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April

Volume 18, Issue 4

President’s Message Greetings to all. This has been an eventful month with so many things going in as many directions it’s a lot of work just to keep up with everything. To start, Medicare. We press on with diligence in getting HR 3032 and S 1879 through the pipeline and up for a vote. If you haven’t contacted your representative and/or each of Florida’s senators to co-sponsor it only takes about 10 minutes to dial their number and speak with their assistant. A link to the format is on Facebook and on the FMHCA website. Late last week we were advised of a movement to sandwich the language of each of these bills into the Medicare Appropriations portion of the Omnibus Budget which is currently being put together. Please contact your representative and ask for this language to be in the Medicare portion of the budget. As we wrapped up the 2018 Legislative session in Tallahassee we reviewed several achievements of note and are presented in this month’s Lobbyist report. Because of Parkland, priority was given to legislation that would formalize Governor Scott’s proposal which, for the most part, was endorsed by the Board of Directors. The items in which FMHCA was a major stakeholder died as a result, and appropriately so. These will be taken up in the next session. We are looking for leaders! If you haven’t noticed, FMHCA has gained great momentum in the past 2 years with Darlene as our Executive Director and a dynamic Board of Directors. How many individuals can you think of who would be a great enhancement to our leadership and represent our professional interests? There will be a leadership retreat in July where existing and incoming board members will be brainstorming goals for 2018-2019, legislative objectives, and some of those tasks that we will need to undertake to make it all happen. If you wish to be a part of this exciting upcoming year, do toss your hat into the ring. Many thanks to our Regional Directors, Joe Skelly, Cindy Wall, Tania Diaz, and Elisa Niles, who is our new director of the southwest region. Already plans are afoot to host CEU events and other networking events intended to draw us all together and strengthen our relationships. As a matter of fact, each region is in the process of planning events with exciting and dynamic presentations. Keep your eye out for notices of the goings on in your region.

Louise Sutherland-Hoyt, LMHC, CCMHC, NCC, MAC

Louise discusses: gov't relations committee, legislative action; presidency click here to listen


Board of Directors 2017 - 2018 President Louise Sutherland-Hoyt LMHC, NCC, CCMHC, MAC lsutherland@flmhca.org

Darlene Silvernail Executive Director Leonel Mesa Past-President Erica Whitfield President-Elect

Kathie Erwin Secretary

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Our growing membership leads me to believe you realize FMHCA is dedicated to your progress in the State of Florida. With this years conference has grown it is a direct result of your support. Thank you to all who attended, presented, sponsored, volunteered, and worked at our conference. We could not have had a successful conference without you and we are grateful for your contribution to our organization. We are already looking forward to our 2019 Annual Conference. It will be held in Lake Mary, Florida at the Orlando Marriott - Lake Mary (the same hotel this year's conference was held at). Quick reminder call for presenters is going on now! Deadline to submit is JULY 1

Benjamin Keyes Treasurer Cindy Wall Regional Director NE Joe P. Skelly Regional Director NW Tania Diaz

Regional Director SE Elisa Niles Regional Director SW

FMHCA has a fabulous newsletter that goes out each month, filled with informative articles that promote and inspire professionals This means you! We would love to hear your voice and welcome submissions that capture social issues facing our industry, promote solutions, and empower your peers. FMHCA also welcomes articles highlighting useful tools, best practices, and effective treatment approaches. I want extend a thank you to all who have submitted and continue to submit articles each month.

Frank Hannah Parliamentarian Diana Huambachano Executive Administrator FMHCA Chapters Broward County Central Florida Emerald Coast Gulf Coast Miami-Dade Palm Beach County Space Coast Suncoast

I encourage you all get involved in any of FMHCA' committees, let your voice be heard, join a chapter as a local member and see firsthand how association efforts can benefit your career, your client base, and your scope of knowledge. Take advantage of our webinar series in order to strengthen your professional identity, and get to know the leaders within our organization. Make connections in your community and beyond by getting to know your local chapter presidents and local mental health advocates. Join a local chapter in order to support the community at large, your future depends on it! Sincerely, Darlene Silvernail PhD, LMHC, CAP


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Volume 18, Issue

Early Bird Rates Happening Now until November 1st, 2018 Click Here To Register

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FMHCA is seeking Graduate Students and Registered Interns to contribute monthly articles for our newsletter. This is a wonderful opportunity to share your point of view and your journey to licensure with others while getting professional exposure. We're looking specifically for articles that will you're your peers navigate the journey to graduation and licensure - study tips, resources, how-tos... there are so many relevant topics worthy of investigation and discussion.

Submit an Article Here


Legislative Update "[Rick] Scott Orders DCF and Police to Identify, Help Young People with Mental Health Issues" 03/26/2018 06:49 PM EDT TALLAHASSEE Alexandra Glorioso Politico Florida Policy Reporter

Gov. Rick Scott on Monday ordered (https://fmhca.wildapricot.org/EmailTracker/LinkTracker.ashx?link AndRecipientCode=nD%2BVlHoB7VT2tW%2FkyhlkLCv4CtRRP QocTI0lTmyalIKA3a7x1p1C8Zvk01pT3nsWnCXgLZ6MnOCvxEY ymcn41bzAvm7Vt8YxOTJR328VZcw%3D) the Florida Department of Children and Families to better coordinate with local law enforcement agencies in all 67 counties to improve substance abuse and mental health services for young people. The action was taken to help stop someone who may be deemed a threat to carrying out a violent attack similar to the one last month at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Broward County by identifying and helping those in need of counseling. "My goal is to ensure DCF is integrated in every local department, so we have a person working hand-in-hand with law enforcement and dedicated solely to being a crisis welfare worker focused on repeat cases in each community," said Scott in a statement. "We will continue [to] ensure that all Floridians have the opportunity to get the treatment they need." Scott's order adds to the provisions already outlined in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Act, FL SB7026 (18R), (https://fmhca.wildapricot.org/EmailTracker/LinkTracker.ashx?link AndRecipientCode=FpY6h0uoTDs1dUuai0av3GcGcuaVs3sI189PM maAF%2BhIfDdSa3bVzpVuCDfaq6l%2BEB2f6ibFiLyOJZaRQ5% 2FF8z3D7D%2B7FR%2FVtCSR94xcECI%3D) which the governor signed into law March 9. The 105-page bill includes funding for mental health services at schools and to direct mental health counselors to all schools. The bill became law less than a month after the confessed shooter, 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz, opened fire with an AR-15 on Valentine's Day, killing 17 people, including 14 students, at the Parkland high school. The Associated Press (https://fmhca.wildapricot.org/EmailTracker/LinkTracker.ashx?link AndRecipientCode=KsSGUClc4dAHreJad5VWZ4%2FaV6OktkLtm 9SH%2FWveFxvNMXav9g6RVYYBKwWmsm0TautMtMNKSPm3 U7EGwOYrPsD6dMMu36nKzXTzmF%2B3vFc%3D) and Miami Herald (https://fmhca.wildapricot.org/EmailTracker/LinkTracker.ashx?link AndRecipientCode=FnMHLglH430JDGvt9lRfUFaBCfTWB84%2F G08uWudUI1zSxfKQCReJRUelaR7iGUl3D5p%2F3JZu53u9ujCn9c pF7LJdO3ce5Kxe58aEIVRuO8g%3D) reported last week that some authorities had wanted to involuntarily commit Cruz. Committing Cruz for an involuntary examination under the state's Baker Act law would have kept him from purchasing a gun for three days, but would not have been a long-term solution for his behavioral health problems. POLITICO has previously reported (https://fmhca.wildapricot.org/EmailTracker/LinkTracker.ashx?link AndRecipientCode=TQdiHPQnv8jshUns4Y4HZsIU7TIHIx4%2Bt TzRnnMXdWberozkW6nkWjlW2OLh%2BY27qZE16I1BLJ%2Fw5

yFTeIii%2BWXySddDJY17KXe95EVjVjk%3D) that mental health experts say he likely needed to be institutionalized for a year or longer, which would have been costly and difficult in Florida. Regardless, Cruz's rampage has highlighted the many weaknesses in Florida's fractured mental health system. Following the worst school shooting in state history, Scott directed three state-run workshops to assess how his administration could better prepare law enforcement, schools and behavioral health experts to prevent future school shootings. Throughout those workshops, sheriffs reiterated their need to get people struggling with mental health issues out of jail and into treatment. The statewide group representing state health administrators applauded Scott's order. "We welcome this collaboration with school officials and law enforcement," Natalie Kelly, the executive director of the Florida Association of Managing Entities, told POLITICO. "This way we can ensure that we have effective communication across the big three: school officials, law enforcement and mental health providers."


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Tobacco Treatment and its Benefits to People With Mental Illness or Substance Abuse Disorders Tobacco is the single greatest cause of preventable disease and premature death in the United States. It kills more people than alcohol, AIDS, car accidents, illegal drugs, murders, and suicides combined. Half of all tobacco users will die prematurely (CDC, 2018).

and non-nicotine substance abuse treatment did not jeopardize alcohol or other substance abuse outcomes. In a randomized trial, Winhusen et al. (2014) found people receiving treatment for substance abuse disorders who received smoking cessation treatment had more drug free days and longer periods of abstinence than those who did not.

These chilling facts have helped reduce tobacco use across the country. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Health Interview Survey, since 1964 when the Surgeon General’s warning first included the deadly consequences of tobacco use, rates have dropped from 42.4% in 1965 to 16.8% in 2014.

Tobacco use rates are very high among people with mental illnesses and substance abuse disorders, but the good news is efforts to reduce these smoking rates not only help these populations live longer, healthier lives, but also help improve the outcomes of behavioral health and substance abuse interventions.

Unfortunately, tobacco use rates remain disproportionately high among people with mental illnesses and substance abuse disorders. For people with mental illnesses, rates are more than double the rates of general population (around 34%)--comparable to population rates in the late 1970’s (CDC, 2015b). Meanwhile, those with substance abuse disorders and alcohol use disorders smoke at unprecedentedly high rates (roughly 70%) (CDC, 2015b).

To learn more about tobacco services available in Florida, visit http:// www.tobaccofreeflorida.com or call the Tobacco Free Florida (TFF) Program at Florida State University Area Health Education Center (AHEC) for assistance with tobacco policy, tobacco cessation services for staff, or to learn more about integrating tobacco cessation along with your other behavioral health services All TFF services are free to organizations and individuals attempting to quit. For more information contact Andrée Aubrey, the AHEC Director, at Andree.aubrey@med.fsu.edu

Why is this? There are some systemic reasons—that is, the tobacco industry has spent a good deal of money marketing tobacco to marginalized populations (CDC, 2013; CDC, 2015c). The tobacco industry has invested in research initiatives kindling the myth that quitting smoking is too stressful for people with mental illnesses or substance abuse disorders. They have also provided discounted and free cigarettes to treatment facilities, while working to block legislation aimed at smoke free hospital policies. Other reasons why these rates are so high include lack of tobacco intervention (as of 2013, only 42% of substance abuse treatment facilities provide any form of tobacco cessation service [SAMHSA, 2013]), high rates of tobacco use among staff and clinicians at treatment sites (about 30-35% of behavioral healthcare workers [SAMHSA, n.d.]) and myths about the dangers of combining tobacco cessation efforts with behavioral health interventions or substance abuse treatment (CDC, 2015). The research shows, however, that integrating tobacco cessation efforts into behavioral health interventions or substance abuse treatment does not harm recovery. In fact, in some studies, this integration has been shown to improve outcomes. In a systematic review of 26 studies, quitting smoking was associated with reductions in symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress in people with diagnosed psychiatric disorders (Taylor et al., 2014). In fact, the size of the effect of quitting smoking on the symptoms of generalized anxiety order were similar to the size of the effect of antidepressants. A 2017 study using the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions found people previously diagnosed with a substance use disorder who smoked were more likely to relapse than those who did not (Weinberger et al., 2017). Prochaska, Delucchi, and Hall (2004) found concurrent tobacco

By; Kat Jacobs, MSW, TTS Florida State University Area Health Education Center Click Here To Access References


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Volume 18, Issue

Please continue to encourage your colleagues to SIGN THE PETITION: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QT853H7 FMHCA's lobbyist is hard at work to make our goals a reality-- the more signatures we collect, the stronger our message! "A PETITION TO DIALOGUE IN THE INTEREST OF FLORIDA MENTAL HEALTH. As both providers and consumers of mental health services from Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Florida (BCBSFL) and New Directions Behavioral Health (NDBH - the managed care component of same), we, the undersigned, are requesting that our legislators, regulating agencies and consumers exhort BCBS & NDBH to begin dialogue with a representative board of FMHCA, NASW-FL, FLMFT, FCA, APA, AMA and others to alleviate the following inconsistencies and unjustified decrease in appropriate reimbursement to the providers of mental health services to the residents of Florida - particularly in view of mass violence in Parkland, Orlando and through natural or human-generated disasters in our State. It is time to end arbitrary policies by the largest Health Insurer in our State that include: -- Dismissal of requests to engage in meeting with representatives of Mental Health community -- Reducing most utilized billing code for psychotherapy by 37% -- Arbitrary and covert methods utilized to select network providers -- Arbitrary limits set on size of network panels, including heavy emphasis on community mental health centers based on discounted rates -- Effective limiting of panel sizes promoting inbuilt restrictions on diversity -- Arbitrarily stringent limits on provider panel sizes effectively strangulating members’ access to mental health -- Implicit shifting of burden for mental health care to state funding (including community mental health) even after mass violence, natural disasters and more -- Insulation of executives and management from communication with state organizations -- Enjoying “not-for-profit” tax status with (BCBSFL) CEO’s compensation exceeding $8.2 million in 2015 -- Limited access to psychiatrists - a majority opting out of network - with most not accepting BCBS at all"

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Reimbursement Rates Do Not Reflect What It Takes To Be A Proficient and Effective Therapist. I have concerns about our profession and how insurance companies have contributed to the devaluation of therapist time. Over the last several years, insurance companies have been gradually decreasing the reimbursement rates for psychotherapists. Most recently, BCBS, who had always provided a fair rate, and who has been a popular choice for employers in my community, decreased their typical reimbursement rate by 30%. This is problematic and impactful for several reasons. The current low reimbursement rates do not reflect what it takes to be a proficient and effective therapist. Best practice allows time for note-taking, strategic planning, phone calls and interface with other involved parties (especially in the case of children and families), education, consultation with other clinicians and adequate self-care. In addition, time to run a business and billing time needs to be taken into consideration. The billable/face to face time only represents a portion of what a therapist does yet is the only portion that is billable. Another troubling impact of lowered rates is a de-valuing of therapist time in general. Self-pay rates are negotiable and in the light of lowered insurance rates, some therapists are beginning to lower their own rates in order to maintain a sufficient caseload. Therapists are highly trained professionals and yet are oftentimes charging a lower hourly rate than a plumber. And although I have nothing against this practice on a case by case basis, it lowers the “usual and customary rate” that is used in determining appropriate hourly rates. This results in finally lowering the “usual and customary rate” for the area. Most therapists are completely unaware that their rate choices impact the psychotherapy community at large. Finally, how does a therapist continue to maintain a profitable business? I have seen therapists over-book and take advantage of the fact that BCBS’ 45 minute reimbursement rate is the same as their 60 minute rate. This means shorter appointments, stressed-out therapists and lower quality services. Finally, it is the client that suffers. Many successful and proficient therapists have backed out of taking insurance altogether.

Unfortunately, these leaves fewer options for the working middle class for high quality therapy and allows for those who can afford the out-of-pocket cost to receive the best care. Many clients sought me out after the changes, stating that they had called many therapists who were overbooked and they had to go on waiting lists – or simply couldn’t find anyone who takes BCBS. It was disheartening to break the news to the clients that I also could not help them. People should be aware of what is happening to high quality mental health care. Therapists work in a helping profession and tend to want to be helpful. This should not mean powerlessness against the whims of insurance companies. Therapists need advocacy, education and strategies on how to handle pricing issues. It would be a shame to see a decline in quality and quantity of care over time. By: Erica Whitfield MACP, LMHC- President-Elect


Self-Care Introduction

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The altruistic nature of psychotherapy is quite alluring to those who yearn for change and the opportunity to end suffering. Yet, this work tends to take an unexpected toll on the one striving to make a difference. Masqueraded behind a glossy veneer of graduate degrees and mental health counselor credentials rests some serious disappointment. A common theme is to lose sight of oneself while caring for others. One shall need to take measures to ensure their own sanity throughout a taxing career. Distress and Burnout Similar to many other vocations stress is par for the course in mental health. Although the rules of engagement and challenges here are a bit unique. Distress can arise from disagreeable or suicidal clients, seemingly endless mounds of paperwork, grievances with insurance companies, and personal problems such as divorce and death (Barnett, 2014). When these stresses are not properly regulated and accounted for a person can begin to feel suffocated and suffer work-induced burnout (Barnett, 2014). The symptoms of therapist burnout usually include one or more of the following: emotional fatigue and exhaustion, the absence of empathy and depersonalization, disinterest and lack of fulfillment in one’s work (Barnett, 2014). Clearly, these factors can cloud a person’s judgement and hinder their ability to be helpful. Left unchecked, these practices can deeply damage the clients that these professionals have been entrusted to treat. Risk Factors for Burnout in MFTs Certain therapists may stand at an even greater risk for burnout than others. In an effort to determine who stands at the greatest risk a team of researchers conducted a study in 116-embers of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, these MFTs were asked to complete surveys which measured predictors and prevalence of burnout (Rosenberg & Pace, 2006). In general, this group stood at a lower than average risk. The highest predictors of burnout indicated from the (MBI) Maslach Burnout Inventory were the number of hours worked and work location (Rosenberg & Pace, 2006). In addition to these findings, the literature reveals that an inability to deal with setbacks and failure, unrealistic treatment goals, failure to implement methods of measuring progress, traumatic victimization, and the inclination to allow personal problems to interfere with treatment can all lead to burnout unless preventative measures are taken (Rosenberg & Pace, 2006). Self-Care Assessments in Counseling Students The need to employ coping strategies is not only necessary for those already working in the field of mental health. This is also an imperative for aspiring psychology students. A survey of graduate counseling students revealed that lower levels of self-care correlated with higher levels of stress, which in turn can lead to burnout (Mayorga, Devries, & Wardle, 2015). Many graduate students are forced to simultaneously work and attend classes full-time in order to advance their careers. While this is often necessary and not at all a bad thing. Many will demand too much of themselves and not appropriate enough downtime. Self-Care Strategies Research indicates that counselors who devote a considerable amount of time to their own personal wellness will be more likely to promote healthy living to their respective clients (Mayorga et al., 2015). While there are countless avenues of approach that will move one towards a healthier lifestyle, one of the most beneficial for students and their sedentary style of life is physical exercise and eating a more well-rounded diet. Furthermore, mindfulness and meditation stand as two practices that can reduce levels of stress while simultaneously improving psychological and physiological functioning (Mayorga et al., 2015). Meditation is an ancient practice that focuses on stillness, breathing exercises, and visualizations. Whereas mindfulness can be thought of as the act of being fully present in the current in time. As a person focuses on the here and now, they will no longer be shadowed by the anxiety of tomorrow. Positive Psychology One of the newest and most popular psychological methodologies is positive psychology, which promotes wellness, optimism, and resilience. In many ways, mental health counselors serve as role models to their clientele. By accepting this role, these professionals inherit a duty to practice what they preach. As a result, the clinician benefits right along with the client. This is also true when applied to the basic tenets of positive psychology. Coherence is another popular framework within the body of positive psychology. Coherence can be understood as the perfect balance between the physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual state of being (Rybak, 2013). When achieved this will result in an enhanced overall wellness. This can be achieved by the use of mindfulness and meditation. Neuroplasticity can be viewed as the way a brain has been hardwired to react to situations (Rybak, 2013). In other words, neuroplasticity is muscle memory or a conditioned knee-jerk reaction. The good news: if a person has been trained to think and act in a certain way then this indicates the potential for retraining. Precisely why this school of thought is incumbent upon positive thinking (Rybak, 2013). Another significant section of positive psychology is self-compassion. This can be viewed as the act of treating oneself as a close friend. This self-directed form of kindness and love is strongly related to positive mental health, happiness, optimism, and fewer negative emotions (Rybak, 2013). When a person becomes able to better practice self-compassion then they be afforded an enhanced ability to navigate troubled waters which will undoubtedly come. Counselor Mindfulness Training In a randomized double-blind study that used counselors in training as participants, 62 students were trained in regular counselor training and another 62 were trained in Zen meditation in addition to an identical counselor training (Rybak, 2013). Zen meditation and mindfulness are nearly very similar philosophies that focus on being fully present. The experiment stretched over a nine-week period of time, at the outset of the study symptoms were significantly reduced in the experimental group but not in the control group. This stands as positive proof that what the field of psychology is selling actually works, and that if it is good enough for clients then it is equally suited for psychotherapists. Conclusion This essay demonstrates that a lot will be asked of mental health counselors. They must first lead by example and provide clients with the necessary tools to maneuver their way through whatever precarious situations in which they find themselves. Meanwhile, they must also exert themselves to minimize their own levels of stress so that their own emotional baggage never spills over and interferes with treatment plans. It comes as an imperative that all allied mental health professions maintain a system of checks and balances in order to detect therapist fatigue and burnout. Some of the most attractive self-care strategies outlined here would be mindfulness, meditation, and positive psychology. The reason being: they can be practiced from virtually anywhere and appear to be the most effective methods for reducing stress. As a counselor, one must give it away in order to keep it. Yet, one cannot give away something they do not possess. Which again drives home the point that counselors need to walk the talk and practice what they preach.

By: Andrew Walls Troy University


Develop Your Plan of Action - Networking (part 1/5) People A p rdo i l business with people they know, like and trust. This series is aboutVtaking o l u m action e 1 8 ,on I syour s u egoals: 4 to get noticed; gain credibility P a g e and 10 likability; and earn their trust. Each self-promotion strategy highlighted will give you an opportunity to do what it takes to achieve your goals. NETWORKING Your network is made up of the people you already know, who are your supporters, fans, or otherwise know you well enough that they'd at least return a call when you reach out to them. They are people you'd feel comfortable taking out for coffee. It includes:

friends

family

colleagues

grad school cohort

existing referrers

professionals you know

Benefit to you: These folks might care about you. They might have benefitted from knowing you in the past. You already have an "in" if you think about it. They have an interest in your success. They require less "care and feeding" if you do it right. You can count on them. Benefit to them: You are a known entity. This is laced with trust, respect, credibility, experience. They can count on you. Don’t take for granted that everyone in your Network already knows why you are the person to call when it comes to providing services to your target market. EVERYONE in your network should know: •

who you are

whom you serve

why you do it

how you can help THEM

Action plan (This week):

• • •  

Identify 90 people (your Network of 90) for your list Organize their contact information so it’s easy to find whenever you need it Schedule a time each week to reach out and touch 3-4 a week (that's about twice a year contact). Here are a few tips: You can count the "organic" contacts (collaboration, holiday cards, events, etc.) Determine how you will reach out, in advance (email, phone call, snail mail)

Keep your eyes open for links, books, references, invitations for coffee, offers to help out, or introductions to others you know that might benefit them. These are great reasons for you to reach out (Next week):

Reach out to the first 3-4 people on your list

Record your actions and plans for follow up (schedule those in your calendar), and document your correspondence (written and otherwise) so this becomes an organized and efficient effort A goal without action is just a dream. Now is your chance to show yourself just what you’re willing to do, to get what you say you want!

Deb Legge, PhD CRC LMHC DrLegge@gmail.com Deborah A. Legge, PhD, CRC, LMHC, is a nationally known private practice expert who specializes in helping entrepreneurial therapists grow their practices, including a special focus on how to create growth with private pay clients. For over twenty-two years, she has maintained a highly successful clinical practice and a coaching practice that has helped thousands of clinicians fill their appointment books using her proven success strategies. Building a successful private-pay private practice can be a big challenge, but you are not alone. Go to: www.privatepaypractice.com for her allnew free training, Market Magnets: How to Fill Your Book with Private Pay Clients… And End Your Insurance Struggles for Good


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FMHCA Annual Conference January 31st– February 2nd, 2018 in Lake Mary, Orlando PRESENTER PROPOSALS DUE BY JULY 1 FMHCA’s goal is to provide education, legislative oversight, and networking opportunities, our Annual Conference provides an opportunity for advanced professional training. Take advantage of this opportunity and present at the FMHCA 2019 Annual Conference! Possible Dynamic Approaches May Cover: 

Behavioral and Mental Health

Expressive and Creative Therapies

Approaches to Healing

Multicultural Counseling

Innovative Treatments and Skill Building

Practice

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Legal Issues/Family Law Grief and Loss Post Partum Depression And Many More! Benefits of Presenting: Presenters will receive a $50 discount on conference registration.

Promotion of your name and credentials on our website and in all electronic and print marketing materials, where appropriate. Recognition of your expertise by FMHCA and by other industry professionals Networking opportunities. Presenter Eligibility: To be considered, presenters must have professional qualifications in good standing with their professional regulatory board, if applicable, possess the technical expertise necessary to present on a subject effectively, and meet one or more of the following:

EMDR and Trauma Work

Substance Abuse

Military and Veteran Mental Health

Ethics, Domestic Violence , HIV, Laws & Rules

Have extensive experience including at least five years of practical application or research involving subject of presentation

Mediation

Submit a Proposal to be a Presenter:

Social Media

Homelessness

Submit on-line at https://fmhca.wildapricot.org/Callfor-Presentations

Evidence Based Interventions

Please Submit Questions at office@FLmhca.org or

Best Practice for Individuals with Autism

Call 561-228-6129

Have received specialized graduate or post-graduate level training in subject of presentation; and/or


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The FSU College of Medicine Area Health Education Center (AHEC) is offering three scholarships to FMHCA members in the Orlando area for its nationally accredited Tobacco Treatment Specialist (TTS) course. The course provides an in-depth understanding of tobacco dependence as well as the essential science-based treatment tools necessary to help smokers achieve freedom from tobacco use. The FSU AHEC program is offering the scholarships to FMHCA members because tobacco use is concentrated in socially disadvantaged populations, especially people who are experiencing mental illness and/or substance use disorders. Tobacco contributes to more deaths in people with mental illnesses and/or substance use disorders than the primary behavioral health condition. In addition to preventable disease and death, there are numerous psychological, social, employment and quality of life consequences for tobacco users. Mental health counselors are uniquely positioned to make a significant impact and already have the core skill set needed to incorporate the treatment of tobacco use disorders along with other behavioral health services. The TTS training format allows for an interactive and comprehensive educational experience. Participants can expect to leave the training feeling competent to effectively treat patients for tobacco dependence. Participants will earn 24 continuing education credits. Tobacco Treatment Specialist (TTS) is a nationally recognized credential and one may become certified through the FL Certification board. To find out more about the course please visit www.med.fsu.edu/AHEC/tobacco. The TTS training will take place in Orlando from May 1, 2018 to May 3, 2018 at Embassy Suites by Hilton Orlando Lake Buena Vista South, 4955 Kyngs Heath Rd., Kissimmee. The registration fee will be waived for the scholarship recipients and lunch & snacks will be provided each day. If you are interested in the scholarship, contact Rebecca Carter, FSU AHEC Program Manager, at rebecca.carter@med.fsu.edu or 727-439-0072.


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We Need Your Help!!!! Benefits for using a Lobbyist- but we cannot do this alone and need your attention Florida Mental Health Counselors Association benefits from using a lobbyist to get our voice heard in government. Your voice is important to us! Our membership fee’s help to support our legislative presents and contribute in making a difference for our members and the client’s we serve. Did you know that lobbyists can take your message to Congress? Lobbyists enable organizations to draft legislation, develop strategies for new regulations, connect and stay informed, and proactively reach out to elected officials prior to new policies being drafted. Florida Mental Health Counselors Association is asking that you take a look at the direction of our healthcare and industry, wont you help us make a difference? Re-new your membership today Ask a colleague to join FMHCA www.FLMHCA.org


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Child Abuse Prevention Month April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month, when counselors, health care agencies and organizations, researchers, and communities engage in a variety of activities to foster understanding and prevention of child abuse. In the United States, child abuse prevention became a formal concern in 1974 with the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA), which addressed an increase of public awareness of the need to ensure the safety and welfare of children. Since then, prevention has expanded, deploying in diverse and integrated actions through a variety of tools, resources, activities, and promotion of public awareness, allowing for great progress in consciousness and quality of prevention/ intervention related-services. However, child abuse and neglect are still a reality in America today. For example, according to the American Society for the Positive Care of Children (SPCC), the 2015 Child Maltreatment Report of The Children’s Bureau published in January 2017 indicated an increase in child abuse referrals from 3.6 million to 4 million, an increase of the number of children involved to 7.2 million from 6.6 million, and an increase in child deaths from abuse and neglect to 1,670 from 1,580 in 2014. These numbers are alarming, especially considering abuse and neglect is underreported. So it is essential counselors became engaged in this month’s activities, joining with other health care professionals, governmental authorities, the private sector, and all concerned with this cause to create new opportunities for children, to clarify for communities the issues regarding and resources for child abuse, and to spread knowledge in how to identify and stop abuse. In fact, increased awareness and access to appropriate services can lead to significant changes in the protection of children’ rights, but proper counseling intervention can save these children’ lives. Let’s join efforts this month and in the others to keep our children safe from abuse and neglect. Paula Paula Lazarim Mental Health Counseling Graduate Student Nova Southeastern University

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Jackson’s ALL WELLness Services, LLC “Transforming lives, one individual and family at a time.”

Professional Services (for professional men and women) Research Presentations

Based on Dr. Daniella Jackson’s qualitative multiple-case study

Supervision for Florida Mental Health Counselor Interns Dr. Daniella Jackson utilizes a strength-based model for intern supervision Professional Meetings Every other Month

Mental Health Counseling Services (for adult men and women) Dual disorders, addictions (i.e., alcohol, illicit substances, food, technology), addiction related problems, impact of addictions on self, ACOAs, adult children of addicts, early and long-term recovery problems, codependency, and more

Individual Therapy Group Therapy Family Therapy

Health Coaching Services (for adult men and women) For professional women, university students, graduate students, doctoral students (before and during the dissertation phase), parents, grandparents, women before, during and after pregnancy, women over 40, and more

Individualized Wellness Sessions Wellness Classes JAWS Pregnancy Class – face-to-face class JAWS Family Class (for men and women) – face-to-face and online classes JAWS Longevity Class (for women over 40) – face-to-face and online classes

Daniella Jackson, Ph.D., LMHC Jackson’s ALL WELLness Services, LLC Founder, Owner, and CEO Researcher Licensed Mental Health Counselor Qualified Supervisor for Florida Mental Health Counselor Interns Certified Health Coach 7813 Mitchell Boulevard, Suite 106 New Port Richey, Florida 34655 Phone #: (727) 767-9850 / Fax #: (727) 767-9851 Web: www.daniellajackson.com Email: daniella@daniellajackson.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JacksonsAllWellness/


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LGBTQI2-S Then Now, and Cultural Linguistic Context in Today’s Therapy Setting 27 Apr 2018 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM Providing services for LGBT population appeals to an understanding of its history, therapeutic cravings, and clear appreciation to the influence of linguistics. This presentation explores a brief history to understand LGBT significance and transformation. Discussion narrows in the intersection and implications of cultural and linguistic components. Learning Objectives: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Define significant key concepts related to LGBTQI2-S Summarize evolution of Cultural and Linguistic Context Demonstrate Cultural and Linguistic Context impact within functional LGBT cultural identity List Cultural and Linguistic Context ramifications for effective and appropriate services

About the Presenter: Miguel A. Perez is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and National Certified Counselor. He has experience working in private practice settings with children, adolescents, and families. Miguel completed a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology at Florida International University followed by a Masters of Science in Mental Health Counseling at Carlos Albizu University. He is currently an adjunct faculty in the LGBT minor for the Undergraduate Psychology Department at Albizu University. CE Broker Tracking #: 20-601729

Don't miss out! Register here: https://fmhca.wildapricot.org/event-2749819

Creativity in Cross-Cultural Supervision 25 May 2018 2:00 PM Increasing Counselor Knowledge of Disabilities: Understanding Global Perceptions, Available Resources, and Engaging in Advocacy 22 Jun 2018 2:00 PM Distance Counseling in Florida 27 Jul 2018 2:00 PM Unsilencing the Voice Within: Expressive Writing as a Therapeutic Tool 24 Aug 2018 2:00 PM Pornography Therapeutic Interventions 28 Sep 2018 2:00 PM LMHC Exam Preparation 26 Oct 2018 2:00 PM


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Thank You to our Amazing Sponsors! Advertise On Our Website & In Our Newsletter! Increase your professional exposure by becoming a FMHCA sponsor! FMHCA's website gets hundreds of hits a day from members, nonmembers, and prospective members. Becoming a sponsor with FMHCA lets other professionals know that you're out there - it's a terrific way to network and grow as a professional. There are two ways to becoming a sponsor - you can purchase a flashing banner across the top of our pages or one of the sponsor blocks at the bottom of our website pages. Best of all, you get a full year of sponsorship for one low price! Artwork must be submitted in one of the following formats: png, jpg, tif, tiff, or psd. After you have completed payment, submit your artwork to us at office@flmhca.org


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April 2018 fmhca newsletter  
April 2018 fmhca newsletter  
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