Texarkana Symphony Orchestra 2022-2023 Program Book

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CONTENTS

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LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR WELCOME TO THE HISTORIC PEROT THEATRE THE GOLDEN RULES OF THEATRE LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT BOARD OF DIRECTORS WELCOME FROM THE MAYORS LETTER FROM THE MUSIC DIRECTOR LETTER FROM THE CEO OF AR-TX REDI LETTER FROM THE TXK-AR CITY MANAGER LETTER FROM THE TXK-TX CITY MANAGER LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT & CEO OF THE TEXARKANA USA REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BRAVO AND APPLAUSE SUPPORTING THE SYMPHONY TSO PRESENTS: ZUILL RETURNS! STUDENT CONCERTS WITH CARNEGIE HALL MEMORIALS AND HONORARIUMS 2022/2023 ORCHESTRA ROSTER TSO PRESENTS: METAMORPHOSIS TSO PRESENTS: CHRISTMA S AT THE PEROT CELEBRITY CONDUCTOR COMPETITION TEXARKANA YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA TSO PRESENTS: MAHLER ’S FIRST TSO PRESENTS: JURA SSIC PARK IN CONCERT TSO PRESENTS: SPECTACULAR STORIES FOUNDING PATRONS SPECIAL THANKS SUPPORTING THE SYMPHONY: PATRON DONOR LIST

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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

2022/2023 PROGRAM

TEXARKANA

Symphony ORCHESTRA 2022/2023 PROGRAM BOOK

PUBLISHED BY Texarkana Symphony Orchestra PROGRAM BOOK PRODUCTION Dr. Robin Rogers Four States Living Magazine 4104 Summerhill Square Texarkana, TX 75503 903-792-2262 www.fourstatesliving.com DESIGN Graphic Design: Shane Darby Cover Art: Christopher J. Bachers BUSINESS OFFICE Texarkana Symphony Orchestra 421 Hickory Street Texarkana, AR 71854 870-773-3401 www.texarkanasymphony.org


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LETTER FROM THE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

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elcome to the Texarkana Symphony Orchestra’s 17th Season! This beautiful program book represents the fifth year of our partnership with Robin Rogers and her amazing staff at Four States Living Magazine. I know you will enjoy using this program book all season long. Whether by supporting TSO’s many sponsors or preparing for each concert by reading the biographies and program notes ahead of time, there is something for everyone to enjoy! The TSO is blessed with world-class musicians, an internationally respected music director, staff, and volunteers, who are dedicated to making each new TSO season appealing to a wide audience and just as amazing as those from orchestra’s three times our size. Here are just a few of the great things in store for this year: First, you will note that our performances,

except for Christmas at the Perot, will now begin at 7:00PM, with the concert previews starting at 6:10PM. We have listened carefully to your feedback as patrons and ticket buyers and have decided to give this earlier start time a try this season. It is our hope that this earlier time not only provides you with greater after-concert flexibility, but also offers the opportunity for families with younger children to experience an evening concert. Second, this year marks a return for cellist Zuill Bailey who appeared as one of TSO’s first internationally known guest artists in 2009. I am sure you will fall in love with the less performed, but virtuoso and sublime Saint-Saen’s Concerto. Next a monumental concert for both TSO musicians and you, the audience, will take place in February 2023 with the first ever performance by TSO of a symphony by the composer Gustav Mahler. Mahler’s works are monumental in both size of orchestra and in length, but full of great melodies and surprising harmonies—make sure you listen carefully for a famous nursery school tune disguised as a funeral march in the 3rd movement! Finally, we will celebrate the 30th Anniversary of the release of the movie Jurassic Park with a performance of the score live, with the movie on the big screen. If you were in attendance a few years back for our presentation of The Wizard of Oz, you know how powerful it is to watch the movie and the live orchestra work together—it’s a not to be missed experience in March of 2023! Finally, music, beyond all other cultural assets, has the power to define what it means to be human, to bridge socioeconomic barriers, and to truly bring a community together. TSO has been blessed from the beginning to have the extraordinary support from every facet of our community. Over the last 16 years, 58% of TSO’s funding was the result of individuals and foundations just like you, making a commitment to the future of the Orchestra. Thirteen percent of TSO’s funding - higher than for the majority of orchestras of TSO’s size - comes from the two Cities and two States that comprise Texarkana, and the remaining 29% comes from ticket revenue - a percentage that has seen steady growth over the last several years. Out of this revenue TSO spends 74% annually on artistic production and education and only 26% on administrative functions, such as staff salaries and marketing. I hope you will continue, renew, or increase your gift to TSO over this next season—we are a vital part of the cultural fabric of Texarkana and critical, in many ways, to our region’s efforts to attract new business and tourism. Enjoy the Season!

R. Andrew Clark Executive Director, Texarkana Symphony Orchestra

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WELCOME TO THE HISTORIC

PEROT THEATRE

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PHOTOS BY BRIAN JONES

he Perot Theatre opened in downtown Texarkana in 1924 and was hailed as the jewel of the Saenger Theatre chain. Called the most beautiful theatre in the South, it featured silent movies, movie premieres, the nationally broadcast Fifth Annual War Bond Drive with host Orson Welles, and live performances by Annie Oakley, Will Rogers, and John Barrymore. By the mid-20th Century the theatre was owned by the Paramount Corporation and served as the entertainment hub of downtown Texarkana. Due to the growth of the modern movie plex and the population shift to the Northwest, the theatre had been reduced to a B movie house by the 1970s. The theater officially closed in 1977 when the City of Texarkana, Texas, purchased it for $19,000 as part of the Model Cities Program. With the help of Texarkana natives H. Ross Perot and his sister, Bette, the theatre was restored to its current elegance at a cost of $2.4 million and reopened in 1981. The theatre was renamed the Perot Theatre in honor of Gabriel Ross and Lulu May Perot, lifelong residents of the city and the parents of Ross and Bette. This year Texarkana celebrates 40 years of outstanding artistic performances in the Perot Theatre, making it one of the keys to the renewal of downtown and a destination point for tourism throughout our region. Managed by the Texarkana Symphony Orchestra, under a contract with the City of Texarkana, Texas, the Perot Theatre is not only the primary performance venue of Texarkana’s own professional symphony orchestra, but also hosts performances of the Texarkana Community Ballet, and the Texarkana Regional Arts and Humanities Council’s Theatre for Young Audiences Series. The Theatre is proud to have hosted some of the world’s most renowned performers, concerts, and shows including Cary Grant, Anne Murray, Alvin Ailey Dance, the New York City Opera, Warsaw Philharmonic, Marvin Hamlisch, Carol Channing, Harry Belafonte, the Harlem Boys Choir, the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, Savion Glover, Zuill Bailey, Tony DeSare, the Harlem Quartet, Roy Clark, Ray Charles, the Houston Ballet, Tammy Wynette, Broadway blockbusters, and many more! The Texarkana Symphony Orchestra is proud to partner with the City of Texarkana, Texas, to manage one of the most beautiful theatres in the United States. For more information about the Perot Theatre, rental inquires, or for a free tour contact the Box Office at 903-792-4992.

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GOLDEN RULES OF

Theatre

ATTENDING A LIVE PERFORMANCE IS NOT THE SAME AS GOING TO A MOVIE. PLEASE SHOW COURTESY TO THOSE SEATED NEAR YOU AND ENSURE MAGIC MOMENTS IN OUR THEATRE BY RESPECTING THE FOLLOWING GOLDEN RULES…

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PLEASE TURN OFF ALL ELECTRONIC DEVICES. PLEASE UNWRAP ALL COUGH DROPS AND CANDIES BEFORE THE CONCERT BEGINS. IF BRINGING CHILDREN, INSTRUCT THEM IN PROPER AUDIENCE BEHAVIOR AND FAMILIARIZE THEM WITH THE PERFORMANCE BEFOREHAND SO THEY KNOW WHAT TO EXPECT. PLEASE REFRAIN FROM TALKING, HUMMING, SINGING, OR BEATING TIME TO THE MUSIC DURING THE PERFORMANCE. PLEASE USE MODERATION IN APPLYING PERFUME, COLOGNE, OR SCENTED LOTION, AS MANY PEOPLE ARE HIGHLY ALLERGIC TO PERFUMES. AVOID KICKING THE BACK OF THE SEAT IN FRONT OF YOU, EVEN IF IT IS DONE IN TIME TO THE MUSIC. PLEASE ALSO PREVENT YOUR CHILDREN FROM DOING THE SAME. PLAYING GAMES, VIDEOING PERFORMANCES, AND ANY OTHER USES OF YOUR MOBILE DEVICES ARE FORBIDDEN AND INAPPROPRIATE, AND MAY BE ILLEGAL. FOR THE ENJOYMENT OF EVERYONE IN THE AUDIENCE AND FOR YOUR SAFETY, PLEASE DO NOT LEAVE YOUR SEAT ONCE THE CONCERT BEGINS, AND REMAIN SEATED UNTIL THE THEATRE LIGHTS ARE BROUGHT UP FOR INTERMISSION OR THE CONCLUSION OF THE CONCERT. THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION OF OTHERS, AND ENJOY THE EVENING! 2022/2023 PROGRAM

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LETTER FROM THE

PRESIDENT

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would like to welcome you to our 17th Season of the Texarkana Symphony! The Texarkana Symphony Orchestra has completed the first year of management of the historic Perot Theatre. We have made many improvements and look forward to continuing to bring exciting new events for the community to enjoy. The Texarkana Symphony Orchestra is proud to have Philip Mann as the music director and principal conductor. Mann has a worldwide reputation as an “expressively graceful, yet passionate”

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artist with a range spanning symphonic repertoire, opera, new music, and experimental collaborations. Through TSO’s leadership, Texarkana is recognized as a center of musical expertise, while nourishing spirits, as well as developing intellectual and creative assets. We provide a wonderful cultural experience, in a relaxed atmosphere, at our beautiful Perot Theatre. Our mission to pursue excellence in live performances and educational programs is directly related to the financial support we receive from the community. Your support is vital to our success in symphonic music in this historic area. Your gift will enrich our community by developing a legacy for Texarkana’s future. The TSO board is committed to providing not only a variety of musical experiences, but also “to pursue, for all, the transformative power of symphonic music through excellence in live performance and education.” The Perot Theatre will return to 100% capacity this fall. Don’t miss out on this fantastic season!

Mark Van Herpen President, Texarkana Symphony Orchestra Board of Directors

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T E X A R K A N A

S Y M P H O N Y

O R C H E S T R A

Board of Directors MARK VAN HERPEN President

DR. ROBERT S. MCGINNIS, III Vice President

LISA SITTERLEY Secretary

LAIRIE KINCAID Treasurer

Jennifer Doan Remica C. Gray Tonja Luker Hays Dolly Henley Don Howren Jennell Ingram Jo Kahler Dr. Susan Keeney Ron Mills

Judy Morgan David Orr David J. Potter Jeff Prieskorn Robby Robertson Lauren Ross Megan Schroeder Robin Thomas Denis Washington

R. ANDREW CLARK

PHILIP R. MANN

STEVE BENNETT

NANCY JACKSON

DIANA M H NORWOOD

MICAH DORSEY

CATHERINE RICKETT

REMICA C. GRAY

Executive Director

Youth Symphony Conductor Personnel Manager Librarian

Music Director Bookkeeper

Graphic Design

Volunteer Director of Operations


WELCOME FROM TEXARKANA

WELCOME FROM TEXARKANA

TEXAS

ARKANSAS

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or 16 years, Texarkana has enjoyed the symphonic sounds and music from our very own Texarkana Symphony Orchestra. With a mission to pursue the transformative power of symphonic music through excellence in live performance and education, we should count ourselves privileged to have a local symphony orchestra. Performing mainly in the historic Perot Theatre, the symphony offers a variety of shows from the classical masterworks to family concerts. We are blessed our symphony actively engages in educational outreach with programs that benefit our schools. Music speeds up learning, helps cognitive skills, and speeds up a child’s brain development and language skills according to multiple scientific studies. The TSO’s effort to introduce our young kids to music and the various musical instruments is a positive for everyone. If not purely for the benefit of our residents, a local Symphony Orchestra is great for economic development. Businesses that want to attract capable, well-educated employees often choose a location based on local cultural opportunities. The thought is that an area with lots of cultural events is likely to attract diverse, dynamic, intelligent, and talented people. We should not take for granted the level of offerings provided to us through the TSO. And the best part….it is open to people of all ages and music knowledge levels. Everyone is welcome. And what an opportunity for our local and regional gifted musicians to show off their talents while entertaining, educating, and inspiring our community. As Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote, “Music is the universal language of mankind.” Music stirs emotions and engages each one of us in a unique way. A genuine thank you from the City of Texarkana, Arkansas as we celebrate and support the Texarkana Symphony Orchestra’s 2022-2023 season. Sincerely,

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elcome to the Texarkana Symphony Orchestra’s 2022-2023 season at the historic Perot Theatre! This 17th season once again promises nothing less than spectacular performances and fantastic live entertainment. The Texarkana Symphony Orchestra delivers on such expectations year after year, and we are extraordinarily blessed to have them and their contributions to the arts and cultural experiences in our community. We are also thankful for your faithful support of TSO. As we approach the sesquicentennial celebration of Texarkana, USA, we must recognize the organizations that have served as pillars in our history and also the ones who have propelled us forward into a bright future. Having an entity like TSO in our community is not taken for granted. Whenever I can brag about all the great things happening in Texarkana, one of the highlights is mentioning that we have a wonderful symphony orchestra as a community partner. The Texarkana Symphony Orchestra not only provides world class entertainment and culture for our community, but it also gives back by providing educational outreach programs to local school districts, community clubs, and civic organizations. There is so much value in having a local symphony participate in our community. We are also pleased to continue hosting TSO at the historic Perot Theatre. This theatre has been a pillar in our community for almost 100 years and is truly the crown jewel of downtown Texarkana USA. There is no better home for TSO than right here in this landmark Saenger Theatre. Thank you for your continued support of TSO. It is an important contribution to the arts in our community. Our community is better because we have an outstanding local symphony comprised of very talented musicians, hardworking TSO staff and board members, and dedicated patrons like you. I look forward to this season being the best yet! Sincerely,

Mayor Bob Bruggeman City of Texarkana, Texas

Mayor Allen L. Brown City of Texarkana, Arkansas

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LETTER FROM THE

MUSIC DIRECTOR

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PHOTO BY NANCY NOLAN

ear Friends of the TSO,

Thank you for joining us, and welcome to the 17th season of your Texarkana Symphony Orchestra. I have titled this season “Choose Joy” for its unabashed embracing of uplifting, positive, and powerful moments of musical spectacle and storytelling. Each program represents at least one long requested or returning favorite and a work that promises to be an indelible memory for every listener. It is a program of special moments to celebrate together and elevate our spirits. Opening our season with a returning favorite, internationally renowned cellist and friend of the TSO, Zuill Bailey appears with Saint-Saëns’ concerto on a program paired with one of the greatest stories ever put to music in Rimsky Korsakov’s Scheherazade. A swashbuckling, dramatic program of technicolor orchestration and larger than life personalities will set the tone quickly for a spectacular season. In Metamorphosis, an intimately sized string orchestra of soloists will offer a rare chance to experience the mesmerizing beauty of Strauss’s masterpiece. A charming personality and pianist of eclectic musical tastes, Andrew Staupe, also makes his TSO debut offering two lesser-known gems of Franz Liszt and J.C. Bach. Recently requested by musicians and TSO fans more than any other, Gustav Mahler’s symphonies are among the most powerful and triumphant works ever conceived, and we’ll present for the very first time in our ensemble’s history, a symphony of the master, his first, The Titan. Virtuoso violinist Jennifer Frautschi adds to a remarkable event with the sublime concerto of Jean Sibelius. Finally, in Spectacular Stories, we’ll share the orchestral virtuosity of the TSO in a selection of tone poems that tell stories on a grand scale paired with renowned flutist Brian Dunbar. Responding to overwhelming calls to mount another film and orchestra production, we proudly present Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park. The spellbinding score of John Williams matched with soaring cinematography and gripping drama make for an unforgettable performance experience. The TSO will play the entire score as the original film is projected above, and it is a can’t miss event for families and movie buffs alike. Christmas at the Perot, our beloved annual tradition, returns with a sense of community collaboration and international talent. Our TSO Chamber Singers will be

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featured with soprano Maria Fasciano, a special side by side appearance with the Texarkana Youth Symphony Orchestra, of course our Celebrity Conductors, and a few new additions as well. Our colorful and varied program has something for all including our holiday favorites, holiday movie scores, and some classical holiday masterpieces. Presenting music to children from around our region, our multi-year collaboration with Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute as a member of the Link Up partnership program had a fantastic debut last year. We now look to build on this success with an encore performance of The Orchestra Moves reaching even more children. It is our goal to give as many students as possible the chance to have a transformative musical experience that may instill an interest to play an instrument, or simply a desire to make music and the arts a part of their daily lives. Our children, families, and community benefit in myriad ways from such participation, and there is no more important endeavor for the TSO in helping to ensure a bright future for Texarkana. To observe the TSO team on a daily basis making such efforts on behalf of our community is humbling. Our expert management under Andrew Clark’s leadership has my sincere thanks, as does our energetic, engaged board of directors led by Mark Van Herpen. The additional efforts and leadership of our Perot Theater staff add to our winning team, and I am grateful for them. These groups are tireless advocates for the power of music in our community. As ever, please join me in thanking Remica Gray for her commitment and volunteerism, along with our devoted TSO volunteers too numerous to mention. We are blessed to have the generosity of a supportive public, and I’d like to thank all of our audiences, donors, subscribers, and the whole TSO family. Of course, it is our musicians and production team who create the music we all enjoy, especially Kiril, Noah, Diana, and Catherine, and I ask you to join my voice in thanking them profoundly for their artistry, talents, and astonishing efforts. Part of that work is ensuring the next generation of music makers and lovers through our Texarkana Symphony Youth Orchestra under the direction of Steve Bennet, who continues to make an enduring change in our community through his work with our young artists. As I look toward the future, I am infused with optimism and courage for a bright future in Texarkana’s arts. Increased collaboration, support, and communication in our arts partner community is only amplifying our shared successes. This is a wonderful time to be working together in music and all the arts, and I wish all of you an extraordinary season of memories and joy. Yours in music,

Philip Mann Music Director Texarkana Symphony Orchestra

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LETTER FROM THE

CEO OF AR-TX REDI

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he Arts have brought communities together for generations and continues to do so even in our digital driven world. Music and art and culture are universal languages where individuals and groups can express themselves in ways that speak deeply and truly to others. A flourishing art scene gives communities a higher quality of place and makes them more desirable in attracting residents, visitors, and businesses alike. Texarkana USA is fortunate to have a host of opportunities for people to immerse themselves in the Arts and collectively share and appreciate the same cultural experience.

When my wife and I moved to Texarkana just over three years ago, we were amazed by the diverse and robust arts and cultural experiences the region has to offer. One of the many ways to experience the Arts in Texarkana is to visit the Perot Theatre. Named after Texarkana native Ross Perot, the theatre was refurbished with the financial support of the family. Architectural Digest honored the Perot Theatre as the ‘Most Beautifully Designed Theatre in the State of Texas’. The theatre’s orchestra is honored to be led by world-renowned conductor Philip Mann, hailed by the BBC as an “expressively graceful, yet passionate” artist. He is brilliant, fun to watch and a true entertainer. The theater setting, the music and Philip make the symphony my wife and I’s favorite cultural experience in Texarkana. It is moving, engaging and brings out the creativity in all of us! Texarkana is also quickly becoming a southern hub for colorful and eclectic murals and street art. Amazing local artists like Joseph Raymond have created their own outdoor works of art and have gone on to invest in downtown with the opening of an art gallery that receives visitors from all over the county. Not only do the Arts resonate to the soul on a personal level, but also to the soul of the community on an economic level as well. A thriving and vibrant arts scene has many beneficial economic impacts including capital being invested, higher wage jobs, tourism revenue and an enhanced quality of life. The encouragement. investment and celebration of the Arts is essential to any successful holistic economic development strategy. The Arts bring people together to create a sense of community and connects us all in a time when we need unity. Like what can be experienced at the Perot Theatre… Texarkana is a symphony made up of many different elements, all unique but with a shared purpose and unified vision, to come together to ensure harmony and prosperity for the region. Respectfully,

Rob Sitterley President & CEO, AR-TX REDI

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LETTER FROM THE

LETTER FROM THE

TXK-ARKANSAS CITY MANAGER

TXK-TEXAS CITY MANAGER

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ur twin cities are very fortunate to have the Texarkana Symphony Orchestra bring to life for our citizens concert music from three centuries from hundres of composers from dozens of countries. Each of you support a cultural tradition that is an integral part of world history. Perpetuating music cultivates a sense of community and assures this art form will continue through successive generations and centuries to come. Texarkana Symphony Orchestra supports the culture of Texarkana and its businesses, schools, and families as Texarkana continues to become more attractive as a great place to live, work, and have fun! The Symphony memers’ incredible talents and hard work greatly enrich our community. We all look forward to your upcoming 2022-23 season! Congratulations on such an exciting schedule! Enjoy the music! Yours truly,

E. Jay Ellington City Manager

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here are very few organizations that move the needle of community and economic development forward as much as arts organizations, and Texarkana is fortunate to have many such organizations working together year after year to foster a unique culture and civic pride. The Texarkana Symphony Orchestra continues to serve as a leading force for growth, downtown progress, arts education, and high-quality entertainment for Texarkana. As we dive into another incredible season for TSO, I am thrilled to watch the Symphony return to the stage at the breathtaking Perot Theatre. I cannot think of a more exciting venue and occasion than seeing world-class musicians take the stage and light up the crown jewel of downtown Texarkana with their musical genius. Texarkana is certainly in for a treat! Thank you for supporting the arts. Thank you for supporting downtown, and most of all, thank you for your continued involvement in making Texarkana a great place to call home. It’s because of you we are Twice as Nice!

David Orr City Manager

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LETTER FROM THE

PRESIDENT & CEO OF THE TEXARKANA USA REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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he Texarkana USA Regional Chamber of Commerce recognizes the Texarkana Symphony Orchestra as a key partner in serving our mission to grow, retain and expand our business clientele. They help facilitate our joint mission with other economic development partners to attract new industry to the region. The symphony’s success and programming has helped fill a need in our community. The cultural atmosphere the Texarkana Symphony Orchestra presents nurtures the minds and souls of our regional population. They expose our youth to a varied musical experience lasting a lifetime. The Texarkana Symphony Orchestra consistently entertains our community with both national and international talent, along with accomplished regional musicians rivaling similar venues. It is a vital tool for the region’s economic development specialists to utilize in exhibiting the quality of life in northeast Texas and southwest Arkansas.

Respectfully,

Denis R. Washington Interim President & CEO Texarkana USA Regional Chamber of Commerce

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BRAVO! SEASON CONCERT SPONSORS

Patterson Troike Foundation | Vasco McCoy, Jr. Foundation | Kelley Morgan Foundation Lois and Cary Patterson | Cabe Cook Foundation | Emily and Gabe Tarr

Yvonne Clements Melissa and John Delk Dr. George W. English, III In memory of Florence and George Crank

Suzy and Victor Hlavinka Dr. Susan Keeney Mike and Pete Mankins Drs. Kathleen and Michael Martin Barbara and Dr. Paul McCash Dottie and Ed Miller In Memory of Martha and Josh Morriss, Jr.

by the Gray and McGinnis Families

Vicki and Roy Deskin Remica and Danny Gray Haltom & Doan

by their family

Barrie Thomson

STUDENT CONCERTS IN THE PEROT THEATRE Vicki and Maurice Orr

TEXARKANA AREA

TEXARKANA YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Texarkana Music Teachers Association | AR/TX Music Connection | Barbara and Ludwig Stoeckl Vicki and Maurice Orr | Texas Pioneer Foundation | Mary Scott and Dr. C. Jack Smith

SYMPHONY CHAIR SPONSORS

Underwriting a TSO musician for the Season are: Katherine and George Lease Bobbie A. Atkinson Deborah and Michael Malek William R. and Dorothy T. Beaty Endowment Barbara and Dr. Paul McCash Diana and Dr. Kirby Bunel LeeAnn and Buddy McCulloch in memory of Allen Riley C. Louis & Mary C. Cabe Foundation Katrina and Dr. Robert McGinnis Yvonne Clements Deborah and Ron Mills Dr. George W. English, III Martha and Jeff Prieskorn In memory of Dr. Jauquita Hargus Barbara and Ray Whitney Craig Lashford

APPLAUSE! SPECIAL EVENTS UNDERWRITERS

Remica and Danny Gray | Dr. Susan Keeney | Cathy and Mark Van Herpen | Angela and Andrew Clark

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SUPPORTING THE

SYMPHONY

Texarkana is a community that has always been passionate about the arts, and the Symphony is honored to help further that legacy by bringing the world of symphonic music to our area. Yet, our capacity to pursue excellence in live performance and educational programs is directly related to the financial support the community provides. It is only through generous gifts from people like you who are passionate about music, education, and their community that we can create this legacy of symphonic music for Texarkana. Please help us set the stage for the present and the future by making an annual fund contribution.

YOUR SUPPORT IS VITAL TO TEXARKANA, EVERY GIFT, NO MATTER THE SIZE… • • • • •

CONSIDER WHAT IT WOULD TAKE TO SPONSOR A CONCERT? TSO’s annual concert sponsors dramatically impact the orchestra and our community by ensuring the vital need for live symphonic performances in Texarkana. You can become a concert sponsor for as little as $2,500 per year. For more information, call the TSO office at 870-773-3401.

SUPPORTS THE SYMPHONY’S VISION FOR TEXARKANA TO BE A CENTER OF MUSICAL EXCELLENCE. FOSTERS EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE THROUGH MUSIC FOR AREA CHILDREN AND YOUTH. ENRICHES OUR COMMUNITY THROUGH ACCESS TO LIVE SYMPHONIC PERFORMANCES. PROVIDES ECONOMIC GROWTH THROUGH EXPANDED CULTURAL RESOURCES. DEVELOPS A LEGACY FOR TEXARKANA’S FUTURE.

YOUR GENEROSITY IS RECOGNIZED BY: • • • • •

WANT TO MEET THE MAESTRO AND MUSICIANS UP CLOSE? Become a Symphony Chair Sponsor at $1,500 per year and be invited to attend an orchestra rehearsal, sit on the stage, and meet TSO musicians and the Maestro up-close.

LISTING IN THE PROGRAM BOOK DISCOUNT ON SEASON TICKET PURCHASES INVITATIONS TO TSO EVENTS (ASSOCIATE AND ABOVE) COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS (BRONZE AND ABOVE) TAX-DEDUCTIBLE GIFTS (MINUS THE VALUE OF ANY COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS USED)

HOW TO GIVE MAIL

your donations to Texarkana Symphony Orchestra 421 Hickory Street Texarkana, Arkansas 71854

CALL

the TSO Office at 870-773-3401 The TSO is pleased to accept your credit card donations.

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ONLINE

Visit the website at: www.texarkanasymphony.org Click the “Support Us” tab.

Ticket revenue only covers a quarter of the symphony’s operating costs.

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ENHANCE YOUR EXPERIENCE: TSO’s donor benefits are designed to provide you with upclose access to the music and musicians. As your donor level increases, so does your opportunity to meet TSO musicians and guest artists and receive invitations to special events and post-concert receptions.

YOUR SUPPORT IS VITAL… AND THERE ARE MANY WAYS TO GIVE: TSO accepts gifts of any size, and there are multiple ways to make an impact. Donate securities, name the TSO as an insurance policy or IRA beneficiary, request a matching gift from your company, or include the Symphony in your will. Donations are accepted year-round, and payment options can be set up yearly, quarterly, or monthly.

PLATINUM: $10,000 OR MORE

GOLD: $5,000-$9,999

SILVER: $2,500-$4,999

BRONZE: $1,000-$2,499

SUSTAINER: $500-$999

ASSOCIATE: $100-$499

FRIEND: UP TO $99 2022/2023 PROGRAM

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P R E S E N T S

Zuill Returns!

8 OCTOBER 2022 • 7:00 P.M. PEROT THEATRE Concert Preview 6:10 p.m.

Philip R. Mann, conductor with Zuill Bailey, cello

CONCERT REPERTOIRE ERICH WOLFGANG KORNGOLD (1897-1957) Captain Blood Overture 3’ CAMILLE SAINT-SAËNS (1835-1921) Cello Concerto in A minor, no. 1, op. 33 Allegro non troppo Allegretto con moto Tempo Primo ZUILL BAILEY

16’

Zuill Bailey is represented by Colbert Artists Management, Inc., 180 Elm Street, Suite I #221, Pittsfield, MA 01201-6552. Tel: (212) 757-0782. www.colbertartists.com

INTERMISSION NIKOLAI ANDREYEVICH RIMSKY-KORSAKOV (1844-1908) Sheherazade, op. 35 42’ The Sea and Sinbad’s Ship The Tale of Prince Kalendar The Young Prince and the Princess The Festival at Bagdad; The Sea; The Ship Goes to Pieces on a Rock


CELLO

ZUILL BAILEY

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uill Bailey, widely considered one of the premiere cellists in the world, is a Grammy Award winning, internationally renowned soloist, recitalist, Artistic Director and teacher. His rare combination of celebrated artistry, technical wizardry and engaging personality has made him one of the most sought after and active cellists today. Mr. Bailey has been featured with symphony orchestras and music festivals worldwide. He won the Best Solo Performance Grammy Award in 2017, for his recording of Michael Daugherty’s “Tales of Hemingway,” with the Nashville

Symphony led by Giancarlo Guerrero. His extensive discography includes his newest release – his second recording of the Bach Cello Suites for PS Audio’s Octave Records label, recorded and mixed in stereo and multichannel sound. He appeared in a recurring role on the HBO series “Oz,” and has been heard on NPR’s “Morning Edition,” “Tiny Desk Concert,” “Performance Today,” “Saint Paul Sunday,” BBC’s “In Tune,” XM Radio’s “Live from Studio II,” Sirius Satellite Radio’s “Virtuoso Voices,” and his latest disc of Bach Suites was the disc of the week on Sirius’ Symphony Hall. Mr. Bailey received his Bachelor’s Degree from the Peabody Conservatory where he was named the 2014 Johns Hopkins University Distinguished Alumni, and received a Master’s Degree from the Juilliard School. He performs on the “rosette” 1693 Matteo Gofriller Cello formerly owned by Mischa Schneider of the Budapest String Quartet. He is the Artistic Director of El Paso Pro-Musica (Texas), the Sitka Summer Music Festival/Series and Cello Seminar, (Alaska), Juneau Jazz and Classics, (Alaska), the Northwest Bach Festival (Washington), Classical Inside Out Series- Mesa Arts Center (Arizona) and is Director of the Center for Arts Entrepreneurship and Professor of Cello at the University of Texas at El Paso.

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MASTERWORKS I: ZUILL RETURNS!

PROGRAM NOTES CAPTAIN BLOOD: OVERTURE ERICH WOLFGANG KORNGOLD

B. BRNO, MORAVIA / MAY 29, 1897; D. HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA, USA / NOVEMBER 29, 1957 The first sea-going adventure on this evening’s program comes from a gifted composer whose lushly romantic style went out of fashion during his lifetime and came back in again after his death. Long sneered at by classical purists for providing “more korn than gold,” and for “lowering himself ” to write music for films, Korngold’s compositions for every field in which he worked – concert hall, opera house and silver screen – have undergone major, positive reappraisal over the last 40 years. Music as expressive and satisfying as his was bound to find acceptance one day. Korngold was a child prodigy of Mozart-like proportions (his middle name derives from Mozart). His father Julius, a powerful Viennese music critic who had naturally made many enemies, was accused by his opponents of faking the boy’s talent, but proof of young Erich’s gifts was unimpeachable. He composed his first music at eight and saw his ballet The Snowman professionally produced five years later. All Vienna, including Gustav Mahler and Richard Strauss, marveled at the gift that allowed him to write mature, fully professional music at such a tender age. Korngold scored one major success after another. His most acclaimed work, the opera Die Tote Stadt (The Dead City, 1920), premiered simultaneously in Hamburg and Cologne with all-star casts. An invitation from renowned stage director Max Reinhart to adapt Mendelssohn’s music for an all-star film version of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream brought Korngold to Hollywood in 1934. Impressed by his work, the Warner Bros. studio asked him to compose original film scores. Despite being eminently qualified, at first Korngold declined. He agreed to give it a try after watching a print of Captain Blood (1935). With just three weeks to write the lengthy score, he slipped in a few minutes from a Liszt tone poem in order to meet the deadline; thus his modest on-screen credit, “musical arrangements by Erich Wolfgang Korngold.” This entertaining swashbuckler launched the career of screen heartthrob Errol Flynn. He portrays Peter Blood, a idealistic Irish doctor whom circumstances drive into the life of a pirate. After much intrigue and swordplay, he defeats his enemies and wins the hand of his aristocratic ladylove, played by the exquisite Olivia de

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Havilland. Korngold’s rousing score provided the model for the soundtrack of every similar film that followed. He went on to score six more Flynn films, including the actor’s finest, The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938, for which Korngold won the second of his two Academy Awards) and The Sea Hawk (1940). Unable to return to Austria after the Nazi invasion, Korngold remained in California, where he composed 18 film scores in total. His reputation guaranteed him far better working conditions than those enjoyed by other film composers, including choice of subjects. Many of the movies he worked on are unworthy of his talent, but he never failed to enhance them with beautifully crafted musical backings. After the war, he attempted to resume his career as a composer of concert music and operas, but his heart-on-sleeve style found little success in the cynical mood of the times.

CELLO CONCERTO NO. 1 IN A MINOR, OP. 33 CAMILLE SAINT-SAËNS B. PARIS, FRANCE / OCTOBER 9, 1835; D. ALGIERS, ALGERIA / DECEMBER 16, 1921

Music was only the foremost of Saint-Saëns’ many interests. This nineteenth-century Renaissance man (a firm admirer and friend of Liszt, by the way) also developed a working knowledge of several sciences, published volumes of poetry, saw his plays produced on the stage, and wrote reams of newspaper articles on many different topics, while somehow finding time to travel extensively. He led a full musical life, as well. It included conducting orchestras, giving recitals on both the piano and the organ, preparing new editions of music by earlier composers, and composing nearly 300 works of his own. Cellists are grateful for Saint-Saëns’ superb contributions to their limited repertoire: two concertos, two sonatas with piano, a suite and a number of shorter works. He composed Concerto No. 1 in 1872. He dedicated it to the soloist who played the premiere: Auguste Tolbecque, Principal Cellist in the Orchestra of the Paris Conservatoire. Its attractions are not confined to appealing themes and an effortless response to the problem of ensuring that the low-voiced cello is never obscured by the orchestra. Another plus is an ingenious structure. Borrowing procedures originated by his friend, Franz Liszt, Saint-Saëns telescoped the traditional three movements of a concerto into a continuous whole. He also based the first and last of them on the same thematic material. The urgent, dramatic book-ends are separated by a minuetlike section that displays a refined, very French elegance and a playful sense of fantasy.

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PROGRAM NOTES CONTINUED...

SCHEHERAZADE, OP. 35 NIKOLAI RIMSKY-KORSAKOV

B. TIKHVIN, RUSSIA / MARCH 18, 1844; D. LYUBENSK, RUSSIA / JUNE 21, 1908 Our second sea-going adventure is a purely concert work, and one of the greatest orchestral showpieces. Surely it was destiny that led Rimsky-Korsakov to compose a piece inspired by the Arabian Nights legends. He spent decades acquiring the necessary skills to do the material justice, above all a mastery of colorful orchestration and a flair for composing sweeping, exotic melodies. He composed the symphonic suite, Scheherazade, in 1888. He included in the printed score the following introduction, drawn from the original stories: “The Sultan Shakriar, convinced of the falsehood and inconstancy of all women, had sworn an oath to put to death each of his wives after the first night. However the Sultana Scheherazade saved her life by arousing his interest in the tales which she told during the 1001 nights. Driven by curiosity, the Sultan postponed her execution from day to day, and at last abandoned his bloodthirsty design.” The orchestration of Scheherazade is masterly, drawing from what is a not particularly large ensemble the maximum in

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color. Much of this brilliance is achieved by continuously dotting the score with passages for solo instruments. The suite is bound together by a recurring motive, a bewitching melody sung by the solo violin: the voice of Scheherazade. The first movement gives a strong impression of the sea, complete with the swell of ocean breezes, the roll of the waves and the adventurous call of foreign ports. At the start of the second movement, Scheherazade’s theme again declares “Once upon a time...” Solo bassoon launches the tale, sinuously, like the chant of an ancient storyteller. A war-like fanfare introduced by trombones and tuba plays an important role in the fantastic proceedings. The third movement can’t be anything but a love scene. A lively dance, tinged with light percussion, appears at the core. The Scheherazade violin theme puts in an appearance, leading to a brief, ecstatic climax – a first kiss? The finale opens with alternations of furious orchestral outbursts and passionate violin solos. Rimsky then kicks off a boisterous carnival, where themes heard earlier in the suite jostle for attention. At the height of festivities we return to the sea, sailing majestically until a colossal climax is reached. The Scheherazade theme returns one last time, keening softly in the heights to close her story.

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Program Notes by Don Anderson © 2022


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FEBRUARY 2, 2023 9:30 A.M.** - PEROT THEATRE This is a national program of Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute.

In collaboration with Carnegie Hall, the Texarkana Symphony Orchestra is participating in Link Up “The Orchestra Moves,” a music education program provided by Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute. The students participating in Link Up attend a culminating concert on February 2, 2023, at the Perot Theatre where they sing, move, and play recorder or the violin with the orchestra from their seats! The Texarkana Symphony Orchestra is one of 120 national and international orchestras chosen for this program. Carnegie Hall supports TSO’s existing education programs and strengthens their partnerships with local schools. Link Up orchestras pair with students in grades 3-5 to explore orchestral repertoire and fundamental musical skills, including creative work and composition, through a hands-on music curriculum. This partnership also provides a high quality, year-long curriculum that teachers can implement, along with classroom materials, online video and audio resources, and the professional development and support necessary to make the program an engaging experience for students. Schools participating in the Link Up program will have priority seating in February. However, additional schools may attend in the traditional concert setting as well, observing those in the Link Up program, enjoying a live orchestra performance, and considering participation in Link Up in the years to come. REPERTOIRE FOR THIS CONCERT INCLUDES:

Cabaniss: Come to Play Márquez: Danzón No. 2 Strauss: The Blue Danube Offenbach: Barcarolle

Mozart: Overture to The Marriage of Figaro Bizet: Toreador from “Carmen” Negrón: Un, dos tres Beethoven: “Allegro con brio” from Symphony No. 5 Filho: Cidade Maravilhosa

**TSO’s annual student concerts are for local school systems and homeschool groups. Any unused seats will be available to the public after January 9, 2023. For more information on these concerts please contact: Remica Gray, director of operations/education committee chair, at 870-773-3401. 30

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Memorials & Honorariums Memorials and Honorariums given to TSO in the last year as of September 1, 2022.

Steinway Piano made possible by Dr. and Mrs. Charles Hollingsworth and Family.

GIFTS IN HONOR Andrew Clark Sue Sanderson Garden Club

Alice and Gene McMillan Lindsay and Chris McMillan

Angela and Andrew Clark Patsy and Don Morriss

Ethan Miller Sue Sanderson Garden Club

Dick Eckstein Judy Morgan Mary Scott and Dr. C. Jack Smith Caroline and Dr. Andrew Curry Dr. Susan Keeney Georgette and Dr. Richard Peckham

Linda Schafer Sue Sanderson Garden Club

Remica and Danny Gray Vicki and Roy Deskin Patsy and Don Morriss

Katherine Stoeckl Mr. and Mrs. Ludwig Stoeckl

Katrina and Dr. Robert McGinnis Patsy and Don Morriss

Cathy and Mark Van Herpen Patsy and Don Morriss

GIFTS IN MEMORY Birdia Nettles Covington Margaret Fischer Davis Kathryn Ludlow Owen Ludlow - for the Perot Theatre June Owen Gail Abrahamson Angela and Andrew Clark Remica and Danny Gray Allen Riley LeeAnn and Buddy McCulloch Nancy Troike Deborah and Ron Mills


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ORCHESTRA ROSTER Phillip Mann, Music Director and Principal Conductor Steve Bennett, Conductor, Texarkana Youth Symphony Orchestra Scott Thornhill, Conductor, TSO Chamber Singers

CONCERTMASTER Kiril Laskarov *Dr. George W. English, III ASSOCIATE CONCERTMASTER Algimantas Staskevicius *Katherine and George Lease ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTERS Dan Santelices *Deborah and Ron Mills Diana Norwood *Craig Lashford VIOLIN Elizabeth Beck Linnaea Brophy Mia Catania Oscar Albert Garcia Delgadillo Sardor Djumaev Paulo Eskitch Juan Carlos Flores Diana Galimova Yida Hu Ronnamarie Jensen Nicole Paglialonga Cassandra Lin Jennifer Sherman Karina Sim Jose Valesquez VIOLA Borys B. Smolaga, Principal *Barbara and Ray Whitney Ray Areolla Anna Bass J. Michele Gunn Tatiana Kotcherguina Jorge Luis Zapata Marin Eduardo Rios CELLO Brett Andrews, Principal *Martha and Jeff Prieskorn Stefan Koch Jason Mooney Kourtney Newton Jose Ottonello Milovan Paz

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Jorge Rodriguez Alisha Rufty Ozge Serceler Eric Smith Jacob Wunsch BASS Justin Kujawski, Acting Principal Jeff Madlock Kirby Nunez Sean O’Hara Lois Robinson Andrew Cody Williams FLUTE Gabriel Vega, Acting Principal Laura Bennett, Flute II *Katrina and Dr. Robert McGinnis Kara Compton, Flute III/Piccolo Mehrdad Gholami Kelsey McDonald OBOE Theresa Zale Bridges, Principal *Barbara and Dr. Paul McCash Leah Forsyth, Oboe II, English Horn Ryan Estes Sharon L. Lacey CLARINET Scot Humes, Acting Principal *In memory of Dr. Jauquita Hargus Jasper Hensley, Acting Principal Brian Do, Bass Clarinet Chastine Hofmeister, Bass Clarinet BASSOON Michael Jones, Acting Principal Janelle Ott, Bassoon II Sarah Boyd, Contrabassoon HORN Brent Shires, Principal *Diana and Kirby Bunel Adam Black Vivian Chang Mirella Gable Derek Matthesen Katie McBain Evan Mino

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TRUMPET Jeremy McBain, Principal *William R. and Dorothy T. Beaty Endowment Buddy Deese *William R. and Dorothy T. Beaty Endowment Mike Scarlato Micah Bell TROMBONE Mark Windham, Principal *LeeAnn and Buddy McCulloch in memory of Allen Riley Steve Bennett Carlito Chavez Bruce Faske J. Mark Thompson, Bass Trombone TUBA Ed Owen, Principal TIMPANI Derron Bell, Principal *Deborah and Michael Malek PERCUSSION Jacob Adam Garcia, Principal *Bobbie A. Atkinson Doug DeMorrow Aaron Guillory Ryan Lewis Erick Saoud Blake Taylor HARP Dr. Janel S.R. Hector, Principal *C. Lewis and Mary C. Cabe Foundation Chelsea Bushong Alisa Coffey PIANO/KEYBOARD Mary Scott Smith, Principal *Yvonne Clements Robin Thomas * DENOTES CHAIR SPONSOR


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Concert Preview 6:10 p.m.

Philip R. Mann, conductor with Andrew Staupe, piano

CONCERT REPERTOIRE JOHANN CHRISTIAN BACH (1735-1782) Keyboard Concerto, op. 7, no. 6, in G major, W. C60a Allegro Andante Allegretto ANDREW STAUPE FRANZ LISZT (1811-1886) Malédiction for Solo Piano and String Orchestra, S. 121 Quasi moderato-Sostenuto Energico nobilmente-Sempre moderato ANDREW STAUPE

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INTERMISSION RICHARD STRAUSS (1894-1949) Metamorphosen, TrV 290


PIANO

ANDREW STAUPE

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ianist Andrew Staupe is emerging as one of the distinctive voices of a new generation of pianists. Andrew has appeared as soloist with the Baltimore Symphony, San Diego Symphony, Minnesota Orchestra, Houston Symphony, Fort Worth Symphony, Colorado Symphony, Indianapolis Symphony, Utah Symphony, Arkansas Symphony, Tallahassee Symphony, and many other orchestras throughout the United States. He has collaborated with distinguished conductors Osmo Vänskä, Bobby McFerrin, Jahja Ling, Gerard Schwarz, Andrew Litton, Cristian Macelaru, Larry Rachleff, Lucas Richman, Rossen Milanov, Daniel Hege, and Josep-Caballé Domenech. He has performed across the United States and extensively in Europe, appearing in Russia, Holland, the Czech Republic, Austria, Hungary, Latvia, Romania, France, Germany, and Bulgaria. On tour in Europe, he has appeared in distinguished concert venues including the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, Rachmaninov Hall in Moscow, the Salle Cortot in Paris, and the Ateneul Roman in Romania. In 2012 Andrew made his Carnegie Hall debut to critical acclaim, in which New York Concert Review stated that “Staupe gave a brilliant performance, handling the virtuosic demands with apparent ease… I was stunned- this was one of the most incredible performances… A once in a lifetime performance!”

An avid chamber musician, Andrew has jammed with legendary vocalist Bobby McFerrin, played Tangos with the Assad Brothers, and has performed with Chee-Yun, Sharon Robinson, Martin Chalifour, Jessica Rivera, Desmond Hoebig, James Dunham, and Joseph Swensen. Andrew has a keen interest in performing new music and has premiered a number of works for solo piano and chamber ensemble by composers Howard Shore, Sarah Kirkland Snider, Christopher Walczak, Christopher Goddard, among numerous others. Other notable performances include concerts at the Kennedy Center and the Library of Congress in Washington DC, and Steinway Hall in New York City. He has performed twice on American Public Media’s “Performance Today,” and on Garrison Keillor’s “A Prairie Home Companion” in 2004. Deeply committed to teaching, Andrew is an Assistant Professor of Piano at the University of Utah, and gives frequent master classes around the country. A native of Saint Paul, Minnesota, he earned his Doctorate at Rice University with Jon Kimura Parker, and studied at the University of Minnesota with Lydia Artymiw.

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MASTERWORKS II: METAMORPHOSIS

PROGRAM NOTES KEYBOARD CONCERTO IN G MAJOR, OP. 7 NO. 6 (W C.60A) JOHANN CHRISTIAN BACH B. LEIPZIG, GERMANY / SEPTEMBER 5, 1735; D. LONDON, ENGLAND / JANUARY 1, 1782

The youngest son of Johann Sebastian Bach, and the eleventh of the 13 children of JSB and his second wife, Maria Barbara, Johann Christian studied music with his father, his halfbrother Carl, and with Italian master Padre Martini. He spent his early career in continental Europe, including a period as organist at the Cathedral in the Italian city, Milan. Once he had proven his flair for composing opera, he received several invitations to compose works for Turin, Naples and other major centers. In 1762, he petitioned the cathedral authorities in Milan for a year’s leave of absence to compose two operas that had been commissioned from him by the prestigious King’s Theater in London. Permission was granted and he departed for England. He intended to stay only a short time, but his success there was so great that it was destined to remain the base of his many and diverse activities for the remainder of his life. Among his numerous achievements was the co-founding of a long-running series of orchestral concerts in London. Many of the finest composers and soloists of the day performed at them, and it witnessed the premiere countless significant compositions. His catalogue of gracious and appealing compositions includes considerable quantities of chamber music, keyboard works, sacred pieces and some 25 concertos for keyboard. During his later years,

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the solo instrument in performances of the concertos would have been the piano rather than the harpsichord of previous years. The concerto you will hear at this concert was published in Amsterdam in 1770. In it may be heard pre-echoes of the marvelous concertos that JC Bach’s good friend, Mozart, would offer to the world in the ensuing decades. The outer movements are attractive and vivacious. Between them rests a sweet-tempered oasis of lyrical tranquility.

MALÉDICTION FOR SOLO PIANO AND STRING ORCHESTRA FRANZ LISZT

B. RAIDING, HUNGARY / OCTOBER 22, 1811; D. BAYREUTH, GERMANY / JULY 31, 1886 The enduring popularity of Liszt’s first two concertos has cast his other works for piano and orchestra into the shade. These concerts present a welcome opportunity to give one of them a hearing. Among the works he performed during a successful visit to England in 1826 was a concerto he had composed himself. It has not survived, but it seems likely that he used its materials as the basis for the so-called Malédiction, which dates from the following decade. The untitled manuscript was discovered after his death. It saw print in 1915, with a name chosen by the publisher, based on inscriptions in Liszt’s hand on a copyist’s manuscript: “malédiction” (curse) over the opening theme; “orgueil” (pride) above the second; and “raillerie” (mockery) over the third. Liszt reused two of these themes in later compositions: the first in his choral work Prometheus Unbound, at the moment where the female chorus of Oceanides call down curses upon Prometheus; the second in the finale of his Faust Symphony. He had been interested in composing concertos from early in his career, but he lacked experience in orchestration. Both the “London” concerto and the Malédiction may be seen as trial runs, less sophisticated and strongly integrated than the later concertante works, and sporting a string orchestra accompaniment rather than a full one. “Curse” may indeed be an apt description of the opening subject, but it scarcely applies to the piece as a whole. It is a free-flowing succession of highly contrasted sections: quiet and expressive, light and playful, brash and exciting. It charts a gradual emotional progression from darkness to light, suggesting an underlying, undisclosed program.

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PROGRAM NOTES CONTINUED...

METAMORPHOSEN, TRV 290 RICHARD STRAUSS

B. MUNICH, GERMANY / JUNE 11, 1864 D. GARMISCH-PARTENKIRCHEN, GERMANY / SEPTEMBER 8, 1949 On October 2, 1943, the opera house in Munich, Germany, Strauss’s home city, was destroyed by Allied bombs. The composer was moved to write as follows to his biographer, Willi Schuh: “The burning of the Munich Hoftheater, the place consecrated to the first performances of (Wagner’s) Tristan and Meistersinger, in which 73 years ago I heard (Weber’s) Der Freischütz for the first time, where my good father sat for 49 years as first horn in the orchestra…this was the greatest catastrophe which has ever been brought into my life, for which there can be no consolation and in my old age, no hope.” Immediately afterwards, he sketched a few bars of music that

he labelled Mourning for Munich. He put them aside, after they reminded him of a waltz he had composed in 1939 for a documentary film about Munich, a film that was never released. He revised the waltz by adding a sombre, minor-key section inspired by the destruction of the opera house, and christened the resulting concert work Munich: A Memorial Waltz. In September 1944, conductor Paul Sacher commissioned a new work from him. The following February, the Semper Opera House in Dresden (where eight Strauss operas had premiered, as well as three of Wagner’s) suffered a similar fate to Munich’s. Then the Vienna State Opera was heavily damaged on March 12, 1945. The very next day, Strauss turned back to the 1943 “mourning” sketch and used it as the point of departure for Metamorphosen (subtitled ‘a study for 23 solo strings’), the work that he composed in response to Sacher’s commission. He completed it on April 12, mere weeks before the end of the war. It is a deeply emotional, passionately eloquent lament, reflecting his distress over not only the destruction of the opera houses, but what they represented to him: the grand German culture that had nurtured him. For a time, he considered releasing this very personal work for performance only after his death. In the end he relented. Sacher conducted the premiere on January 25 1946, leading the Collegium Musicum of Zurich, Switzerland. Strauss scored Metamorphosen for 10 violins, five violas, five cellos, and three double basses. It falls into three broad, continuous sections. The centre panel is quick in tempo and impassioned in mood. Strauss book-ended it with slow sections, the last even slower and more desolate than the first. “Themes proliferate and interweave in seamless counterpoint,” author Michael Kennedy has written. “These themes, particularly the first, sound familiar to the listener, not because they are especially reminiscent of earlier Strauss themes, but because they seem to carry echoes of Wagner, Brahms, and others. Only at the very end do we realize what the principal theme really is, when Strauss quotes the opening of the Funeral March from Beethoven’s ‘Eroica’ symphony (No. 3), and writes underneath it in the score ‘In Memoriam!’ He later said that not until he reached this point did he realize that this was the theme that had been haunting him from the start. In no other work of his is the writing for strings more eloquent, more moving, and technically more accomplished. The thematic allusions are so subtle yet so poignant that we seem to be hearing a funeral hymn for the whole of German music.” Program Notes by Don Anderson © 2022

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Christmas at the Perot P R E S E N T S

11 DECEMBER 2022 • 4:00 P.M. PHILIP R. MANN, conductor with MARIA FASCIANO, soprano

The Texarkana Symphony Chamber Singers, Scott Thornhill, conductor The Texarkana Community Ballet The Texarkana Youth Symphony Orchestra, Steve Bennett, conductor

GOELLER, DAN Christmas Fantasy for Orchestra BIRDWELL, CHUCK Various Themes on “Fa-La-La”

WILLIAMS, JOHN Selections from the motion picture Home Alone I. Somewhere in My Memory II. Merry Christmas, Merry Christmas! DEBNEY, JOHN Suite from the motion picture Elf YON, PIATRO ALLESANDRO Jesu Bambino MARIA FACIANO RICHMAN, LUCAS Hanukkah Festival Overture ADAM, ADOLFE O Holy Night MARIA FACIANO

INTERMISSION GUARALDI, VINCE A Charlie Brown Christmas ANDERSON, LEROY Sleigh Ride 2022 CELEBRITY CONDUCTOR TCHAIKOVSKY, PYOTR ILYICH Nutcracker, op. 71a I. March II. Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy III. Dance of the Mirlitons “Reed-Flutes” MEMBERS OF THE TEXARKANA COMMUNITY BALLET CORELLI, ARCANGELO Concerto Grosso in G minor, op. 6, no. 8 “Christmas Concerto” I. Vivace—Grave. Arcate, sostenuto e come stà TEXARKANA YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA STYNE, JULE, Chuck Sayre, arr. Let it Snow! Let it Snow! Let it Snow! TEXARKANA YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA FINNEGIN, JOHN Christmas Sing Along


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TSO CHAMBER SINGERS CONDUCTOR

TSO CHAMBER PIANIST

SCOTT THORNHILL

ROBIN THOMAS

cott grew up the son of an Air Force officer who retired to Redwater, Texas. After graduating high school in 1990, he studied Vocal Performance at the University of Arkansas at Monticello for two years before earning a Bachelor of Music in Church Music/Vocal Performance from Ouachita Baptist University in 1995. He then married his college sweetheart, Renee Brown, and moved to Fort Worth, Texas to attend Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, completing his Master of Arts in Religious Education and Administration in 1998. Scott served First Baptist Church in Livingston, Tennessee for four years before coming back home to Texas. He has been Minister of Music and Education at Pleasant Grove Baptist Church in Texarkana since 2002. Throughout his career, Scott had led adult, youth and children’s choirs. His joy is leading others to use their musical talents and abilities in God’s service. He has participated in a variety of choirs and ensembles, including the Tennessee Baptist Men’s Chorale and the Singing Men of Texas. He has been privileged to sing in choir tours in Korea, China, Japan, Hong Kong and Hawaii and, most recently, at Carnegie Hall in New York City. Scott and Renee have one son, Nate, and they enjoy many outdoor activities, such as fishing, hunting, hiking, and backpacking. On his days off, he also enjoys being a full-time cow chaser and fence-mender at the family farm.

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obin Thomas serves as Worship Associate and Director of the School of Worship Arts at First Baptist Church, Texarkana. A native of Shreveport, Louisiana, Robin studied piano with Nena Plant Wideman and performed the Saint-Saens Carnival of the Animals with the Shreveport Symphony during her senior year of high school. Robin holds both Bachelor and Master’s degrees in piano performance from Louisiana Tech University and the University of Louisiana in Monroe, respectively. Before moving to Texarkana in 2012, Robin was the Music & Worship Associate at First Baptist Church in West Monroe, Louisiana, and Orchestra Consultant for the Louisiana Baptist Convention. Robin served on the Board of Directors of the Monroe Symphony Orchestra and was a featured soloist with the orchestra performing Mozart’s Piano Concerto in A major, K. 488. Robin composed the work Southern Harmony Hymn Suite, which was premiered by the Monroe Symphony Orchestra. Robin currently serves on the Texarkana Symphony Board of Directors and is a graduate of Leadership Texarkana. Robin has four published collections for solo and duo piano along with five recordings for solo and duo piano. She and her husband, Joe, enjoy spending time with their three children, spouses, and eight grandchildren.

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Celebrity Conductor C O M P E T I T I O N

SOME QUICK FACTS ABOUT THE COMPETITION: The primary purpose of the Competition is to bring awareness of the TSO and its mission to a broad cross-section of Texarkana and to raise important financial support. Four community leaders compete for the honor of conducting the orchestra for one selection at the TSO Christmas at the Perot concert on Sunday afternoon, December 11, 2022, at 4:00 p.m. Anyone may vote to support their favorite candidate and support the TSO in the process. Each vote is $20, and you can vote for as many candidates as you wish, and as many times as your pocketbook allows!

Each competitor has been given the freedom to solicit votes in any manner they choose, so long as it is not illegal, immoral, or unethical! Conducting Competitors will each receive their own baton, a conducting class from Maestro Philip Mann, and an opportunity to conduct the orchestra at the dress rehearsal. Beyond that, none of the competitors will know who has won until Santa brings them all on stage at the Christmas Concert. Votes can be cast through PayPal on the Symphony Facebook page, at texarkanasymphony.org or by visiting the Celebrity Conductor table at TSO’s fall 2022 Concert.


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mber Adams has lived in Texarkana for four years and was transplanted here for work. Her first weekend in Texarkana, she attended a TSO concert at the Perot! During the four years she obtained her Bachelor of Applied Arts and Science (BAAS) from Texas A&M University-Texarkana and is Director of Partner Development at the Texarkana Chamber of Commerce. She is a graduate of Leadership Texarkana, Strategic Doing Training, and obtained, “Outstanding Performance” in Dale Carnegie Course. For her associates degree she studied music, as a vocalist, and will always cherish what music has done for her. By participating in the contest, she hopes she can influence young children to discover their love for music and artistic excellence. Adams is excited to be a part of the celebrity conductor contest, as one of her goals is to help the arts in the community. She is a huge Dolly Parton fan, and her favorite quote is “it’s hard to be a diamond in a rhinestone world.” The way she sees it, it is time for the Perot and TSO to SHINE! Vote for Amber. What Would Dolly Do?

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r. Kirby Bunel has practiced Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Texarkana since 1993 when he purchased the practice of the legendary Pierce Noble, DDS. Dr. Bunel began his education at Baylor University. Next, he earned his D.D.S. from Baylor College of Dentistry, Dallas, Texas in 1988. Dr. Bunel spent the next year as a Teaching Fellow in the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Baylor. Then he moved to Houston to complete his Residency at The University of Texas Health Science Center at the Texas Medical Center from 1989 to 1993. After 10 years in solo practice, he merged his practice with Drs. Dan Moore and Joe James to form Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons of Northeast Texas. Currently, Dr. Bunel is the senior surgeon and practice administrator for OMS of Northeast Texas where he works alongside Drs. Duke, Legan, Burks and Hastings. His civic involvement includes the Texarkana Chamber of Commerce, Leadership Texarkana, and TRAHC. In addition, Dr. Bunel supported the local Komen Texarkana Race for the Cure for many years, both as a race participant and sponsor. He has supported many local entities including the Women for the Arts and Party with the Picassos’, the Clay Eichler Memorial Fund, and the ArkLaTex 100 Club. Texarkana Symphony Orchestra is a favorite, and he is excited to represent the Symphony as a celebrity conductor! Dr. Bunel is married to Diana and they have 2 children and 1 son-in-law.

DR. BRIAN

ROBIN

MATTHEWS

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PROCTOR

r. Brian L. Matthews is a tenured Associate Professor of Management, Department Chair of Business, and Management faculty advisor in the College of Business, Engineering, and Technology at Texas A&M University-Texarkana. In 2001, he graduated cum laude from Harding University in Searcy, Arkansas with a Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing and was inducted into Phi Eta Sigma. In 2002, Dr. Matthews graduated summa cum laude with a Master of Business Administration in Management from Harding and was inducted into Mu Delta Honor Society. In 2012, Dr. Matthews successfully defended his dissertation and received a Doctor of Business Administration in Marketing from Argosy University, graduating magna cum laude with a 4.0 GPA. For his academic achievement, he was inducted into the National Society of Collegiate Scholars (NSCS). A former city council member, Dr. Matthews now serves as a board member for Literacy Council of Miller and Bowie Counties, Leadership Texarkana, Main Street Texarkana, Texarkana Resources Center, and Wilbur Smith Rotary. He has published numerous research articles in national and international peer-reviewed journals and contributes to the Texarkana Gazette as a guest business columnist. Dr. Matthews is an Associate Minister and Sunday School teacher at Greater St. John Missionary Baptist Church.

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t has been said, Robin Choate Proctor cut her teeth on music. As a toddler, she left her teeth marks on the edge of the family console record player. By the age of 5, Robin was a side-kick performer with her dad, the well-known Bobby Choate. Using his wit and charm, Bobby was able to get his foot in the door, and Robin on the stages, of country music artists who came to town. The more notable of those performances were on the stages of Merle Haggard, Sonny James and Marty Robbins. Robin, sitting on a stool next to her dad, would belt out big songs like “You Ain’t Woman Enough to Take My Man”, to the delight of every audience! When she got older, she opened shows for T.G. Sheppard and Steve Warner. Robin went straight from high school to the big stages of Six Flags, Dogpatch USA and The World’s Fair in Knoxville, TN. As well, in 1980, Robin represented her hometown as Miss Texarkana and would go on to be the preliminary talent winner of the Miss Texas pageant. Robin earned her bachelor’s degree, in education, from East Texas State University-Texarkana. She is married to Danny Proctor and has one son, Chase Mooty Proctor. He and his wife, Natalie, have blessed her with two grandsons. Over the past ten years, Robin, along with her sister Judy, have dedicated themselves to fundraising for Party with Picassos. Robin enjoys gardening, cooking, and canning; a talent she inherited from her dad.

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TYSO CONDUCTOR

STEVE M. BENNETT

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r. Bennett received his Music Education degree from Harding University and continued his education at the University of Central Arkansas where he received his master’s degree in instrumental conducting. While completing his undergraduate and graduate degrees, he was a member of the Harding and UCA concert bands and orchestras, the Conway Civic Orchestra, and was the music director of the University of Central Arkansas summer

musical. After his first year at UCA, Mr. Bennett was awarded the Outstanding Graduate Student Award from his professors. He began his teaching career in the fall of 1995 in Montgomery, Alabama, where he helped start a band program at Alabama Christian Academy. During his five years there, the band competed in many events throughout the school year and received numerous awards at local and state levels. He and his family moved to Texarkana during the summer of 2000 to take on his current position with the Texarkana Independent School District. His teaching duties since moving to Texarkana include assistant band director at Pine Street Middle School, Texas Middle School, Texas High School, Red Lick Middle School, and the orchestra director at both Texas Middle and High Schools. Mr. Bennett’s teaching duties outside of TISD include both Texarkana College and the University of Arkansas Hope/Texarkana. As a performer and conductor, Mr. Bennett has been a member of the Texarkana Symphony Orchestra as a trombonist when it premiered in 2006 and the director of the Texarkana Youth Symphony Orchestra since its second season in 2008.

t u O e m Co & Play! CHRISTMAS AT THE PEROT SIDE-BY-SIDE WITH TSO SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2022, 4:00PM PEROT THEATRE

MISSION OF THE TYSO: THE MISSION OF THE TEXARKANA YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA IS TO FOSTER A LOVE OF MUSIC AND BUILD FRIENDSHIPS THROUGH EXCELLENCE IN ORCHESTRAL EDUCATION AND PERFORMANCE EXPERIENCES. 46

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SPRING CONCERT SUNDAY, APRIL 30, 2023, 4:00PM SULLIVAN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER JOHN THOMAS THEATRE 3941 SUMMERHILL RD, TEXARKANA TX


ABOUT THE YOUTH ORCHESTRA: The Texarkana Youth Symphony Orchestra (TYSO) auditions are open to all qualified middle and high school students (ages 10-19) who are prepared to make a commitment to the Youth Orchestra’s rigorous rehearsal and concert schedule. Exceptions for younger ages will occur only with the approval of the student’s private lesson instructor and at the discretion of the TYSO conductor. Auditions are held each fall and spring. For participation in TYSO, students must successfully pass an audition each year. Students must also be a member of his/her school instrumental program, if provided. Tuition for participation in TYSO is $125 per year and shall be paid in full by the first rehearsal. Financial aid is available in the form of scholarships for those who demonstrate need as verified by the Federal Free and Reduced Lunch Standards. The orchestra rehearses every Monday evening from 6:00-7:30PM.

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P R E S E N T S

Mahler’s First 4 FEBRUARY 2023 • 7:00 P.M. PEROT THEATRE Concert Preview 6:10 p.m.

Philip R. Mann, conductor with Jennifer Frautschi, violin

CONCERT REPERTOIRE JEAN SIBELIUS (1865-1957) Violin Concerto, op. 47, in D minor Allegro moderato Adagio di molto Allegro mar non tanto JENNIFER FRAUTSCHI

35’

Jennifer Frautschi appears under agreement with Arts Management Group, Inc.

INTERMISSION GUSTAV MAHLER (1860-1911) Symphony no. 1, “Titan” Langsam. Schleppend. Wie ein Naturlaut (Slowly, dragging. Like a sound from nature.) Kräftig bewegt, doch nicht zu schnell (Moving strongly, not too fast.) Feierlich und gemessen, ohne zu schleppen (solemnly, without dragging.) Stürmisch bewegt (Stormily agitated.)

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VIOLIN

JENNIFER FRAUTSCHI

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wo-time GRAMMY nominee and Avery Fisher career grant recipient Jennifer Frautschi has garnered worldwide acclaim as a deeply expressive, musically adventurous violinist with impeccable technique and a wide-ranging repertoire. Equally at home in the classic and contemporary repertoire, her recent seasons have featured performances and recordings of works ranging from Robert Schumann and Lili Boulanger to Barbara White and Arnold Schoenberg. She has also had the privilege of premiering several new works composed for her by prominent living composers. Critics have described her performances as ‘electrifying,’ ‘riveting’ and ‘mesmerizing’, lauding her ‘staggering energy and finesse’ and ‘fierce expression.’ After a recent performance of the Brahms Violin Concerto, Cleveland Classical wrote: ‘We witnessed the most magnificent performance by a guest soloist in recent memory. From the outset of the Brahms Concerto, she was a stunning presence, her playing a breathtaking conflation of grace and grit, and at times downright ferocious.’ Ms. Frautschi’s concerto appearances have included the Los Angeles Philharmonic under Pierre Boulez, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra under Christoph Eschenbach, Minnesota Orchestra under Osmo Vänska, Boston Philharmonic, Buffalo Philharmonic, Cincinnati Symphony, Florida Orchestra, Milwaukee Symphony, Rhode Island Philharmonic, St Paul Chamber Orchestra, Utah Symphony, Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart Festival, and Orchestra of the Teatro di San Carlo Opera House. Her 2022-23 season features engagements with the Indianapolis Symphony and New World Symphony, re-engagements with the New Mexico Philharmonic and the Santa Rosa Symphony, and a residency at the North Carolina School of the Arts. During the 2022 summer season, she has been invited to perform at Chamber Music Northwest, Charlottesville Chamber Music Festival, Music@ Menlo, Santa Fe Music Festival, Salt Bay Chamberfest, Sarasota Music Festival, Tippet Rise, and Vivace Festival. Ms. Frautschi is an Artist Member of the Boston Chamber Music Society, and has performed at virtually all of the premier chamber music series and festivals in the United States: Caramoor, Charlottesville, Lake Champlain, La Musica, Moab, Newport, Ojai, Salt Bay, Santa Fe, Seattle, and Spoleto USA Chamber Music Festivals; Bravo! Vail, Chamber Music Northwest, La Jolla Summerfest, Music@Menlo, and Tippet Rise Arts Center;

and at the Library of Congress, New York’s Metropolitan and Guggenheim Museums of Art, the 92nd Street Y, Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, Phillips Collection, and Mainly Mozart in San Diego. Internationally, she has been invited to present recitals in the Salzburg Mozarteum, Vienna Konzerthaus, Amsterdam Concertgebouw, La Cité de la Musique in Paris, Brussels’ Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie, London’s Wigmore Hall, and Beijing’s Imperial Garden, and toured England with musicians from Prussia Cove. She has performed at Chanel’s Pygmalion Series in Tokyo, the Cartagena International Music Festival in Columbia, San Miguel de Allende Festival in Mexico, the Spoleto Festival of the Two Worlds and Rome Chamber Music Festival in Italy, Pharo’s Trust in Cyprus, Kutna Hora Festival in the Czech Republic, Toronto Summer Music in Canada, and St. Barth’s Music Festival in the French West Indies. She has premiered important new works by Barbara White, Mason Bates, Oliver Knussen, Krzysztof Penderecki, Michael Hersch, and others, and has appeared at New York’s George Crumb Festival and Stefan Wolpe Centenary Concerts. Her extensive discography includes several discs for Naxos: the Stravinsky Violin Concerto with the Philharmonia Orchestra of London, conducted by the legendary Robert Craft, and two GRAMMY-nominated recordings– Schoenberg’s Concerto for String Quartet and Orchestra (nominated for ‘Best Instrumental Soloist Performance’ in 2006) and the Schoenberg Third String Quartet (nominated for ‘Best Chamber Music Performance’ in 2011). Her most recent releases are with pianist John Blacklow on Albany Records: the complete sonatas of Robert Schumann, and American Duos, featuring works by contemporary American composers Barbara White, Steven Mackey, Elena Ruehr, Dan Coleman, and Stephen Hartke. The three recordings she released on Artek have received universal acclaim: the two Prokofiev Concerti with Gerard Schwarz and the Seattle Symphony; music of Ravel and Stravinsky for violin and piano; and 20th-century works for solo violin. Other recent recordings include a disc of Romantic Horn Trios, with hornist Eric Ruske and pianist Stephen Prutsman, and the Stravinsky Duo Concertant with pianist Jeremy Denk. Born in Pasadena, California, Ms. Frautschi began the violin at age three under the Suzuki Method. She was a student of Robert Lipsett at the Colburn School for the Performing Arts in Los Angeles. She attended Harvard, the University of Southern California, the New England Conservatory of Music, and finished her studies with Robert Mann at The Juilliard School. She is an Artist-in-Residence at Stony Brook University. She performs on a glorious Antonio Stradivarius violin from 1722, the ‘ex-Cadiz,’ on generous loan to her from a private American foundation with support from Rare Violins In Consortium.

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MASTERWORKS III: MAHLER’S FIRST

PROGRAM NOTES VIOLIN CONCERTO IN D MINOR, OP. 47 JEAN SIBELIUS

SYMPHONY NO. 1 IN D MAJOR, “THE TITAN” GUSTAV MAHLER

Sibelius’s early desire had been for a career as a violin soloist, but his talent as a performer proved insufficient. On the other hand, these circumstances ensured that he had no need to consult a professional soloist when he set to a work on this concerto in September 1902. The acclaimed soloist Willy Burmester had made repeated requests for him to do so, and by that time Sibelius felt prepared to fulfill the commission successfully. For a number of reasons, including the pressing need for cash that regularly plagued him, the premiere was given at a hastily-organized concert in Helsinki on February 8, 1904. Burmester being unavailable on such short notice, the solo part was played by the little-known and relatively inexperienced Viktor Nováček. Sibelius conducted. The concerto failed miserably. He revised it during the summer of 1905, spurred on by his publisher’s success in placing the piece in the concert series staged in Berlin by composer/conductor Richard Strauss. Strauss conducted the Berlin Philharmonic in the concerto’s second debut on October 19, with the orchestra’s Concertmaster, Carl Halir, playing the solo part. This version achieved everything that the first had not. (You can compare the original and revised versions of the concerto with a CD featuring violinist Leonidas Kavakos on the BIS label: BIS CD-500). Sibelius gave the concerto a superbly atmospheric opening that casts an immediate spell of mystery. The solo violin emerges out of a murmuring bed of strings, with a long, yearning theme of evergrowing intensity. The second subject is highly expressive, almost passionate. The conclusion of the movement is uncompromisingly stern. The first half of the second movement is quite restrained. The emotional temperature rises towards the middle, first through orchestral surges, then increasingly so as the soloist joins in, leading to a powerful climax. In its wake, some sense of emotional resolution is at last achieved. Typically for Sibelius, the finale isn’t a jolly, dancing romp, but a serious, substantial exciting, and insistently rhythmic rondo. The celebrated Scottish musicologist Sir Donald Tovey labeled it “a polonaise for polar bears.” It contains the concerto’s highest share of technical demands, and builds up a vibrant head of steam en route to the dynamic conclusion.

D u r i n g M a h l e r ’s lifetime he was better known, and far more w idely pr a i se d, a s a c onduc tor t ha n a s a composer. Some of the variable success earned by his music can be traced to Mahler himself. His br u s qu e c ondu c t i n g style, constant desire to innovate, and quality-first administrative decisions a lienated scores of singers, orchestral players, managers and journalists. Those who saw past his difficult exterior found a warm heart. The others heaped abuse upon him whenever possible. Mahler lived to see at least a portion of this venomous tide reversed. His later years brought growing appreciation of his music, climaxing in the triumphant 1910 premiere of his mammoth Symphony No. 8. Time ran out before he could capitalize on it personally. He died just eight months later. “My time will come,” he stated, commenting on his music’s lack of widespread acceptance during his lifetime. How right he was! A few loyal conductors (Bruno Walter, Willem Mengelberg, et al.) kept the flame of his reputation burning while his reputation lay hibernating. A major revival of interest began in the early 1960s. Leonard Bernstein’s conducting and recording of the symphonies played a major role in this. Mahler’s music has firmly established itself in the international symphonic repertoire. Reactions to His First Symphony reflect a century’s worth of change in musical taste. He conducted the premiere himself, during his tenure as Director of the Royal Budapest Opera. This was the first time that one of his orchestral works was heard in public. Given that the audience was accustomed to little save mainstream Italian opera, the indifferent, if not hostile response came as no surprise. Press reaction was almost unanimously negative. One critic claimed that only Mahler’s friends had applauded the “incomprehensible and disagreeable cacophony,” the “succession of formless, impersonal, atmospheric tableaux.” But what struck so many ears as shapeless and vulgar in 1889 has become loveable, even quaint. This robust score bursts with the boldness and fire of youth, proudly displays a burgeoning mastery of orchestration, and flirts cheekily with traditional ideas of good taste. Echoes of Weber, Wagner, Liszt and Berlioz can be detected, but they are already well-digested, even though Mahler was just 28 at the time.

B. HÄMEENLINNA, FINLAND / DECEMBER 8, 1865; D. JÄRVENPÄÄ, FINLAND / SEPTEMBER 20, 1957

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B. KALISCHT, BOHEMIA / JULY 7, 1860; D. VIENNA, AUSTRIA / MAY 18, 1911

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For Mahler, the close intertwining of song and symphony would become a regular practice. In the First Symphony, he utilizes two themes from the vocal cycle Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen (Songs of a Wayfarer), which he had composed a short time before. Their appearance in the symphony marks the melodies’ debut in orchestral dress – he orchestrated this voice-and-piano cycle only after completing the symphony. At first, Mahler referred to the work as a symphonic poem rather than a symphony, and gave each of the five movements a programmatic association – nature’s awakening after the long sleep of winter (first movement); the hunter’s funeral procession (third movement); from the inferno to paradise (fourth movement), and so forth. At other times, he associated the symphony with The Titan, a novel by one of his favorite authors, Jean Paul. He eventually disavowed all these outside inspirations, confessing that he made them up after composing the music, in the sole hope of making the pieces easier to understand. In the first movement, he builds a crescendo of sound and emotional awakening. It grows from a quiet beginning dotted with bird calls, through a warmly flowing melody for cellos drawn from the second of the Wayfarer songs, to a jubilant conclusion. Mahler dropped what was originally the second movement in time for the symphony’s publication. It didn’t resurface until the 1960s. It is now occasionally performed separately under the original title: Blumine, or Flower Piece. What we now know as the second movement is a hearty “peasant” scherzo. Its strong accents and rustic themes, with their echoes of yodelling, recall the mid-European country dances Mahler had known and loved from childhood onwards. A solo horn introduces a trio section soaked in sentimental Viennese schmaltz, before the peasant dance resumes with renewed vigor.

Timpani set the pace for the third movement, an ironic funeral march. The solo double bass introduces a minor-key version of the old French children’s round song Frère Jacques, or Brüder Martin, as Mahler knew it. A witty, klezmer-like parody of military band music intrudes, then a tender interlude based on the fourth Wayfarer song. The march resumes, only to fade away into silence. The finale bursts in abruptly with an explosion of heated emotion. Romantic yearning wages battle with darker sentiments, but positive feelings win the day. Mahler reprises materials from the symphony’s opening movement, adds a passing quote from Handel’s Hallelujah Chorus (And He Shall Reign For Ever and Ever), and crowns the symphony with a lengthy, unreservedly triumphant coda. Program Notes by Don Anderson © 2022

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T E X A R K A N A

S Y M P H O N Y

O R C H E S T R A

P R E S E N T S

4 MARCH 2023 Philip R. Mann, conductor

A STEVEN SPIELBERG Film SAM NEILL LAURA DERN JEFF GOLDBLUM and

Music by JOHN WILLIAMS

Jurassic Park in Concert produced by Film Concerts Live!, a joint venture of IMG Artists, LLC and The Gorfaine/Schwartz Agency, Inc.

Film Edited by MICHAEL KAHN, A.C.E.

Producers: Steven A. Linder and Jamie Richardson Director of Operations: Rob Stogsdill Production Manager: Sophie Greaves Worldwide Representation: IMG Artists, LLC Technical Director: Mike Runice

RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH

BOB PECK MARTIN FERRERO B.D. WONG SAMUEL L. JACKSON WAYNE KNIGHT JOSEPH MAZZELLO ARIANA RICHARDS Live Action Dinosaurs STAN WINSTON Full Motion Dinosaurs by DENNIS MUREN, A.S.C. Dinosaur Supervisor PHIL TIPPETT Special Dinosaur Effects MICHAEL LANTIERI

PRODUCTION CREDITS

Production Designer RICK CARTER Director of Photography DEAN CUNDEY, A.S.C. Based on the Novel by MICHAEL CRICHTON Screenplay by MICHAEL CRICHTON and DAVID KOEPP Produced by KATHLEEN KENNEDY and GERALD R. MOLEN Directed by STEVEN SPIELBERG

Music Composed by John Williams Music Preparation: Jo Ann Kane Music Service Film Preparation for Concert Performance: Ramiro Belgardt Technical Consultant: Laura Gibson Sound Remixing for Concert Performance: Chace Audio by Deluxe The score for Jurassic Park has been adapted for live concert performance. With special thanks to: Universal Pictures, Amblin Entertainment, Steven Spielberg, Kathleen Kennedy, John Williams, Kristin Stark, Michael Silver, Patrick Koors, Tammy Olsen, Lawrence Liu, Thomas Schroder, Tanya Perra, Chris Herzberger, Noah Bergman, Jason Jackowski, Shayne Mifsud, Darice Murphy, Mike Matessino, Mark Graham and the musicians and staff of the Texarkana Symphony Orchestra.

A UNIVERSAL PICTURE

Tonight’s program is a presentation of the complete film Jurassic Park with a live performance of the film’s entire score, including music played by the orchestra during the end credits. Out of respect for the musicians and your fellow audience members, please remain seated until the conclusion of the credits.

© Universal City Studios LLC and Amblin Entertainment, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


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P R E S E N T S

SpectacularStories 15 APRIL 2023 • 7:00 P.M. PEROT THEATRE Concert Preview 6:10 p.m.

Philip R. Mann, conductor with Brian Dunbar, flute

CONCERT REPERTOIRE RICHARD STRAUSS (1864-1949) Don Juan, op. 20, TrV 156 SIMON CARLOS (b. 1986) Concerto for Flute and Orchestra BRIAN DUNBAR

17’

15’

17’

INTERMISSION OTTORINO RESPIGHI (1879-1936) Fontane di Roma, p. 106, [Fountains of Rome] Fountain of Valle Guilia at Dawn Triton Fountain in the Morning Trevi Fountain at Noon Villa Medici Fountain at Sunset

FRANZ LISZT (1811-1886) Mazeppa, S. 100 (Symphonic Poem, no. 6)

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FLUTE

DR. BRIAN DUNBAR

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r. Brian Dunbar, a native of St. Augustine, FL, enjoys performing as a soloist, orchestral performer, and chamber musician, in addition to his activities as a flute instructor. He earned a Doctor of Musical Arts from Louisiana State University, Master of Music from the University of Michigan, and Bachelor of Music from Stetson University. Dr. Dunbar is the Assistant Professor of Flute at the Crane School of Music at SUNY Potsdam. Previously he held teaching positions at Southern University and A&M College, Southeastern Louisiana University, and Louisiana State University.

Brian has considerable experience as a performer in multiple settings of professional performance including concerto, recital, chamber, solo, studio, and orchestral contexts. He has been recognized in the Monroe Symphony League Marjorie Stricklin Emerging Artists, Stetson University and Louisiana State University Concerto, Sankyo Flutes Orchestral Excerpts, Music Teachers National Association and the Louisiana Flute Society competitions. In 2018, he received First Prize in the inaugural International Low Flutes Festival Alto Flute Competition in Reston, VA. He has performed at The National Flute Association Annual Convention in Chicago, San Diego, and Orlando, and Salt Lake City. Additionally, he is a featured collaborator at the annual New Music on The Bayou Summer Festival in Rutson, LA. Brian has participated in performances internationally and throughout the United States. Appearances have included U.S. & European tours as a counselor and member of the Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp International Exchange Program and as a guest lecturer and performer at the Initiatives Meetings and Publications on Artistic Research “Hands on Flute” conference in Aveiro, Portugal. He has performed in the flute sections of the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra, Acadiana Symphony, Dearborn Symphony, Battle Creek Symphony, and Sphinx Symphony Orchestra, in addition to other regional orchestras throughout the United States.

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MASTERWORKS IV: SPECTACULAR STORIES

PROGRAM NOTES

The adventures of a heartless, amorous rake; delicate and rousing portraits of ancient Roman landmarks; and the heroic struggles of a seventeenth-century Cossack leader against his enemies – three-quarters of this colorful concert offer vivid examples of “program” music, the kind that seeks to tell a story, paint a picture or a mood, or a character. Two super-familiar examples of this practice are Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons and Beethoven’s “Pastoral” symphony. There are countless others, many of which have achieved enduring popularity, whether or not you take the composers’ suggestions on what to listen for in them. You can enjoy them simply as music. Franz Liszt invented the symphonic poem, the most frequently written type of nineteenth-century program music. Countless composers have produced examples of it. The purely musical values of the finest symphonic poems – such as those by Strauss and Sibelius – have helped them maintain a strong hold on audiences world-wide.

DON JUAN, OP. 20/TRV 156 RICHARD STRAUSS

B. MUNICH, GERMANY / JUNE 11, 1864 D. GARMISCH-PARTENKIRCHEN, GERMANY / SEPTEMBER 8, 1949 Don Juan is Strauss’s second tone poem (as he preferred to call them). By the time he put the finishing touches on it, he had taken up the position of assistant conductor at the opera house in Weimar, Germany. Naturally he planned to perform Don Juan there, but his wish nearly came to grief when the members of the orchestra balked at the high technical demands it placed on them. At one point he told them, “I would ask those of you who are married, to play as it you were engaged, and all will be well.” The sensationally successful premiere took place on November 11, 1889, and the many other performances which quickly followed, catapulted the twenty-fiveyear-old genius into the international musical spotlight. Inspiration f lowed from dramatic verses written in 1844 by Austrian author Nicolaus Lenau. Ref lecting the growing psychological and moral complexity of the time, Lenau depicted Don Juan as more than simply the heartless, high-born rake of earlier treatments. Lenau made him something of a philosopher, too, seeking through his many conquests the “ideal woman.” Disillusioned and weary of his aimless, unsatisfying life, this Don Juan allows himself to be killed in a duel.

MOVEMENTS, FOR FLUTE AND ORCHESTRA CARLOS SIMON B. ATLANTA, GEORGIA, USA / 1986

The music of Carlos Simon ranges from concert music for large and small ensembles to film scores with influences of jazz, gospel, and neo-romanticism. He is the Composerin-Residence for the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. The composer writes, My friend and colleague, Brian Dunbar

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approached me to write a flute concerto with the hopes of expanding the repertoire for solo flute and orchestra. He told me that, to his knowledge, only one work for solo flute and orchestra existed that was composed by Black composer: Ulysses Kay. After learning this, I definitely wanted to take on the commission as my first concerto. Hopefully among the many benefits towards the diversification of classical music, this concerto for flute orchestra will stand out as a piece commissioned by a Black flutist and written by a Black composer. I chose to explore the movements of life through four separate sections: loop it, think it, love it and move it. The idea of this piece is based on the philosophy that life (it) can be a fluid entity that develops through many different aspects of living. We have control over these elements based on our thinking and inner will. What we live is nothing more than what exists in our minds. The choice is ours!

FOUNTAINS OF ROME OTTORINO RESPIGHI

B. BOLOGNA, ITALY / JULY 9, 1879; D. ROME, ITALY / APRIL 18, 1936 Fountains of Rome (1916), the first of three lavishly orchestrated symphonic poems in which Respighi celebrated the past and present beauties of his beloved adopted city, established his reputation. It has four sections, played without pauses between them. This is how he described the contents: “In this symphonic poem t he composer ha s endeavored to give expression t o t h e s e nt i m e nt s a n d visions suggested to him by four of Rome’s fountains contemplated at the hour in which their character is most in harmony with the surrounding landscape, or in which their beauty appears most impressive to the observer. “The first part of the poem, inspired by the fountain of Valle Giulia, depicts a pastoral landscape: droves of cattle pass and disappear in the fresh damp mists of a Roman dawn. A sudden loud and insistent blast of horns above the whole orchestra introduces the second part, The Triton Fountain. It is like a joyous call, summoning troops of naiads and tritons, who come running up, pursuing each other and mingling in a frenzied dance between the jets of water.

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T E X A R K A N A

S Y M P H O N Y

O R C H E S T R A

Founding Patrons FOUNDING SPONSOR

DR. AND MRS. GEORGE BOHMFALK CANDACE TAYLOR AND MARC-ANDRÉ BOUGIE SCOTTIE AND BOB* BURNETT JAMES W. BURNETT, III KELLY ELIZABETH BURNETT CLEVELAND BURTON* BETTY AND PERRY BUTCHER* LOIS TOWLES CAESAR* (IN MEMORIAM) (FROM DOROTHEA TOWLES) LUCILLE T. COOK FLORENCE* AND GEORGE* CRANK MR.* AND MRS. CARL CULPEPPER DR. AND MRS. ROY DESKIN JENNIFER AND DARBY DOAN DR. NORMA AND FAY J. DURRANT DR. GEORGE W. ENGLISH, III MARY SCOTT AND HOWARD* GOODE REMICA AND DANNY GRAY

PATRICIA* AND BARRY* GREEN SAMMYE* AND JIM HALTOM MARGARET HARRELL LOUANNE AND BILLY HARRELL PEGGY* AND JASPER HOWARD H. LOUISE JOHNSON* JOHN JAY JONES FUNERAL HOME KATHY AND GEORGE LEASE MRS. FLEET F. MAGEE* MICHAEL AND PETE MANKINS BARBARA AND DR. PAUL MCCASH PAMELA MCCOY DOTTIE AND ED MILLER JULIA PECK MOBLEY JUDY MORGAN JIM MORGAN MARTHA* AND JOSH* MORRISS, JR.

KAY* AND JIMMY MURPHY DRS. WANDA AND JON NORTHAM MARTHA AND FRED NORTON, JR. CHARLOTTE AND DAVID POTTER LAWANDA AND JOHN RICH PHYLLIS RUSSELL MARY ANNE AND CHARLES T. SETTLE DR. AND MRS. VERNON C. SHAFFER DRS. ROSANNE STRIPLING AND LARRY SULLIVAN WEDNESDAY MUSIC CLUB LYNNEL WESTERMAN RUTH ELLEN AND DR. DAVE WHITT DR. AND MRS. DAVID L. WILLIAMS WILLIAMS MEMORIAL UMC FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT BRENDA AND JIM WORKS JEAN* AND DR. HERB* WREN WILLIAM WRIGHT *DECEASED

SUPPORT FOR TEXARKANA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA IS PROVIDED, IN PART, BY THE ARKANSAS ARTS COUNCIL, AN AGENCY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ARKANSAS HERITAGE, AND NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS; AND BY THE TEXAS COMMISSION ON THE ARTS. 2022/2023 PROGRAM

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PROGRAM NOTES CONTINUED...

“Next there appears a solemn theme borne on the undulations of the orchestra. It is the fountain of Trevi at mid-day. The solemn theme, passing from the woodwind to the brass instruments, assumes a triumphal character. Trumpets peal: across the radiant surface of the water there passes Neptune’s chariot drawn by sea-horses, and followed by a train of sirens and tritons. The procession then vanishes while faint trumpet blasts resound in the distance. The fourth part, The Villa Medici Fountain, is announced by a sad theme which rises above a subdued warbling. It is the nostalgic hour of sunset. The air is full of the sound of tolling bells, birds twittering, leaves rustling. Then all dies peacefully into the silence of the night.”

MAZEPPA, S. 100 (SYMPHONIC POEM NO. 6) FRANZ LISZT B. RAIDING, HUNGARY / OCTOBER 22, 1811; D. BAYREUTH, GERMANY / JULY 31, 1886 This vibrant music began life as a piano piece, the fourth of the technically demanding 12 Transcendental Etudes (1851). Liszt created the expanded orchestral “symphonic poem” version from 1851 to 1854. Mazeppa’s story was first written as an epic poem by English author Lord Byron in 1818, but Liszt’s Mazeppa is based upon a much shorter account written by French author Victor Hugo in 1829. Both those Mazeppa writings are based on the life of Ivan Stepanovich Mazepa-Koledinsky (c. 1632–1709). Hugo’s poem introduces him as a Ukrainian nobleman who became a page at the court of the King of Poland. Mazeppa was caught having an affair with the wife of a nobleman. He was tied naked onto a wild horse and dispatched into the wilderness.

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After a long, furious ride, the horse collapsed in death. Mazeppa survived the ride and was welcomed into a band of Ukrainian Cossacks. They acclaimed him their leader and under his direction they gained a major victory on the battlefield. Musicologist Paula Kelley writes, “Liszt was clearly drawn to this legend by its heroic qualities, and Mazeppa’s wild ride across the steppes is certainly given full-blooded treatment. However, even more powerful than the audible pounding of his horse’s hooves is the atmosphere of sheer terror that builds up as one brassy climax succeeds another.” Liszt concluded the piece by celebrating Mazeppa’s eventual triumph in music of vigor and joy. It includes an authentic, traditional Cossack march theme. Program Notes by Don Anderson © 2022

2022/2023 PROGRAM


2022/2023 PROGRAM

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SUPPORTING THE

SYMPHONY WE GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGE THE GENEROSITY OF THE FOLLOWING DONORS WHO HAVE CONTRIBUTED TO THE TSO IN THE LAST YEAR, AS OF SEPTEMBER 1, 2022.

PLATINUM $10,000+

Arkansas Arts Council Cabe Cook Foundation Lucille Cook Martha and Jeff Prieskorn City of Texarkana, TX Judy Kelley Morgan/Jack B Kelley Enterprises Inc Kelley & Morgan Families Foundation MGD Barbara and Dr. Paul McCash* Vasco McCoy, Jr Foundation Ms. Pamela McCoy Vicki and Maurice Orr Lois and Cary Patterson Patterson-Troike Foundation Emily and Gabe Tarr Texas Pioneer Foundation

GOLD $5,000-9,999

Bobbie Atkinson Foundation Yvonne Clements* Dr. George W. English, III * James R. Murphy Texas Commission on the Arts

SILVER $2,500-4,999

Gale H. Arnold LaCrecia and Dean Barry William R. and Dorothy T. Beaty Endowment** Yulin and Jerry Brewer Melissa and John Delk Vicki and Dr. Roy Deskin Remica and Danny Gray Gray and McGinnis Families in memory of Florence & George Crank Haltom & Doan Trial & Appellate Counsel Dolly and Paul Henley Suzy and Victor Hlavinka Sonja and Bob Hubbard Dr. Susan Keeney Deborah and Michael Malek * Mike and Pete Mankins Drs. Kathleen and Michael Martin

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Cassy and Fred Meisenheimer M.N. Osborne Charitable Foundation Trust Dottie and Ed Miller Morriss Families in memory of Martha and Josh Morriss, Jr. Diana and Josh Morriss Patsy and Don Morriss Rita and William Morriss RoyOMartin Foundation Barrie Thomson Ruth Ellen and Dr. David Whitt Yates Group Jim Yates Foundation

BRONZE $1,000-2,499

Debbie and Dr. Chris Alkire Arkansas Community Foundation Texarkana Area Bobbie A. Atkinson * Dr. James and Lauren Booker Diana and Dr. Kirby Bunel * Drs. Valeria and Matthew Burks C. Louis and Mary C. Cabe Foundation* Christus St. Michael Health System Coleman ChevroletChrysler-Jeep-Dodge-Ram Lucille Cook Jacqueline Santos Day Digital Press Jane and Pat Davitt Lesley and Adam Dukelow James and Barbara Freeman Wayne H. Garrison Charitable Trust Leann and Kyle Groom James N. Haltom In Memory of Dr. Jauquita Hargus * Debbie and James Herrington Connie Heyer Sandra K. Holmes JCM Industries Inc. Foundation Susan Johnson Debe and Lairie Kincaid Craig Lashford * Kathy and George Lease * Ledwell Office Solutions Lisa and Steve Ledwell Ludlow Farm for the Perot Theatre in memory of Kathryn Ludlow Brenda Martinez

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Buddy and LeAnn McCulloch Katrina and Dr. Robert McGinnis * Lacy McMillen Deborah and Ron Mills * Julia Peck Mobley Jennifer Moczygemba Morel Group Rita and William Morriss Martha and Jeff Prieksorn * LaWanda and John Rich * Janis Robbins William B. Roberts Debbie and Alan Schimming Susan and Louis Slimer Henry and Kathy Struckman Texas A&M University-Texarkana James H. Verschoyle & Kathleen Brooks Verschoyle Mary and Denis Washington Barbara and Ray Whitney * Wholesale Electric * CHAIR SPONSORS

SUSTAINER $500-999

Greta L. Alexander Alzheimer’s Alliance Texarkana Area Arkansas’s Great Southwest BancorpSouth Asset Management & Trust Benchmark American Brasserie Glen Boles Randy and Ruth Ann Branin Mrs. J. Robert Burnett Thomas D. Burns Brenda and Dr. Tom Burns Jason Carter Companies CASA for Children Angela and Andrew Clark Sheri and Sam Clem Coleman Motors Inc. Vee and Ron Collins Collom & Carney Radiology Associates Anita and Jack Coltharp Commercial National Bank DeAnna and Dr. Brett Craytor Crocker’s Fine Jewelry Rita and Mike Cross Diana and Fr. Richard Daly Winford Dunn Dr. Norma and Fay J. Durrant Gail and Dr. Ed Eichler Marsha and James Elliott Farmers Bank & Trust Elizabeth and Bunn Fawcett Bruce A. Flint Lou Ford

2022/2023 PROGRAM

Four States Furniture James I. Freeman Charitable Trust, Barbara and James Freeman Nan and Dr. Bob Fry Gray’s Jewelers Rosalie and Bill Griffin HATT/City of Texarkana, TX Sherry Jackson Hawkins Betty Jo Hays Don and Mary Herron Highland Park Baptist Church Hilton Garden Inn Holliday, Lemons & Cox, P.C. Adam Holmes Sue and Don Howren Sonja and Bob Hubbard Jennell and Douglas Ingram JCM Industries Foundation Julie’s Deli, Inc. Nancy and Kenneth King Dr. Cordell Klein KTXK Dr. Josephine Kahler and Mr. Eddie Lamb Lancaster Hotel Literacy Council of Bowie and Miller Counties Lydia and Bryce Lawrence Mary Jayne P. Locke Logan Electric Company, Inc. Mel and Steve Luebbert Main Street Texarkana Tatiana Roitman-Mann and Philip Mann Patricia and Rion Mitchell Julia Peck Mobley Patsy and Don Morriss Carol and Bob Nelson Karen and Steve Nipper Martha and Fred Norton, Jr. Malise and Dr. Dennis O’Banion Mary Ann and Steve Oden Jessica Odom Greg Orr Teensy and Holt Parsons Pecan Point Brewing Company Pete Mankins Nissan Becky and Stuart Phillips Charlotte and David Potter REC-TXK, LLC Regional Systems Linda and Roger Roberts Richard Reynolds Robbins Toyota Cliff and Becky Robertson Jane Rochelle Haley and Randy Roeser Nancy and Dr. Joe Robbins Rebecca and Jason Rounds Lauren and Jason Ross Beth and Chuck Rowe


Nancy and Tom Sadowski Megan Schroeder Lisa B. Shoalmire Lisa and Rob Sitterley Smiles of Arkansas Dental Center, LLC Smith Blair, Inc. Deirdre and Dr. Malcolm Smith Mary Scott and Dr. C. Jack Smith St. James Church St. James Day School State Bank Susan and John Stanley Ronald Stewart Texarkana/Chapelwood Funeral Homes Texarkana College Texarkana Convention Partners, LLC Texarkana Magazine TexRep The Historical Society/ Texarkana Museums System Twisted Fork Cathy and Mark Van Herpen Barbara and Dave Vershaw Ashley and Brandon Washington Bridget and Philip White Lynn and Dr. Paul Whitt Wisdom Animal Clinic, Inc. Cindy and Dr. Matthew Young

ASSOCIATE $100-499

Ty Abston Wayne V. Adcock Shelby and Kyle Akin Gin and Michael Allen Rhonda Allen Tim Allen Virginia Allen All-In Restaurant Group #2, LLC Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Alston Amigo Juan Restaurant Jimmy L. Anderson Dr. Joe and Cathy Andrews Susan and Kurt Andrews Katie and Josh Andrus Terrie Arnold and Jeff Harlow AR/TEX Music Connection Lesa and Tony Asbille Kevin Avery Nancy and Fred Barlow Deidra Bennett Hollis Boyette Eugenia Bradford Jeff Brown Gabrielle and Gary Bachers The Beauty & Wellness Center/Susan Whitten Pamela Beck Ruth Penney Bell Laura and Steve Bennett Morgan and Dr. Brent Bennett Dr. and Mrs. Jim Blackburn Mark Bledsoe

Jessica Bolton Dr. Dean Bowman Wanda Boyette Kathy and Dan Boyles Ruth Ann Branin Karen and Mark Brine Randy and Rebecca Brown Jane and Scott Bruner Cindy and Jim Bunch Gayle and H.T. Burrow Valerie Buster Bruce Cannedy Charles B. Carter Julia and George Carpenter Alex Carrillo Beverly Carter Joan and Jack Carter Lloyd Champion Lawrence Chellaian Darla Clement Gail and James Cobb J Michael Cobb Melanie and Greg Cockerell Gail and Gene Cogbill Linda and Stacy Cogbill Alice Coleman Lanita and Dr. Johnny Colley Anesthesia and Intensive Care Lucille T. Cook Haley and Dana Cox Terrie Cozart Dr. Kenneth and Terressa Crane Mike Craven Tavo Cruz Nona Culpepper Caroline and Todd Cumbie Caroline and Dr. Andrew Curry Drs. Emily and Tom Cutrer Daines Insurance Donna and David Dailey Andrea Daines Katherine and Bobby Daniel T.J. Davidson Kyle Davis Dr. and Mrs. Larry G. Davis Leigh Davis Linda Davis Margaret F. Davis Robert and Dr. Doris Davis Joyce and Earl Dawson Jim Day Mindy Day Jamye and Jeff Dehaan Buddy and Phyllis Deese Alisha Delcambre Art Dereksen Jennifer and Darby Doan Staci Dodson Double J Supply Margaret Dowd Norma and Fay J Durrant Winford Dunn East Funeral Home Charles E. Eaves Foundation Repair Robyn Elkins Kaye and Dr. Tom Ellison The ENT Group

The Eye Guys Dr. Chris Ferguson Jill and Greg Flanagan Hershel Flanagan Flanagan Financial Group LLC Flying Burger/El Dorado, AR Lou Ford Michael and Paula Foster Kim and Wade Fowler Francine Francis Barbara Yates Freeman Gary Gathright Gayle’s Cosmetics & Accessories Genesis PrimeCare Andrew Geppert Sharon and Dr. Richard Gibson Carol Giese Terri Giles Gale Gill Barbara and Howard Glick Nancy and John Graham Curt Green Jessica and Tyler Grey Grier, Reeves & Lawley, P.C. Dr. and Mrs. Bryan Griffin Donna and Dr. Stan Griffin Jesse Griffin Jackie and Bill Gooding Leann Groom Habitat for Humanity of Texarkana, Inc. Sue Ellen Hall Jeanne and Alan Harrel Nathan Harris Melissa and Scott Harris Julie-Ray and John Harrison Tonja and John Hays Layla Hazin Craig Henry Melissa Hensley Mr. and Mrs. Donald A. Herron Dena and Michael Hill Dr. Carol and Garry Hodgson Janis Fischer Holliday Hooters Kim and Bruce Hornbuckle Hospice of Texarkana Foundation Lisa and Bobby Howell Sonja and Bob Hubbard Peggy Hubrel Mike Ingram Ironwood Grill Suzy and Robert Irwin Thomas M. Irwin, Jr., M.D. Cassie and Alan Jean Nancy and Charles Jackson Dr. Sudheer Jayaprabhu Johnson Investigations, Inc. Sue and Steve Johnson Jeff W. Josma Melissa L. Keil Korey Keith Sandra Kennedy Klark Kent Cindy King Kim and Duane Knowles Susan and Dennis Landreaux

2022/2023 PROGRAM

Jill and Mark Launius Lydia and Bryce Lawrence Nelda and Rodney LeBoeuf Mark Luckett Myra Loving Dr. Kristin and Hal Lower Scott Mahlstedt Virginia Mann Kaa March Voncile and George Martin Glenda Mason Ann and Michael Mayo Mary Ted and Gary Mayo Julie and Jimmy McClurg Derrick McGary, State Farm Insurance Agency Melinda and Jim McGee Camille and Rob McGinnis Lindsey and Dr. Chris McMillan Dr. and Mrs. Donald McMillan Lacy McMillen Sarah Medley Susie and John Mercy Dr. and Mrs. Paul D. Meredith Duane Meyers Mary Mickens Judge Bill Miller Gloria Miller Dee Miller and John Greer Chayta Mills Drew Mims Insurance Fran Mitchell Karen and Mark Mittelman Julia Peck Mobley Deborah and Tom Moore Carolyn and Bonnie Moreland Jim Moser Claire Moulton Stephanie Murdock Lynn and Mike Murrah Drs. Rebecca and Dub Narramore Bob and Carol Nelsen Carla and Joe Nichols Drs. Wanda and Jon Northam John Norton Jeanie and Gary Nutter Mary Alice O’Farrell Joe Neal Oliver Laura and David Orr Mary Jane and David Orr Gregg Orr Auto Collection Inc. Krystal and Glenn Osborne Debby and Larry Oxford Jessica Palmer Debbie and Cal Partee Tim Paslay Danielle and Dr. Chad Patterson Lisa and Paul Patterson Drs. Christina and Chris Payne David Peavy Dr. and Mrs. Larry Peebles Edward Perry Anthony Pinkham Rachael and Josh Potter Twyla and Jerry Pruden Dan Puckett Harvey J. Purdy

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DONORS CONTINUED... Michelle and Brian Purtle/ The Purtle Agency Chad Raney Betty Rateliff Haley J. Reed Trish and Tim Reed ReNew Integrated Medical Spa Richardson Fence & Patio, Inc. Shane and Cole Riddell Susan Robbins Dr. Brent Robinson Ralph Robertson Jane Rochelle Cathy and Jimmy Roeser Jeffrey R. Roeser Jeanna and Mike Rogers Robin Rogers Art Romero Laurie Romero/Twin City Title Diane and Donald Ross Ross & Shoalmire, LLP Eileen and John Rothwell Edward Rowedda Diann and Billy Roy Geana Russell William Russell Sacred Heart Catholic Church Julie and Leon Sanderson Rose Anne Sanderson Lucy and Dr. Randy Sarrett Richard Savins Karen and Dr. Randy Schmidt Megan Schroeder Kathleen and David Setula Jon Sheppard, Southern Insurance Group Bertha and Bobby Shipp Chad Shipp Michelle and Todd Shores Jay Simmons Larry Sims Lisa and Robert Sitterley

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Sitters, LLC Deirdre and Dr. Malcolm Smith Joanna and Loyd Smith Judy and Mark Smith Patty and Willis B Smith Claudia and Pete Snow Dr. Patrick Somerville Beth and Jerry Sparks Karen Stephens Barbara and Ludwig Stoeckl in honor of Katheryn Stoeckl Ruth Stone Studio 57 Andrea and Joel Styles Stan Szmyd Texarkana Area Community Foundation Texarkana National Storage Texarkana Music Teachers Association Josh Thane Mary Jane Thane Dr. Jonathan F. Thomas Robin and Joe Thomas John and Linda Thomas Stephen Thompson Louise Thornell Cathy and John Tidwell Julie and Kelly Tidwell Nelda Timmons Paula and Billy Tompkins DeMita Torrans Jennifer and Mark Townsend Billie Troutt Beverly and Paul Tye Paul Tye, State Farm Insurance Novie and Dustyn Tysdal Kaysi Upton University of Arkansas HopeTexarkana Foundation Tina Veal-Gooch

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Verona Fine Italian Restaurant Karen and Tom Wacha Susan and Daniel Warmack Pat and Tom Wagy Lila and Chesley Walker Mel and Ray Walsh Judy Wright Walter John P. Warmack Susan Warmack Amy Warren Katherine Weber Lynnel Westerman Kristi and Michael White Missy and Mike White Carolyn N. Whittle Wiggins Eye Center, PLLC Lova and Glen Wile Wilf & Henderson, P.C., CPA’s Marion and Marvin Williams Pat and Keith Williams Lynn Willing-Bond Kayla Wood Joanna Pridgen Woodard Brenda and Jim Works Denise and Harrison Wright Gayle Wright LeAnne and Tim Wright Timothy Wright Brenda and Jerry Yates FaEllen Yates Stacy Yates Caitlin and Blake Yazel Carol Yazel Junie and Dennis Young Dr. Mary Ellen Young

FRIEND UP TO $99

Kelli Ashbrook-Cummings Sara M. Barnett Pam Beck Bob Bell Carolyn Bland Dr. and Mrs. William R. Brown Monica and Collins Bruner

2022/2023 PROGRAM

Dr. and Mrs. Denzer Burke Valerie Buster Erica and Eric Cain Holly Cook Kimberly and Jay Davis Tonya and Michael Dumdei Helen Floyd Dr. and Mrs. Richard Gibson Deborah Gilliam Julia and David Glenn Deann and Reggie Goins Lindola Griffin Rashinda and Ryan Hampton Mr. Alfred and Dr. Teretha Harper Suzy and John Heath Tabitha Houchens Merilynn Johnson JR Building Supply Marilyn Lane Cathy Cox Lee Nelda S. Lile Melissa Manning Carol Ann May Mr. and Mrs. Danny McAlister Judy McClung Fran Mitchell Carla and Joe Nichols Lakin and Lynn Oakley Christina and Bruce Ramsey Ralph Robertson Mrs. Flora Rowe Jill and Jake Sawyer Amy and Gary Schulz Janice Scott James T. Smith John and Linda Thomas Gay Thompson Regina and Michael Welch Betty and Doug Williams Brenda and Dr. David Williams Charles and Lillie Young