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JANUARY 2019

COMPLIMENTARY

DREAM HOME MOOD BOARD


Turning the page ON A NEW YEAR L et me give you a glimpse into the life of a magazine editor. As I write this, we are halfway through the editorial process and I am working closely with our talented graphic designer every day to create a series of mood boards that are representative of the spaces we saw during photoshoots and interviews in 2018. Although the magazine is still in production, I can already see the pages coming together.

By the time you are reading this editorial, the January issue will be complete. For me, that moment will be here sooner than you would think. I know from experience how quickly time flies between deadlines. Every once and a while (like at least once a year), it's refreshing to take a deep breath and reflect on why we do what we do. I have spent the last few weeks rereading articles from the past year and can't tell you how thankful I am to be in a position where I am able to share so much inspiration with the local community. Of course, we couldn't have done this without the homeowners who opened their doors and hearts to us in 2018.

PHOTO BY Hillary Ehlen

In my two years with Design & Living Magazine, I have met many amazing artists, architects, homeowners, interior designers, decorators and landscapers. To all of those people (you know who you are), I can't wait to continue collaborating. I also look forward to meeting new professionals in the industry in 2019. Speaking of new faces, I am delighted to introduce you to our new contributors. You can read all about them on page 6! Until February,

Rebecca Opp Editor becca@spotlightmediafargo.com @becca-opp

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DESIGN & LIVING

TEAM

At Design & Living Magazine, our goal is to create a publication that is just as much fun to read as it is to view. Here are the writers, designers, photographers and contributors who so affably use their time and talents to tell a story and give our pages purpose.

HILLARY EHLEN PHOTOGRAPHER

Ehlen is an editorial photographer for Spotlight Media and owner of Hillary Ehlen Photography. She is a native of Fargo and attended North Dakota State University for visual arts with an emphasis in photography.

JESSE HOORELBEKE PHOTOGRAPHER

Hoorelbeke is a former professional baseball player turned photographer. He is the owner of J. Alan Paul Photography in Fargo and veteran, lead editorial photographer for Spotlight Media. Hoorelbeke specializes in editorial, commercial, architectural and landscape photography.

SARAH GEIGER ART DIRECTOR

Geiger is a MSUM graduate with a BFA with an emphasis in Graphic Design. She is the lead publication designer for Design & Living Magazine, Fargo Monthly and Fargo INC! magazines at Spotlight Media.

SARAH STAUNER GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Originally from central Wisconsin, Stauner relocated to the FargoMoorhead area in 2017. She is a graduate of the University of Minnesota Duluth, where she recieved her BFA in Graphic Design and Marketing.

PAUL H. GLEYE CONTRIBUTOR

Gleye is a professor of architecture at North Dakota State University. His fields of expertise include historic preservation and urban design, and he leads the architecture school’s term abroad program in Europe each spring semester.

TARA FERMOYLE CONTRIBUTOR

Tara Fermoyle has made her home in Fargo, N.D., but loves to travel whenever she gets the chance. Since 2016, she has owned and operated Fermie Studios where she concentrates on interior design services and handmade ceramic art.spring semester.

CHRISTEN ANDERSON CONTRIBUTOR

Anderson is a Minnesota native with an eye for decor and design. She is the owner of Christen Joy Homes and is known for her exceptional remodels, expert home staging and accessorizing high-end living spaces. Anderson is also a passionate art collector, world traveler and home cook who frequently entertains friends.


Design & Living Magazine

Sarah Huckle Social Media Coordinator North Dakota Interior Designers

Melissa Rademacher President & CEO Downtown Community Partnership

downtownfargo.com ndid.org

Rich Lahren Hardscape Committee Member, Past Board Member & Past President North Dakota Nursery, Greenhouse & Landscape Association

Chris Hawley Licensed Architect/Member American Institute of Architects

Editorial Advisory Board We at Design & Living Magazine want to make sure that our content is accurate, unbiased and reflects the local home industry. That is why we meet with our Editorial Advisory Board, which is made up of representatives from local, statewide and national organizations. Each month, we listen to their feedback and discuss innovations in local art, architecture, home decor, interior design and landscaping.

Krista Mund Executive Vice President Home Builders Association of Fargo-Moorhead

Dayna Del Val President & CEO The Arts Partnership

theartspartnership.net aia.org hbafm.com ndnga.com 10

DESIGN & LIVING | J A N U A R Y 2 01 9

Photos by Hillary Ehlen and J. Alan Paul Photography

2019


contents FEATURE STORY

28 Dream Home Mood Board

We've gathered photos from our archives to create a mood board for what we are calling the Design & Living Magazine Dream Home. Now, this house doesn't really exist, but these meticulously curated mood boards will provide you with home inspiration that will be relevant for years to come.

Decorator with 20 Dear Christen Joy Homes

In each issue of Design & Living Magazine, Christen Anderson of Christen Joy Homes will answer a home design question posed by one of our readers. This month, she will address: "How can we embrace 2019 trends right here in the FM area?"

22 Embracing Warmth

January is the coldest month of the year in North Dakota and Minnesota. When you walk through the front door, you want to be surrounded by warmth. Nothing warms your body and soul like the sight of a gently roaring fire in the wintertime. Recently, we visited the home of Lisa and Taya Cormican to see how they have embraced this feeling by incorporating a custom fireplace into their main living area.

70 Locally Trending

Join new contributor, ceramist and interior designer, Tara Fermoyle, as she takes over "Locally Trending" this January. Within these pages, Tara shares a few local finds that you can incorporate into your home in the new year. Featuring pieces from Eco Chic Home, Catie Miller and Grain Designs, this is one month that you definitely won't want to miss.

– 72 Minimalism Architecture With Eternal Appeal

Join new contributor Paul H. Gleye as he comments on exterior photographs of homes from our archive to provide more insight into their architectural style. This month, he delved into a lake home designed by Jackson Strom of Chris Hawley Architects.

Behind Closed 74 Ecce Doors: Part III

Ecce Behind Closed Doors is a series that demonstrates how anyone can purchase local art regardless of space and budget. This month, we visited with Melissa Burkland and Grant Syvertson who have seamlessly integrated local and regional artwork into their 1898 home. Join us as we paint a picture of the story behind each piece they have been drawn to over the years.

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2019 JANUARY

Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography

NEXT MONTH Join us for our next issue as we take a moment to appreciate aesthetically pleasing commercial design in the FM area. Look forward to fabulous office tours and tips for styling your own home office.

ON THE COVER This cover was designed by Sarah Stauner, graphic designer at Spotlight Media. Left, it features the Freng family home photographed by Hillary Ehlen. In the top right, you see the DeFoe family home by Studio West Homes photographed by J. Alan Paul Photography. Finally, at the bottom right, we have a photo styled by Showplace Cabinetry Design Center, also photographed by Hillary Ehlen.

For more exclusive, original content,

FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM @designandlivingmagazine

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JANUARY 2019 Design & Living Magazine is a free publication distributed 12 times a year. Our mission is to showcase all that the Red River Valley has to offer in terms of interior design, architecture and landscaping, profiling the people that make these possible. We also strive to provide a quality and fun reading experience and improve the way of life in our community. The publication is mailed to homes across the US and has stand distribution throughout North Dakota and Minnesota.

Publisher Mike Dragosavich

drago@spotlightmediafargo.com

Chief Operations Officer Steve Kruse CREATIVE Editorial Director Andrew Jason

andrew@spotlightmediafargo.com

Editor Becca Opp

becca@spotlightmediafargo.com

Art Director Sarah Geiger Designer Sarah Stauner Creative Director Simon Andrys Photographers Hillary Ehlen, J. Alan Paul Photography, HBA, Elisabeth Eden, Dan Francis Photography, Madison Christianson, Lauren K. Photography, Dusty Bias Videographer Patrick Thompson Contributors John Gunkleman, Christen Anderson, Tara Fermoyle, Paul H. Gleye Social Media & PR Coordinator Ariel Holbrook Web Editor Jessica Kuehn ADVERTISING Associate Sales Director Neil Keltgen Senior Sales Executive Paul Hoefer

paul@spotlightmedia.com

Sales Executives Nick Linder

NickLinder@SpotlightMediaFargo.com

Ross Uglem

Ross@SpotlightMediaFargo.com

Zach Olson

zach@spotlightmediafargo.com

Executives Sales Assistant Kellen Feeney Client Relations Manager Jenny Johnson Client Relations & Office Assistant Alex Kizima Business Development Assistant Jennifer McColm VP of Human Resources Colleen Dreyer Business Development Manager Nick Schommer Digital Marketing Specialist Tommy Uhlir DISTRIBUTION Delivery Bruce Crummy, John Stuber, Craig Sheets Design & Living Magazine is published by Spotlight Media, LLC. Copyright 2019 Design & Living Magazine & designandlivingmagazine.com. All rights reserved. No parts of this magazine may be reproduced or distributed without written permission of Design & Living Magazine and Spotlight Media, LLC is not responsible for, and expressly disclaims all liability for, damages of any kind arising out of use, reference to, or reliance on such information. Spotlight Media, LLC accepts no liability for the accuracy of statements made by the advertisers.

ADVERTISING: 701-478-SPOT (7768) spotlightmediafargo.com Send change of address information and other correspondence to: Spotlight Media, LLC 15 Broadway N. Suite 500, Fargo, ND 58102 or info@spotlightmediafargo.com


Meet the team

MIKE

ALEXANDRA

SARAH

JESSE

COLEEN

STEVE

BECCA

SARAH

HILLARY

BRUCE

ANDREW

NOLAN

JENNY

JESSICA

Nick

JOHN ALEX

CRAIG

JENNY

NICK

ARIEL

SIMON

PATRICK

NEIL

JENNIFER

TOMMY

ROSS

PAUL

KELLEN

ZACH


TURN YOUR HOME IMPROVEMENT DREAMS

Into Reality

by John Gunkelman Dakota Construction of Fargo, Inc. Home Builders Association of Fargo-Moorhead

Nurture a thriving, innovative and diverse housing industry in our community. have some great news for those of you looking to start the remodel project you have been dreaming about. Our local cities have incentives to help qualified homeowners! Even more great news: it’s almost Red River Valley Home & Garden Show time, which means you can start planning to fix up your home. There is no other place to meet hundreds of home improvement and building industry professionals in person under one roof.

I

For those of you looking to remodel, here is a quick rundown of programs in the metro area: Moorhead and Dilworth ∙Moorhead offers interest-free loans of up to $20,000 through its Community Development Block Grant Home Rehabilitation Program for incomequalified residents. ∙Both Moorhead and Dilworth offer the Minnesota Fix Up Fund, through which households earning $125,900 or less may borrow up to $50,000 and repay the loan with fixed monthly payments over 10 to 20 years. ∙Dilworth has a housing rehabilitation program available through Clay County Housing & Redevelopment Authority for income-qualified owner-occupied homes to receive grants to rehabilitate their houses. Fargo and West Fargo ∙Fargo has a five-year tax exemption on any value added through remodeling to residential properties over 40 years old. If a property is between 25 and 40 18

DESIGN & LIVING | J A N U A R Y 2 01 9

years old, it is eligible for a three-year exemption on remodeling and additions. Through its Housing Rehabilitation Program, Fargo has loans and grants available for rehab work on single-family, owner-occupied homes. In addition, Fargo has incentives to encourage housing investment in its downtown and surrounding neighborhoods. There are assistance opportunities for low interest loans through the Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative program and tax incentives for the Renaissance Zone. Some incentive are based on household income, and others have no income restrictions. ∙West Fargo offers a five-year remodeling tax exemption on any added value on residential property at least 25 years old with a $25,000 increase in true and full value. A project that adds less than $25,000 in value is eligible for an exemption up to three years. West Fargo’s Renaissance Zone encompasses a 20-block area primarily located on Sheyenne St., Center Street and Main Ave. corridors. Residential

John Gunkelman is current Home Builders Association of F-M president. He owns Dakota Construction of Fargo, Inc., specializing in custom homes, commercial remodeling and residential remodeling.

properties included in this area are eligible for property tax exemptions through the city and approved projects can apply for state income tax exemptions. For those of you wishing to purchase a newly built home, there are incentives for you, too! Save up to $4,000 on your property tax bill when you buy a newly built home in Fargo or West Fargo. Get a two-year property tax rebate on newly built homes in Dilworth and Moorhead: on a $250,000 home, this is a value of $5,700 over the two-year period. For details, contact your city. Remember, the Home & Garden Show is almost here: Feb. 22-24 at the Fargodome! Plan to maximize your time, get out and stretch your legs and explore all the options for building a home, improving your home or beautifying your yard. Next month’s column will outline the great workshops and kids’ activities you can expect to see at the show.

Home Builders Association of FM Home Builders Care of Fargo-Moorhead Foundation provides a positive outlet for the housing industry to give back to the community, building a framework for the future.

For more information, contact: hbafm.com info@hbafm.com facebook.com/ HBAFargoMoorhead twitter.com/HBAFM


TAKE A LOOK AT

Spotlight Media's Other Magazines

For the first time, Fargo Inc! will be mailed to small businesses across the state with our special North Dakota Business Guide. This issue walks business owners through the many public sector programs available to help them through all stages of business. We are so excited to provide a resource to over 10,000 small businesses across the state to help them navigate the many accessible programs established to help them thrive.

Just in time for Dakota Medical Foundation's Giving Hearts Day on February 14, Fargo Monthly is excited to dedicate a whole issue to the local non-profits and charities in our area. Read about different organizations and learn how they are making a positive impact on our community and those who live in it.

With National Girls and Women in Sports Day fast approaching in early February, Bison Illustrated sits down and honors some of the phenomenal women student-athletes, coaches and administration at NDSU. They, along with every woman at NDSU, help take Bison athletics to new heights each and every day.

LEARN MORE ABOUT US spotlightmediafargo.com


DEAR decorator WITH CHRISTEN JOY HOMES

Meet Christen Anderson of Christen Joy Homes. Each month, she will answer a home design question posed by one of our readers. Anderson is a Minnesota native with an eye for decor and design. Christen Joy Homes is known for exceptional remodels, expert staging and accessorizing high-end living spaces. Anderson is also a passionate art collector, world traveler and home cook who frequently entertains for friends.

QUESTION: "HOW CAN WE EMBRACE 2019 TRENDS RIGHT HERE IN THE FM AREA?"

With the holiday décor posted to Instagram accounts and soon to be packed away for next year, people are eager to see what the new design trends are around the corner to integrate into their home for a fresh start to the year!

First and foremost, what you’re seeing in trends is that people are eager to be more willing to show their personality through their selections. For those eager to do this, I applaud you and say yes, yes, yes! Your friends and family should walk in a space and say, “this is so you.”

There are a ton of predictions on what the 2019 trends will be, but in my opinion, not all of them will call Let’s jump in — the FM area home (at least not right away). With this in mind, I pulled three top trends in the industry that I could see showing up in local designs. I urge you to give them a try—I think you'll love them!

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1. LIVE COLORFULLY Good-bye to the days of gray, the color of choice for the past couple of years. Bold hues are back! Bold hues are being used throughout all rooms of the home with layering of everything from paints, rugs, fabrics and accessories to add more interest to personal spaces. From unexpected painted cabinetry to throwing in a pop of color with an accent pillow or artwork, color is helping identify spaces as personal reflections of the homeowners. Top colors for 2019 will include jewel tones—bold indigo, deep greens, teals and rich purples. Here are two colors to kick off 2019 with. Exotic Purple – Benjamin Moore 2071-10 Cascades – Sherwin Williams 7623

2. VELVET FURNITURE This multi-dimensional, luxurious fabric will be highly sought after in 2019. Though this trend had a past of being labeled as “flea-market find” or “old,” there is a reason velvet furniture has been around and stayed around—it is classic. Whether it’s reupholstering a family heirloom or purchasing new, velvet will be used in statement pieces to add that sophisticated touch to a space.

3. WALLPAPER The more the merrier! To those who have peeled off wallpaper, I get that you cringe at this, but the instant wow-factor that wallpaper gives to a room is unmistakable. Specifically, floral wallpapers, which have a timeless elegance, will be installed in homes. If you aren’t ready to commit to a completely-wallpapered room, I recommend you start with an accent wall and pull a complimentary color for the other walls. Interested in taking things to the next level? Consider wallpapering your ceiling. It’s unexpected and changes the perspective when you walk into the room. If you have low ceilings, I recommend avoiding paper that is too dark as this can cause the ceilings to seem lower than they actually are. Another great way to add more wow-factor and interest is through textured wallpaper such as a grass cloth.

Wishing you a wonderful start to 2019! Join me on Instagram & Facebook to see my latest projects and email me your design questions at hello@christenjoyhomes.com to have the opportunity to have your question answered next month. Until then, enjoy!

Live colorfully, Christen Anderson Christen Joy Homes hello@christenjoyhomes.com facebook.com/ChristenJoyHomes instagram.com/christenjoyhomes

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Embracing Warmth BY Becca Opp | PHOTOS BY Hillary Ehlen

J A N U A R Y is the coldest month of the year in North Dakota and Minnesota. When you walk through the front door, you want to be surrounded by warmth. Nothing warms your body and soul like the sight of a gently roaring fire in the wintertime. Recently, we visited the home of Lisa and Taya Cormican to see how they have embraced this feeling by incorporating a custom fireplace into their main living area.

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When the homeowner and her young daughter moved in, they wanted to feel at home. Naturally, Home & Hearth was able to help with their main living area. It is hard to believe that just a few short months ago, this room did not have a fireplace at all. Now, it looks as if the whole space was designed around it. "It looks like the fireplace was built with the home," said Darla Skaurud, General Manager at Home & Hearth. Together with Christen Anderson of Christen Joy Homes, the homeowner selected a linear fireplace with stacked stone. Linear fireplaces are long and narrow in shape and are often used to complement contemporary or modern interiors. However, this homeowner added driftwood logs to the fire box. The result is a transitional look that pairs well with the other selections in the main living area. The fire box also features reflective panels, which allow the flames to be enjoyed from any angle in the room. The homeowner initially thought she wanted the fireplace and television screen to be side by side, but she eventually decided to have them one on top of the other. Now, the screen effortlessly floats above the fireplace without any protruding wires.

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This gas fireplace can be controlled by the press of a button on a remote, which the homeowner has styled on her coffee table. The nice thing about this is that she can coordinate her fireplace with the thermostat so that the flame dies down when the temperature reaches a certain degree. Near the fireplace, the homeowner has a basket full of throws for even more cozygoodness. Notice how the dark, forest green blanket is a play on the subtle hues in the Eldorado stacked stone, which the homeowner opted for in the newer color, Daybreak. We can definitely imagine enjoying a glass of wine by this fire at the end of a long day. For more information, please contact: Home & Hearth 1750 45th St. S, Fargo 701-893-9300 homeandhearthfireplaces.com

Darla Skaurud General Manager Home & Hearth Home & Hearth is a locally-owned business that has been around for more than 60 years. Their showroom features roughly 90 gas, wood, electric and pellet fireplaces.

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DREAM HOME M O O D B OA R D With the arrival of a new calendar year, we can't help but to reflect on the past twelve months. In 2018, Design & Living Magazine amassed quite the collection of stunning photos for your home inspiration. That being said, this is the perfect time to look back at all of the exquisite places we've been. While doing so, we noted our own personal favorite elements of each space, which leads us to imagine, "What would it be like if someone designed a home using a mood board based on content from Design & Living Magazine?" In case you were wondering, that is exactly what we have done here. As an exercise in indulgence, we've gathered photos taken in 2018 from our archives and used them to create a mood board for what we can only describe as a Design & Living Magazine dream home. Now, this house doesn't really exist, but these meticulously curated mood boards will provide you with home inspiration for years and years to come. Also within these pages, local experts predict which design trends will be big over in 2019. What would you want to see in the magazine this year? Tell us at designandlivingmagazine.com/ contact-us.

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FOYER

Welcome to our dream home. For the foyer, we pulled inspiration from a variety of houses that we toured earlier this year. We think that when coming home after a long day of work, you should immediately feel welcomed when you walk through the door. In our neck of the Midwest, this often includes having a place to hang your coat, hat and gloves. In addition to bringing in functional storage, we recommend making your personality apparent in the foyer with custom paint colors and accessories.

WHITE WALLS

SNAKE PLANT

A

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MODERN STAIR CASE BENCH

B

DARK GREEN WAINSCOTTING

VINTAGE PIECES

RUBBER PLANT

C

A Photo by Hillary Ehlen Freng Family Home Home by Thomsen Homes B Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography DeFoe Family Home Home by Studio West Homes C Photo by Hillary Ehlen Freng Family Home Home by Thomsen Homes

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D

D Photo by Elisabeth Eden Iepson Family Home Home by Jordahl Custom Homes E Photo by Hillary Ehlen Ham Family Home F Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography DeFoe Family Home Home by Studio West Homes

E


ROUND MIRROR

F

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LIVING ROOM Have a seat. The would-be living room of our 2018 Design & Living Magazine dream home was inspired by the most stylish spaces we've visited this year. Each of these spaces was designed to be ideal for their homeowners, but we've taken elements from each room that we think represent the year as a whole. That includes clean-lined furnishings, carefully curated local art and materials such as faux fur and leather.

BUFFALO PLAID CHARIS

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LEATHER FLOOR POUF

LOCAL ART

A

B

C


FIREPLACE

D

AUTOMATED BLINDS PERSONALIZED ART

E

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F


A Photo by Hillary Ehlen Foss Family Home Interior by Christen Joy Anderson of Christen Joy Homes Art curated by Mark Weiler Artwork by Bob Crowe B Photo by Hillary Ehlen Furniture styled by Carrie Brusven of Gathered. Boutique Rentals & Events C Photo by Hillary Ehlen Home of Aaron Karvonen Interior by Shayla Hunstad & Bailee Schissel of Refreshing Designs

H

D Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Nelson Family Home Interior by Sara Bekkerus of Skapa Design Home by Tomlinson Schultz E Photo by Hillary Ehlen Steenholdt Home F Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Home Technology by Smart Home Technologies G Photo by Hillary Ehlen Danielson Family Home

FAUX COWHIDE RUG

G 35


DINING ROOM This mood board was intended to be a feast for the eyes. From whimsical florals to custom dining tables, this would-be dining room has everything you could dream of for entertaining family and friends. Once again, we had quite the selection of inspiring spaces. There are many things that we appreciate in each of these rooms. It was actually a tough choice when we had to pull just one or two design eleemnts from every image. However, from the architectural features to the staging, no detail has been overlooked by our staff members' discerning eyes.

WOVEN RUG

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A


TRAY CEILING IN CONTRASTING COLOR

CUSTOM TABLE

FLORAL CENTERPIECE

B

D

C WHIMSICAL FLORALS

WALLPAPER

E

F 37


A Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography DeFoe Family Home Home by Studio West Homes B Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Interior by Audra Mehl of Grace 1972 Design Staging by Carrie Brusven of Gathered. Boutique Rentals & Events C Photo by Hillary Ehlen Florals by Love Always Floral D Photo by Elisabeth Eden Iepson Family Home Home by Jordahl Custom Homes

E Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Nelson Family Home Interior by Sara Bekkerus of Skapa Design Home by Tomlinson Schultz F Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Cote van Rensburg Family Home Glassware by The White House Co. Floral Arrangement by Erika with a K Designs G Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Home by Magnum Custom Homes Staging by Maria Bosak H Photo by Hillary Ehlen Shafer Family Home I Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Czichotzki Family Home

NATURAL LIGHT

G

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LOCAL ARTWORK

ORIGINAL WOODWORK

H

OPEN FLOOR PLAN

I

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KITCHEN It's time to reveal the mood board for everybody's favorite part of the house. Composed of a high-contrast color palette, brass hardware, quartz countertops and tile, this mood board is full of inspiration for any new home or home renovation you may have simmering in the back of your mind.

CEILING-HEIGHT TILE BACKSPLASH

VINTAGE APPLIANCES

CAMBRIA QUARTZ COUNTERTOPS

CONTRASTING COLOR

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B

C


EAT-IN KITCHEN

A

COFFEE BAR

OPEN SHELVING

D

E

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F


HIDDEN TV

G

LARGE ISLAND

H

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A Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Interior by Audra Mehl of Grace 1972 Design Staging by Carrie Brusven of Gathered. Boutique Rentals & Events B Photo by Hillary Ehlen Danielson Family Home C Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Nelson Family Home Interior by Sara Bekkerus of Skapa Design Home by Mark Schultz of Tomlinson Schultz D Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Nelson Family Home Interior by Sara Bekkerus of Skapa Design Home by Mark Schultz of Tomlinson Schultz

F Photo by Hillary Ehlen Syvertson Family Home G Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Home Technology by Smart Home Technologies H Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography DeFoe Family Home Home by Studio West Homes I Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Nelson Family Home Interior by Sara Bekkerus of Skapa Design Home by Mark Schultz of Tomlinson Schultz Floors by Legacy Hardwood Floors

E Photo by Hillary Ehlen Bernstien Family Home Cabinets – Floor to Ceiling Carpet One Floor & Home Countertops – Stone Countertop Outlet Backsplash – Floor to Ceiling Carpet One Floor & Home

WARM HARWOOD FLOORS

I

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LAUNDRY We actually wouldn't mind doing laundry in one of these lovely rooms. In a dream home, no room should be lacking form or function, especially the laundry room. Navy cabinets, whimsical wallpaper and luxe light fixtures inspire our imaginations, even when doing something as simple as the every-day task of cleaning up after ourselves and our loved ones.

NAVY CABINETS STORAGE

A

OPEN STORAGE BUILT-IN DESK

B C

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A Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Nelson Family Home Interior by Sara Bekkerus of Skapa Design Home by Tomlinson Schultz B Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Interior by Audra Mehl of Grace 1972 Design Staging by Carrie Brusven of Gathered. Boutique Rentals & Events

C Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography DeFoe Family Home Home by Studio West Homes D Photo by Hillary Ehlen Waverek Family Home


WALLPAPER

D


BATH From freestanding tubs to steam showers to patterned tile and wallpaper, this mood board is overflowing with beautiful spaces. Whether you are considering updating your powder bath or adding an ensuite to your master bedroom, look no further than our would-be Design & Living Magazine dream home for your inspiration.

LOCAL ART

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STEAM SHOWER

ROUND MIRROR

B D FLORALS

C

SMART TV

E

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A Photo by Hillary Ehlen Foss Family Home Interior by Christen Joy Anderson of Christen Joy Homes Art curated by Mark Weiler Artwork by Amber Fletschock B Photo by Hillary Ehlen Freng Home Home by Thomsen Homes C Photo by Hillary Ehlen Foss Family Home Interior by Christen Joy Anderson of Christen Joy Homes Florals by Love Always Floral D Photo by Hillary Ehlen Foss Family Home Interior by Christen Joy Anderson of Christen Joy Homes E Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Home Technology by Smart Home Technologies

F Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Home by Magnum Custom Homes Staging by Maria Bosak G Photo by Hillary Ehlen Freng Home Home by Thomsen Homes H Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Home of Amanda Rydell I Photo by Hillary Ehlen Product and styling by Showplace Cabinetry Design Center J Photo by Hillary Ehlen Foss Family Home Interior by Christen Joy Anderson of Christen Joy Homes K Photo by Hillary Ehlen Foss Family Home Interior by Christen Joy Anderson of Christen Joy Homes L Photo by Hillary Ehlen Product and styling by Showplace Cabinetry Design Center

FREE STANDING BATH TUB

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BLACK CEILING VINTAGE-INSPIRED LIGHT

H

BRASS HARDWARE

I

VINTAGE-INSPIRED FIXTURES

J G

DOOR KNOB

K

BRUSHED ROSE GOLD

F

L

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YOUR ROOM Self-care is ensuring that you feel comfortable and content in your bedroom. In our dream home, the master bedroom is the ultimate calming oasis.

GREEN ACCENT WALL

A 54

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BENCH

CERAMIC BUD VASE

B

C

A Photo by Hillary Ehlen Freng Home Home by Thomsen Homes B Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Czichotzki Family Home C Photo by Hillary Ehlen Ham Family Home

D Photo by Hillary Ehlen Foss Family Home Interior by Christen Joy Anderson of Christen Joy Homes Art curated by Mark Weiler E Photo by Elisabeth Eden Iepson Family Home Home by Jordahl Custom Homes F Photo by Hillary Ehlen Painting by Amber Fletschock

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ROUND MIRROR

DECORATIVE MOLDING

D

E

LOCAL ART

F

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THEIR ROOM From vintage rocking horses to playful wallpaper, designing a space for your littles can be a challenge. Our dream home mood board will draw the creativity out of you and your children.

HANGING RATTAN CHAIR

VINTAGE ROCKING HORSE

A

B 58

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A Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Anderson Family Home Home by Benjamin Custom Homes

D Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Sullivan Family Home Interior by Katie Sullivan

B Photo by Hillary Ehlen Schiltz Family Home

E Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Sullivan Family Home Interior by Katie Sullivan

C Photo by Hillary Ehlen Freng Home Home by Thomsen Homes

F Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Nelson Family Home Interior by Sara Bekkerus of Skapa Design Home by Tomlinson Schultz G Photo by Hillary Ehlen Schiltz Family Home

LIVE GREENS

WOODLAND WALLPAPER

BRASS MOBILE

VINTAGE WALLPAPER

D

C

READING NOOK

E

F

G 59


FLEX SPACE Wouldn't it be nice to have extra space to transform into your own private library, home office, man cave, she-shed, bar, wine cellar or craft room? For our flex space mood board, we couldn't pick just one theme. That is why we've included a variety of ways that homeowners in the FM area have utilized their bonus rooms. Perhaps we can have it all. If not, we can always dream!

HOME OFFICE 60

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A


HIDDEN

BAR WITH SMART TECHNOLOGY

D

C

BUILT-IN SOUND SYSTEM

BAR

E

B

A Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Interior by Audra Mehl of Grace 1972 Design Staging by Carrie Brusven of Gathered. Boutique Rentals & Events B Photo by Hillary Ehlen Home of Aaron Karvonen Interior Design by Shayla Hunstad & Bailee Schissel of Refreshing Designs

C Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Home Technology by Smart Home Technologies D Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Home Technology by Smart Home Technologies E Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Home Technology by Smart Home Technologies

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BACKYARD It feels like ages since we were last able to enjoy a glass of wine on the patio underneath a big, blue sky. These images make us long for warmer days. The Design & Living Magazine dream house would have ample outdoor space for stunning seating arrangements like those we saw in the houses we visited last summer.

FIRE PIT

A 62

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OUTDOOR DINING AREA

LAKESIDE BONFIRE

B

C

LAKESIDE DINING

D

OUTDOOR SEATING

E A Photo by Hillary Ehlen Home of Aaron Karvonen Landscaping by Lakes Country Landscaping B Photo by Hillary Ehlen Hagen Family Home Home by Kochmann Brothers Homes, Inc.

D Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Staging by designingwomen2 E Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography DeFoe Family Home Home by Studio West Homes

C Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography DeFoe Family Home Home by Studio West Homes

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EXTERIOR This year, we have seen some incredible exteriors. For this mood board, we narrowed them down based on the elements that we would most like to see in our Design & Living Magazine dream home. We would also like to highlight a building technique used by James Van Raden of EngageBUILD that we learned about in our July issue, "We Love the Lakes."

METAL ACCENTS

Back in June, we toured a Structural Insulated Panel house that Van Raden was in the process of building. "What is a SIP house?" you ask. In this type of home, the walls are covered with OSB, a product similar to particle board, while the space in between is filled with EPS, a lightweight foam. As a result, fewer studs were needed when framing, which prevents the escape of heat through the excess studs used in standard homes. SIP houses are a greener alternative to traditional building techniques, and you can bet that our 2018 Design & Living Magazine dream home would be as environmentally friendly as it could be.

A

SPACIOUS PATIO

SIP HOUSE

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B


THOUGHTFUL LIGHTING

C

SPACIOUS GARAGE

D

A Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography DeFoe Family Home Home by Studio West Homes

C Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography Home by Magnum Custom Homes Staging by Maria Bosak

B Front rendering Rendering provided by engageBUILD Homebuilder: James Van Raden, EngageBUILD Architect: Brent Behm, Ruki Modern

D Photo by J. Alan Paul Photography DeFoe Family Home Home by Studio West Home

COLORFUL PLANTERS

E

E Photo by Hillary Ehlen Stibbe Family Home Home by Studio West Homes

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TREND FORECAST We all know that trends come and go...and come...and go. One decade, your wood paneling is in, but the next it's out. If you are patient enough, it will eventually become "cool" again. With that being said, we reached out to local experts to find out which trends from 2018 are going to stick around and which trends they'd like to see varnish into thin air. We for one can't wait to start seeing these 2019 trends in upcoming home tours!

Q. What were your favorite interior design trends of 2018?

Q. What were your favorite interior design trends of 2018?

Donna Wigger of T.L. Stoh Architects & Interiors Photo by Hillary Ehlen

A. "Real and faux marble, felted wool, gold, colored appliances, wall coverings, handmade encaustic cement tiles, graffiti, bohemian, antiques, white walls, black walls, Scandinavian influences." Q. What were your LEAST favorite interior design trends of 2018? A. "Anything farmhouse that isn't in an actual farmhouse." Q. What interior design trends (from any era) would you like to see make a comeback in 2019? A. "Most trends ARE a comeback!" Q. What interior design trends do you think will be BIG in 2019? A. "Warm, earthy colors; more use of black; curved shapes; velvet; dark wood; large scale patterned wall coverings; mixed metals; recycled and handmade items; folk art; vintage pieces; natural materials; light wood."

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A. "The use of natural elements in the home continues to bring me joy. Mother Nature is the consummate artist. Why not use her inspired design in the home? The use of natural elements makes design accessible to all. I also am an unabashed fan of velvet. What's not to love? It is sensuous, wears well, comes in beautiful, saturated colors and provides sheen and texture. However, the best trend of all is calling your own shots, so you can combine the luxury of velvet with earthy natural elements or whatever else speaks to you!" Q. What were your LEAST favorite interior design trends of 2018? A. "I will be mocked for this...because it is everywhere...and I follow bloggers that do it...but I'm kind of tired of all white rooms. There, I said it." Q. What interior design trends (from any era) would you like to see make a comeback in 2019? A. "It is already here, but I hope it takes off in Fargo. I'd love to see people embrace a modern twist on Mid-Century modern. The architecture of these pieces are so creative! The forms are comfortable and the lines are stunning." Q. What interior design trends do you think will be BIG in 2019? A. "The use of brushed gold and burnished brass will continue to grow. These warm metals are showing up in lamps, furniture and fixtures."

Kari Rasmus

of Designingwomen2 Photo by Madison Christianson


Q. What were your favorite interior design trends of 2018? A. "I loved seeing the trends change from an all white aesthetic to tying in beautiful stained features, but in a fresh way. Clients are also really gravitating to natural and lighter finishes such as marble, but we're executing them in ways that are still extremely durable and will hold up to busy families. The same can be said when it comes to furniture. Gone are the days that we have to be afraid of white sofas because we use durable and resistant fabrics." Q. What were your LEAST favorite interior design trends of 2018? A. "That's a tough one. I'm usually really open to new and fresh trends. I would say accent walls and mud-cloth fabrics. I'm loving the more updated classic feel in interiors and tend to lean away from the boho style." Q. What interior design trends (from any era) would you like to see make a comeback in 2019? A. "Light hardwoods—they are not only beautiful, but are also extremely functional and easy to maintain. I'm also loving the floral wallpapers and fabric accents that are making a comeback." Q. What interior design trends do you think will be BIG in 2019? A. "This is totally out of my comfort zone, but I love that animal prints are making a come back—in neutrals."

Lindsey Christie of Linsey Grace Interiors Photo by Hillary Ehlen

Q. What were your favorite interior design trends of 2018? A. "I've really been enjoying the global trend. It's fun mixing boho with world travels and a tribal flare into peoples' everyday lives. Many of my clients have treasures from their travels, so getting those pieces incorporated into their design is at the top of my list. A house is a home because it's personal and should reflect the person living in it."

Trever Hill

of Trever Hill Design Photo by Hillary Ehlen

Q. What were your LEAST favorite interior design trends of 2018? A. "Bright and bold colors made a come back in 2018. Bright colors along with many patterns. I love to incorporate splashes of color, but feel there is a fine line. You don't want the space to start to feel like a circus or outdated." Q. What interior design trends (from any era) would you like to see make a comeback in 2019? A. "The use of more natural, organic materials. This is something that never went out of style, but specific materials have swings on the trend pendulum. Nearly any trend can intermix with it such as a more neutral earthy boho look. Even the farmhouse look that was trending the past few years can lean into this trend and transform the space." Q. What interior design trends do you think will be BIG in 2019? A. "Large floral patterns and velvet have been gaining popularity again. It's no longer outdated or old fashioned. It's being put on different unexpected items in unique ways. The sky is the limit with creativity on material use. Also, the use of large format finishes such as tile will continue to rise in 2019."

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Q. What were your favorite interior design trends of 2018? A. "Mixing up the metals. I’m loving the brushed golds in lighting and fixtures. The marriage between gold, silver, bronze and even black allows us to repurpose items and still get a brand new look. The new quality laminates are beautiful and practical. Last year, we saw so many more options. It was easier to find just the right product for our clients. Performance fabrics on furniture are also making life much easier for those families with pets, children and clumsy adults. The selection is becoming larger every year. We saw color coming back in furniture and art. I might be more excited about that than anything." Q. What were your LEAST favorite interior design trends of 2018? A. "Statement floors in large spaces. Geometric designs in large kitchens make my eyes dance and can fight with whatever else is going on. Leave the bold patterns to powder rooms or smaller bathrooms, in my opinion." Q. What interior design trends (from any era) would you like to see make a comeback in 2019? A. "Post modern...1980s and 90s. We saw it starting last year with whimsical elements...light fixtures, wallpaper, wall art and furniture. One must always remember a little goes a long way, though." Q. What interior design trends do you think will be BIG in 2019? A. "Curves and color in upholstered pieces and also more and more wallpaper. Don’t be scared. If using wallpaper sparingly, tastefully and prepped properly, it can be a beautiful element in your design. I love using wallpaper on ceilings. It’s an unexpected element that creates a 'WOW' reaction."

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Linda Birmingham of Designingwomen2

Photo by Dan Francis Photography

Q. What were your favorite interior design trends of 2018?

Kris Carlson

of Designingwomen2

Photo by Hillary Ehlen

A. "I liked the blending of different metals. Whether it is silver or gold or copper or bronze, mixing the metals together helps design stay in style longer and adds interest. I also like the additional use of acrylic furniture, accent pieces and hardware. Use of acrylic pieces add ‘invisible,’ yet highly visible elements of design." Q. What were your LEAST favorite interior design trends of 2018? A. "Seeing the same design look in too many places. I like tone-on-tone as much as the next person; however, there needs to be something that makes a home or office unique, interesting, welcoming and personal." Q. What interior design trends (from any era) would you like to see make a comeback in 2019? A. "I would like to see a blending of today’s wide open floor plans coupled with some rooms that have been separated. I’m still a fan of a separate dining room and a quiet small room for reading, visiting or meditating." Q. What interior design trends do you think will be BIG in 2019? A. "I think gold will continue to make a strong comeback, but it won’t ace out the other metals. I see gray fading out, black becoming more prominent and walls going to a soft shade of white or cream. Color will be brought out with accessories, while furniture will most likely remain in the neutral category. Minimalism will also be strong. People are busy and want less clutter to look at and clean. This minimalistic trend will naturally bring about a more modern and sophisticated, yet comfortable look and feel."


Q. What were your favorite interior design trends of 2018?

Sara Bekkerus

of Skapa Design & Consulting Photo by Lauren K. Photography

A. "In 2018, I loved the continued use of deep blues in home decor and furnishing. This color is an easy one to work with, pairing well with many other colors—and it works well through all seasons. I also love that wallpaper continues to grow in popularity as well as use of sustainable and reclaimed materials. Use of mixed metals has also been a fun trend to work with." Q. What were your LEAST favorite interior design trends of 2018?

Q. What were your favorite interior design trends of 2018?

Bree Duval

of Mcneal & Friends

Photo by Photo by Dan Francis Photography

A. "We adored a nice geometric brushed brass finish this year...in light fixtures, hardware and accessories!" Q. What were your LEAST favorite interior design trends of 2018? A. "The perfect amount of accessorizing is tough, no doubt; however, the time has come and gone for lackluster accents."

A. "I have a hard time with homes that are styled to perfectly reflect a home seen in a magazine or on HGTV—homes that are located in another state and styled for another family. Your home should be styled for you and where you live. A wise woman once said, "Grow where you are planted." While I love certain elements of the rustic chic/ modern farmhouse look that has been trendy for a while now, I think trying to incorporate this look into any and every home does not work." Q. What interior design trends (from any era) would you like to see make a comeback in 2019? A. "Although it has been making a comeback for a while now, I still love the use of mid-century modern decor and

would like to see that trend continue. Also, for a long time, open floor plans have been considered ideal. I would like to see more incorporation of intimate and cozy spaces in home plans. I have always had a love for the book-lined and wood paneled walls of old dens and libraries—rooms with deep furniture and rich color that are the perfect hideaway on a cold winter day." Q. What interior design trends do you think will be BIG in 2019? A. "I see a continued trend toward eclectic design with the mixing of metals, materials and trends from different decades. As far as color, I see more use of lush jewel-toned greens, as well as more incorporation of black and blush. All of these colors pair well with gold tones, which we will continue to see. I believe we will also notice more sightings of medium to light wood tones in floors, vanities, and furniture pieces. Along with this will be the incorporation of heavier, more textured fabrics such as tweeds and velvets that balance well with more simplistic styles in furniture. Meanwhile, wallpaper designs are getting evermore daring with use of florals and bold designs. Finally, I see the popularity of Scandinavian design continuing to grow, which of course, I love. As a society, we are gravitating toward the need to create spaces in our homes that feel warm and inviting—rooms that incorporate art and decor that reflect our interests, our travels and our memories instead of items that just looked good on the store shelf.

Q. What interior design trends (from any era) would you like to see make a comeback in 2019? A. "Depending on which of our designers you ask, one says: 'French Country Chic please! Ooh la la!' and another says 'Give me Modern Art Deco everyday!'" Q. What interior design trends do you think will be BIG in 2019? A. "I think people will continue layering textures and color and pay special attention to unexpected details. Imagine all of the intricacies of historical European design with a modern twist."

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locally

trending

NEAR AND FAR

BY Tara Fermoyle | PHOTOS BY Hillary Ehlen

I was in Chicago recently, checking out a few local markets and national trade shows to see innovations in home design and all-things handmade for 2019. A few trends to look out for this year will be merging styles, the use of contrasting materials and adding a bit of color. While in the heart of the city, I was surrounded by art, architecture, the hustle and bustle of the people and traffic. Unsurprisingly, I couldn’t help but feel a sense of familiarity when interacting with some of the local makers and small businesses. Like Chicago, Fargo has so many amazing local artists, makers and businesses who carefully curate unique, quality products for shoppers to enjoy. Here are a few local finds and ideas that you can incorporate into your home in the new year.

MARBLE TRAY Grain Designs $72.50

GALVANIZED VASE Echo Chic Home $24

CERAMIC HOUSE SCULPTURE Catie Miller Ceramics TRIPOD END TABLE Grain Designs $179

Take this sleek tripod end table ($179), created by Grain Designs, as a great example of mixing materials. This 14” square top with dark walnut stain paired and a metal tripod base makes for a great contemporary addition to your home. TARA’S TIP: Pair this table with your favorite reading chair. The small square top offers just enough room to rest your book as well as a nice cup of coffee or tea. Did you know things taste better when sipped from something handmade? Give it a try with this handmade mug from Catie Miller Ceramics and see what you think.

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$25

Another great find from Grain Designs was this teak and marble tray ($72.50), a great combination of wood and stone. Take it a step further and create a full display by adding in some metal with this galvanized vase ($24) from Echo Chic Home and a small ceramic house sculpture ($25) by Catie Miller Ceramics. TARA’S TIP: It’s that time of year when we start thinking about packing things away, organizing, and starting fresh. When choosing accessories keep it simple and arrange items that inspire you. Small groups of three work great, consider material, size, and color when choosing your objects.


MINI CORBEL BOOKENDS Echo Chic Home $32

VINTAGE LIBRARY BOOKS Echo Chic Home $3 each

Combine vintage finds, like these mini corbel bookends ($32) from Echo Chic Home, with a contemporary element like a glass shelf or marble countertop for a unique display. Add in some coral colored vintage Library books ($3 each) from Echo Chic Home to complete the look. TARA’S TIP: Pantone introduced Living Coral as this years color of the year and I’m loving it. Pantone explained in its official announcement that the color represents “innate need for optimism and joyful pursuits.” While you are considering your resolutions for the new year and setting goals, add a little coral to your life for a boost of inspiration and motivation. Also, add vibrancy to your home to help get though our long white winter months by incorporating bits of color here and there.

MEET TARA Tara Fermoyle has made her home in Fargo, ND, but loves to travel whenever she gets the chance. Since 2016, she has owned and operated Fermie Studios where she concentrates on Interior Design services and handmade ceramic art.


Architecture with eternal appeal What are the essential elements of beauty in architecture? As new homes become larger and more complex, an architectural counter-movement is afoot that eschews unnecessary complexity and, instead, celebrates the beauty of clear organization and fine materials. This house on Lake Pickerel, S.D., designed by Jackson Strom of Chris Hawley Architects, exemplifies the minimalist approach in its three cubic forms that cascade down a slope toward the lake. At its core, the home is designed around the kitchen and dining area with bedrooms above. A second cube houses a living area with big windows looking out upon the lake, adjoined by an outdoor patio faced with ashlar stone masonry. The garage extends from the rear of the house as a third cube at the top of the slope.

Photo by Hillary Ehlen

Paul H. Gleye is a professor of architecture at North Dakota State University. His fields of expertise include historic preservation and urban design, and he leads the architecture school’s term abroad program in Europe each spring semester. 72

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A sleek stairway of elegant simplicity forms the focal point of the home and extends from basement to top. True to the architecture’s minimalist aesthetic, the stairwell rises alongside a wall of long horizontal slats that allow natural light to flow through the home. The handrail of clear, light maple is supported by black steel uprights and horizontal metal cables for minimal obstruction of the open interior space. Clean, open rooms filled with natural light are an essential feature of minimalist architecture, and the spacious quality of this home celebrates that design aesthetic. Outside, and contrasting with the taut discipline of the architecture, the landscape is carefully worked to maintain the slope’s natural character, with stones stepping down to the lake. Trees and natural vegetation surround the home beyond the modest-sized lawn to lend a sense of seclusion. Reducing architecture to its fundamental elements has a long history, in various ways dating back to the eighteenth century, but modern conceptions of minimalism in architecture and the arts emerged largely in the postwar years as various notions of “Modernism” vied for public attention. Today, as decorative features have increasingly come to define contemporary architecture, minimalism as a movement continues to occupy a significant niche in residential design, as displayed in this home. In that spirit, here the architecture features an elegant composition of basic patterns such as lines and planes, relying on the intrinsic aesthetic of fine building materials, finishes, and colors rather than applied decoration. Inside the home, modern-style furniture, fixtures and equipment, which are often minimalist in their own right, provide an open, clean and bright environment well-suited to our contemporary lifestyle.


ECCE

BEHIND CLOSED

DOORS PART 3

The Burkland-Syverson Home

Ecce Behind Closed Doors is a series that demonstrates how anyone can purchase local art regardless of space and budget. This month, we visited with Melissa Burkland and Grant Syverson who have seamlessly integrated local and regional artwork into their 1898 home. Join us as we paint a picture of the story behind each piece they have been drawn to over the years.

BY Becca Opp PHOTOGRAPHY BY Hillary Ehlen

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Meet Melissa & Grant Melissa is a Fargo native, and Grant is originally from Jamestown. The two met through a mutual friend while at UND. A few years later, the couple relocated to Wisconsin for work where they enjoyed living in Milwaukee and Madison. In 2017, Melissa and Grant moved back to Fargo. Today, they have settled into the historic Hawthorne Neighborhood with son Isaac (8), daughter Lauren (6) and their sweet rescue dogs, Charlotte and Atticus. How They Got Into Art Although neither Melissa nor Grant has a background in art, they both appreciate and try to support local art. "I've always loved art," Melissa said. "We don't have any background in art. Neither of us has a degree in it. We just really enjoy it and tend to plan our travel around visiting different art museums," she revealed. For Grant, his love of art began to show itself in Milwaukee. "When we lived in Milwaukee, we lived across the street from the Milwaukee Art Museum. For me, that's probably where I first started getting into art," he shared. The Milwaukee Art Museum is an architectural landmark off of the shore of Lake Michigan that houses nearly 25,000 pieces of art. Art As A Way Of Feeling Connected To The Community Melissa and Grant were excited when they learned that Melissa's childhood friend, Mark Weiler, had opened ecce gallery. "I grew up with Mark Weiler, so I was really excited when he opened his own gallery," Melissa said. They started visiting the gallery just for fun and were drawn to the work of Andrew Stark. "Andrew Stark's mother was one of my favorite teachers in high school. I didn't know him, but she was really special to me. It was neat to have something I felt like I had a connection to. Even in Wisconsin, we tried to get things from local artists just because there's something meaningful about having art that was created in your community."

"It was neat to have something I felt like I had a connection to." - Melissa Burkland

Family Portrait by Micah Player

Also in the foyer, you will see a family portrait by Micah Player, an illustrator who lives in Utah.

"Connection Energy Exchange" by Andrew Stark

When you walk into Melissa and Grant's foyer, you are greeted by an energetic painting by Andrew Stark. "It’s such a bright and cheerful welcome into our house," Melissa said. This is one of the pieces the couple found through ecce gallery.

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"Wade Square Skirt" by Walter Piehl

At the top of the staircase in the foyer is a painting by Walter Piehl. "I remember seeing it, loving it and not being able to stop thinking about it, so I knew I really wanted it," Melissa shared. Luckily, she and Grant have similar taste in art. "Wade Square Skirt" was also one of their finds from ecce gallery.

Untitled piece by Eric A. Johnson

Directly across from their Walter Piehl is Grant and Melissa's newest piece. It was made by Eric A. Johnson during his artist residency at West Acres. "Grant and I saw this separately and both used the same word to describe it: happy," Melissa divulged. The couple faced some challenges as they installed it above their staircase themselves. To anyone in a similar situation, they would recommend reaching out to a professional for help.


"Meet You At (D3)" by Jessica Wachter

This piece was shown at Jessica Wachter's #nowords solo exhibition at The Capital Gallery in Bismarck last year. "Jessica was another artist I had loved for a long time, and I was excited to see this piece. It’s on linen, not canvas, which I think makes a really neat background, and I love the color, movement and brightness of it," Melissa said.

"Space Adventures" by Warren Kessler

Melissa and Grant have been longtime admirers of Warren Kessler's artwork and were thrilled that he was having a show at the new ecce space last May. "We loved everything in the show, but 'Space Adventures' stopped us in our tracks. When you see it in person, you have a greater appreciation for just how technically talented he is; I love to tell people that it's not framed. He actually painted the wood that makes it look like a frame," Melissa said. Grant has been a fan of Space Ghost ever since he was a kid, so the couple just knew they had to add this painting to their collection.


"Dialogue" by Andrew Stark

This piece by Andrew Stark actually weighs more than any of the larger pieces they've acquired. "This little guy has so much paint on it that when we got it, it wasn't even officially dry yet, but l love the color and the texture on it," Melissa said.

"Reminiscence" by Andrew Stark

"Reminiscence" was one of the first larger pieces that Melissa and Grant ever bought. They were surprised when they brought it home because it looked much larger in their dining room than when they saw it on display at the gallery.

Lake Agassiz print by Amy Jo

The couple found this print at the 2018 Unglued Craft Fest, which was held at the Plains Art Museum.

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Left: "Mother Earth" by Andrew Stark Right: "Big Sky" by Andrew Stark

"Mother Earth" was the very first piece that Melissa and Grant bought from Mark Weiler at ecce gallery. "Big Sky" is also one of their purchases from ecce gallery. Melissa enjoys listening to Isaac and Lauren's interpretations of this piece, which is on display above their velvet sofa. Melissa and Grant also have a few CSA pieces in their living room. CSA, or Community Supported Art, is a program organized by the Arts Partnership. Melissa and Grant found out about it through the second installment of "Ecce: Behind Closed Doors," which was published in our February 2018 issue. When describing the experience for us, Grant said: "It is a combination of a musician, a chef from town and a local artist." According to The Arts Partnership, the program has 50 shares available per season, and one share provides access to three parties per year. At each party, you and a guest enjoy local cuisine, view an area performance and have the option to take home a piece of visual art made by a local artist. "We love being a part of this and tell everyone they should become shareholders. All of what we’ve experienced has been a mind-blowing treat," Melissa explained. CSA pieces they have acquired so far include an encaustic work by Dennis Krull and two little houses by Nicole Gagner painted to represent the North Dakota sky on different days.

"Together" by Andrew Stark

Sandwich art by Jesse Suppa

Melissa and Grant also got this piece by Jesse Suppa at the 2018 Plains Art Museum Spring Gala.

For the most part, Grant and Melissa have very little art on their second floor. They are very intentional with hanging things, so it can take them years to make decisions. "We have a lot of stuff stashed in our basement but no imminent plans to hang anything," Melissa shared. The only exception is "Together," a smaller Andrew Stark painting that the two have hanging in a corner of their bedroom.

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Set of Four art blocks

Along with a piece called "Learning the Backstroke" by Chris Bruno (not pictured), these four pieces out of a set of 100 were from the Milwaukee Lakefront Festival of the Arts. "We have dear friends who have other pieces from the 100, and I love that we both have sets from the whole," Melissa said.

Along with the works of local and regional artists, Melissa and Grant love to display Isaac and Lauren's artwork in their home. "They're our favorite artists. We have their work on display everywhere," Grant said with a smile. This corner of their kitchen features frames double as storage. "These are great because you can switch out the pictures and keep the archive in the back," Melissa explained. Melissa and Grant are a wonderful example of how to get involved in the community through local art. Not only does the artwork that they have purchased over the years look great in their space, but each each piece really does resonate with the homeowners on a personal level. We believe that your space should be a reflection of your personality, and this couple has created a beautiful home and an art collection that does just that.

For more information, contact: ECCE GALLERY 208 Roberts Alley, Fargo 701-361-7067 eccegallery.com facebook.com/ecceartgallery

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Profile for Spotlight

Design & Living January 2019  

This month, we gathered photos from our archives to create a mood board for the Design & Living Magazine Dream Home. Now, this house doesn't...

Design & Living January 2019  

This month, we gathered photos from our archives to create a mood board for the Design & Living Magazine Dream Home. Now, this house doesn't...