s local clients banded together and decided they were going to try, Howard says. “And they did. And they made the best wine anybody had ever had from Maryland fruit. That was a good inspiration to know what we could do.” The Wilsons initially sold grapes to area wineries. In 2011, they began consulting with a winemaker from France. In 2015, they bottled their first vintage with a mobile bottling truck. Today, their farm is part of an agricultural preservation zone, boasting over 20 miles of vine rows, all maintained by hand, with no herbicides. The tasting room, which was originally the old farm’s dairy, is adorned with antique tools and other memorabilia. The winery’s logo comes from an 1840 painting of the property. The wines have been well received by critics and the public alike. “Every wine we’ve ever entered in a competition has won an award,” Susan says. “Part of the fun in doing the winemaking is experimenting with different things,” Howard says. An orange wine made from a muscat blanc base is one example. They are also in the process of crafting barrels from trees felled on the property. It’s a laborintensive project, but will be worth the effort if the wine is good, Howard says. “The barrels are coming from the same soil that your grapes are. Not many people can say that.”


fall 19

27


Linganore Winecellars’ Anthony Aellen stands on a large grape harvesting machine.

Linganore Winecellars

The largest winery in Maryland had a humble start. In 1971, Anthony Aellen’s parents purchased a working dairy farm in Mt. Airy. Originally from Brooklyn and Queens, the Aellens planted grapes “mainly as a hobby,” Aellen says, to make homemade wine as their family had done for generations. “Everyone around here thought we were nuts,” Aellen says, because Maryland was not known as a grape-growing region. In 1974, the family inherited his grandfather’s winemaking equipment. With the knowhow, the grapes in the ground, and now the tools in hand, they decided to apply for a winery license, and in July of 1976, Linganore Winecellars opened. “We started making bone-dry wines because that’s what we drank,” Aellen says. They soon discovered local consumers preferred something sweeter. In 1978, they became the first winery in the state to introduce semisweet wines, which proved extremely popular. Given the winery’s out-of-the-way location, Aellen’s father decided to start hosting wine festivals to attract customers. “It was a marketing opportunity for us in the beginning,” Aellen says. “Now it’s really sort of become more of a cultural event.” The winery’s central Maryland location makes it an ideal spot for family reunions and friend meet-ups. Children play Frisbee on the expansive lawn, and even dogs can relax at the new dog park. For those who like 28

fall 19

live music and wine but prefer a quieter scene, musicians perform Friday through Sunday nights. The 2014 opening of Red Shedman Farm Brewery & Hop Yard has proved to be another popular addition. With Aellen’s older brother Victor as brewmaster, Red Shedman makes close to 20 beers and hard ciders, which have won numerous awards. “It’s neat to watch customers get out of the cars, split and go in both directions,” Aellen says, indicating the two tasting rooms. In 2014, Ray Mitchum came on board at Linganore as head winemaker. Third-generation winemaker Melissa Aellen returned to the family business in 2017 to shepherd a dry wine program. “It’s really taken off in the last five years or so,” Melissa says. “We tend to be known for our sweet wines because we were the only sweet wine producer for years and years. But probably 50 percent of our awards are for our dry wines.” “You can make a wine you know will do really well in competitions,” Melissa says. “But we all are foodies. We don’t care if it gets awards. We all focus on food and the wine that can go best with the food we can eat.” She adds that nearly all their wine labels include suggested food pairings. “We only started entering wine competitions in 1992,” Anthony says. “Now we have over 500 medals to our name. But I tell customers it doesn’t mean anything unless you like the wine. Everybody’s tastes are different, and nobody’s tastes are wrong.”


fall 19

29


30

fall 19


away

FROM HOME

Savory Seafood All crabs are not created equal. If you’re hankering for ocean fare, make sure to try these Frederick restaurants.

PHOTOS: JOE MAY, FIRESTONE’S OYSTERS - DAN GROSS. AVERY’S - BILL GREEN.

Story by Jeanne Marie Ford

Firestone’s Raw Bar The newest offshoot of the venerable Firestone’s Culinary Tavern, Firestone’s Raw Bar opened in October 2015. Manager Keelin Mallory says that when the original Firestone’s Market storefront became available, the owners took their time developing a vision for the space. Their aim was to create a restaurant that would be good for Frederick while offering something slightly different from the flagship restaurant. A luxurious white marble bar stands at the center of the restaurant. The gentle sound of a waterfall emanates from the rear. A large wall map touts the origins of the day’s oyster selections. Chic light fixtures shaped like lobster pots and a crab made of stained glass add to the air of elegance. Mallory characterizes the restaurant as slightly “more elevated from Firestone’s, but still people-friendly.” She says, “We basically just picked things that we loved to eat,” with oysters, fresh seafood, and charcuterie as the main offerings. The emphasis on small plates encourages patrons to sample and share. The bar sources alcohol locally as much as possible; the friendly bartender chats excitedly about a new “oyster water” cocktail on the menu.

LEFT Joe May, owner of May’s Restaurant in Frederick, with a tray of colossal crab RIGHT, TOP TO BOTTOM Avery’s Maryland Grille oysters Annapolis with crab meat  very’s Captain JR Platter with Alaskan king crab, steak, A shrimp and a number of sides Oysters from Firestone’s Raw Bar

fall 19

31


away

FROM HOME

Fresh live Maryland crabs waiting to be steamed at May’s Restaurant

Avery’s Maryland Grille For more than 50 years, Jug Bridge Seafood was a beloved Frederick institution. In 2006, Stephen Polcari bought a bar on the property, Monkey Lala. A few years later, Jug Bridge closed, and Polcari decided to buy the building. Initially, he says, “I wasn’t sure exactly what 32

fall 19

“A lot of people think not much goes into just crabs, but they’d be surprised.” - Stephen Polcari

concept I was going for. But this building with all its history is going to be a seafood house. It was a seafood house before me, and maybe after me… I just feel like that’s what it is.” He began renovations in 2012 and opened Avery’s Maryland Grille two years later. Avery’s offers three distinct dining experiences: a family restaurant with a nautical theme and a large aquarium as its centerpiece, a lively sports bar, and an enclosed outdoor patio with string lights and a

PHOTOS: CRABS - DAN GROSS. MALLET - BILL GREEN.

Firestone’s Raw Bar offers at least five types of East Coast oysters at any given time. “We’re always working with lots of fresh fish,” Mallory says; the restaurant receives a shipment of fresh oysters and a half side of tuna every day. Crudo dishes, poke bowls, and crab cakes are frequent specials, and Maryland crab dip is a menu mainstay. “The Chef’s Tower” is the pièce de résistance, featuring 18 oysters, ceviche, tuna tartare, and a raw seafood special such as lobster salad or steamed shrimp, all served on ice. It’s a bargain, Mallory says, at $65. A high-end, hand-operated meat slicer—ready to prepare charcuterie at a moment’s notice—holds a place of honor at the front of the restaurant “to keep the people who don’t like oysters happy,” Mallory says. “We want to be here for everyone.”


fall 19

33


away

FROM HOME

beachy vibe. Avery’s also does a brisk business in takeout crabs, drawing customers from a wide area that extends well beyond Frederick County. “A lot of people think not much goes into just crabs, but they’d be surprised,” Polcari says. “We’re lucky that we do a big enough volume that my buying power in the crab department is very good. That makes me be able to pick and choose whom I’m buying from.” “Obviously, I think we do a great job with the crabs first and foremost,” Polcari says, but Avery’s offers a large and varied menu. Other customer favorites include crab legs, oysters, and clams. The restaurant also boasts a wood-burning grill, where steaks, ribs, and chicken are cooked over an open flame. Weekly specials include discounted crab legs on Tuesdays, crabs on Wednesdays, and oysters on Thursdays. An all-you-can-eat option is offered every day, with four pricing levels with different perks. Polcari says that Avery’s was recently chosen by the website Only in Your State (onlyinyourstate.com) as one of the featured all-you-can-eat crab restaurants in the Delmarva region. He also offers high praise for his staff, who work with him to ensure that each customer receives a high-quality product. “I’d put our crab cakes and seafood up against anybody else’s, regardless of price point, ” Polcari says.

34

fall 19

Oyster Blues Top oysters on the half shell with Ken’s Chunky Blue Cheese Dressing. Add applewood-smoked bacon. Broil until the top browns slightly. Eat. Enjoy. Repeat!

Firestone’s Raw Bar 105 North Market Street, Frederick firestonesrestaurant.com/raw-bar/about-the-raw-bar/ Avery’s Maryland Grille 9009 Baltimore Road, Frederick averysmarylandgrille.com May’s Restaurant 5640 Urbana Pike (Route 355), Frederick maysrestaurant.com

PHOTOS: DAN GROSS

May’s Restaurant General manager Mindy Frye holds court at the entrance to May’s Restaurant, where she’s worked for more than 28 years. Doug May, the original owner, eats lunch at a nearby table and engages in friendly banter with the regular customers. Three years ago, he sold the restaurant to his nephew, Joe May, and Joe’s wife, Fay. He still dines here nearly every day. Doug May’s history with the establishment dates to 1962, when it was a grocery store and gas station. He saw the business through a variety of changes over the years—it was a biker bar before its current incarnation as a family restaurant. May says business took off after he removed the original bar and smoking section. Around 2002, he had the idea to begin serving crabs, and bought a

shipment of three bushels. He laughs as he recounts his wife’s skepticism that the investment would pay off. Today, all-you-can-eat crabs are the most popular item at May’s, which now sells 20 to 40 bushels a day. “We offer everything seafood,” says current coowner Fay May. Crab imperial, crab legs, shrimp, and stuffed flounder are popular menu items. Tuesdays attract a large crowd for the one-dollar oyster special. For land lovers, the menu offers an array of choices such as burgers and chicken. May’s is a popular stop for travelers seeking “the Maryland experience,” Fay says, and the restaurant is often recommended by local hotels and businesses. Flying Dog Brewery is the main supplier of the full-service bar. On weekends, there is almost always a wait, despite the spacious patio behind the restaurant that seats about 150. Fay is reviving favorite recipes from the original menu. She says old customers will sometimes come in and ask for sandwiches with colorful names such as “The Wide Load” and “The Clucker.” Fay is grateful for longtime employees like Frye who can help recreate these favorites. One of the most popular items, “Oyster Blues,” is an invention of Doug May.


A tray of hot and spicy Maryland hardshell crabs at May’s Restaurant

Tuna and rockfish poke with zucchini noodles, pickled shallots, and a warm soy fumet at Firestone’s Raw Bar

fall 19

35


away

FROM HOME

Healthy Holiday Travel Tips By Bevin Clare

W

hen we think about holiday travel, it may seem like there are more reasons to stay home than to have an adventure. For many of us, the potential stress and possibility of getting sick during a time of year when we want to celebrate can give us pause in our planning. Don’t despair—the joys and excitement of holiday travel outweigh the negatives! While we can’t do much about the challenges of family dynamics or the busyness of airports and train stations, there are many things we can do to keep ourselves steady, thriving, and healthy while traveling during the most hectic weeks of the year.

36

fall 19

number is concerning, it’s worth noting that while 40 percent of these individuals were carriers, this study doesn't indicate that they became ill, as being an asymptomatic carrier is common with respiratory infections. Another study emphasized how likely you are to get sick based on your proximity to someone who is ill with a viral pathogen. A 2018 study found that one of the most important factors in staying well during air travel is the health of passengers sitting closest to you. If you’re sitting in front of or behind a passenger who’s ill, you can have up to an 80 percent chance of acquiring their virus. But once you’re at least three rows away, the likelihood drops dramatically. Stress and exposure to pathogens are interrelated because stress weakens the immune system. Their relationship creates the perfect storm for illness. If you haven’t been sick during a holiday season, you likely know others who have been and the impact illness had on their families and their travel plans. What to Do if You Did Catch Something Even when you take the time to practice as many thoughtful behaviors and precautions as possible, things can go wrong, and you can end up sick on your holiday. When this happens, try to take a break and support your body and its healing processes. If you take a day to convalesce, curl up in bed and sleep, hydrate, and eat nourishing foods (such as soups), you might find you are ready to go the next day. If you do get sick, see if you can obtain some garlicky food, and be ready with larger doses of elderberry and echinacea. And, of course, see a doctor if your illness requires more than rest, nutrition, and hydration.

PHOTO: GETTY

Stress and Susceptibility There are two main reasons we tend to fall under the weather when we travel during the holidays. The first is the impact of cumulative and ongoing stress, both mental and physical. Where do we see this? While there’s often a lot of joy and fun this time of year, it can be accompanied by an increase in sugar and alcohol intake, a change in sleep schedule with more late nights, and increased personal interactions, especially if your holidays include family visits. The holidays can also create complex feelings for people who have mixed associations with the season, or those who find the financial aspects of gift-giving overwhelming. If you add travel on top of these factors, you’re looking at a high amount of stress, even if everything goes perfectly. The second reason for sickness is exposure to a greater variety of pathogens. It doesn’t take a science degree to know that sitting in close proximity to a large number of people and breathing recycled air for a long period of time can increase chances of exposure to organisms and pathogens. Our immune systems are readily prepared to deal with them, and general exposure for healthy individuals typically isn’t a problem. On an airplane, however, we might be exposed to something in a greater concentration and for a longer duration, which can increase susceptibility. In a 2007 paper, one research group found that, on average, about 40 percent of airline passengers carried a pathogen after their flights. The majority of discovered pathogens were viral, and the most common were influenza and parainfluenza, followed by adenoviruses. Although this

About 40 percent of airline passengers carried a pathogen after their flights.


If attending a party, consider bringing a healthy dish, such as a vegetable platter, instead of sugary foods.

Consuming garlic can help prevent colds, which is especially helpful while traveling.

TRAVEL PREPARATIONS

PHOTOS: ADOBE STOCK - FAHRWASSER, LILIGRAPHIE

Here are some tips and tricks to create an optimal internal environment and to stay as balanced as possible before and on the days of travel:

• Beginning a week before your travels, as well as throughout your traveling, consider taking herbal medicines, such as elderberry or echinacea, to reduce your chances of getting sick. In a 2016 study, elderberry was shown to prevent individuals from acquiring respiratory infections during flight. Those who contracted infections while taking elderberry had fewer symptoms and a shorter duration of illness. A 2012 study with echinacea showed similar results with passengers acquiring fewer illnesses. Both herbal products are generally safe and can be taken in many different forms; however, before adding any new herbal supplements to your lifestyle, consult with a medical practitioner. • Eat garlic the day before your travels, and even the day of. When you have eaten enough garlic, your lungs and respiratory mucosa actually exude the antimicrobial garlic volatiles, which

may go a long way in preventing the acquisition of a respiratory infection. A study in 2001 demonstrated that a garlic supplement would reduce the chances of acquiring a cold during the winter. Eating garlic, preferably raw, is easiest in the form of guacamole, or in butter or honey, and a good goal is one or two cloves per day.

• Have healthy snacks ready to go for your trip. Nuts, fruits and vegetables, cheese and crackers, sushi rice rolls, and other healthy favorites can make a difference when you’re on the go. Limiting sugar this time of year can be a key piece of the wellness puzzle. Patients have reported that higher sugar consumption can cause negative effects on the body, including increased stress levels. • Respiratory pathogens are going to enter your system on an enclosed airplane, and staying hydrated is critical for optimal functioning. Bring an empty water bottle with you and fill it once you’re through security. Consider carrying a small hydration packet, such as Emergen-C, to add to your water

bottle, too. You can find options that contain vitamin C and magnesium.

• Wash your hands thoroughly each time you have an opportunity, especially before you eat anything or after touching objects that are used by many people, such as touchscreens, public transport grips, or public-use pens. Use transportable wet wipes or a natural antimicrobial thyme oil spray if you aren’t near a sink with hot water and soap. Of all of the preventative measures you can take to remain healthy, handwashing is among the most effective. • When traveling by air, use wet wipes to clean the armrests and tray table before you use them. This is especially helpful if you have kids who tend to be all over the place. • If you are sick and infectious, consider delaying your trip, or at a minimum, use a respiratory mask to protect others. This common practice in Asian countries hasn’t caught on in many parts of the world, but it’s a socially responsible and easy action to take if you have a cold and are flying. fall 19

37


what we love right now Drinks, events, and everything pumpkin Story by Christie Wisniewski

38

fall 19


away

FROM HOME

drinks.

PHOTOS: ROCKWELL - DAN GROSS. VOLT AND ISABELLA’S - BILL GREEN.

one. ROCKWELL BREWERY Bad LeRoy Imperial Brown Ale Move over, summer IPAs and lagers. Cooler days and darker nights mean fall is here, and along with the season comes delectable dark beers like Rockwell Brewery’s Bad LeRoy, an imperial brown ale aged in rye whiskey barrels. This robust ale packs a punch at around 12 percent ABV and is available October through November. (rockwellbrewery.com) two. VOLT Fall Frenzy Cocktail Sweetly spicy cinnamon tincture and luscious pineapple cream add a unique and seasonal twist to Volt’s special Fall Frenzy cocktail. This one-of-a-kind drink features Copper & Kings apple brandy, Pierre Ferrand Curacao, Heering cherry liqueur, and Bénédictine herbal liqueur along with house grenadine and a splash of lime. (voltrestaurant.com) three. ISABELLA’S TAVERNA & TAPAS BAR Baked Apple Sangria Start a fall date night off right with tasty tapas and baked apple sangria at Isabella’s Taverna & Tapas Bar. A seasonal favorite, the sangria features a blend of chardonnay, brandy, lemon-lime soda, and house-made baked apple puree. Fresh apple slices and a cinnamon stick top it off. (isabellas-tavern.com)

fall 19

39


away

FROM HOME

events.

one. FALL FESTIVAL AT ROSE HILL MANOR October 5 and 6 / 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Enjoy hayrides, mouthwatering homestyle food, live music, craft vendors, demonstrations, a Saturday morning tractor pull and much more at the Frederick County Farm Museum Association’s Annual Fall Festival hosted on the gorgeous grounds of the historic Rose Hill Manor Park. two. FIRST SATURDAY October 5, November 2 / all day If you want to get into the fall spirit without driving out to the pumpkin patch, downtown Frederick is the place to be. Supporting local businesses is the theme of the October and November First Saturday events, so there’s no better time to visit the many local restaurants and specialty shops downtown.

40

fall 19

PHOTOS: RIGHT - BILL GREEN. BILL GREEN(2), SKIP LAWRENCE.

three. BRUNSWICK RAILROAD DAYS October 5 and 6 / 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Learn about Brunswick’s rich history as a railroad hub and its connections to the nearby C&O Canal at the 36th annual Brunswick Railroad Days on the first full weekend of October. Only a 20-minute drive from Frederick, this fall festival includes food, live music, games, crafts, and vendors, as well as stunning Potomac River scenery. (brunswickrailroaddays.org)


Jim Harbaugh forks straw off a wagon at a previous Fall Festival at Rose Hill Manor. fall 19

41


fall 19

42

PHOTO: CHRISTIE WISNIEWSKI. RIGHT: ICE CREAM - BILL GREEN. PASTA - CHRISTIE WISNIEWSKI. PUMPKIN PATCH - DAN GROSS.

Pumpkin Patch Bowl at GOOD JuJu


away

FROM HOME

pumpkin. one. HOMETOWN HARVEST KITCHEN Pumpkin Cheesecake Ice Cream Who says ice cream is just for summer? Since its grand opening in May, Hometown Harvest has quickly become a downtown staple for fresh, homemade ice cream from its creamery in Middletown. Try Harvest’s pumpkin cheesecake flavor for a creamy, delicious, and seasonal treat that’s not too sweet. (hometownharvest.com) two. THE PASTA PALETTE Autumn Harvest Orzo from Pappardelle’s Pasta Pumpkin, sage, and chestnut are blended into this delicious seasonal orzo—think rice, but in pasta form—at The Pasta Palette on Market Street. All you need to complete this divine dish is brown butter sauce, which complements the flavors of the pasta perfectly. (Facebook: thepastapalette) three. GOOD JUJU Pumpkin Patch Bowl Taste the season in a healthy way with GOOD juju’s Pumpkin Patch Bowl, featuring a creamy smoothie base of pumpkin, banana, almond milk, and pumpkin spice. For a bit of crunchy sweetness, the base is topped with fresh green apple, coconut whip, harvest berry granola, and a drizzle of agave nectar. (Facebook: goodjujujuicebar) fall 19

43


44

fall 19


VINTAGE VEHICLES

~

Hobbyists all across the county share their passion at car shows. S T O R Y

B Y

G I N A

P H O T O S

B Y

G A L L U C C I - W H I T E B I L L

G R E E N

Miles White stands with his 1935 12-cylinder Packard sedan. Very few of these stately cars were made. fall 19

45


cover

The only parts of Chuck Loughry’s 1976 Chevrolet Scottsdale that are original to the vehicle are the two rear fenders. Everything else has been changed. “It’s lowered all the way around,” he points out to a visitor. “The engine has been redone. It’s now a true 355 engine. The whole interior has been taken out and redone. The undercarriage has been redone. Not too much of it is still 1976.” Loughry did most of the work himself, but not all. He estimates it took around three years to complete, and he works on the vehicle every weekend to make further adjustments. He bought the Chevrolet from a friend in 1978. He has had an interest in cars since the age of 15, and that interest became a career as he served for 28 years as a mechanic in the U.S. Air Force. One day, he decided to start restoring the truck. “I didn’t have any money, and this was sitting at the house, so I started it,” he says. One aspect of Loughry’s truck that will catch observers’ eyes immediately is its bright orange paint job and pumpkin graphics throughout the vehicle, including airbrushed paintings on the tailgate and under the hood. When he first joined the Golden Gears Car Club of Frederick County around 20 years ago, a lady said the truck looked like a pumpkin; the name stuck, so Loughry embraced it.

“You keep changing things,” he says. “It’s just the way it works. ...You just keep doing the work on them. Play with them. Enjoy them. You gotta enjoy it.” The truck was one of several on display during the annual Wine & Wheels Car Show at Catoctin Breeze Vineyard in Thurmont. The July event helped raise money for the Children’s Cancer Recovery Foundation. The county is home to a number of car shows and more casual cruise-ins arranged by various groups throughout the summer. Some of the most well-known include June’s Benefit for Veterans Car Show, July’s Car, Truck, and Motorcycle Show in Brunswick, and the Francis Scott Key Antique Car Club’s Rose Hill Manor Benefit Car Show in August; Governor Thomas Johnson’s home on North Market Street hosted more than 100 vehicles. Golden Gears plans 25 to 30 shows a year, including cruise-ins each month from April to October. Many of the shows they attend benefit community organizations. “Everything we make in the club, we put to some type of charity locally here in Frederick County,” Jay Henley, club president, says. The group donates to a variety of local nonprofits, averaging between 28 to 33 recipients a year. These have included the Korean War Veterans Association, Toys for Tots, and Vietnam Veterans of America.

Chuck Loughry’s 1976 Chevrolet Scottsdale has its original two rear fenders. Everything else has been changed.

46

fall 19


Two men at the Francis Scott Key Antique Car Club’s Rose Hill Manor Benefit Car Show examine the interior of a 1915 Model T Ford.

A vintage MG is detailed with decorative emblems, including that of the Clustered Spires British Car Club.

fall 19

47


A 1938 Chevy Coupe

A vintage MG sports car

A visitor to the Francis Scott Key Antique Car Club’s Rose Hill Manor Benefit Car Show in August peeks inside a restored Ford Mustang.

48

fall 19

Henley says there is a camaraderie across different car clubs. They often promote each others’ events, and members are sometimes in multiple clubs. Golden Gears, which was founded in 1973, has 50 to 60 active members, but anyone can show off their vehicle at an event, whether it’s in pristine vintage condition or not. “It’s kind of like a traveling museum,” Henley says. “You see cars from the ’20s, ’30s, ’40s, up to modern cars. ... You get a wide variety of vehicles, and we welcome all.” About 15 years ago, Henley was driving along U.S. Highway 40 and saw the club having a cruise-in. He stopped and decided to join the group. He now owns anniversary editions of the 2003 and 1978 Corvette, which he bought restored. “We “When my said that it would be neat if we father was still had a 25th anniversary car and a 50th anniversary car,” he says. Golden Gears vice president alive, he would Mike Locke estimates he has always just owned more than 40 vehicles. have always been a car nut shake his head “Isince I was a little kid riding around with my father looking when I came at cars,” he says. “I’d buy one, back with fix it up, run it for a while, and then I’d see something else I another car.” liked and would sell that and -Mike Locke buy something else. When my father was still alive, he would always just shake his head when I came back with another car. He’d say, ‘Hey, that is what you like to do.’ So I stayed with it.” He owns a 1937 Ford five-window custom coupe. “I was online looking for it because I’ve always wanted this model here,” he says, showing a visitor a photograph on his phone. He did not bring the car to the show because it was over 100 degrees. “I just love the body style of it. The way it sits. I found it online in Kentucky. My buddy and I went down with a trailer. I bought it. I changed the interior out. Put a chrome grill on it.” He also owns a 2016 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray that includes custom seats and a 475 horsepower fuel-injected motor. “I love talking to people that have cars at car shows. … The car people are just like a family.”


fall 19

49


backstory HANDMADE HARVEST DÉCOR

& GIFTS FOR FALL If you've eaten your fill of garden bounty and put up the rest, try a new tack this season and use vegetables for interesting and useful craft material. Colorful corn, seeds, and peppers can all be dried and transformed into unique handmade gifts or added to your home decor. Corn Wreaths Multi-colored dried corn and mini pumpkins can be used to make beautiful fall wreaths. The cute, 2- to 3-inch ‘Strawberry’ corn cultivar (Zea mays), produces rich, deep red small ears of popcorn that look like strawberries. Leave half of the husks on some and remove them entirely from others. ‘Rainbow Sweet Inca’ is another strain of beautiful multi-colored corn that makes an ornamental addition in fall wreaths and centerpieces. Turn Seeds into Jewelry It’s easy to transform dried seeds into pendants for necklaces, earrings, broaches and bracelets. Suspend them in epoxy or back them with polymer clay to make medallion pendants. You can also use a small drill to turn the seeds into beads. Then, string the new "seed beads" onto beading thread with a needle. Add a little bling with colorful glass beads.

50

fall 19

- Gwen Kilchherr

PHOTO: GETTY

Mexican Ristra A Mexican ristra is a good luck charm composed of dried peppers and can hang in a long strip or be

tied together to create a wreath shape. They also make wonderful homemade gifts. Pick the hot peppers from your garden (or purchase them from your farmers market) and wash them in cool water. Spread the hot peppers on cooling racks to dry. You will want to use disposable gloves to protect your hands from the irritant in the hot peppers. Whatever you do, don’t rub your eyes! Thread a needle with a 20 to 30 inches of dental floss. Tie a double knot in the end of the dental floss. Insert the needle through the hot pepper (near the stem). Pass the hot pepper all the way along the dental floss until it stops at the knot at the end of the floss. Tie a knot in the dental floss approximately ½-inch above the hot pepper. This will space the peppers along the dental floss and ensure that air circulates adequately around each pepper. Keep stringing until you get to the end of the dental floss. Remove the needle from the dental floss and tie a loop on the end of the string. Hang the hot peppers in a sunny window, and leave to dry until they are leathery and shriveled. This may take one to two weeks. So now get out there and harvest some fall decorations from your own garden. Not only can you let your imagination run wild, but you’ll get the satisfaction of standing back and looking at what you created, saying to yourself, “Wow, I did that!”


52

fall 19

Profile for Frederick News-Post

Spires, Fall 2019  

In, around and away from home in Frederick, Maryland

Spires, Fall 2019  

In, around and away from home in Frederick, Maryland