Page 1

#9 Autumn 2019

Μagazine

Fine food and drinks of Greece

#9

Fine food and drinks of Greece

Autumn 2 0 1 9

greek olive oil Greek organic evoo

magazine

Nectar of the Gods

07- 08 - 09

MARCH

2020 ATHENS • GREECE

ambrosiamagazine.com

The Mediterranean Food Experience


Cactu s Mare Hotel

Crete islan d - Greece


2

Contents ma ga z i n e

Contents

4-5 > Epirus: Walk on the Wild Side 8-23 > The Feta Revolution 24-31 > Vassilitsa - G.& A. Nousias: Organic Matters 32-33 > The Ultimate Guide to Greek Table Olives 34-37 > Authentic Yogurt: Totally Greek 38-45 > Olive Oil: The Organic Factor 46-51 > Greek Oven-Baked Sweets 52-55 > Souvla: Fast-Fine Experience 56-61 > Paximadi: A Unique Greek Tradition 62-65 > Select Bakery: Baking up the Future 62-67 > Salt of the Earth 68-71 > Black Pig, the Greek Version 72-75 > Violanta: Excellence and Innovation 76-77 > Vineyard of Naoussa: King in the North 78-81 > The Divine Cuisine of Greek Monasteries 82-85 > Food Expo Greece 2020 86-91 > Packaging Innovation Awards 2019 92-93 > FOODTECH 2019 94-95 > Market Report  96-101 > What’s New  102-104 > Editor’s Note

EPIRUS

8

Walk on the Wild Side

Authentic Yogurt Unique and totally Greek

38

Organic evoo The rise of the Greek production

46

greek salt Natural and extremely sought-after On the cover: Greek organic EVOOs gain ground in international markets.

68


The innovation

Crinkly traditional pie lactose free, dairy free

new product range Traditional crinkly pies are one of the most delicious Greek products that originate in the area of Epirus. Its vegan adaptation has a deliciously rich filling of wholesome vegan ingredients covered with crunchy freshly baked filo pastry and lovingly hand wrapped. Dairy and lactose free.

find us on

www.rodoula.gr

DOUGH & DESSERT PRODUCTS


4

Editorial ma ga z i n e

Editor’s

id

NOTE T

Publisher Nikos Choudalakis nx@forumsa.gr Publishing Director Thanassis Gialouris gialouris@forumsa.gr

they say: “Keep evolving.” We, at FORUM SA, say: “Keep evolving. Keep changing. Keep succeeding.” Case in point, the strategic takeover of FORUM SA, the leading exhibition firm in Greece, by the NÜRNBERG MESSE GROUP, listed among the 15 largest trade show organizers in the world. Working under a shared vision and a common set of values, the two companies will combine their know-how, operational experience and portfolio to usher a new era for the Greek trade show industry, turning Greece into an exhibition hub for the Balkans and Southeast Europe. We are proud that together, NÜRNBERG MESSE and FORUM SA, will be shaping the future not only of the Greek exhibition landscape, but also of the Greec economy in its whole. Within this context, FORUM has already started OUR VISION IS TO TURN to move forward by creGREECE INTO A TRADE SHOW ating GreekFoodNews. com, an online platform HUB FOR THE BALKANS & dedicated to specialty SOUTHEAST EUROPE food hailing from Greece and reporting on the latest news –including export opportunities, market analysis, product launches, technological and supply chain developments, etc.– as well as providing in-depth profiles to give anyone and everyone interested in Greek Food & Drinks the right ingredients to rise up and connect to new opportunities. We, therefore, invite you to become part of the platform’s growing community of Greek food aficionados. We also suggest you visit FOOD EXPO 2020, the ultimate trade fair for Greek, Mediterranean and specialty food and discover unique, exciting products from Greece and the world.

Nikos Choudalakis

Publisher

Deputy Publishing Director Tina Kouloufakou tk@forumsa.gr Sales Director Thanassis Panagoulias sales@forumsa.gr Creative Art Director Niki Galanopoulou ng@forumsa.gr Editor-in-Chief Vana Antonopoulou va@forumsa.gr Contributing Editors Eleni Donou, Eva Touna Art Director Evgenios Kalofolias Graphic Designers Lenia Chalkea, Nikos Kartalias Photo Retoucher Gogo Trikerioti Sales Department T. Belekoukias, A. Kaliantzi, I. Margelis D. Michalochristas, K. Molfeta, A. Mourati, G. Theodoropoulos Advertising Coordinators M. Spichopoulou, G. Patsari Int’l Relations F. Papanastasiou Printed by Baxas SA

ambrosiamagazine.com

FORUM SA: 328 Vouliagmenis Ave., 17342 Agios Dimitrios, Greece Tel.: +30 210 5242100 - Fax: +30 210 5246581

Published by FORUM SA

ISSN

2623-4858


THE F IN ES T S E LE C T I O N O F MEDI TE R R A N E A N B R E A D P R O DUCTS FOR HO R ECA A N D R E T A I L _ Privately owned facilities (Thessaloniki and Athens) 25.000 m² _ 10 Automatic production lines _ Capacity of logistic center 6.500 frozen pallet places _ 550 References of bread products


6

Business Insider ma ga z i n e

NEW CHALLENGES CREATE GROWTH OPPORTUNITIES

T

he Greek Food & Drink Industry is a fundamental pillar of the Greek economy, representing 25% of the transformation sector, with a turnover of €14.2 billion. It is a key job provider with more than 1,200 active enterprises that employ 360,000 direct and indirect employees. It is also a global champion and a major exporter all over the world with exports reaching a value of €4.1 billion. The food sector is facing many new challenges, while the Greek Food Industry remains robust and competitive, focusing on continuous improvement and on the promotion of innovation and extroversion. Food sufficiency, food waste, fragmentation on the internal EU market, food safety, product reformulation, the urgent need to protect the environment and ensure sustainable development, are some of the issues that we face and we will continue to confront in the coming years. In order to meet the challenges our Industry faces, we need to seize the opportunities presented. We need to continue to provide economic growth, ensure the satisfaction and well-being of our consumers and secure environmental sustainability. In the Food Industry we put consumers in the heart of our scope and we aim to preserve the important role that nutrition and food play in their evThe greek food industry eryday life and their percepremains robust and tion. In this respect the Greek Food Industry takes into accompetitive focusing on count the new trends and the increasing needs of modern innovation & extroversion consumers and continues to operate responsibly. It takes advantage of the findings that result from research, technology and innovation and develops added value and healthier food options to respond to their special nutritional requirements. Furthermore, Food & Drink manufacturers are firmly committed to promote sustainable practices, respecting not only the economic but also the social and environmental aspects of their business and to offer qualitative, innovative and affordable products with low environmental footprint, strengthening the links between food, people and the environment. All these efforts prove that even within a challenging and highly demanding environment, the commitment to growth of the Greek Food Industry is indisputable and the priority put on our consumers, our products and the sustainability of our sector is non-negotiable.

1,200

ENTERPRISES IN THE GREEK F&B SECTOR

€4.1 bn EXPORTS IN FOOD & BEVERAGES

Evangelos Kaloussis

Chairman of the Federation of Hellenic Food Industries (SEVT)

SEVT - ID The TheFederation FederationofofHellenic Hellenic Food FoodIndustries Industries(SEVT) (SEVT)

The Federation of Hellenic Food Industries (SEVT), is the official body representing the interests of the Food and Drink Industries at national and European level. SEVT has as members not only food and drink companies but also branch associations.


8

Region of Epirus Thessaly ma ga z i n e

Epirus

WALK ON THE

WILD

SIDE


Mountainous and rugged, Epirus is, nevertheless, one of the most beautiful regions of Greece, producing a great variety of cheeses, wines and honey and engaging in both animal farming and aquaculture, not to mention the fine art of culinary pleasure.

EPIRUS


10

Region Region of Νorth Aegean of Epirus ma ga z i n e

1

2

ECONOMY, TRADE AND THE F&B SECTOR 1

Although Epirus is one of the roughest regions of Greece, food trade is booming both on national as well as international level.

E

pirus is a Region in northwestern Greece. It borders the regions of West Macedonia and Thessaly, the Ionian islands, western Greece and Albania. It is largely made up of mountainous ridges and its highest spot is on Mount Smolikas at an altitude of 2,637m. above sea level. Most of Epirus lies on the windward side of the Pindus mountain range, while the winds from the Ionian Sea offer the region more rainfall than any other part of Greece. The region has few resources and its rugged terrain makes agriculture rarger difficult. Sheep and goat farming has always been an important activity in the region. In fact, Epirus provides more than 45 percent of meat to the Greek market, but in recent years poultry production and pig farming have also been on the rise.

In addition, Epirus is home to a number of the country's most famous dairy product brands, which produce Feta cheese among others, not to mention that wine production, that saw a steep decline after WWII, is also booming, with the most terroirs located in the central part of the district of Ioannina, while systematically cultivated vineyards are found in the areas of Zitsa, Metsovo and north Tzoumerka, at altitudes of about 1,100m. –the highest vineyards in Greece. Although a rugged and poor region, in recent years Epirus has been trying to create a self-sustainable and extravert development of the primary, secondary and tertiary sector, which will primarily rely on local production activities. As a result, these activities will enhance the local identity, while giving businesses in the area a competitive edge.

1 Animal farming is big business in Epirus, which provides 45% of meat to the Greek market.

2 The Region produces excellent high-altitude wines.

EPIROT EXPORTS IN NUMBERS*

71%

0.9%

OF EXPORTS CORRESPOND TO FOOD PRODUCTS

CONTRIBUTION TO TOTAL GREEK EXPORTS

+2.4% ANNUAL CHANGE IN EXPORTS FOR THE 2016-17 PERIOD

+9.3% AVERAGE ANNUAL VALUE IN EXPORTS (2013-17)

*Source: SEVE (Greek Exporters Association)

€207.5 MILLION IN AGRI-FOOD PRODUCT EXPORTS (2017)


12

Region of Epirus ma ga z i n e

EXTRAVERSION, THE ONLY WAY FORWARD The total exports of the region are experiencing a continuous and rather significant rise

F

1 Epirus has extensive fishing grounds along its shores.

or the region of Epirus, extraversion and, of course, exports are a means not only to gain a significant economic profit, but also to promote its unique local products to a wide customer base all across the globe. And exports are in fact booming – especially as regards to the F&B sector, which seems to be gaining significant momentum– spearheaded by major Greek brands that call Epirus "home". Case in point, in 2013, foodstuff exports amounted to €145.4 million, while in 2014 and 2015 to approximately €162 million and €166.8 million, respectively. In addition, food exports from Epirus were almost €202 million in 2016, showing an increase of 17.4% within just one year, whereas in 2017, they amounted to €207.5 million. It is also worth mentioning that food amounts to appr. 71% of the Region's exports. In terms of exported products, fresh fruit and nuts are in first place, alcoholic drinks in second, meat in third, dairy in fourth, and fish and shellfish in fifth, followed by vegetables, oil, cereal, etc.

TOP 3 EXPORT PRODUCTS (2017)* • IN KILOS

• IN EURO

NUTS & FRESH FRUIT

FISH & SHELLFISH

53,684,571

€72,967,938

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

DAIRY

MEAT

NUTS & FRESH FRUIT

20,323,474 19,320,623

*Source: SEVE (Greek Exporters Association)

€51,862,215 €30,382,972

1

ALEXANDROS KACHRIMANIS GOVERNOR OF THE REGION OF EPIRUS

Every region of Greece has its own products to promote. In Epirus, we have that little extra: Quality products with their own character owed to the unique biodiversity of our region and the way they are made. Today, Epirote products travel all over Greece, but also to select markets abroad. For the Region of Epirus, local products are part of our development strategy, and are promoted in parallel with tourism. It is our desire that all tourists coming to Epirus leave our country having experienced our hospitality but also the taste of local, delicious and pure Epirote products. This is the purpose behind the ‘Taste Epirus’ exhibition. To introduce visitors (and local residents) to Epirote products right here where they are produced. Discover them, enjoy them... The culinary sensations of Epirus will astound you.


14

Region of Epirus ma ga z i n e

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY A MOST DYNAMIC SECTOR Animal farming is big in the region, with meat exports amounting to 19,320 kg for the year 2017.

P

oultry farming in Epirus is the most dynamic branch of Greek livestock farming with the highest verticalisation (processing of the primary sector product until final disposal to the consumer). The main businesses involved in poultry farming are concentrated to a large extent in Epirus (and mainly in the basin of Ioannina), reaching about 45 percent of total Greek production. Both egg and meat production are very developed. The latter is showing significant growth, while the Region of Epirus accounts for a large percentage in total produced chicken meat. In recent years, poultry production from poultry farms in Epirus accounts for 42 percent of Greek production, whereas the corresponding rate of the production of edible eggs amounts to about 10 percent, which shows that this particular sector shows smaller growth.

3

1

Sheep-and-goat farming In the region of Epirus, due to the diversity of the soil and the rugged terrain, sheep and goat farming is one of the major branches of production in the primary sector and the main source of income for its residents. In the Region, a significant –and one of the largest in the country– number of sheep and

ta

REGIONAL BREEDS OF SHEEP Kalarrytiko sheep Small, multi purpose sheep, white with reddish spots. Katsika sheep Raised in the mountains of Epirus, it is very well adapted in the particular environment and has sufficient production, as the average milk yield is higher than other local mountain breeds. Boutsiko sheep Well

adapted to lowland areas with humid climate. It gives high milk yields. Frisarta sheep Found in the lowlands of Arta and Preveza, is the result of crossbreeding between the Friesian and Greek breeds from Arta. This breed has the best milk yield compared to other Greek breeds and a good meat production.


2

The varied flora and the diverse terrain together with the local epirot breeds, produce lambs and goats of distinctive flavor and quality

1 The largest poulty production units in Greece are concentrated in Epirus.

2 Epirus accounts for 42% of Greek poultry production.

3 Epirus boasts four local sheep breeds.

goat are kept. The varied flora and the diverse terrain together with the local sheep and goat breeds, produce lambs and goats of distinctive flavor and quality, which make them stand out from all others not only in Greece, but also in Europe. In fact, goat and sheep meat from Epirus fully comply with both the European and Greek market requirements (low weight and tasty product) and therefore enjoy better prices than products from the rest of the country. During the last years, more than 60,000 carcasses have been exported to the EU –mostly in Italy, Spain and Cyprus– while the eastern Europe market has also been exploited. In addition, a significant number of live sheep and goats has also been Turkey-bound. The main advantage is that Epirot farmers have managed to secure higher prices in Turkey, while this par-

ticular market requires larger carcasses (1530kg) which are difficult to be absorbed by the Greek or European marketplace.

Pig farming The Region of Epirus has had a long-standing tradition in pig farming since the ‘70s. Nowadays, Epirus and the municipality of Filippiada in particular, are one of the major pig farming centers in Greece. There are a total of 85 organized pig farms in the region, breeding approximately 18,000 sows and producing about 370,000 pigs for slaughter a year, amounting to more than €56,000,000. The above-mentioned pigs are mostly slaughtered in slaughterhouses within the Region, while the remaining percentage is slaughtered in slaughterhouses in the rest of the country and especially in Northern Greece.


16

Region of Epirus ma ga z i n e

EXCITING WINES & FIERY TSIPOURO Epirus produces wines of excellent quality, while many consider the region as the birthplace of the famous tsipouro.

V

iticulture and winemaking in Epirus date back as early as the 15th century. Although in terms of quantity its wine production falls short compared to other regions of Greece, this is not the case with regard to quality. In fact, Epirus produces exceptional wines from local –the characteristic Epirot varieties are the white Debina and the reds Vlachiko and Bekiari– as well as international varieties of a unique character. The zone of PGI Epirus, established in 2000, comprises four districts: Arta, Ioannina, Thesprotia and Preveza, which constitute an autonomous viticultural region. Practically, PGI Epirus is represented by the mountainous district of Ioannina which is the most developed of the four, both in terms of viticulture as well as of wine making. Despite the fact that its coastline is over 200 km, Epirus, the northwestern region, is mountainous. the most extensive terroirs are in the central part of the district of Ioannina, while systematically cultivated vineyards are found in the areas of Metsovo

1

(900-1,000m. altitude, which is where the cultivation of Cabernet Sauvignon started in Greece, and north Tzoumerka, at altitudes of about 1,100m. –the highest vineyards in the country.

The exciting PDO Zitsa vineyards Zitsa, at 700m above sea level on the western slopes of the Pindos range, has the highest annual rainfall level in the country (appr. 40in.) Here, the local Debina white variety occupies about 1,250 acres, yielding dry and semi-sparkling PDO Zitsa wines. Almost all of the PDO Zitsa zone’s (established in 1972) vineyards are fenced in since the area’s boars and other fauna are quite fond of

IN THE REGION OF TSIPOURO

Tsipouro is the most popular Greek eau de vie. It is made, just like Italian grappa, by distilling the skins, pulp, seeds, and stems (the pomace, in short) left over from winemaking, after pressing the grapes. Great quality grapes are a prerequisite for the production of

quality tsipouro, the fiery spirit the Region of Epirus is known for. Therefore, the grape variety, the composition of the vineyard's soil, its altitude and orientation, cultivation practices, etc. play a decisive role in the final product. As already mentioned above, all of these factors

are combined in a unique way in the region of Epirus. And especially the Debina variety produces tsipouro of excellent quality. In fact, many could argue that Debine produces the best tsipouro there is.

1 The vineyards of Epirus are located in the highest regions of Greece.

2 Epirus is famous for the production of exceptional Tsipouro.


2

Epirus produces excellent wines from local –mostly white Debina and the reds Vlachiko & Bekiari– as well as international varieties of a unique character the Debina grapes cultivated there. Traditionally, the greater Zitsa area has produced sparkling wines, as the resumption of fermentation in the spring after the winter interruption due to the cold weather would produce carbon dioxide in the sealed canisters or barrels.

Debina: Fantasy in white One of the least known Greek indigenous varieties, Debina, comes from Epirus and is used in the production of dry whites as well as superb sparkling and semi-sparkling wines. The vineyard of Zitsa, in the greater Ioannina area, is the main cultivation hub of this especially sensitive grape variety. The region’s cold climate endows Debina with a unique fresh

character; those tasting the wine crafted from this variety have the impression that they have just bitten into a freshly-picked Granny Smith apple. This feeling holds true when the wine is the mild, low-alcohol PDO Zitsa white. Due to its high susceptibility to oxidation, its consumption had remained until recently the privilege of those residing in the areas of its production. Fortunately, contemporary vinification, bottling, and transport methods allow any wine lover open to new horizons and journeys of exploration to delight in the distinct freshness of Debina.

EPIRUS WINES IN NUMBERS

7,500

HECTARES OF VINEYARDS IN THE REGION

5,500

HECTARES CULTIVATED WITH DEBINA VARIETY

15

DIFFERENT PDO ZITSA WINES PRODUCED


18

Region of Epirus ma ga z i n e

1

2

KINGDOM OF CHEESE The oft-overlooked region of Epirus sports a flavorful rustic cuisine and a great variety of cheeses still made using traditional farmhouse methods

S

heep and goat farming is the main source of income for the residents of Epirus. Actually, the Region keeps the largest number of goats and sheep found in Greece. As a result, a number of delicious cheeses, as well as yogurt are produced.

Feta Feta is the most well-known Greek cheese, produced from sheep milk or in combination with goat milk. It is a soft, white cheese which matures in brine for two months, and which is preserved in brine. It has a slightly salty taste and a natural white color. Feta from Epirus can be characterized as organic because it is produced from milk coming from herds allowed to graze freely in areas where no pesticides, insect repellants or other pollutants are used. Feta is consumed as a table cheese or used in the region’s famous and quite delicious pies.

Kefalograviera Kefalograviera is produced from sheep milk or a combination with goat milk, in which case the goat milk should not exceed 10% of the total weight. It is a hard cheese which has a hard and thin rind, dry appearance

and yellow to light brown color. It has a 40% maximum humidity and a 40% minimum dry fat content. It has a hard and elastic touch with many small cuts on its mass. Kefalograviera has a pleasant salty taste and rich aroma. The cheese is salted and left to mature for at least 3 months.

Galotyri Galotyri cheese is one of the most ancient Greek cheeses and is produced main- ly in the region of Epirus. It is a soft, creamy cheese, without rind, with a pleasant and fresh taste and aroma. It is consumed as a table cheese. It has a 75% maximum humidity and a 40% fat content. For its production, milk is warmed up until it reaches boiling point. It is then poured into containers -preferably ceramic- where it stays for 24 hours. A small quantity of salt (3% to 4%) is added, and the mixture is left at room temperature for 2 days. During this period, it is stirred periodically, until sufficient acidity develops. It is then poured into textile or skin sacks or even into wooden barrels. The sacks or barrels are closed air-tightly and stored in cool and humid spaces at temperatures lower than 8°C, for at least 2 months. During this period, the cheese matures and gains its pleasant sensory characteristics.

1 Feta production is a traditional practice. That's why the famous cheese has PDO designation.

2 Maturation of the Kefalograviera is done in booths.


Metsovone is produced at the dairy of the foundation of Michael Tositsa, operating in Metsovo since 1955 Metsovone is produced from sheep, cow or goat's milk or a combination of all three Metsovone has been a PDO product since 1996

Metsovone is produced in the Metsovo region in Epirus, hence its name

METSOVONE A UNIQUE SMOKED CHEESE

M

etsovone is exclusively produced at the dairy of the foundation of the famous Greek benefactor, baron Michael Tositsa, operating in Metsovo since 1955. The vision of Evangelos Averof Tositsa was for the dairy to become a school and for that reason he made sure that some young boys from local farmers went to study in Italy. The young men managed to combine the production method of certain Italian cheeses with Greek recipes and techniques, choosing the relevant hard cheese types that matched with the milk characteristics from

Metsovo. This is how Metsovone the famous local cheese was born. In fact, even today the dairy is still operated by young cheesemakers. The cheese matures for at least 3 months. It has a 38% maximum humidity and a 40% minimum dry fat content. It is classified as a semi-hard to hard cheese, with a thin and dry skin; its color resembles that of straw. It is commonly found in pieces of a cylindrical shape, 10 cm in diameter and 10 cm in height, weighing 1.5, 2.5 or 4.5 kg. It is a table cheese and has a slightly salt and peppery taste and a pleasant aroma.

CHEESE PRODUCTION IN EPIRUS

25

1/5

90%

BUSINESSES PRODUCING FETA IN THE REGION

OF TOTAL GREEK FETA PRODUCTION

OF TOTAL GALOTYRI PRODUCTION

50% OF TOTAL KEFALOGRAVIERA PRODUCTION


20

Region of Epirus ma ga z i n e

LAND OF HERBS & HONEY Today, apiculture together with the systematic cultivation of aromatic herbs, play an important part in Epirot economy.

A

piculture is an important activity, exploiting the potential of Greek flora in an efficient way and ensuring a fair income for beekeepers with relatively small inflows even in areas that are not suitable for other activities. At the same time, beekeeping is proven to be very important in maintaining environmental balance, especially in areas with fragile ecological characteristics. Honey

In Epirus, herbs are farmed in natural conditions & most are collected from the wild production in the Region of Epirus grows at a satisfactory pace. Beekeeping is mostly nomadic and employs several people with small to medium-sized farms, with few exceptions, and the honey produced is mainly available in the local market. Due to the Region’s rich flora, most of the honey produced is flower honey of excellent quality, such as thyme and citrus honey. In addition, large quantities of pine and spruce honey are also produced. On a smaller scale, a limited number of beekeepers also engages in the production of other honey products, such

as pollen, propolis, royal jelly and more. Lately, organic apiculture has also been developing in the Region. The aim is to produce high quality products to meet growing market needs for organic products.

Natural Greek flavors After decades of decline, herbs are regaining popularity in the West and scientists are reevaluating their uses and medicinal benefits. As a result, infusions from aromatic herbs are hailed as natural remedies, and spearheading efforts to promote a healthier lifestyle. Herbs in the region of Epirus show remarkable quality standards (percentage in essential oils, ratio of active substances, etc.) that affect their flavor and aroma as well as their action, especially when used for medicinal purposes. In addition, growing conditions and harvesting methods in Epirus promote GMO-free organic products, ensuring that all herbs are gathered at their optimum and, as a result, are packed with more active ingredients and flavor than other herbs found elsewhere in the world. As demand for teas and infusions with interesting flavors grows, a burgeoning industry to support this need has developed. In Epirus, herbs are farmed in natural conditions

1 The region of Epirus produces some excellent honeysm mostly pine.

2 Local herbs are collected by hand and considered among the best.


Honey production in Epirus

4.1%

OF GREECE’S HONEY PRODUCTION

1.237

BEEKEEPERS IN THE REGION

90.480 BEE COLONIES

548

ORGANIC BEE COLONIES

and the majority is collected by hand from the wild. Herbs harvested in the region are organic, GMO-free, and their quality is second to none. Although there is no systematic cultivation of aromatic medicinal plants in Epirus, the Region, however, boasts many indigenous plants. And the existence of many local aromatic and medicinal plants throughout the region is a strong indication that there are favorable soil as well as climatic conditions for their development. In the prefecture of Ioannina there are businesses that produce essential oils from various local aromatic-medicinal plants (elderflower, chamomile, fern, wild rose, calendula, hyssop, lemon balm, etc.). There are also small family businesses or individuals who collect indigenous plants in their area, mainly mountain tea, chamomile and oreg-

ano and sell them locally. Quality certification, packaging improvement and collection in an appropriate way so that there is no risk to biodiversity, would give an opportunity to increase the income of the residents in the region. This means that systematic cultivation can be an alternative to exploiting less-favored, mountainous or semimountainous areas, where the fields cannot perform well when growing other crops.

1 Many beekeprs also engage in the production of pollen, propolis, royal jelly, etc.


22

Region of Epirus ma ga z i n e

THE FUTURE LIES IN THE WATER With an extended coastline, it’s no wonder the Region of Epirus bases a large part of its economic activity on aquaculture.

I Fish, crustaceans & molluscs Exports in euros 2013

60,970,739 2014

64,886,444 2015

63,500,214 2016

77,372,019 2017

72,967,938

n the region of Epirus, fishing takes place in the Ionian Sea, Amvrakikos Gulf as well as in fresh water lakes and rivers. One of the most important fishing centers in the region is the town of Preveza, where fishing is traditionally one of the main occupations. In the regional untit of Preveza, there are approximately 245 shipping vessels and about 500 fishermen. In the regional unit of Arta, there are almost 280 boats and in Thesprotia 84. Most of the active fishing boats in the Region are coastal vessels, netters or longliners, with each employing about 2-3 persons, one of which is the owner. Namely: In the fishing waters of the Ionian Sea, operate coastal and medium-sized vessels (purse seine vessels and trawlers from Lefkada, Parga, Igoumenitsa, Corfu and Patras). The main catches are cod, red mullet, picarels, bogues, horse mackerels, while fishing for large pelagic fish –principally swordfish and tuna– is also quite developed. In the Amvrakikos bay, there is only coastal fishing with nets, longlines, fish traps, trolling boats, fishing nets and also fishing for

shells with looms, rakes, and forks. The main catches are shrimp, red mullet, cephalopods, sardines and cuttlefish, while shellfish, mussels and scallops are equally popular. Fishing also takes place in the Region's fresh waters. It is worth mentioning fishing spots such as the lake of Ioannina or the artificial lake of the Aoos River with its famous lobster.

The Epirot lagoons In the region of Epirus, there is a large number of lagoons distributed on the shores of its three coastal prefectures. The most significant ones are located in the northern part of Amvrakikos gulf (Logarou, Tsoukalio-Rodia, Tsopeli, Mazoma), while on the side of the Ionian Sea, there are another 6 lagoons in the regional unit of Thesprotia: Rhyhos, Vatas, Loutsa-Papadia, Voda and Bastia-Alykes. The lagoons of the Region are exploited by fishing cooperatives. The method of fish farming in lagoons is traditional. Fishing is mainly done with fish-harvesting facilities and nets. Approximately 130-215 tons of fish per year are produced from lagoons throughout Epirus.


24

Feta Cheese ma ga z i n e


What is it that makes the authentic, Greek PDO Feta cheese so unique? Could it be its tangy albeit delicious flavor? The fact that it’s the perfect snack? How about its exceptional nutritional profile? Producers, food traders as well as scientists weigh in.

THE FETA

FETA CHEESE IN NUMBERS (2017)

121,000

TONS OF FETA CHEESE PRODUCTION

56,760

TONS OF FETA EXPORTED

43.1%

OF FETA IS PRODUCED IN THESSALY


26

Feta Cheese ma ga z i n e

F

or centuries, Greeks have relied on cheese as their main source of protein, and since sheep and goats were the chief source of milk, Feta was the cheese that mostly covered such a need. But what makes it stand out? “Feta is an exceptional cheese with quite a distinct flavor, which is one the reasons it is so famous,” explains George Vanidis, Exports Director at Mevgal SA, one of the major Greek dairy product industries. “Greek Feta companies should stick to its intriguing character that creates added value, while educating consumers regarding its uniqueness.” Due to its status as a Protected Denomination of Origin product, Feta can only be produced from natural ingredients, while its production and processing adhere to strict quality control and safety procedures. And keeping in mind that sheep and goat’s milk is quite different from cow’s milk, sheep from one country are also quite different from the sheep in another (Greece in this instance), quite simply because the land is different and so are the breeds of livestock. Mr Vanidis reveals that “Any other cheese product made from non-Greek milk is just a cheese with no relation whatsoever –both in terms of taste and quality– to the authentic Feta.” “I believe that the main advantage of Feta cheese is the excellent quality of Greek milk paired with the know-how of Greek cheese and dairy producers, upholding tradition while adapting it to the

1 latest technological requirements,” acknowledges Konstantinos Nousias of Vassilitsa - G. & A. Nousias G.P. and third-generation cheese-maker. “Greek Feta is the only authentic Feta cheese; its roots date back to ancient Greece and only Greeks know its authentic recipe.” George Hotos, sales director at Hotos SA, another company, which combines almost a century’s worth of know-how, asserts that “Authentic Greek Feta PDO can only be produced from 100% sheep and goat milk from Greece at a percentage of at least 70% sheep and maximum 30% goat milk. Compared to cow’s milk, both goat and sheep milk contain more fat and casein, creating organoleptic characteristics specific to cheeses made from sheep and goat milk that make them stand out from other types of cheese.”

1 As a PDO product, Feta must be produced in particular areas in Greece, following specific traditional methods.

FETA PRODUCTION PER REGION*

43.1% 15.6% 11.9%

EASTERN MACEDONIA & THRACE

THESSALY

NOTHERN AEGEAN

EPIRUS

CENTRAL MACEDONIA

WESTERN GREECE

5.3% 1.1%

1.5%

PELOPONNESE

WESTERN MACEDONIA

CENTRAL GREECE

ATTICA *Source: Hellenic Agricultural Organization Elgo-Dimitra

3.7% 16% 1.2%

0.6%


28

Feta Cheese ma ga z i n e

QUEEN OF EXPORTS Greek Feta sales are constantly increasing, proving that there is indeed a market for the genuine cheese.

E

xport opportunities for Greek cheese, and especially Feta cheese have encouraged a greater production, and have spurred the local dairy and cheese industry to evolve even further. In the last five to ten years, Greek Feta processing companies have been investing in innovation, cutting-edge technologies, marketing, and new product development, thus improving value for money and resulting in a more competitive marketplace. In Greece, there are many large companies shell-

Feta exports (2017)* In the EU Germany 37.4% UK 18.8% Italy 12.3% Sweden 7.3% France 5.7% Austria 4.7% Others 13.8%

*Source: Hellenic Agricultural Organization Elgo-Dimitra

Rest of the world USA 36% Australia 27.8 Switzerland 18.5% Canada 8.3 Others 9.4%

ing out in the production of Feta cheese, and especially the one matured in tins. About 10 of them produce Feta in barrels, and according to a traditional recipe, while approximately 5 of them can accommodate large scale demand. Large and medium-sized Greek Feta companies have modern infrastructure, a fully organized distribution network, and offer a wide variety of products that could cater to the needs of super markets or delis all over the world. Smaller, however, production units, from family-owned dairy farms to small-sized businesses, are struggling to keep up with demand and are usually operating within their specific geographical area or market their Feta as a gourmet choice. According to Mr Hotos, “International consumers do not recognize the authentic Greek Feta cheese –there are many imitations that tend to confuse them.” “Both buyers and consumers alike should choose the authentic Greek Feta cheese; its quality is way superior than its cheap imitations,” concurs Mr Noussias of Vassilitsa. A significant trend in the cheese market is an increased demand for organic certification. Consequently, several Greek companies created new products featuring the “BIO” logo. “There is certainly a rise in the demand for organic Feta, but the ‘classic’ recipe still reigns supreme,” declares Mr Vanidis of Mevgal. “The international clientele wants to taste the authentic flavor of Feta.”


at e! We pa rt ic ip

d Α02/B01 Hall 2 / Stan

7 - 9 MARCH 2020 AT H E N S • G R E E C E


30

Feta Cheese ma ga z i n e

FETA UNCHARTED NO MORE Scientists analyzed the famous cheese determining its properties & value and establishing its authenticity against imitations.

R

ecently, scientists at the Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens (BRFAA) have decoded the “DNA” of the authentic Feta cheese produced in Greece, unlocking its secrets at a molecular level. Dr George Tsangaris and Dr Athanasios Anagnostopoulos examined, using high resolution mass-spectrometry –namely a method they developed themselves and called “trophometry”– many types of commercially available PDO Feta cheese, analyzing in full their protein content and identifying their nutritional properties and value. The research revealed that all varieties of PDO Feta contain 489 different types of protein known, among others, for their antimicrobial activity and for

strengthening the immune system. The research also identified many proteins that benefit the nervous system, help maintain good kidney function, regulate arterial pressure and reduce cholesterol. As a result, the authentic Greek Feta cheese emerges as one of the most protein-rich cheeses in the world. “The first thing we noted was that Feta cheese is an extremely rich biological material,” clarifies Dr George Tsangaris. “We encountered an extensive range of proteins, each corresponding to a different action. Proteins we had absolutely no idea existed in Feta cheese. This proved that Feta is some kind of super food.” Dr Athanasios Anagnostopoulos acknowledges that “Our findings debunk the myth that Feta is a ‘dangerous’ food, with high fat and salt content.” He also adds that this research is important because it managed to give substance to a significant traditional Greek product. “We proved that Feta PDO has certain characteristics that make it unique,” Dr Tsangaris explains. “And any cheese without these characteristics cannot be called Feta. Feta is a cheese equal to other ‘great’ international cheeses, such as Parmigiano, etc.” Or as Dr Anagnostopoulos puts it, “Feta is a super star!”

RESEARCH proved that Feta PDO has certain characteristics that make it unique


at e! We pa rt ic ip

d Α02/B01 Hall 2 / Stan

7 - 9 MARCH 2020 AT H E N S • G R E E C E


Vassilitsa - G. & A. Nousias G.P.

Organic matters Tradition and innovation go hand in hand in this familyowned business from Larissa, producing not only exceptional dairy, but also quality organic cheeses.

C

heesemaking is an art for Vassilitsa - G. & A. Nousias G.P., a brand that has been creating, for approximately 40 years now, dairy products using traditional methods and combining them with state-of-the-art quality controls and packaging. With hard work, dedication and an extensive know-how, Vassilitsa has grown into a leader in the cheese business, producing Feta cheese, Manouri, Anthotyro, goat cheese, as well as a number of organic offerings.

Tradition meets state-of-the-art technologies Vassilitsa - G. & A. Nousias G.P., located in Nea Lefki, Larissa, is a modern dairy production unit, with a significant presence in the region of Thessaly as well as the rest of Greece

and the world following extensive export activity. Its philosophy is centered on the quality of the products and is focused on customer demands. In addition, traditional cheese and dairy practices are combined with cutting-edge technology and an increased environmental awareness, thus creating the right conditions for the sustainable development of the company. Not to mention the production of organic cheeses.

Good organic practices In the case of organic cheeses, Vassilitsa - G. & A. Nousias G.P. uses organic milk exclusively from Greek farms that respect nature’s balance and ensure the well-being of animals. Animals that produce this milk –be it sheep, goats or cows– are fed organic foods with no synthetic chemicals. In addition, farmers main-

VASSILITSA ORGANIC CHEESE PRODUCTION IN NUMBERS

34,390.56 KG

25,311.62

KG ΟRGANIC FETA PDO

ORGANIC MANOURI PDO

ORGANIC GOAT CHEESE

201,132.93

KG


tain their grazing areas without any pesticides or chemical fertilizers, and refrain from using hormones or genetically modified organisms, as specified by the Greek legislation that prohibits the use of GMOs. Furthermore, before all organic products can be marketed, they are subject to strict inspections regarding animal farming and cheese production and have obtained all necessary organic certification.

The way to international markets The global organic food industry is a lucrative market, especially since the international clientele deems organic products as a healthy and ethical choice thanks to mounting evidence of the difference between organic and nonorganic, both in terms of nutrition and environmental impact. Vassilitsa - G. & A. Nousias G.P. has been developing its outward-looking orientation since 1967, when the first export of Feta cheese to West Germany, under the brand name “Vassilitsa,” took place. Since then, 95 percent of or production –both regu-

lar and organic, for that matter– is exported, mostly to Germany, the UK, Sweden, Belgium, France, as well as the US. Nowadays, Vassilitsa - G. & A. Nousias G.P. is ready to respond to increased customer demands, consolidating its leading place in the Greek market and searching for new markets not only in Europe but, also, in other parts of the world.

VASSILITSA - G. & A. NOUSIAS G.P. IN NUMBERS

95%

23

40

OF PRODUCTION EXPORTED

TONS OF SHEEP & GOATS MILK USED

YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN CHEESEMAKING

PUBLI


34

Table Greek Cuisine Olives ma ga z i n e

the

ULTIMATE

guide

TO GREEK TABLE OLIVES Three major olive varieties; €400 million contribution to Greece’s GDP; more than 41 million olive trees. Here are the latest facts and figures on one of Greece’s top F&B export products.


NO2

X

OLIVE

215,000 tons

EXPORTS DOUBLED

EXPORTER IN THE WORLD

AVERAGE ANNUAL

IN THE LAST DECADE

PRODUCTION

100+ EXPORT

64,000+ OLIVE GROWERS

O

F

TI

8%

OF GREEK TABLE OLIVES PRODUCTION IS EXPORTED

ON

DESTINATIONS

92% +

2

GL

O BA L P R O

€450 MILLION IN MARKET SIZE

C U D

5,000 EMPLOYEES

IN OLIVE PROCESSING PACKAGING AND EXPORTS


36

Table Olives ma ga z i n e

From Greece to more than 100 markets wordwide €220 mil. EUROPE

€140 mil.

€50 mil.

AMERICA

€15 mil. RUSSIA

ASIA

€10 mil. AFRICA

HALKIDIKI VARIETY

10,000,000 olive trees 13,400+ olive farms 120,000 tons of harvested olives 92% of the variety is exported

The Halkidiki green table olives come from the Halkidiki variety, which is grown in the Prefecture of Halkidiki and also in Central and Eastern Macedonia, in northern Greece, while a lesser number of trees of the variety are grown in other regions of the country. Internationally, they are sold under the name “green olives Halkidiki variety” and have a characteristically large fruit, cylindrical-conical shape with a pointed tip on the lower part of the fruit, a bright green or greenish-yellow color, large ratio of flesh to pit, and outstanding organoleptic characteristics. Around 30 percent of the Halkidiki olives sorted by quality and size end up as “whole olives” in packages of various sizes and with a wide range of condiments and flavorings. Around 70 percent are pitted and also sold under a wide range of offerings, such as pitted olives or olives stuffed with various fillings (peppers, almonds, onion, anchovies, garlic, etc.). Greece’s “green olives Halkidiki variety” are a major export product, resulting in thousands of olive saplings of the Halkidiki variety planted every year in areas where the variety is grown.

€15 mil. AUSTRALIA

KALAMATA VARIETY Natural black table olives of the Kalamata variety (Kalamata olives) come from olive trees of the Kalamata, Aetonycholia, Hondrolia, Tsingeli, Aetonychi, Nychati or Korakolia varieties, which are grown in various parts of the Peloponnese and Central Greece. Internationally these are known as “Kalamata olives”. Their reputation on both the Greek and global markets is excellent due to their outstanding organoleptic characteristics: their dark color, crisp flesh and amazing flavor. The olives are sorted by quality and size and sent for packaging in bulk or to be further processed as sliced or pitted olives (around 60% of the end product is sold as pitted olives). This internationally-renowned type of Greek table olive has strong exports and is in high demand. That means that every year thousands of olive saplings of the Kalamata variety are being planted, primarily in the prefectures of Aetolia-Acarnania, Laconia and Phthiotis. It is expected that over the next years, production will exceed 100,000 tons.

10,000,000 olive trees 13,900+ olive farms 76,000 tons of harvested olives 85% of the variety is exported


KONSERVOLIA VARIETY

*Source: Interprofessional Table Olives Organisation (DOEPEL)

The oldest table olive variety in Greece. The Konservolia variety is primarily grown in central Greece in the prefectures of Phthiotis, Fokida, Magnesia, Aetolia-Acarnania, Arta and Evia. It is the most widely known table olive and accounts for the largest number of trees. Konservolia olives are round to oval in shape, small to medium in size and with a high ratio of flesh to pit which can be easily separated from the pit while eating or pitting. One feature that sets it apart is that olives of the Konservolia variety can be transformed

into a range of different types of table olives, though the most common ones are: Green olives in brine and Natural black olives in brine. No matter how Konservolia table olives are sold, all are naturally fermented and the end product has outstanding organoleptic characteristics. Approximately, 30 percent of the variety are consumed as “whole olives� in packages of various sizes, while around 70 percent are pitted and sold as pitted or stuffed, in packagings of various sizes, with various condiments and flavorings, such as almonds, garlic, oregano, etc.

ADV

Europe’s finest table olives

20,000,000 olive trees 35,500+ olive farms 200,000 tons of harvested olives 85% of the variety is exported


38

Greek Yogurt ma ga z i n e


Yogurt has always been one of the finest products of the Greek farming tradition and Greek yogurt, full of proteins and nutrients, is a global food trend that seems to refuse to go out of style.

AUTHENTIC YOGURT

Totally

Greek! GREECE: YOGURT FACTS & FIGURES

4th

42%

22%

90%

PLACE IN THE WORLD REGARDING YOGURT EXPORTS

OF GREEK EXPORTS GO TO ITALY

OF GREEK EXPORTS GO TO THE UK

OF GREEK YOGURT EXPORTS IS OF THE PLAIN VARIETY

*Source: Technavio


40

Greek Yogurt ma ga z i n e

G 1 Greek yogurt is classic yogurt that has been strained a second time.

2 Greek yogurt has a thicker, creamier texture compared to traditional yogurt.

reek yogurt, also known as “strained yogurt” or “stragisto” in Greece, is just that: traditional yogurt that has been strained a second time. Both types of yogurt are strained following the fermentation process; however, additional straining occurs during the production of Greek yogurt. Extensive straining removes a great amount of the liquid whey and sugar, which alters the nutritional and sensory properties of the yogurt. As a result, Greek yogurt has a much thicker, creamier texture and a tangy taste. Not to mention, it is naturally rich in protein and low in fat, and with fewer carbohydrates. In addition, Greek or strained yogurt contains no added sweeteners, thickeners, preservatives or powdered products, and because it is more concentrated, it has more protein than its regular counterpart. This is not, however, the only type of yogurt produced by Greeks. There are, in fact, several other varieties that are also exported, but, unfortunately, don’t have the appeal of Greek yogurt in international markets.

Classic or regular: From sheep, goat or cow’s milk, it is not as thick as Greek yogurt and can be produced from skimmed or semi-skimmed milk.

Traditional: This particular type of yogurt is classified as traditional due to the “skin”, a layer of cream which covers the surface. Its kind is unique in Europe. It is usually made from sheep or goat’s milk.

With fruit, nuts, etc.: Fruit, cereal, jams, honey, even spoon sweets have been added to strained yogurt in order to produce delicious desserts that combine the nutritious profile of Greek yogurt together with extra vitamins.

1

research suggests the bacteria in yogurt may help relieve anxiety and stress

2


Greek companies Greek dairy companies, focused on the production of yogurt, are a force to be reckoned with, even in the competitive international marketplace. Patented technologies, innovations, significant export activity, and a top quality product have boosted the reputation of the authentic Greek yogurt. The rise of Greek yogurt all over the world reflects a larger change in contemporary culinary consciousness: a desire for foods that are considered purer, simpler, and more natural. Dairy producers on Greek soil fall into two categories: big manufacturers with state-ofthe-art, highly automated facilities that can accommodate demand in both the Greek and international markets, and small pasteurization units, collecting milk from small regional farms and serving almost exclusively local needs. In fact, many family-run dairy companies are famous in Greece for their authentic

flavors and their exceptional yogurt –mostly from sheep or goat’s milk. Exploring their growth options, mainly in European markets, many yogurt producers are constantly investing in ultramodern plants consisting of fully automated production lines, to ensure minimal processing of the fresh milk while sealing all of its nutrients. Following its spectacular success, Greek yogurt is presently exported to over 40 countries. This means there are more opportunities but also more competition for new companies entering the market. These brands try to win over customers with new flavors, additional health benefits and improved texture.

GREEK YOGURT: GROWTH RATE OF KEY COUNTRIES * Country 2019 2020 2021 USA 5.77% 5.90% 5.98% UK 7.51% 8.66% 9.59% France 6.95% 7.86% 8.59% Germany 7.69% 8.39% 9.11% Greece 6.44% 7.55% 8.56% *Source: Technavio


42

Greek Yogurt ma ga z i n e

AN EVER-GROWING GLOBAL TREND The rising awareness of Greek yogurt as a healthier substitute to other food products has created a multi-billion euro market.

F

or some time now, consumers are increasingly preferring Greek yogurt due to the health benefits provided through its high protein, low sodium and carbohydrate level, and low lactose content. Not to mention that Greek yogurt is rich in essential vitamins and probiotics, while a study suggests the bacteria in yogurt may help relieve anxiety and stress by reducing a specific brain activity. As a result, market analysts estimate that the Greek yogurt market BLACK V. will grow steadily at a CAGR of 8.85 percent

REGULAR PIGS

few products have experienced a more meteoric rise than that of Greek yogurt by 2021. Namely, according to leading market research company Technavio, the Greek yogurt market will grow by $4.02 billion, while, the contribution to growth for the period 2016-2021 is as follows: the Americas with 44.78 percent, Asia-Pacific with 43.03 percent and Europe-Middle East-Africa with 12.19 percent. Considering the market share by region in

2016 was 53.48 percent for the Americas, 37.45 percent for Asia-Pacific and 9.07 percent for Europe-Middle East-Africa, the numbers prove that the Greek yogurt trend is showing no signs of slowing down. The key countries leading Greek yogurt consumption are the US with a 51.12 percent of market share, France with 8.70 percent share, Germany with 8.31 percent and the UK with 6.31 percent, followed by Greece with a 4.01 percent market share. There are several factors driving demand. Not only Greek yogurt is an extremely healthy food option, its consumption as meal replacement and/or snack is constantly growing. Yogurt manufacturers are introducing new flavors into their yogurt products to attract customers, a trend which is expected to contribute largely through 2021. In addition, changing consumer tastes and preferences and rapid technological changes will contribute to the growing competition among the players, whereas the introduction of new flavors and attractive packaging will positively influence the Greek yogurt market size and share. To accelerate this rise in the customer base, the players are also providing the option of organic, lowfat and non-fat Greek yogurt packs.


44

Greek Yogurt ma ga z i n e

THE GREEK WAY Greek yogurt sales have more than doubled in the past years and lots of companies are jumping on the Greek yogurt train.

G

reek dairy companies only use fresh milk from local, Greek farms, most of them family-owned, where everything, from the care and well-being of the animals to the milking takes place on the farm. It should be noted that many farms let their animals roam and graze in the countryside and feed on the GMO-free plants of the Hellenic land. After milking, the milk is tested and retested under the strictest regulations in the industry and is sent daily to the company facilities where it is made into the yogurt we all know and love. According to Greek producers, straining is a time-consuming, expensive and specialized process, and non-Greek brands have neither the know-how nor the patented machines to make it. So, they resort to cheaper ways that may produce an almost identical yogurt, but which has neither the flavor nor the nutritional val-

Greek yogurt is made the traditional way with state-ofthe-art production methods ue of the authentic Greek yogurt. Greek yogurt is a Greek tradition exploited by international brands that want to reap the benefits of its considerable impact on modern food culture. The original, authentic Greek yogurt is only produced in Greece –or by Greek companies in international facilities– no matter what other brands claim. It is made by a natural process, does not contain any additives or preservatives, sweeteners, colorings or flavorings, and is the result of fresh, high quality produce combined with new technologies.

Winning the battle against “Greek yogurt” imitations Recently, there has been an important victory for Greece’s dairy industry, as the Czech Republic has sent the European Commission a draft amendment to its national laws that will prevent Czech dairies from marketing products under the name of “Greek yogurt”. In a statement, Greek officials said that “The names and use of symbols on products whose reputation is based on Greece, will be protected.” It was also underlined that in any international conventions signed from now on will be clear “that we want our trade marks to be fully protected.” The next step will be to establish a PGI certification for Greek yogurt.

Special thanks to Technavio market research company for the help and information.


46

Greek Olive Oil ma ga z i n e


Olive oil

the organic

factor Organic olive oil is a high-end product with an elevated asking price, and Greek producers are keen to dive into a large and dynamically evolving market.

GREEK ORGANIC OLIVES & OLIVE OIL PRODUCTION

132,000 TONS OF ORGANIC OLIVE PRODUCTION IN 2017

47,605 ha OF ORGANIC OLIVE AREA IN 2015

8.7% OF GREEK OLIVE PRODUCTION IS ORGANIC


48

Greek Olive Oil ma ga z i n e

T 1 According to experts, recently, there’s been an increase in organic olive oil processing.

2 The cultivation of organic olive oil needs continuous training and effort.

he market of organic food is growing strongly in Greece, after a long period of inactivity. This particular fact together with a significant increase in organic exports has led Greek growers to undergo a change in mentality. They’ve implemented organic methods in their production and work on obtaining GlobalGAP certification for their products and farming methods. In fact, with regard to organic farmland, Greece is currently in 10th place within the EU, accounting for 3.3% of total European organic crop area. As far as permanent crops, such as olives, are concerned, the organic area in the EU amounts to more than 1.2 million hectares. In 2015, olive groves represented 34% of all organic permanent crops in the EU-28, with 454,227 hectares. Most of them are located in Spain (197,136 ha), Italy (179,886 ha), Greece and Portugal (21,766 ha), while the largest part of the production of organic olives in Member States together is utilized for the production of oil. In Greece, 37% of organic farmland in Greece accounts for olive trees, making them the second largest bio cultivation in the country after cereal and rice. In fact, the number of organic olive area appears to have peaked in 2008 with 64,136 hectares, followed by a declining path. Organic grove numbers, however, are currently fluctuating, amounting to 47,605 hectares in 2015 and representing 0.72% of total utilized agricultural area, while rising to 0.75% in 2016 according to the latest estimates by Eurostat.

2

1

Realizing its strong potential, Greek olive farmers have been switching to organic What about Greek organic olive oils? In an organic olive grove, cultivation is done without chemicals, insecticides, hormones and pesticides and is controlled by approved certifications. At the same time, in Greece, organic farming is on the rise, and there are areas, such as Laconia in the Peloponnese, with particularly low levels of environmental pollution and, in general, ideal conditions for the cultivation and production of organic olive oil. According to Mr Kostas Liris, agronomic engineer/oleologist and judge at the prestigious NYIOOC World Olive Oil Competition, there has been a gradual increase in Greek organic EVOOs for many years now, but the rate remains very low. “Sometimes it is hard to find an organic olive oil with excellent chemical and organoleptic characteristics –in fact, occasionally, non-organic olive oils are better. And almost always, at least as far as Greek EVOOs are concerned, there are no pesticide residues, even in the non-organic ones. You see, Greeks never spray excessively their olive


3

4

3 Organic olive oil was always produced, but in the past it was difficult to access the markets.

4 Growing, harvesting, and manufacturing is reviewed by accredited organic certifying agencies.

groves,” he explains. Mr Yiorgos Economou, General Manager at SEVITEL (Association of Hellenic Industries for the Standardization of Olive Oil) concurs that “even conventional olive groves are somewhat organic in Greece, since farmers employ traditional cultivation practices with limited use of pesticides. In fact, in recent years, the most dangerous pesticides have been banned and aerial spraying of crops has stopped altogether.” “The cultivation of organic olive oil needs continuous training, monitoring of the markets and the latest developments in olive oil, constant presence in the olive groves, treating the olive trees with great care, as well as incredible dedication,” suggests Mr George Sakellaropoulos of Sakellaropoulos Organic Farming located near Sparta in the Peloponnese. “Since special formulations aka pesticides and insecticides are not allowed to fight any unwanted phenomena or to increase production, smart solutions, special attention and significant experience are needed. In addition, yields in organic farming are at normal levels and not at the abnormally high levels of conventional farming. Therefore, organic farming is a way of life, laborious but also very rewarding to those who succeed in it.”

KORONEIKI: THE BEST VARIETY FOR BIO

Due to restrictions on using chemical fertilizers and pesticides, the preferable varieties for organic cultivation are those which are highly resistant to diseases and adapting to the soil and climate conditions of each area. One of the best and most resilient olive varieties is Koroneiki, which shows relative production stability from year to year. Koroneiki is the most important olive variety in Greece and it gives one of the best quality olives in both flavor and yield.


50

Greek Olive Oil ma ga z i n e

ORGANIC vs. REGULAR EVOO Is organic olive oil better than conventional olive oil? What are the distinctions between the two types and are they really all that different?

M

any consumers wonder what the differences are between Organic EVOOs and conventional ones. In terms of organoleptic characteristics, the difference is, unfortunately, not easily detectable as it happens with other fruit and vegetables. Therefore, you cannot spot differences in taste, odor and color. They both have the same requirements for acidity, chemical make up and sensory tests that allow them to be called Extra Virgin. The primary difference is that one is produced using Certified Organic olives, and the other is not. Despite this and

considering the great effort it takes to produce them, organic olive oils are usually in the highest range of quality and taste. “Organic products compared to conventional, non-bio ones, are noticeably superior in nutritional ingredients, are free from chemicals harmful to human and animal health, while offering distinct aromas and flavors,” discloses Mr Sakellaropoulos. Mr Liris reveals that “Undoubtedly, the public recognizes an organic product as healthy. And there are also people –a rising percentage, in fact– that buys organic products fanatically.”


52

Greek Desserts ma ga z i n e

From the delicate galaktoboureko to crunchy baklava to fluffy ravani and more, Greek oven-baked sweet treats offer their fair share of sinful pleasure. Made with semolina, phyllo pastry, honey, nuts and cream, these scrumptious treats are veritable temptations.

Baking the difference


54

Greek Desserts ma ga z i n e

T

he bakery market has been constantly growing due to the development of new technologies related to the preservation of natural ingredients. And as quality-conscious consumers continue to demand products of a home-made nature, Greek pastry producers have a great opportunity to improve profits by providing retailers with a diverse selection of baked and syrup offerings. With decades of knowledge and experience, not to mention the use of unique traditional recipes, Greek companies are a strong and reliable partner for international businesses to ensure that products meet customer expectations. As Athena Kolionasios, owner and Managing Director at Kolionasios Baklava Gold, specializing in baklava, specifies, “The rich pastry tradition in almost every part of Greece has helped a growing number of local companies try their hand in the baked and syrup pastry market. We are using our best creative skills to offer products suiting the modern consumer dietary concerns and gastronomic preferences. Our vision is to use the great food traditions of the Mediterranean as a platform for new taste experiences.” Greek baked sweets companies are currently developing new varieties, while trying to create products as close to the consumers’ notion of home-made as possible in order to get a piece of the action –pun intended. “We have experimented extensively with an abundance of ingredients for the final product. In fact, we put our customers in the testing process because they are the ones in direct contact with the end-user and can convey consumer preferences,” says Ms Yiorkia Papa, owner of P. Papa SA, producing frozen desserts.

2

1

in the Greek baked desserts sector, quality, safety and innovation go hand-in-hand Exporting the Greek know-how Tadition and innovation are the cornerstones of Greek baked sweets production, and the defining elements of its growing success in the global market. “There is a profound certified production know-how. It is no coincidence that we are now targeting many different markets, both in Greece and abroad,” continues Ms Papa. “We use blast freezers to deep freeze our products so that all the flavor remains intact as if it just came out of the oven.” As a result, traditional Greek baked and syrup pastries and delicacies have established a strong interest in international markets, especially from countries in the Middle East where


MOST POPULAR BAKED & SYRUP PASTRIES BAKLAVA There are many versions of the origins story of baklava. And whatever the historical controversies, the fact remains that baklava is a world-famous and quite delicious traditional dessert made of layers of crispy golden-brown tissue paper-thin phyllo pastry, filled with chopped nuts and garnished with lemon scented syrup.

2

GALAKTOBOUREKO Galaktoboureko is basically a custard pie –the name means literally “milk pie”– baked, covered with filo and soaked with a citrus-scented syrup. Galaktoboureko represents a melding of Middle Eastern traditions. Galaktoboureko comes in two forms, with phyllo pastry (galaktoboureko) or without (galatopita). The pastry version is a staple of Greek bakeries everywhere, from the new wave of designer patisseries to the small village bakeries of the islands.

ORANGE PIE

1 Baklava is one of the most popular Greek baked, phyllo pastry desserts.

2 Many companies name portokalopita as their best seller.

desserts such as these are part of their culinary tradition, as well as parts of the world where there is significant Greek diaspora (Canada, Australia, the US, ect.). Maria Vrettou, Managing Director at Vrettos Sweets, a family business specializing in traditional syrup desserts, discloses that “Countries with a strong Greek element, such as Germany, have a large share of sales. In recent years, due to the increase of immigrants from the East, syrup and baked sweets are now placed in more and more countries as a permanent code or inout promotion.” “In recent years, the shift towards the Mediterranean diet, and particularly Greek products and ingredients, has buyers interested even more in Greek sweets. Baked sweets are part of the Greek tradition, which makes Greek companies experts in the field,” explains Mr Panagiotis Karachalios, President & CEO of Rodoula SA, one of the leading Greek companies for frozen dough products and sweet delicacies.

“Portokalopita” is a Greek orange pie made with phyllo pastry, a custard and, of course, oranges. There are so many recipes and so many methods of making portokalopita. Some fold the phyllo sheets, others crush them to pieces. Some make the custard with milk, others with yogurt. Whatever the technique, the final product needs to be a light, airy, fluffy pie with the intense flavor of oranges. Orange pie is a staple in every Greek household.

RAVANI Ravani or revani as it is also known, is a semolina cake drenched in luscious sweet syrup, with Middle Eastern roots. The treat has many variations all over Greece. Semolina or farina is the primary ingredient. Sugar, vanilla extract, butter or virgin olive oil are laso used to make the cake batter. Once the cake is cooled completely, chefs create flavored sugar syrup that is poured over the cake.


56

Success Story m agaz i ne

sou vla

FAST-FINE EXPERIENCE

In 2014, Souvla, a Greek-inspired restaurant in San Francisco, managed to shake things up in the city’s gastro scene. Five years and four restaurants later, this innovative concept has gained a cult following, counting among its fans even Michelle and Barack Obama!


58

Success Story ma ga z i n e

W

1 Mixed modern and traditional style at the Marina Souvla.

2 The public welcomed the Souvla concept from the very beginning.

hen Greek-American Charles Bililies opened the first Souvla in the Hayes Valley neighborhood of San Francisco in 2014, he practically singlehandedly redefined the city’s fine-casual scene. No wonder, since the restaurant, which now counts three more locations (NoPa, Mission and Marina) combines the easy approach of a counter service joint with the quality and flavors of fine dining. Charles is adamant that for him, the important thing in creating Souvla was that it be for everyone. He also appreciates the ingenuity of his idea, which he perceives as the embodiment of the fast-fine genre and the future of restaurants. “Souvla has been a pioneer in the fine-casual segment of the more commonly known and popular fast-casual dining category. We define fast-fine as a counter service restaurant that looks, acts and feels like a full-service restaurant, even though you order from the counter. Your food is delivered to your table, your table is bussed, you are able to order wine and beer from a curated list and drink them from proper glassware. Your food is prepared in a kitchen (not scooped in front of you) and served on proper (non-disposable) plates and bowls and with actual silverware. In addition, there is considerable attention paid to the design, aesthetic and feel of the establishment,” he explains.

2

1 What’s the story behind Souvla? The idea first came to me about nine years ago when, after a backyard party where we roasted a whole lamb (Greek style) with friends, I made a simple pita sandwich with the leftover lamb meat, veggies, yogurt and feta. The lightbulb went off, and I asked myself why I couldn’t find something like this anywhere, and why no one had modernized the Americanized gyro sandwich. I thought –how can I take the service standards and touch points of a fine-dining restaurant and distill them down to an elevated counter service model while simultaneously creating a more viable, profitable business model? After several years of planning, Souvla and its fast-fine business model debuted in 2014. What is the Souvla concept? We like to think of it as Greek-inspired through a Californian lens. Part of that ethos is a reflection of my own heritage; I am a second-generation Greek-American. Though I grew up in the Greek church and with many of the cultural traditions of Greece, we were also very much American. With Souvla, I wanted to showcase many traditional aspects of Greek cuisine and culture, but make it very approachable and current.


3 4

Souvla is all about bringing Greek cuisine and Greek wine to a wider audience, making it approachable, affordable and accessible to everyone How would you describe the menu? Our menu is simple, streamlined and curated. We strongly believe in doing one thing, and doing it well. Our menu a unique blend of local produce and meats along with imported Greek ingredients - it spans from the traditional like our avgolemono soup, to the inspired like our roasted white sweet potato with kalamata olives, toasted walnuts and mizithra cheese or our frozen Greek yogurt.

3 The four Souvla restaurants employ 175 people.

4 Frozen Greek yogurt is one of the best sellers.

Do you believe that Greek restaurants in Paris, London, NYC, etc. have helped develop a growing interest in Greek food? I really do! I certainly think the big, fancy restaurants in major international cities have helped develop this trend. However, I also believe that consumers over the last five or ten years have become more mindful about what they are eating, and Greek cuisine and the Mediterranean diet overall is an excellent way to eat mindfully with minimal sacrifice in taste and deliciousness.

What’s the image the American clientele has of Greek products? I think it is quite positive. The rise in popularity of Greek (style) yogurt in the United States has helped considerably, and many Americans vacation in Greece, always returning raving about their experiences, the food, and the wine. If you look at most of the full-service, higher-end Greek restaurants in San Francisco and New York, places like Kokkari Estiatorio in San Francisco and Milos in New York, those are huge, expensive restaurants that are always fully booked and very difficult to get a reservation for. What are your plans for the future? We just celebrated our five-year anniversary, and we feel very lucky to have accomplished what we have, and to be a part of the cultural fabric of San Francisco. We are working on building our catering and special events business and are hoping to bring Souvla to New York City in the next year or so.


60

Success Story m agaz i ne

AVGOLEMONO SOUP by Tony Cervone

INGREDIENTS (For 4 people) 2 QT Chicken stock 4 Whole eggs 4 Lemons, juiced 2/3 cup white rice 1 1/2 cup cooked chicken, cut into small pieces Salt & Pepper to taste

PREPARATION 1. Heat the stock in a large pot over medium-high heat. 2. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs until frothy. Add the lemon juice and stir to combine. 3. Take to 1/3 cup of stock from the pot and slowly add it to the egg-lemon mix in a thin, steady stream, whisking constantly, just as you would add oil to make mayonnaise. Continue to whisk until the stock is fully combined with the egg-lemon mixture. 4. Add the tempered mixture back to the remaining stock, along with the rice and chicken, and bring the stock to a brief boil, then lower it to a simmer. Let it cook for a minute or until it has thickened slightly. 5. Season the soup with, garnish with chopped parsley and serve warm. n

Chef’s tips Chef Cervone advises taking the eggs and lemons out of the refrigerator ahead of time, so they are closer to room temperature when they are tempered.


62

Greek Rusks ma ga z i n e

PAXIMADI

A unique

Greek

tradition While they may look like nothing more than slices of stale bread, paximadi (or rusks), once a peasant food, are very popular all over Greece, with many different types available. And no wonder, they are also gaining momentum across the world.


GREEK RUSKS - EXPORT DESTINATIONS (2018)*

13.2% CYPRUS

11.3%

BULGARIA

10.2% GERMANY

*Source: Foundation for Economic & Industrial Research (IOBE)


64

Greek Rusks ma ga z i n e

1

T

he ancient word for what in Greece is now called “paximadi” is “dipyros artos”, literally meaning “twice-baked bread.” It refers to bread that has been baked twice: once for the initial loaf, then sliced and baked again in a low temperature for a long period of time until all moisture is gone and the bread has hardened. As Mr Manolis Christopoulos, owner of Artokosmos Spartis, explains, paximadi has been a staple of Greek cuisine since antiquity. “Barley formed the basis of the ancient Spartans’ diet, and it seems that they knew perfectly well the important role carbohydrates play as a major source of energy for the human body. No wonder barley rusks were part of the ancient Spartan warriors’ food.” Rusks are still made the same way today as they were during antiquity and long after. Of course, in the past, twice baking was important, even necessary, to keep bread longer without it spoiling. That way, families who could not

2

There’s only one country where something so humble, like the hard rusk is considered a delicacy: Greece bake often, or people spending extended periods of time away from home, such as sailors, farmers and shepherds could enjoy some bread with their meal. This is why rusks were a staple of very poor Aegean island cuisines, like the ones of Santorini, Ios, Kimolos and Mykonos, as well as many of the Dodecanese islands – all of them areas where wood was scarce and people only baked bread a few times a year.

The rusk factor 4

Greek rusks come in all shapes and forms, depending on their origin and can be deliciously combined with fresh or baked vegetables, almost all the varieties of Greek cheese, olive spreads, olive oil, honey or even, minced meat, pastrami, ham, raisins, anchovy, capers, etc. In the island of Santorini, people make a kind of sweetmeat, pounding together the very black local rusks with sultanas and shaping the thick dough into walnut size balls, which they often roll on toasted sesame seeds. In the Pelopon-


POPULAR TYPES OF PAXIMADI

• The Cretan barley rusk

3

1 In Greece, there are as many types of rusks as their origin.

2 Paximadi can be literally combined with everything!

3 Rusks are baked twice until all moisture is gone.

4 Dakos is the most famous version of Greek rusks.

nese, the paximadi is dipped in water, drizzled with olive oil and sprinkled with coarse sea salt and oregano in a snack called “riganada”. In the island of Kea, they combine soaked paximadia with a local soft cheese and tomatoes. The most famous Greek rusks are the Cretan barley rusk also called “dakos”, the rye rusk, the wholegrain rusk, and the rusk with olive oil from the island of Kythera, all of which are currently exported mainly to ethnic and specialty stores and delicatessens across the world. In addition, many chefs use Greek rusks in dishes inspired by the Mediterranean diet. “Rusks are considered innovative products since you can’t find them in any other country,” discloses Ms Georgia Paradeisi, Export Manager at Tsanos, one of the largest baked goods companies in Greece. “Paximadi can easily adapt to any market trend, be it vegan, organic, GMOfree, sugar-free, etc. And the momentum the Mediterranean diet is enjoying at this point has also helped to raise brand awareness.” Nowadays, Greek rusks are viewed as an integral part for a healthy, balanced diet and the companies producing them are particularly active in exports. In fact, rusks are highly prized, with international customers recognizing their nutritional value –Greek rusks are rich in B complex vitamins (helping the nervous system), starch (an energy booster) and high fiber content.

Cretan rusks, made of barley, were created to be stored for long periods of time and this is why they were also so hard –the degree of hardness varied according to the duration for which they were baked. Therefore, the traditional Cretan paximadi or “dakos” as it is known when topped with chopped tomatoes, oregano, and Feta or xynomyzithra cheese, was born out of necessity. Nowadays, the barley rusk is no longer a food consumed out of need. It is recognized for its high nutritional value and is an important part of the Greek diet. This is why modern Cretan –and Greek– cuisine makes use of it in many ways.

• Olive oil rusk from Kythera Another equally beloved type of Greek rusk is the “ladopaximado” from Kythera, an island south of the Peloponnese. This tasty type of rusk is the complete opposite of those from Crete: light yellow in color and crunchy-soft like shortbread, it’s easily enjoyed all on its own. The dough is composed of durum wheat and up to 20 percent olive oil, hence its name (“ladi” is the Greek word for oil). Kythera-type rusks have a high content of beneficial fatty acids (monounsaturated), while one serving has proportionally half the amount of salt compared to a portion of bread. It is an ideal addition to snacks and can accompany every meal of the day.


66

Special Feature ma ga z i n e

SELECT BAKERY

Baking up the future

Select combines expertise, commitment and innovation to provide exceptional bakery solutions to the foodservice and retail sectors –both in Greece and the world.

A

Mr Konstantinos Papadopoulos, Exports Sales Manager at Select

ccording to Select, one of the leading bread and bakery production companies in Greece, excellence, consistency and versatility are the core values of its 89-year old success story. Mr Konstantinos Papadopoulos, the company’s Exports Sales Manager talks extraversion, the brand ethos and what makes Select Bakery products stand out. What is the company philosophy? Select is an innovative business, which produces and markets bakery products. In fact, we have

the largest product range in Greece with more than 550 offerings! The company has been active in the foodservice sector for almost 90 years –since 1930– and is considered a leader in the industry. Having “conquered” the Greek market we are currently focusing on the rest of the world by placing emphasis on exports. We strive to infuse passion into all that we do, in order to give our customers the very best and help them move their businesses forward. It’s the spark that sets us apart; together with our core values of quality, consistency and flexibility.


What makes your products stand out? Quality is the cornerstone of our operations. Our commitment to quality is organized in three pillars: Ingredient selection based on strict specifications; fully automated production lines; continuous and strict controls at all production stages. Therefore, we create highvalue, quality, great-tasting baked goods to meet the evolving needs of businesses of all kinds. With unmatched manufacturing and distribution capabilities, we bring together the knowledge, commitment and innovation our customers deserve. How important are exports to the company? Exports are an integral part of our business. In fact, export share these days exceeds 15% of our annual turnover. What is truly remark-

able is that this share grows at the same rate as our turnover, which clearly indicates the company's successful strategy in select overseas markets.

More information on www.selectbakery.gr

What does the future hold for Select? To us, every day is a challenge. Currently, we are in the process of implementing a 5-year investment plan in both facilities and machinery, which, upon completion, will consolidate Select's reputation as a strong business presence in the Balkans. And while we will always strive to innovate and grow, we also keep in mind our roots as a small family business, established in 1930 in the city of Drama, in northern Greece. This state of mind is the driving force behind our progress and towards a bright future.

FACTS AND FIGURES

25,000 m2 IN FACILITIES

210

EMPLOYEES

550+

PRODUCT CODES

15%

TURNOVER EXPORTED


68

Greek Salt m agaz i ne

Compared to its other counterparts, Greek salt has a brighter flavor, is somewhat sweeter, tastes fresh and makes everything you put it on or in just better.

SALT

OF THE

EARTH GREEK SALT FACTS & FIGURES*

260,000

TONS OF SALT PRODUCED A YEAR

60%

OF SALT IS PRODUCED IN MESSOLONGHI

92%

OF GREEK SALT COMES FROM ONLY 8 PANS

* Special thanks to the Greek Exporters Association (SEVE) and Hellenic Saltworks.

15,882

TONS OF SALT EXPORTED IN 2018


S

alt has always played a significant part in the history of civilization. In fact, the first salt harvest was recorded in 6000 BC making it one of the world’s oldest industries, while salt has also served as currency –the word “salary” in Latin literally means payment in salt (sal)– and was considered as valuable as gold. Not to mention that the human body needs salt to live, to properly regulate nerve and muscle function. In Greece, salt can be found almost everywhere, a natural consequence to the fact that the country is surrounded by water. As a result, salt production has been a big deal since antiquity. Nowadays, there are 8 active salt pans in Greece, all of them operating under the management of the Greek government, from which over 92 percent of the country’s salt production is obtained: two pans in Messolonghi, two in Lesvos in Kalloni and Polichnitos, one in Kitros, Pieria, one in Aggelo-

chori, Thessaloniki, one in Messi, Komotini, and one in Nea Kessani, Xanthi –all last four located in northern Greece. The largest, however, salt pans are the ones in Messolonghi, accounting for approximately 60 percent of all salt production in Greece.

A natural product The two main elements “collaborating” in the production of salt are the sun and the sea. And Greece is famous for both. Greek salt is 100 percent natural and is not being chemically treated in any part of the process. Instead, depending on the type of salt grain desired, after collection, the sea salt is washed and crushed and packaged with only a minimal amount of, if any, processing. For example, the famous “Fleur de Sel”, the salt that forms as a thin, delicate crust on the surface of seawater as it evaporates, needs to be harvested by hand, so this is done with traditional methods using traditional tools.


70

Greek Salt m agaz i ne

1

2

Greek sea salt is produced naturally, using traditional methods and minimum processing And Greek Fleur de Sel is considered second to none

1 Most of the Greek salt pans are protected ecosystems.

2 Salt collection starts in early fall to ensure timely harvesting before the onset of rains.

3 At the pans, salt is gathered into 10-15m heaps.

In addition, the Messolonghi lagoon, where most of Greek salt production takes place, as well as the Kitros and Messi salt marshes, are ecosystems protected by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance since 1975 and a part of the Natura 2000 network. “One could unofficially call Greek salt ‘bio” says Mr Thanassis Bellos, Owner of Belissimo, a brand that trades Greek products from small, exceptional producers. “You see, most of it comes from protected ecosystems, such as Messolonghi, and even when it is sourced from elsewhere, it is still gathered using traditional tools. Not to mention that Greek salt is quite delicious!” “Salt, according to regulations, cannot be considered as organic, since it comes from the open sea,” explains Mr Mario Karaslidis, Export Manager and Co-owner of Salt Odyssey, which markets specialty Greek salt. “Some companies, however, are addressing the need for natural, organic products by mixing natural salt with certified organic herbs and spices to create exciting flavors. Let’s put it this way: when salt has not been chemically treated, it is in fact a natural, bio product.”

GREEK SALT EXPORTS ARE THRIVING Greek salt is valued and sough-after in every corner of the world. In fact, although quantity-wise Greek salt trade has decreased around 3% since 2016 (namely, in 2016, 16,376 tons of salt were exported, while in 2018, the number was down to 15,882), the actual value of exports has gone up 4.3 percent (€3,642,366 in 2016 compared to €3,806,231 in 2018). The top countries importing salt from Greece are Canada, Germany, North Macedonia, Bulgaria, Hungary and Romania, accounting for almost 87.2 percent of total international sales and bringing in €2,966,626 euros for the year 2018.


SALT PRODUCTION IN TONS*

35,000

12,000

Kitros, Pieria

Messi, Komotini

5,000 Aggelochori Thessaloniki

5,000 Nea Kessani, Xanthi

120,000 Messolonghi

40,000 Kalloni, Lesvos

10,000 Polichnitos, Lesvos

*Source: Hellenic Saltworks

3

Greek salt: best of the rest Greek salt is a superior, highly sought-after product that is recognized throughout the world for its quality and flavor. “International customers are recognizing the top-tier quality of Greek salt and are turning to Greek brands to provide them with unique offerings, such as salt blends,” discusses Mr Bellos. “Greek salt is minimally processed and, in many cases, enhanced with indigenous Greek herbs that give it added value –exactly what buyers and stores are looking for,” he clarifies. Mr Karaslidis also insists that “When inter-

national buyers are properly informed, they can easily recognize the quality of Greek salt and tend to prefer it over other salts. Especially salts that don’t come from the sea but are instead mined.” In fact, sea salt is created through the evaporation of sea water or saltwater lakes. Unlike table salt, which is mined from the ground and processed to filter out excess minerals and include anti-clumping additives, sea salt is produced naturally. Furthermore, all the complex processes of sea salt harvesting and transformation are endorsed by international certifications, which guarantee excellent final product quality. Price, value for money and innovation are equally important to international customers and therefore to food traders. “Today, selling Greek products to markets all across the globe depends on the quality of ingredients, the right value for money, the proper packaging, an organized R&D department, and an excellent customer service,” resumes Mr Karaslidis. “The objective is to make new products that will satisfy even the most demanding palate.”

Special thanks to the Greek Exporters Association (SEVE) and Hellenic Saltworks.


72

Heritage Breeds ma ga z i n e

Black

pig

THE GREEK VERSION


Known since Homeric times, the Greek black pig is a delicious and quite nutritious alternative to regular pork. No wonder it is experiencing a resurgence of interest.

B

lack pig has been known in the Mediterranean basin since antiquity. It is documented that the father of all the black pigs in the Mediterranean is Greek, and, specifically, comes from a Paleolithic settlement in the region of Sitagroi in Drama, northern Greece. With the Hellenistic colonies, it was transported and spread throughout the Mediterranean. This particular pig was bred throughout Greece until the 1960s and is an indigenous Greek breed officially recognized both by the Greek as well as the Europeans.

The revival of an ancient race “The black pig has a disadvantage; while his meat is amazing, it has too much fat. Thus, in the 1980s, when the Greek changed their eating habits and began to eat meat almost daily, they turned to lower-fat choices and the black pig almost disappeared because the market itself ceased to ask for it,” explains Mr Nikos Fotiadis of Fotiadis Farm in Pieria, northern Greece, linked to pig farming and the revival of the Greek black pig since 1925. Purebred animals were scarce, but both Mr Fotiadis and Mr Dimitris Dimou of Kivotos tou Dimou farms located in Trikala in Thessaly, kept a few and together with the Greek National Center for Research and Technological Development are attempting to “genetically” purify this ancient race of pigs and create an “identity” with the pure breed DNA.“The Greek indigenous race of black pigs tended to disappear because of the expansion of intensive livestock breeding, which shows preference to more productive breeds and is used for housing and artificially fattening the animals. In Greece, nowadays, there are approximately 2,000 certified sows” discloses Mr Dimou who is passionate about preserving the race.


74

Heritage Breeds ma ga z i n e

T

he purebred animals of the indigenous Greek black pig race, unlike crossbred animals, are reared under semi-extensive conditions, that is, they spend for most of their time roaming free and happy in pastures where they mostly feed on acorns. Therefore, their rearing is done with the least possible human intervention. As a result, black pigs have been fully adapted to a semi-mountainous environment and are thus able to cope with potential illnesses without the need for medication nor with feed enriched with chemicals. This means that when they reach the proper age for slaughter, their weight will be considerably less than that of crossbred animals, and yet their meat will be much redder, much more delicious and much juicier than the fawn pink, dry and tasteless meat, which people now recognize as pork. And

1 2

according to research, black pig has one of the highest levels of antioxidants although black pig meat is somewhat fatter, its fat –which contributes to its superior taste– has, according to international studies, more than 50 percent more monounsaturated fat (omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, alpha-oleic acid), which are considered the healthiest among animal fat. In addition, black pig meat is richer in protein, polyphenols and iron. Mr Dimou is the only European awarded twice from the Slow Food movement for his contribution to preserving the planet’s biodiversity, for the rescue of a specific cow breed, the Greek steppe race of Katerini, gave a few months ago meat samples to the Laboratory of Animal Physiology of the Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology of the University of Thessaly, under Professor Dimitrios Kouretas, who has been working on the quality of Greek meat for over a year now. “We are analyzing samples from pigs, sheep, goats and cows from farms all across Greece to determine their quality and antioxidant defense, an element

1  Apart from regular meat, black pig also produces salami.

2 Prosciutto from black pig is a rare delicacy, made in select units.


3

4

3 Although there is strong export interest, black pig product quantities are still limited.

4 Black pig meat has more flavor and more fat.

of the metabolic health of the animal,” discloses Mr Kouretas. “With regard to black pig, we found that it has one of the highest levels of antioxidant defense in Greece, which can be due to many factors, such as its diet. This means that black pig meat has much better quality characteristics.”

Black pig products Apart from meat, black pig also produces salami, ham, sausages, burgers as well as kavourma, flavored with Greek aromatic herbs and spices, such as truffle, mountain tea, mushrooms, thyme, etc. Yet, although there is a significant international interest in black pig offerings, quantities are still limited due to lack of raw material and, there-

fore, exports cannot take off. Innovation, however, is spearheading local production. In Fotiadis Farm, black pigs are also fed with olives, which provide the meat with additional nutritional value and flavor. According to analyses, these pigs have an especially increased omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids content –whereas conventional pigs have 0.08 omega-3 and omega-6 content, the indigenous Greek black pig fed with olives has 4.58. Its meat also contains more protein and iron as well as less intramuscular fat. “The indigenous black pig fed with olives did unexpectedly well in the analyses. These indications show that we may be talking about a global innovation in the field of meat hygiene,” suggests Mr Fotiadis.

BLACK VS. REGULAR PIGS

VS Besides their black color, which is due to the overproduction of eumelanin, a different type of melanocytes, compared to regular pigs, Greek black pigs (sus scrofa domesticus) are smaller, giving birth to 6-8 piglets, whereas regular ones give birth to 10-16. They also physically in 12 months while regular in 5-6 months. Regarding their organoleptic characteristics, their meat has more flavor and more fat than regular pigs and grow naturally without growth promoters.


76

Special Feature ma ga z i n e

VIOLANTA

excellence

& INNOVATION Synonymous with delicious, quality cookies and biscuits, Violanta is considered among the leading Greek brands in the dough products sector. Here’s what makes the brand stand out. Violanta philosophy and ethos Violanta is a renowned Greek business focused on the production of dough products –namely cookies and biscuits– and developing various categories of offerings, presented in a luxury packaging. The Violanta approach to food production attaches particular importance to the full compliance of all products with EU and international legislation, focusing on customer health. Strict hygiene standards are being applied to all production stages, while cutting-edge technologies are being used, combined with respect for the environment. In short, Violanta products are synonymous

with quality ingredients, satisfactory flavor, perfect product and packaging appearance and affordable prices. With its two vertically-integrated production units, located in Trikala, Greece, and covering an area of 14,000m2, in a privately-owned area of 25,000m2, the mission of the company is to meet customer expectations by producing and offering cookies and biscuits of different flavors and top-tier quality. Creating and producing the aforementioned products is an area in which Violanta has excellent know-how and is a sector that the brand intends to operate in the long term.


Products that stand out Apart from the excellent quality of ingredients, what makes Violanta products stand out is their innovative and diverse character compared to other products in the business, internationally, with patented production methods, new shapes and flavors! These days, Violanta offers a wide range of 120 products, consolidating its reputation as a quality, inspiring and ground-breaking producer of cookies and biscuits, always upholding top quality standards.

Greek cookies conquer the world

VIOLANTA IN NUMBERS

120

COOKIE & BISCUIT CODES

30

COUNTRIES OF EXPORT

14,000 m2

MODERN FACILITIES IN TRIKALA

Violanta's dynamic presence on the international marketplace, as well as the everincreasing demand for its products rank it among Greek companies with significant export activity. In addition to the Greek market, Violanta cookies are available in 30 countries

on all 5 continents, such as the US, japan, Colombia, France, etc. In addition, Violanta has partnered with large chains on the global food scene, while each year the company sets new goals for the continued expansion of its international clientele.

Future endeavors Following the realization of the company’s bulding and equipment extension sometime at the beginning of the year 2020, further expansion of its already significant export activity is planned. Violanta's goal is to establish itself in both consumer and client consciousness as a company and a brand whose name describes and defines the entire biscuit industry and comes most readily to mind of anyone wishing to taste delicious, quality cookies.

More information on www.violanta.gr


78

Vineyard of Naoussa m agaz i ne

King

in the

North Naoussa in northern Greece, is home to one of the most fertile vineyards, where the exciting red Xinomavro variety is cultivated.

I

n the prefecture of Imathia, in the regional unit of Macedonia, northern Greece, is located Naoussa, one of the most important appellation areas of the Greek vineyards. The Protected Designation of Origin Naoussa (PDO Naoussa) aka the lush and varied vineyards of Naoussa, takes its name from the eponymous city, though several other communes are included in the appellation. The main variety cultivated in Naoussa is Xinomavro, yet other varietals are also grown, such as Syrah and Merlot, as well as Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Roditis, Malagouzia, Assyrtiko, and the local Prekniariko, but in small quantities. The vineyards of Naoussa sit between 150 and 450m elevation and, in general, receive sufficient rainfall to render irrigation unnecessary, while detailed soil


80

Vineyard of Naoussa ma ga z i n e

analysis has been done, revealing significant differences within the region and at least 25 different soil types (of which 5 main categories have been established). The various wines produced in the vineyards of Naoussa in these sub-regions are already well known to local growers, and discussions about officially recognizing them are underway, although for the moment some wines, such as the tannic ones from the commune of Gastra, the ones from Trilofos, or the fresh and full of aroma wine from Yiannakohori, for example, remain an insider’s knowledge.

The right terroir In the vineyards of Naoussa, the indigenous Xinomavro variety clearly dominates. Due to the climatic conditions prevalent in the area, PDO Xinomavro-Naoussa ripens late, after September 20, which increases its vulnerability during the cold and rainy years, when the tannic character of the wines becomes more pronounced. The diverse topography and the distinct soil of the vineyards of Naoussa are key determinants of the quality of the product. Cultivations stretch along the foothills and eastern slopes of Mount Vermio, at altitudes between 100 and 400 meters and on soil which ranges from acid schistose to high quantity of lime and clay. Overall, Xinomavro matures bet-

ter on calcareous soil with good drainage. The desired attributes of the wine are even more pronounced when it originates in vineyards with low yields per acre and appropriately tended to. Despite all of the survey and the accumulated knowledge on Xinomavro-Naoussa –one of the two most significant Greek red varieties–, its preferred terroirs, vineyard management and winemaking techniques, some producers speculate that only about 30-40 percent of the grape’s potential has been realized.

A wine for connoisseurs Xinomavro-Naoussa, a singular red, is the most significant red grape of northern Greece. For the record, there are 4 appellations in Greece that feature Xinomavro. PDO Goumenissa, north of Thessaloniki and PDO Rapsani on the eastern slopes of Mount Olympus require vintners to blend Xinomavro with native Negoska, Krassato and Stavroto. But Xinomavro-Naoussa and Xinomavro-Amynteo (the fourth appellation), planted in two significant wine growing areas of northwestern Macedonia, give the mono-varietal appellations PDO Naoussa and PDO Amynteo, where this exceptional, highly idiosyncratic, northern red reveals its deeper character. Both Naoussa and Amynteo produce red wines capable of long ageing, arguably the most ageworthy in all of Greece.

THE VINEYARD OF NAOUSSA IN NUMBERS* *Source: VAENI Naoussa Co-op

4,800

DECARES OF VINEYARDS

3,800

DECARES OF XINOMAVRO VARIETY

2

MILLION BOTTLES PRODUCTION A YEAR

21

OFFICIAL WINERIES IN THE AREA

60%

OF PRODUCTION EXPORTED


82

Greek Cuisine m agaz ma ga zi nne e

Born inside the confines of monastic simplicity and isolation, the authentic culinary tradition of Greek cloisters not only has survived the passing centuries but is still showing signs of evolution.

The

“divine� cuisine OF GREEK MONASTERIES


84

Greek Cuisine m agaz i ne

W

1 The vineyard at the Monastery of Agia Triada Tsangarolon, in Chania, Crete.

2 Traditional lenten bean soup or “fasolada”.

e invite you to get to know the authentic everyday life of the monks in some of Greece’s historic monasteries, who, along with their spiritual work, uphold a unique, centuries-old gastronomic and wine tradition. In fact, Greek monasteries have developed their own olives, vines, citrus trees, vegetables, almonds, nuts and aromatic plants in order to secure the monks’ nutrition, church service as well as maintenance costs. According to the form of the Orthodox Christian worship, the monastic diet is strictly vegetarian, while cheese, bread, wine, fruit and dessert are always present on the table, and fish is a holiday staple. Every Wednesday and Friday, they don’t put olive oil in the food, and tahini, which they produce themselves from sesame, gives them energy when fasting. Greek coffee, Turkish delights (or “loukoumi”, as it is known in Greece), spoon sweets, sour cherry juice and, of course, crystal clear water are provided freely to worshippers. Some monasteries have their own olive oil mills, wineries, distilleries, pasta workshops or dairies –mostly the cloisters of Mount Athos and Crete– and many of them also have created gastronomy and wine museums in their premises. In addition, monastery gardens and yards are carefully planted, with orchards, vineyards, etc. mostly dedicated to organic farming. Aromatic herbs, such as lavender, oregano, tea, mint and many more, are also cultivated, whereas vegetable gardens with Greek indigenous varieties of plants provide ample nourishment.

2

1

according to some of the monks, “olive oil, honey, wine are all blessed from God” Holy food from the Holy Mountain In the Athonite State, an emblematic personality is Father Epifanios, famous winemaker and prominent chef, explains that “I learned the secrets of the kitchen next to the old monks. When I cook, I have the impression that I serve the angels; I pour my heart and soul on the dishes; I prefer to create simple dishes and sprinkle them with dill and wild fennel for aroma. I also like to use pepper corns. Us, Athonian monks cook with fruit and nuts and the vegetables we grow and use are 100 percent organic from our own back yards. As we don’t have electricity, we use wood to cook our heavenly flavors.” One of their well-kept secrets is onion juice, which gives any meal exceptional taste, while wine will always be on the monk’s table. As a result, each and every monastery has its own organic vineyards –some at water’s edge and others on mountain slopes– producing award-winning wines of phenomenal quality.


3

Cuisine & products from Mount Olympus At the Patriarchal Monastery of St Dionysios, underneath Mount Olympus, home of the ancient Greek gods, most of the monks are scientists with know-how to guarantee the production of goods of exceptional quality. Here, cultivation emphasizes the agrarian and livestock character of the monastery, tasks which

4

are carried out in tandem with the intense spiritual development. Mount Olympus has a unique biodiversity, and the milk produced from the local herds is oneof-a-kind. Father Cornelius, cheese maker, creates cheese of unique quality by following the traditional cheese-making techniques. His PDO Feta cheese maintains the authentic taste of yesteryear, the Graviera has a buttery flavor, the Kefalotyri is spicy, the Anthotyro and the butter simply divine (pun intended). Chestnuts, firs, black pines and wild flowers produce delicious honey. The abbot, Father Maximos, has a rich bank of fruit and vegetable seeds from indigenous varieties organically cultivated by the monks. Animal husbandry is highly developed. The local animal breeds roam the mountain side to feed on the flora. Here, the famous black pig of the ancestral Greek race is raised and an effort to protect it is taking place. Father Porfyrios is famous for his cooking. He creates nostalgic and rather aromatic dishes where spices are used sparingly in order to maintain the original taste of the ingredients. Lemon, wine, tsipouro (the famous fiery Greek spirit), extra virgin olive oil, cumin, oregano, sea salt and honey are among his culinary secrets. Divine taste, indeed.

3 Father Philotheos at the Pantokratoras Monastery in Andros puts the finishing touches on halva.

4 Monks at the Monastery of St Dionysios in Mount Olympus go fishing.


7 - 9 MARCH 2020 ATHENS • GREECE

THE PREMIER

food & DRINK TRADE SHOW IN S.E. ΕUROPE

FOOD EXPO 2020 will once again provide an overview of the Greek and international F&B stage, as well as all the latest trends and innovations. FOOD EXPO 2020 KEY FIGURES FORECAST

1,350

ΕXHIBITORS

300

INT'L EXHIBITORS

5,000

INT'L VISITORS

950

HOSTED BUYERS

75,000 VISITORS


A FOOD & BEVERAGE EXHIBITION WITH INTERNATIONAL REACH!

F

OOD EXPO, the leading F&B trade show in Southeast Europe, continues to write its success story. Its latest iteration last March, featuring 3,500 international trade visitors from 83 countries, approximately 1,300 exhibitors from Greece and another 33 countries and more than 70,000 trade visitors from 28,000 businesses, not to mention 17,500 pre-arranged B2B meetings between key food traders and exhibitors, was a resounding success that gave tangible shape to the aspirations of the Greek and international food industry and proved that it is indeed an international F&B trading hub. FOOD EXPO 2020 will take place March 7-9 at the at the Metropolitan Expo exhibition center in Athens, Greece and is once again expected to be filled with top buyers, innovative and exciting foodstuff and great energy. As always, FOOD EXPO 2020 will be the central platform for the international food industry interested in Mediterranean products. Approximately 1,350 companies will be presenting the broad spectrum of products, fields of application and services on an exhibition space spanning 50,000 m2, for buyers from the entirety of the F&B sector.

MORE THAN 5,000 INT’L FOOD TRADERS AT FOOD EXPO 2020! FOOD EXPO 2020 is expected to hold significant attraction for more than 5,000 international buyers, confirming once again its international profile and orientation. These 5,000 int’l food traders will have the opportunity to come into contact with Greek and int’l exhibitors, to discover the newest products and innovations as well as the latest trends and hold B2B meetings with a high likelihood to close significant deals.

21%

increase in int’l visitors at food expo 2019 compared to last year’s trade show numbers

OVERALL SATISFACTION & HIGH COMMERCIAL EFFECTIVENESS FOOD EXPO 2019 was characterized by extensive networking and the closing of numerous business deals. Decision-makers from the Greek and international trade scene, as well as leading importers and buyers from key foodservice firms were very satisfied with the overall results. In addition, many companies reported intense discussions with high-level food traders and a good level of ordering activity, while praising the quality and internationality of trade visitors, with exhibitors generally expecting post-fair busi-

ness to be good. In fact, 96% of Hosted Buyers were very satisfied over their visit to FOOD EXPO, a fact that confirms the fair’s reputation as the main platform for buyers interested in Greek and Mediterranean products and specialty foods, in general. Furthermore, 23% indicated they have signed trade agreements with exhibitors and 93% intend to close deals within the next 6 months. Finally, 97% of the show’s 900 Hosted Buyers expressed their desire 97% to attend the next iteration of FOOD EXPO, in 2020.

HIGH COMMERCIAL EFFECTIVENESS FOR FOOD EXPO 2019 VISITORS*

91

of Greek & int'l exhibitors were satisfied with their participation at FOOD EXPO 2019

%

of Greek & int'l exhibitors expressed their intention to also participate at FOOD EXPO 2020

94

%

*** Data from ALCO survey


88 7 - 9 MARCH 202 0 METROPOLITAN EXPO • ATHENS

MEDITERRANEAN GASTRONOMY FORUM GASTRONOMY AT ITS BEST!

63%

of international visitors have attended food expo more than three times

With the signature of international chefs, the Forum will highlight the culinary treasures of Greece and the Mediterranean.

NEW ORGANIC PRODUCTS SECTION

T

FOOD EXPO, responding to the exponential growth of the organic sector, introduces a distinct section filled with organic products. Exhibitors in this section will

he wealth of Greek Food & Beverages will be presented in a unique way through the Mediterranean Gastronomy Forum, an innovative event that will last all three days of the trade show and will feature the participation of critically acclaimed Greek and international chefs. Using a great variety of excellent products from every corner of Greece the chefs will showcase to Greek and international trade visitors unique culinary ideas., and through interactive culinary demonstrations, professionals from the foodservice and hospitality sectors will be able to discover a wide range of products from all over Greece, consolidating, at the same time, the role of Greek gastronomy as an important vehicle for the promotion of exports. Finally, on the stage of the Mediterranean Gastronomy Forum, chefs from Lebanon, Egypt, Tunisia and many more countries will hold various gastronomic shows, showcasing the affinity of Mediterranean cuisines.

88%

OF LAST YEAR’S VISITORS WERE DECISION MAKERS

section be spread throughout Hall 2 and will have the opportunity to present their products and make contact with Greek and int’l visitors interested in including organic food and beverages in their businesses.

91%

OF INT’L VISITORS FOUND WHAT THEY WERE LOOKING FOR


hello Greece

the site of Greek products and tourism

H NUT I G RIT H ION VAL AL PRO UE DU C TS

FARMERS UNION Farmers Union organic extra- virgin olive oil of Aeghion Agricultural Cooperatives, combines superior taste with high biological value. It is produced in the high tech installations of the Cooperative, and according to the strictest food industry specifications. Greek black Corinthian raisin “ super food” is also produced by Farmers Union. It is classified to “functional food”, which means that they provide benefits beyond basic nutrition.

PEACH

Agricultural Cooperatives Union Aeghion SA www.pesunion.gr, Korinthou 201, Aeghio, P.C. 25 100, Greece

Agricultural Cooperative of Naoussa www.acn.com.gr

NAXOS GRAVIERA

KROKOS KOZANIS (RED GREEK SAFFRON)

Naxos graviera, by the Union of Agricultural Cooperatives of Naxos, awarded for consecutive years, has once again got an honorable distinction from the International Taste & Quality institute 2016(2 stars) this time for the Naxos graviera with truffle mushroom. The famous PDO graviera of Naxos, combines great taste and high content of calcium. One Kilo of Naxos graviera is made by 12 kilos of fresh cow milk. That’s why it gives special extra flavor to soufflé or quiches.

Agricultural Cooperative of Naoussa Protected Destination of Origin peaches, are famous for their distinctive taste, rich aroma and their freshness since they are packaged directly after being picked from the tree. Naoussa PDO peaches, are holding a leading position in Greek and international markets, as Russia and the Arab world.

Krokos Kozanis was 2 stars awarded , as a PDO biological product by the International Taste & Quality institute 2016. The Greek red Saffron belongs to the highest quality of Saffron in the world. It is well known for its anticancer, aphrodisiac and memory enhancing properties. It has also antidepressant, antioxidant and anti ageing action. Krokos Kozanis saffron, gives to dishes a delicate aroma, a subtle spicy flavour and a beautiful yellow color. It goes perfectly with rice, pasta, meat and sweets.

Eas Naxos www.easnaxos.com, Galanado Naxou, Naxos, Cyclades, P.C. 84300, Greece

The Kozani Saffron Producers Cooperative www.safran.gr, Krokos Kozani, P.C. 50 010, Greece

APPLES ZAGORIN

PAPAYANNAKOPOULOS WINERY

The Agricultural Cooperatives’ Union produces apples which are tested, of high quality, certified with the qualification of Protected Designation of Origin (PDO). This distinction certifies that the Zagorin apple is a product of high quality. By using the “Integrated Production” method the Zagorin apple is clean, healthy, tested and this is why consumers in Greece and all around the world trust it. Agricultural Cooperative of Zagora-Pilio www.zagorin.gr, Zagora Pelion, P.C. 37001, Greece

VIOLANTA Full 45 Cookies with Yogurt. An innovative proposition by Violanta, 45% filling with yoghurt cream. Yogurt is now in our daily diet and a valuable element for our health, ideal snack for kids and grown ups. VIOLANDA has a rich variety of pure products, biscuits and cookies that combine traditional recipes and delicious flavor. Made according to the quality guarantee of VIOLANTA. Violanta S.A. www.violanta.gr, 6th km Trikala - Karditsa Road P.C. 42100, Trikala, Greece

The Papayannakopoulos winery participated in the 16th Annual Congress of the European Council of the Gastronomy & Oenology, held in Zappeion. Kidonitsa Papayannakopoulos and Ypsilon Agiorgitiko red, were selected for the official dinner-gala, offered to the speakers and the greatest Chefs of Europe! The winery gives great emphasis in making quality wines with a distinct character that represents fully the potential of the variety they come from. PAPAYANNAKOPOULOS WINERY www.papagiannakopoulos.com


90 7 - 9 MARCH 202 0 METROPOLITAN EXPO • ATHENS

JOIN THE HOSTED BUYER PROGRAM AND ENJOY EXCLUSIVE BENEFITS

F

OOD EXPO has designed a comprehensive Hosted Buyer Program for major international Food & Beverage traders to help them discover new suppliers and build networks. With all or part of their travel and accommodation expenses paid for, qualified Hosted Buyers simply have to show genuine purchase responsibility and attend a minimum number of B2B meetings that are scheduled through the Matchmaking Platform, an intuitive online platform allowing visitors to book meetings in advance with the exhibitors of the trade show.

Get impressive benefits By joining the Hosted Buyer Program of the trade show, you enjoy the following benefits: • 2 or 3 nights hotel accommodation • Round trip economy air ticket • Complimentary day cruise to the Greek islands / Athens tour • Access to the int’l buyers Meeting Area.

18,000

COMBINE BUSINESS WITH PLEASURE Take advantage of your visit to FOOD EXPO 2020 to explore Greek products and do business with suppliers from around the world in a professional & efficient environment. In addition, why not enjoy some downtime to discover Athens and its surroundings, and live an authentic Greek experience? FOOD EXPO is offering its int’l visitors the chance to experience the beauty, historic sights and culinary treasures of Greece. Enjoy a day cruise to the Saronic Gulf or take a guided tour around Athens and its monumental landmarks.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT OUR TEAM

Filippos Papanastasiou • fp@forumsa.gr Marilena Galani • gm@forumsa.gr Ioanna Lalia • il@forumsa.gr Ioanna Polychronopoulou • ip@forumsa.gr

B2B MEETINGS BETWEEN EXHIBITORS & INT’L VISITORS

94%

OF HOSTED BUYERS WERE SATISFIED BY THE B2B MEETINGS


7- 9

MARCH

2020 ATHENS · GREECE

ΤΗΕ LEADING F&B TRADE SHOW IN S.E. EUROPE

1,350

ΕXHIBITORS •

50,000 SQ.M • 75,000 VISITORS • 950 HOSTED BUYERS

ORGANIZED BY FORUM SA, Μember of NÜRNBERGMESSE GROUP 328 Vouliagmenis Ave., | 173 42 Athens, Greece | Τ: +30 210 5242100 | W: www.foοdexpo.gr | E: sales@forumsa.gr


92

Awards ma ga z i n e

Packaging Innovation

Awards 2019

Economic crisis aside, Greek F&B companies continue to invest heavily in packaging design, proof things are moving in the right direction.

I

t is said that any person or object has approximately seven seconds to make a first impression. And nowhere is that tenet more applicable than in products. In Greece, Food & Beverage businesses have started to realize that a high-quality product is only part of the success equation, and that innovative packaging and labeling can play an important role in brand awareness, especially with international consumers in mind. The Packaging Innovation Awards, organized by Marketing Week, Plant and Self Service (Boussias Communications magazines) and supported by the Association of the Greek Manufacturers of Packaging & Materials (AGMPM), honor innovations in packaging design, materials, technology and processes across the entire packagBLACK V. ing value chain. And, according at least to the REGULAR PIGS awards ceremony that took place on June 20, 2019, this year has been particularly creative in terms of both design and research.

2019 awards & honorable mentions A number of companies from a broad range of operations attended the Packaging Innovation Awards 2019 ceremony. The following businesses received the Gold Prize: Apivita, A. Hatzopoulos, A.S. Advertising, Agrino, Ahaean Land, Coca-Cola Hellenic, Elixir Tea, MS Creative, Lidl Hellas, LKC Drinks, MILK Branding Professionals, Paperpack, Papoutsanis, Pressious Arvanitidis, Red Design Consultants, Superfy, Athenian Brewery, Helios Pasta, Epikinonin Creative Team, Dragees Hatziyiannakis, Loumidis Coffee Shops, Lychnia, Melissa Kikizas, Barba Stathis, and St. George’s Mills. In addition, honorable mentions were also awarded to three people for their contribution to the development of the packaging industry: Ms Efrosini Roupa and Dr. Evangelos Hekimoglou for the book “Introduction to the History of Greek Packaging” and Mr Konstantinos Evripides, Managing Director of Genesis Pharma and President of the Entrepreneurship Club.


94

Trade Show ma ga z i n e

FOODTECH

FOOD PROCESSING & PACKAGING EXHIBITION

12-14 OCΤ 2019 AT H E N S ½ G R E E C E

A trade

show

for the Food Industry

The answer to the F&B sector’s demand for innovation and technological update comes in the form of a new trade show with international aspirations that opens its doors in a few days.

P

reparations for FOODTECH, the new international trade show specifically targeted at the production, processing, packaging and handling technologies of Food & Drinks, and directed to owners and executives from the sector’s productive and commercial enterprises, are coming down the homestretch.

FOODTECH, a premium and 100% F&B targeted trade show, will be held at the Metropolitan Expo, the largest and best exhibition center in Greece. The 1st FOODTECH will take place on October 12, 13 and 14 October 2019 with thousands of Food and Beverage professionals gathering to make deals and form partnerships. As a consequence, the trade show will become the meeting point


for hundreds of Greek and international exhibitors and a real pole of attraction for thousands of trade visitors from Greece as well as the global marketplace, at least as far as the region of Southeast Europe is concerned.

More than 220 Greek and international exhibitors FOODTECH 2019 has laid the foundation for becoming the most significant trade show regarding the production, processing, packaging and handling technologies of Food & Beverages not only in Greece but also in Southeast Europe. The extensive and in-line advertising and promotion plan, the targeted actions to attract prominent key buyers from international markets, the high organizational level, the invitation of thousands of executives from the food and beverage industry, guarantee its huge commercial success. As a result, FOODTECH will attract as exhibitors leading suppliers from Greece and the world, which produce or import Technology and Processing products and services. More than 150 Greek and international companies have already finalized their participation, and the total number of exhibitors is expected to exceed 220.

FOODTECH 2019 KEY FORECAST FIGURES

220

Greek & int’l exhibitors

18,000

Greek & int’l visitors

Why visit FOODTECH 2019 ✔ Meet over 220 Greek and int’l exhibitors and reach significant trade agreements. ✔ Get to know an extensive range of products and services from, all under one roof. ✔ Discover products and ideas that will help you differentiate from your competition and make your business more profitable. ✔ Gain inspiration and inform yourselves on the latest market trends.

150 HOSTED BUYERS, 2,500 B2B MEETINGS With the aim to make FOODTECH a key international business hub, the organizing company is investing significant funds in a comprehensive Hosted Buyer program for key international buyers. Approximately 150 major buyers from all around the world are expected to attend FOODTECH 2019 as part of the show’s Hosted Buyer program. It is worth mentioning that almost 2,500 b2b meetings between these buyers and Greek as well as international exhibitors will take place during the 3 days of the fair.

150

Hosted Buyers

25,000 m2 Εxhibition space

€ 380,000 advertising expenditure


96

Market News ma ga z i n e

+

news MORE 1

2

NÜrnberg Messe - Forum SA

Major strategic partnership A historic, for Greek trade show industry standards, strategic partnership between the Nürnberg Messe Group and Forum SA, the largest exhibition company in Greece, has been carried out successfully. The acquisition of Forum SA from one of the most dynamic German trade fair companies only proves the confidence the German economy shows towards healthy Greek entrepreneurship. It is worth noting that its integration into the Nürnberg Messe Group makes Forum SA the largest subsidiary of the German exhibition behemoth, worldwide.

Greece, an exhibition hub for the entire Southeast Europe The unprecedented dynamic created by the meeting of these two leading companies, generates countless prospects and opportunities for the Greek economy, and especially for the country’s trade show industry. Helped by the know-how, operational experience, portfolio, vision and the synergies between the two companies, Greece will

become an exhibition hub for the Balkans and Southeast Europe. As stated by Mr. Nikos Choudalakis, President and CEO of Forum SA at the joint Press Conference: “Right from our first meeting with Nürnberg Messe Group executives, in May 2018, it was obvious that we share a common set of values, a similar business ethos and goals, as well as a shared vision of the future. Looking to the future with optimism and believing in our potential as well as the prospects opening up for our country, we sketch out together a fresh start, focused

on international development. A start that would cross Greek frontiers and will help turn Greece into a significant trade show hub for the entire Southeast Europe.” Both Dr Roland Fleck and Peter Ottmann, the two Nürnberg Messe CEOs, made one thing perfectly clear at the press conference in Athens: “We’ve achieved the goals we set in our corporate strategy two whole years ahead of schedule. And that major step forward will give us the momentum we need to approach the next chapter of the Nürnberg Messe success story.”

3

1. The ultra modern Nürnberg Messe exhibition center. 2.  Peter Ottmann, Nikos Choudalakis and Dr Roland Fleck. 3.  During the firts meeting of the two teams.


Mandrekas sa the greek dairy company is planning α Second plant in the us east coast

Feta cheese Bone of contention between Australia and the EU

Mandrekas SA is planning a second production facility in the United States, after the company’s first successful opening in the country. The company is one of the largest pri-

15.5

vate label Greek yogurt producers in Greece and has been active in the US market since 2012. As the company’s president and CEO, Mr Vassilis Mandrekas, announced, the sec-

ond production facility will be built in the East Coast. After all, as he explains, the main problem is such a large market place is "logistics, and not production." www.greekyogurt.gr

MILLION EURO THE VALUE OF GREEK HONEY EXPORTS IN 2018, WITH FIVE YEARS, 30.2% GOING TO GERMANY, 13.9% TO FRANCE, 10.8% TO THE US, 7.5% TO CYRPUS, AND 5.9% TO THE UNITED KINGDOM.

Feta cheese stands in the way of European Union’s negotiations with Australia on a trade deal, as Greece seeks to protect the “Feta” brand name and its PDO status as much as possible. Feta cheese has been recognized by the European Union as a Geographical Indication product and as such, a cheese not produced in Greece under specific and strict production regulations, cannot be called Feta. Brussels, during the negotiations with Australia, demands that this denomination be respected. But Australia has a large Greek community which produces Feta, and producers would be reluctant to give up that name. A compromise might be possible as in the EU-Canadian deal, Ceta, where producers already making cheese and calling it Feta are allowed to continue to do so.

Greek sea buckthorn production is expected to triple within the year 2019 Greek sea buckthorn or hippophae –as it is also known– producers are ready to expand their presence into international markets. According to Mr Nikos Doukas, General Manager of Hippophae Hellas, Greek sea buckthorn is a superior fruit, resulting in significant profitability for its growers. In fact production is expected to reach 30 tons compared to 10 tons in 2018. In addition, sea buckthorn arable land is currently at 1,600 hectares and expected to reach 6,000 hectares within the next 5 years. Hippophae.net


98

Market News ma ga z i n e

news

+

MORE

Chipita €510 million turnover and a new factory in Slovakia

Sales at Chipita, one of the leading and fastest growing food companies in Greece, for the year 2018 were up, while turnover reached appr. €510 million. In addition, a new plant in Slovakia – producing croissants and Bake Rolls, one of the brand’s most popular offerings– is already underway and expected to be fully operational during the first Spyros Theodoropoulos, trimester of 2020. CEO of Chipita www.chipita.com

CHIPITA IN NUMBERS (2018)

€0.5 bn. SALES GLOBALLY

MORE

10.67% €28.8 m. REVENUE PROFIT INCREASE

Kalamata olives Healthiest in the world! spectacular findings of new clinical study Kalamata table olives were examined by a team of Greek researchers and scientists. They conducted a clinical study in which twenty healthy people were put on a diet consist-

70%

ing of Kalamata olives for sixty days. The results of this study were spectacular, since the volunteers showed a significant increase in HDL (good cholesterol) and the ratio of total

to LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) showed a significant reduction in the ratio of total HDL cholesterol and LDL / HDL as 95% of statistical correspondence was observed.

OF TOTAL CHIOS MASTIHA SALES ACCOUNT FOR EXPORTS, WHICH PRESENT A 51% IN ANNUAL GROWTH AND ARE EXPECTED TO REACH €15 MILLION BY THE END OF 2020.

AFTER TAX

news

GREEK CHESTNUTS: EXPORTS REACH 80% ACCORDING TO INFORMATION, CHESTNUT PRODUCTION FOR 2019 IN THE REGION OF MOUNT KISSAVOS AND NOTABLY IN THE SO-CALLED “CHESTNUT VILLAGES” WHERE MOST OF THE CULTIVATION TAKES PLACE, IS EXPECTED TO INCREASE. AFTER A BAD YEAR, PRODUCTION WILL REACH 250-300 TONS.

PALIRRIA: PLANNING TAKEOVERS PALIRRIA, THE GREEK “KINGS OF DOLMA”, IS IN SEARCH OF GREEK AS WELL AS INTERNATIONAL COMPANIES ACTIVE IN THE F&B INDUSTRY, THAT MAY BE AVAILABLE FOR TAKEOVER. AT THE SAME TIME, THE COMPANY PLANS TO EXPAND ITS PORTFOLIO WITH NEW PRODUCTS. WWW.PALIRRIA.COM


12 - 14

ΟCTOBER

2019 AT H E N S • G R E E C E

FOODTECH FOOD PROCESSING & PACKAGING EXHIBITION

Future solutions in the food industry

ORGANIZED BY FORUM SA, Μember of NÜRNBERGMESSE GROUP 328 Vouliagmenis Ave. | 173 42 Athens, Greece | Τ: +30 210 5242100 | W: www.foodtech.gr | E: sales@forumsa.gr SUPPORTED BY


100

Market News ma ga z i n e

news

+

MORE

Mevgal Further growth and a five-year investment plan

Pindos: 10% rise in sales the Ioannina Agricultural Poultry Cooperative is investing €20 million for upgrades

For the Ioannina Agricultural Poultry Cooperative – Pindos sales were up 10% in the first eight months of 2019. The cooperative is currently realizing a 5-year investment plan (2018-

2022) totaling €20 million in order to increase productive capacity. The construction of a new plant for pre-grilled products is underway and expected to start operating in April 2020.

In addition, €5 million will also be invested in the Pindos processing plant, granting the possibility for the slaughter of approximately 8,000 chicken/hour. www.pindos-apsi.gr

Mevgal, one of the major dairy players in Greece, is expecting further growth for 2019. The company has attributed the surge to a five-year investment plan, which includes an appr. €54 million bond loan. Namely, the €54.3 million bond includes a corresponding number of bonds, each with a value of €1, while the term of the floating rate with physical collateral loan is 10 years. www.mevgal.gr

530 MORE

MILLION EURO WERE THE GREEK EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL EXPORTS FOR 2018, REGISTERING AN INCREASE OF ALMOST €117 MILLION COMPARED TO THE PREVIOUS YEAR.

news

CRETAN AVOCADO APPLYING FOR PGI STATUS 90% OF GREEK AVOCADO PRODUCTION TAKES PLACE IN CRETE AND AN EFFORT TO RECOGNIZE IT AS A PROTECTED GEOGRAPHICAL INDICATION (PGI) PRODUCT IS UNDERWAY. IN FACT, ALL DOCUMENTS FOR ITS PGI DESIGNATION WILL BE SENT IN EARLY 2020.

F&B PRODUCTS AT THE FOREFRONT OF GREEK EXPORTS FOR 2019 GREEK F&B EXPORTS HAVE BEEN STEADILY GROWING IN BOTH JULY AND DURING JANUARY-JULY 2019. IN THE PERIOD JANUARY-JULY 2019, FOOD EXPORTS AMOUNTED TO €2,788 MILL. COMPARED TO €2,741.5 MILL. FOR THE SAME PERIOD IN 2018.


8-9-10

MAY

2020 ATHENS • GREECE

2 nd

THE FUTURE IS ORGANIC ORGANIZED BY FORUM SA, Μember of NÜRNBERGMESSE GROUP 328 Vouliagmenis Ave. | 173 42 Athens, Greece | Τ: +30 210 5242100 | W: www.biofestival.gr | E: sales@forumsa.gr


New Products ma ga z i n e

new

WHAT’S

102

MEGAS YEEROS “MINI BITES” Megas Yeeros, the No1 gyros producer in the world, has recently launched the delicious, homemade “Mini Bites” and “Mini Bites with Philadelphia”. Homemade Mini Bites are a Greek traditional recipe: patties from beef and pork that go well with French fries, tomato and red sauce. Both offerings are ideal for the foodservice sector; simple and tasty, they can be deep fried, fried or grilled. www.megasyeeros.gr

INNOVATIVE BAGUETTES BY SELECT Select Bakery, responding to the market’s interest in innovative breads and –especially– baguettes, has created a new range of 8 product codes in 27cm., featuring wheat and whole wheat seedless bread, as well as 3 seed-coated versions (White Sesame, White & Black Sesame, Corn). Finally, there is also the “Wheat Baguette 27cm. baked and frozen”, a ready-to-use product for extra convenience. Crusty and rich, the new baguette recipe is ideal for all kinds of sandwiches. www.selectbakery.gr

NEW VEGAN PRODUCT LINE BY RODOULA

3 NEW MISE-EN-PLACE SAUCES

Rodoula’s Traditional pies (Crinkly, Spiral, Triangle) are one of the most delicious Greek products from the region of Epirus. The vegan, dairy and lactose free, adaptations have a delicious filling of wholesome vegan ingredients covered with crunchy freshly-baked filo pastry. In March 2019 Rodoula received the NRA, FABI award for its innovative product, Traditional Vegan Crinkly Pie. www.rodoula.gr

Provil SA introduces a new addition to its company portfolio: 3 mise-en-place sauces with Greek Flavor. An impressive combination of ingredients in traditional recipes from all over Greece, give the opportunity and flexibility to cooking professionals to make a difference in their menus. The goal is to offer creative ideas to cooking professionals and help them build their own culinary proposals.www.provil.gr


MYTHICAL SWEETS

ALWAYS SUNNY WITH SUNOUZO

Hercules, Theseus, Jason, etc. are launching the most delicious Greek confections. Poursalidis Ath. & Sons SA introduces a new product range, under the name “Mythical Delight�, a series of individually wrapped traditional sweets. www.siropiastasakis.com

SunOuzo is a different approach to your traditional drinks, made with mastery befitting a high quality alcoholic beverage. It contains Ouzo distilled with the traditional method, in delicious 4 natural juice flavors: orange, lemon, lemon & mint, and sour cherry. www.sunouzo.gr


New Products ma ga z i n e

new

WHAT’S

104

SWEET AND VEGAN

ZAGORIN MOLASESS FROM PELION

Vrettos has been synonymous with highquality sweet creations ever since 1992. Specializing in a wide range of traditional Greek syrup desserts (“siropiasta” in Greek), the company keeps enriching its production range with fresh ideas and new flavors, that are distributed in Greece and abroad. Our latest Vegan Delights, will put a smile on your customers’ face! www.vrettos.gr

The traditional product of mount Pelion, molasses from Firiki apples, is produced by the Agricultural Cooperative of Zagora - Pelion in exclusive cooperation with the Women’s Agrotourism Cooperative of Zagora, which has certified processing facilities. It is a superior thick and syrupy traditional and healthy product with distinct flavor, which has been warded a Superior Taste Award by the International Taste & Quality Institute (iTQi). www.zagorin.gr

WHEN HIGH QUALITY IS DELICIOUS

THE PACKAGING OF CHOICE

For the connoisseurs from all over the world, we present the absolutely unique Potou Melan Premium EVOO, PDO Kalamata, with health claim certification. This balanced, exceptional and awarded EVOO is so rich in phenols as it is needed to create healthy, delicious dishes. Two centuries of history of respect, passion, love for tradition and innovation for the best! www.c-potou.com

Quality folding cartons, paper bags and wrapping paper is what makes Fokas Packaging, for over 60 years now, a company you can trust. Providing a full range of services from the creative stage to the the final production, our passion for detail makes us stand out. Fast delivery times and competitive prices add to a winning choice for every packaging need you might have. www.fokaspackaging.gr


Cactu s Mare Hotel

Crete islan d - Greece


#9 Autumn 2019

Μagazine

Fine food and drinks of Greece

#9

Fine food and drinks of Greece

Autumn 2 0 1 9

greek olive oil Greek organic evoo

magazine

Nectar of the Gods

07- 08 - 09

MARCH

2020 ATHENS • GREECE

ambrosiamagazine.com

The Mediterranean Food Experience

Profile for FORUM SA

Ambrosia #9  

Ambrosia #9  

Profile for forumsa