Page 1

GRILL ISSUE 4

THE ART OF GRILLING

NOVEMBER 2015


PLACE

1 EMPIRE STATE OF MIND

SPACE

2 CALIFORNIA DREAMING

GRILL

3 THE NEW AMERICANS 4 TIPS FOR GRILLING POULTRY

GEAR

5 TOOLS OF THE TRADE 6 DCS DESIGN INSIGHTS 7 THE DCS OUTDOOR GRILL 8 DCS GRILL ACCESSORIES


HEARTH AND HOME


Since the dawn of time, people have come together around the fire to find warmth, light and companionship. Today, the flicker of a hearth fire has been replaced by the comforting whisper of the grill flame as it ignites, but it’s still the sizzle of hearty fare that welcomes a weary traveller, and it’s no co-incidence that so many of our cool season rituals still revolve around food, friends and family. Traditionally a time of harvest, the end of the year brings a series of feasts to brighten the days, wherever your roots lie. This issue, we explore the evolving gastronomic terrain of America, with recipes influenced by the different cultures that make up our rich way of life. We also interview Matt Lambert of the Michelin Star-awarded Musket Room in New York, an expat New Zealander with a love for the natural produce of New York State. The communal nature of today’s grilling recalls those earliest times, answering a deep human need for sustenance and comfort, whether your feasts take place on the patio or indoors with the heating turned up. Happy grilling!


EMPIRE STATE OF MIND Sam Eichblatt, text Mark Wickens, images

New York State’s nickname, “the Empire State”, is fairly accurate. Though not the USA’s most expansive, the 54,000 or so square miles that lie within state borders contain almost enough for an empire unto itself, encompassing ancient forests, wild State Parks and pristine lakes, the mountainous terrains of the Adirondacks ranges, the Atlantic surf towns of Long Island, rustic hamlets of saltbox villas in the Catskills and the lush farmland of the Hudson Valley. And then, at the State’s far-eastern tip, like a beacon, there are the bright lights and dizzying heights of the continental USA’s most densely populated and exciting city.


CHEF MATT LAMBERT Chef, owner The Musket Room New York City


Followers of the Musket Room’s social media will, no doubt, have formed a certain impression. Chef Matt Lambert’s precise, inventive dishes captured in full painterly beauty by Danish photographer Signe Birck, are enormously Instagram-friendly, and the Nolita eatery, with its Hans Wenger chairs, brass light fittings and vivid aquamarine banquettes, has won awards for its design — and oh yes, there’s the Michelin star, which the restaurant received a mere four months after opening. However, it’s the unpretentious personalities of the chef and his business partner and wife, Barbara, which ground the whole enterprise. The Antipodean expat defines his food as “modern New Zealand cuisine”, and draws heavily on home-raised salmon, venison, wagyu and biodynamic wine. A deconstructed steak and cheese pie, and “red deer with flavours of gin” (fennel, celeriac, juniper and liquorice) are two of the most talked-about menu items.


When it came to suppliers closer to home, however, Lambert says he needed to really search. “It’s harder to find stuff here because it’s such a big country. You’ve got to really venture out. Hudson Valley Foie Gras was easy, because it’s the go-to for chefs here, but I had been working in New York for seven years before I discovered Ithaca Milk — and Brent’s product is incomparably better. I can tell he has the same passion and ideals as I do. It’s not just a business to him, and it shows in the way he’s helping other local farmers get their products to the city.” The chef’s love of fresh produce also led him to Goodwater Farms, via a friend’s recommendation, and trays of tiny fennel fronds and nasturtiums from the Long Island farm are now stacked around the restaurant’s pocket-sized backyard herb garden, absorbing the last rays of the late-summer sun. “Brendan and I have a cool relationship,” he says. “I’ll have an idea about something I want to add to the menu, and he’ll grow it specifically for me.” The fact he comes from a country that is not historically noted for its cuisine has been both a great motivator and an opportunity, says the chef. “I’m proud to be doing this, because New Zealand isn’t — I won’t say ‘well-represented’ because it’s just not represented at all. Our food culture is in infant stages. Older countries, like Italy or Sweden, how long have they had, man? Thousands of years! I’ve seen our food change so much over the last 20 years. We’re shaping history, and hopefully the cuisine will keep evolving and become a quintessential part of what we do.”


says Davison. “Scientific data always helps the cause, but what we should also be talking about is the energetic value of the food.

GOOD WATER FARMS

Processed food is dead, but micro-greens are very much ‘alive’. They’re just sexier — that’s what one of my customers always says!” “Davison, a lanky, genial surfer and self-professed hippy, originally started growing microgreens in a tiny greenhouse in the driveway of his former home in the coastal Long Island town of Amagansett — an Algonquian word that translates to “Good Water” in English. He subsequently scaled up to commercial production in Sag Harbour, though he kept that first greenhouse and the farm is still smallscale. However, the plants’ rapid growing cycle has allowed him to expand the business beyond the “living trays” he sells directly to chefs, which take 20 days to mature, to supplying the Whole Foods Market chain with retail packs of arugula, bok choy, broccoli, daikon radish,

Good Water Farms’ micro-greens have an

kale, pea tendrils, red mustard and sunflower,

essential ingredient that makes them taste

which take a mere ten days to grow.

particularly vibrant and full of life: dirt. Over the next couple of years, Good Water Organic soil is the most nourishing ecosystem

Farms is scheduled to become a 34-acre

possible, explains founder Brendan Davison. “A

holding near Bridgehampton, a move that will

seed only has enough energy in it to give it its

allow it to quadruple production, while staying

first growth, so putting it in the soil maximises

true to its biodynamic roots.”

that. Growing food hydroponically is, to me, kind of like growing a test-tube baby — it’s

“We cut on Sundays and Wednesdays to main-

missing one of the five elements.”

tain a consistent cycle,” he says, gesturing to his blackboard schedule. “I don’t have long

There is something magical about the trays

hair, but I’m definitely a hippy. Using soil is

of perfectly formed sprouting greens, familiar

our point of difference — it allows us to have

plants like fennel, nasturtium, basil and rain-

organic certification, and it’s also our state-

bow chard reproduced as Lilliputian miniatures

ment about how important mother earth is

under the grow-bulbs of the farm’s airy ware-

in the nurturing process.”

house. Cucumber greens, a new product, are tiny leaves with the same crisp, sweet astringency as the fruit, and sunflower seed shoots are robust, nutty and bursting with juicy life. “Last year, the US Food Chemistry Division found that micro-greens are four to 40 times more nutrient-packed than mature plants,”


lower in saturated fat than cow’s milk, and results in a very smooth, deliciously creamy product without the high acidity of conven-

ITHACA

tional Greek yoghurt.

MILK

One of the main benefits of using buffalo milk is that it’s a zero-waste product. Naturally thick, it doesn’t need to be spun and pressed to expel extra fluid — the acid whey that’s a by-product of traditional Greek yoghurt production, which can be difficult to dispose of and pollute waterways. Ithaca Milk produces a range of dairy products — milk, cream, yoghurts and cheese — from its herds of buffalo and Jersey cows, which are all pasture-grazed on a rotational system to have as little impact on the land as possible. The farm is free from herbicides, pesticides, antibiotics and growth hormones, and the creamery where the milk is processed is just five miles up the road.

Ithaca Milk’s Brent Maynard pulls the foil cover off a tub of yoghurt and up-ends it over the dairy floor. Nothing falls out. When he sets it upright again, the pristine white surface hasn’t moved a millimetre. “See? It’s so thick that it sets in the cup,” he says, before happily diving in with a spoon. This is a man who genuinely enjoys his own product. Marketed as “Buffalo Greek”, the yoghurt is derived from a unique source — a herd of imposing water buffalo, which graze the 100 acres of pasture between Seneca and Cayuga Lakes in the richly pastoral Finger Lakes area, roughly five hours drive north of New York. First impressions notwithstanding, the buffalo are amiable, gentle and highly cherished animals — a fact general manager Chris Snyder confidently illustrates by sitting Jethro, his two-yearold son, on the back of the herd’s most venerable member, a 1500-pound buffalo named May. Traditionally used to make mozzarella, water buffalo milk is higher in protein solids, and

“We pasteurise it the traditional way — low and slow. High temperatures can denature the proteins and change the mouth-feel and whole experience,” says Maynard. His yoghurts and milks are also non-homogenised, arriving oldschool style with a thick layer of cream on top. “In my opinion, it has a much better flavour, and is delivered in a much healthier and more natural state.” Maynard is also one of the founders of FingerLakes Farms, an eight-year-old enterprise dedicated to creating a more efficient, sustainable and profitable local food system. Working with local farmers producing everything from maple syrup to organic vegetables to hogs, the company has a stringent “Thumbs Up” system covering animal welfare, environmental sustainability and consumer health. “It was just good timing. The whole local food movement is here to stay — and you can see the quality of what we produce being reflected in the quality of the food that chefs like Matt Lambert are making.”


Muscovy and female Pekin ducks, a breed known for being calm and robust, and used commonly throughout the USA, Europe and

HUDSON VALLEY

South-East Asia.

FOIE GRAS

Hudson Valley is, as the name suggests, located in the lush valley carved by the stately Hudson River, about 100 miles north of New York City, and a stone’s throw away from the country’s only other foie gras producer. It operates on strict humane principles that not only minimise stress on the birds, but says the chef, result in a better product. Generally, each liver weighs between 1.5 and 2lbs, and is sold au naturel or as a pâté, mousse or au torchon — marinated in Sauternes, cooked sous vide and rolled into a cylinder. The taste, says Chamberlain, tends to have a nuttier finish than French foie gras, and can be used in a variety of ways. Traditionally, it is

Chef Jenny Chamberlain’s mission is to bring

commonly served with strawberries, cherries,

duck to American dinner plates. As soon as

figs or other jammy fruit with a sweet acidity

she’s finished showing the Grill team around

that offsets its richness.

the group of small, neat barns and outbuildings that comprise the Hudson Valley Duck

However, along with her adventurous take

and Foie Gras campus, Chamberlain will fly

on guacamole, Chamberlain has also set out

out to Eat Drink SF, San Francisco’s four-day

her duck-loving stand with “Duck Heaven”: a

food, wine and spirits festival and, alongside

burger that brings together the products she’s

other top chefs, to present her quintessentially

developed for Hudson Valley under one bun.

new-American signature dish: tacos grilled with duck fat, and filled with duck barbacoa and ‘quackamole’ — a new product that swaps out traditional avocado for creamy foie gras. “I’m always going to stay with the classics, but while embracing new technology,” says Chamberlain, who trained at the Culinary Institute of America, and whose role covers product development and further processing at the farm. While in France, goose liver is the traditional source of foie gras, today ducks account for 95 per cent of production. The large, white ground-foraging Mulard ducks raised on Hudson Valley’s farm are a hybrid of the male


DUCK HEAVEN

INGREDIENTS 1 lb ground duck with duck bacon 1 egg duck or chicken 1, 2 oz slice of foie gras 4 oz of duck bacon 1 bun, bread of choice CONDIMENT SUGGESTION Sriracha mayo Thin-sliced red onion Dill pickle slices

1  Form patty using ground duck with duck bacon, and cook 5-6 minutes each side over medium heat. Remove and let rest. 2  Pour out grease from pan and add the bacon to crisp and heat through, then set aide. 3  Cook egg in duck bacon fat, and set aside. 4  Wipe pan, crank the heat, score foie gras and season with salt. Sear 30 seconds each side. 5  Toast the bun in the rendered foie fat. 6  Finally, assemble and gorge yourself in Duck Heaven.


LUCY LEAN'S ROOFTOP KITCHEN Sam Eichblatt, text Drew Kelly, images

Alongside her many creative pursuits in the food world, British cookbook author and ‘chef whisperer’ Lucy Lean specializes in interpreting chef’s recipes for home cooks. Her indoor-outdoor Los Angeles kitchen is as much her workshop and lab as it is a gathering place for family and friends, and as has recently grown to include a rooftop entertaining area.


The scene is quintessential California; expansive spaces with clean, geometric lines, unruly oversized cactus plants and a view that goes on for miles. High on the hills above the hazy sprawl of Los Angeles, Lucy Lean’s outdoor kitchen anchors a collection of beautiful spaces for cooking, eating and entertaining. The west coast’s architectural trademark lies in the relaxing of boundaries between indoors and out, so the terrace grill kitchen is a natural extension of Lean’s indoor kitchen, which in turn connects over a small bridge to another outdoor entertaining area and fire pit. Today, Lean is at her station by the grill, preparing simple but visually pleasing plates of fresh jumbo shrimp, grilled on skewers with chunks of lemon, which she squeezes over the seafood before serving to give it an extra note of smoky citrus. “I was never originally a grill person,” she laughs. “But I use this grill a lot and I can’t tell you how much I love it. It’s so easy to just switch it on and go. For me, installing

So, her kitchen is a fundamental part of her

the outdoor kitchen was the finishing touch

work toolkit — a combination workshop, social

to our house.”

space and the location for the photos and videos she shares on her website, ladlesandjel-

Alongside her many creative pursuits in the

lyspoons.com.

food world, Lean — who hails originally from the U.K. — is a cookbook author and ‘chef

“I entertain an awful lot, and I use my kitchen

whisperer’, who specializes in interpreting

in my work — but my work and life are in-

chef’s recipes for home cooks. Her indoor-

terchangeable,” she says. Her DCS grill is

outdoor Los Angeles kitchen is as much her

used not only for traditional grilling, but pulls

workshop and lab as it is a gathering place for

double-duty as a pizza oven and for roasting

family and friends, as has recently grown to

Christmas chickens and the Thanksgiving

include a rooftop entertaining area.

turkey: “When I wrote Made in America, I realized the recipes haven’t changed that much

A former editor of Edible Los Angeles, her

— much was cooked over an open flame. For

work now also includes running events like

example, one old recipe for roast chicken has

Go Fish! and the All Star Chef Classic, cast-

a 10-minute cooking time because it was spit-

ing up-and-comers in the culinary world for

roasted, so cooking chicken on the DCS rotis-

Masterchef, and producing a cookbook, Made

serie is much closer to that classic American

in America: Our Best Chefs Reinvent Comfort

recipe than using an oven.”

Food, in which 100 contemporary chefs reworked traditional American recipes.

When Lean, her husband Didier Lean Rachou, and their two children moved into this contemporary house two years ago, it didn’t require a


huge renovation effort. It had been designed to make the most of the hillside location and abundant sunshine, with almost as much outdoor space as in, including a pool area and lawn at lower ground level, and a small terrace adjacent to the street-level kitchen flanked with mature macadamia, persimmon and pomegranate trees, and fantastical cacti, which by Lean’s guess, pre-date the house by 50 to 70 years. “Modern isn’t my first choice for a house, but it suits the Californian lifestyle perfectly,” says Lean. “Straight away, I liked the light, big, open spaces and indoor-outdoor flow. Whoever lived here was an amazing botanist, because the plants come from all over the world, and some are very rare. That made it for me. There’s history here.” The flat roof of the adjacent, freestanding garage, which is level with the house’s upper story, immediately appealed to her as the

“Modern isn’t my first choice for a house, but it suits the Californian lifestyle perfectly,” says Lean. “Straight away, I liked the light, big, open spaces and indoor-outdoor flow.”


perfect spot for an outdoor garden or entertaining area. But first, she created her outdoor grill kitchen on the existing terrace. The space was dictated by the length of the countertop, which used to be a railing, and the placement of the trees — some could be moved, but some, like the larger palms, had to be designed around to create a larger casual outside dining space. “I wanted it to be an extension of my indoor kitchen,” she says. “When you have the sliding door open, it’s almost the same space. We installed a grill, fridge and two trashcans — it’s like living on a boat. Everything needs to be practical.” Another practical requirement was for the grill to have an independent gas supply. “If there’s an earthquake, which we’ve been expecting for a while now, I wanted to be able to boil water and cook: it’s basically part of my earthquake kit,” says Lean. Next, she started work on the garage rooftop, reinforcing internal structural beams, building a bridge across the gap, creating a fire pit and adding a bank of DCS products, including a fridge, pantry and an ice-maker — Lean’s new favorite feature: “It comes into its own when you entertain,” she says. “You can never have too much ice!” A white quartz-stone countertop was used in both indoor and outdoor areas, creating visual consistency and bringing together the three spaces. During the day, the shaded grill area — which the family has nicknamed “Jurassic Park” — is the spot for cooking and casual dining, while the rooftop lounge, exposed to the full sun during the day, becomes an outdoors room-with-a-view as it sets and the fire pit and candles are lit. “What’s really nice is the flow of the house when I have a party,” says Lean. “People can be with me having a drink while I’m cooking on the grill, and then move to the other areas — it’s like we’ve added a whole other outdoor room that feels like it’s always been there.”


THE NEW AMERICANS

The rich landscape of American cooking encompasses cultural influences as broad and diverse as the country itself. Herbs, spices and cooking techniques from every continent have been readily adapted as features of everyday modern meals. However, there is one universal practice shared by almost every culture on the planet — they have all, at some point, cooked over fire. The grill is the place where it all comes together, whether you’re delicately charring spare ribs, grilling fresh tortillas the old-school way, or caramelizing the edges of a classic tarte tatin.

ourkitchen.fisherpaykel.com


GRILLED PORK BÁNH MÌ

PORK 1 pound boneless pork shoulder, (we found this to be more flavorsome and juicy than pork butt)

makes 4 sandwiches MARINADE

JUICY, MARINATED PORK SHOULDER TEAMED WITH DUCK LIVER PATE GIVES HEFT TO THE CLASSIC, FRAGRANT VIETNAMESE SANDWICH.

3 tbsp brown sugar 3 tbsp dark soy sauce 3 garlic cloves, minced 2 tsp minced ginger 1 onion, minced 1/4 cup lemongrass, minced 2 tbsp sesame oil 1 tbsp ground black pepper 1 tsp salt 2 tbsp water

SALAD 3 radishes, cut into matchsticks 1 carrot, cut into batons 1 cucumber, cut into batons A handful coriander, leaves and stalks Fresh chili to taste

DRESSING 1 tbsp fish sauce 1 tbsp soy sauce 1 tbsp sesame oil 2 tbsp white sugar 1/4 cup water

SANDWICH 4 mini baguettes ¼ - ½ cup duck liver pate ¼ - ½ cup mayonnaise


1   Cut pork into chunks, appropriate for the size of your large skewers. Combine all marinade ingredients, pour over pork and marinate in your refrigerator for at least 3hrs, preferably overnight. 2  Prepare the dressing by combining dressing ingredients in a bowl and stirring until sugar dissolves. 3  Prepare the salad ingredients and refrigerate until you assemble the sandwiches. 4  Preheat half of your DCS grill on high. 5  Remove the pork from the marinade and blot the meat dry with paper towels. Reserve the excess marinade for brushing over the pork while cooking. Thread pork chunks onto skewers. 6  Place the skewers on the hot grates and cook until seared on all sides, then move to the cooler side of grill. Baste with excess marinade and then lower the grill hood in order to finish cooking with indirect heat. 7  Turn skewers and re-baste with marinade every 5mins. Cook for 30mins or until meat in centre reaches 160°F. 8  Move pork skewers to a warmed platter, cover with foil and rest. Halve baguettes lengthways and warm over hot grates of your grill. 9  Firmly wrap baguette around skewer and pull skewer out to release it from the meat. Spread pate and mayonnaise onto baguette and then top with salad ingredients. Drizzle dressing over fillings and enjoy.


GRILLED KOREAN STYLE RIBS WITH FRESH KIMCHI serves 4–6

HE PUNGENT ACIDITY OF THE

RIBS

KIMCHI CUTS THROUGH THE RICHNESS OF THE PORK IN THIS CLASSIC COMBO.

1 cup gochujang (Korean kimchi) 1/2 cup ketchup 1/2 cup honey 3 tbsp soy sauce 1/2 cup sake 2 Tbsp unseasoned rice vinegar 3 Tbsp finely grated fresh ginger 1 Tbsp finely grated garlic 1Tbsp ground white pepper 3-4 racks of pork spareribs (membranes removed)

FRESH KIMCHI 1 large head of Chinese cabbage, cored and cut into 2-inch pieces 3 English cucumbers, sliced 1/4 inch thick 1 1/2 pounds daikon, peeled and thinly sliced or julienned 20 medium radishes, thinly sliced 2 carrots, juilliened 1/2 cup kosher salt ¾ cup fresh ginger, peeled and coarsely chopped 1/2 cup gochugaru (Korean red chilli flakes) 1/3 cup rice vinegar 6 large garlic cloves, minced 4 tablespoons hot sesame oil 4 tablespoons fish sauce


RIBS

1  Preheat the oven to 300°. 2  Combine all of the ingredients (except the ribs) in a bowl. 3  Line 2 large lipped baking trays with baking paper and lay ribs on the paper. 4  Brush the ribs with ¾ of the sauce coating all sides. 5  Arrange ribs with the meaty side up and cover the trays and seal with foil. 6  Bake for 1-2 hours or until tender. 7  Cut the ribs into smaller sections if you desire (depending on how you wish to serve them) 8  Preheat the Grill to a med-high heat and cook ribs for a few minutes on each side, basting with the remaining sauce as you go. 9  Once the ribs are nicely glazed and lightly charred transfer to a serving dish.

KIMCHI

1  Combine all vegetables in a large bowl and sprinkle over the Kosher Salt. 2  Cover and leave to sit at room temperature for 1-2 hours. 3  Drain vegetable and one handful at a time, gently squeeze excess moisture from the vegetables. 4  Combine the remaining ingredients in a food processor and blend into a smooth puree. 5  Combine the vegetables with the puree, cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours before serving. Note: This Kimchi will last for 2 weeks in an airtight container in the fridge.


vbb

CRAB CAKES WITH CUCUMBER, HERB AND GINGER SALAD

CRAB CAKES 600g good quality tinned crab meat 1 free range egg, lightly beaten ½ cup fresh egg mayonnaise (made with a generous amount of Dijon mustard and

serves 6

lime juice) 3 spring onions, finely sliced 2 tbsp fresh ginger, finely chopped or

AN AROMATIC, ASIA-INSPIRED SALAD COMPLEMENTS THE DELICATE FLAVOUR OF THIS PERENNIAL SEAFOOD FAVORITE.

¼ cup pickled ginger (I used both) 3 kaffir lime leaves, finely sliced ½ cup coriander stalks, finely chopped Juice and zest of 1 lime 1 tbsp fish sauce Fine polenta for coating

SALAD 1 telegraph cucumber, sliced finely into ribbons 6 baby radishes, sliced finely 1 cup coriander leaves ½ cup fresh dill sprigs Pickled ginger

1 cup fresh egg mayonnaise Lime slices or wedges


1  Strain the tinned crab meat and then empty the meat into a clean tea towel. Use the tea towel to squeeze out all excess moisture from the crab meat. 2  Lightly beat the egg and add to the crab meat. 3  To the fresh egg mayonnaise add the spring onions, ginger, kaffir lime leaves, coriander and lime zest and juice and fish sauce. 4  Fold the mayonnaise mixture through the crab meat and egg mixture. 5  Refrigerate the mixture for at least 1 hour. 6  While the crab mixture is chilling, prepare the salad. On plates assemble the cucumber, radish, coriander, dill and pickled ginger. 7  Form cakes with the crab mixture and oat the cakes lightly in polenta. 8  Cook the crab cakes for 10 minutes each side on either the grill or griddle of your DCS grill, set to medium. 9  Serve the crab cakes on the salad, with a side of fresh egg mayonnaise and fresh lime slices or wedges.


vbb

GRILLED LAMB RACK WITH GARLIC CHILLI MARINADE AND MEDITERRANEAN VEGETABLES serves 4

BRING A TASTE OF THE MED TO YOUR GRILL WITH THIS DISH THAT'S BURSTING WITH FLAVOR.

INGREDIENTS 1kg lamb rack 3 medium-size eggplants 4 zucchinis 3-4 bell peppers (assorted colours) 125g goat’s cheese, crumbled 2 tbsp olive oil Salt and pepper Fresh basil and mint leaves, and clear honey to serve MARINADE 3 tbsp olive oil 3 cloves of garlic, peeled 1 fresh chilli ½ cup fresh mint leaves ½ cup fresh basil leaves 2 small lemons, juice and zest


1  To make the marinade, finely chop garlic cloves, fresh chilli, mint and basil, and combine with olive oil, lemon juice and zest in a bowl. 2  Place the lamb rack in a dish and pour the marinade over, making sure to cover both sides generously. Leave to marinate for 1–2 hours. 3  While the meat is marinating, slice eggplants and zucchinis lengthwise into wide strips, approximately 1 cm thick. Slice bell peppers into quarters or sixths if they are large ones and lay them out in a large pan. Brush with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. 4  Pre-heat grill to high. Place lamb across grill and sear for 2 minutes on each side. Reduce heat to medium, and continue to cook lamb for another 5-8 minutes on each side for medium-rare, or until internal temperature is 130F. 5  Set meat aside to rest for 5–10 minutes. 6  While meat is resting, increase grill heat to medium-high. Grill vegetables until tender and lightly charred.

TO SERVE

1  Plate the grilled vegetables. Sprinkle with mint and basil leaves, and crumbled goat’s cheese. Finely drizzle with clear honey. 2  Slice lamb into cutlets, cutting between each bone, and serve on top of the vegetables.


GRILLED AVOCADO SALSA WITH CORN TORTILLAS

G R I L L E D AV O C A D O 3 avocados, ripe but firm 1 green bell pepper (capsicum) 1 lime, juiced 1 tbsp olive oil

serves 6–8

Salt and pepper to season

SALSA

BOTH THE HOMEMADE TORTILLAS AND EARTHY FRUIT BENEFIT FROM

4-5 tomatillos

A TOUCH OF SMOKE IN THIS

½ red onion

VEGETARIAN VERSION OF A

4 spring onions

MEXICAN STANDARD.

2 jalapeños Generous handful coriander 2 limes, juiced Salt to taste

CORN TORTILLAS MAKES 12 4 cups Masa Harina flour 2 cups hot water 2 tbsp vegetable oil 1 tsp salt

EQUIPMENT 2 large pieces of baking parchment 1 tortilla press or heavy rolling pin


G R I L L E D AV O C A D O S A L S A

1  Halve avocados and remove stones. 2  Whisk together lime juice and olive oil, and brush bell pepper and cut side of avocado halves. Season generously with salt and pepper. 3  Heat your DCS grill to medium-high and grill avocados cut side down for 5–6mins, until seared but not completely mushy. 4  Chargrill bell pepper over high heat until well-blackened all over. 5  Remove seeds from bell pepper, roughly chop flesh and set aside. 6  Peel and roughly chop avocados. 7  In a food processor, finely chop red onion, spring onions, tomatillos and jalapeños. 8  Add coriander, lime juice and salt to taste. 9  Lastly combine chopped bell pepper and avocado with salsa mix.

CORN TORTILLAS

1  Set DCS grill to medium heat. 2  Boil 2 cups hot water, once boiled proceed through the following steps. 3  In a processor add the flour, salt and vegetable oil. 4  Add the boiled water to the processor. 5  Allow the processor to mix until there is a solid piece of dough to work with. 6  Divide the dough into roughly equal portions, I found I was able to make 12 balls of dough. 7  If you are using a tortilla press, open up the press, place one piece of baking parchment on the bottom plate, then add a piece of dough, followed by the second piece of parchment. Close the top plate and press down firmly. If you are using a heavy rolling pin, this replaces the ‘top plate’ of the tortilla. On the counter place a piece of baking parchment, then your tortilla ball, followed by the second piece of parchment. You can then use the rolling pin to carefully roll the dough into a round. 8  The tortilla round can now be cooked on the grill; allow up to 2 minutes per tortilla – cook on both sides. 9  Repeat steps 7 and 8 until all tortillas are cooked through.


GRILLED TARTE TATIN serves 8

SACRE BLEU! PURISTS MAY NOT APPROVE, BUT THE ICONIC FRENCH UPSIDE-DOWN TART GAINS A GREATER CARAMEL DEPTH ON THE GRILL.


1  Preheat your DCS grill to high. 2  Peal the apples, cut in half and remove cores. 3  Place a in pan on the grates and reduce the heat to medium to melt the butter. Add the sugar to the center of the pan as the butter melts. 4  Stir the butter and sugar to mix and once the sugar has dissolved, remove the pan from the heat. 5  Add the vanilla bean and cinnamon to the pan and mix. 6  Arrange half of the apples onto the caramel vertically, circling around the pan. Ensure apples are in tight formation as they will shrink while baking. 7  Put the pan back on the grates for 10 mins over a medium heat to allow the apples to soak in the caramel. 8  Roll the pastry to ⅛ inch thickness. Cut a pastry circle slightly larger than your pan by tracing around a plate. 9  Drape the pastry over the pan and trim off any excess pastry that falls over the pan edges. If you find your grill is too hot to work over, move the pan away from the heat source. !0  Use your hands to tuck the pastry inside the pan and enclose the caramel and apples. !1  With the tip of a knife, cut an X shape hole in the top of the pastry to allow the water vapour to escape while baking. !2  Turn grill to medium-high and position the pan to the cooler side of the grill, you will be cooking with indirect heat. Lower the hood and cook for 25 mins. !3  Depending on your grill power, check every 10 mins. Once the pastry has cooked remove the pan from the grill. !4  Allow the pan to cool until it can INGREDIENTS 8 to 10 apples 1/3 lbs of butter 3/4 cups sugar 1 lbs puff pastry Ground cinnamon 1 vanilla pod, split lengthways and seeds removed Vanilla ice cream or whipped cream to serve

be handled. Place a plate, upside down on top of the pastry. With one hand firmly supporting the base of the plate, in one motion flip the pan and transfer the tatin to the plate. !5  Serve with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.


CHEF DAVID LEFEVRE MB Post, Fishing with Dynamite, The Arthur J

The chef-owner of Manhattan Beach Post cooked alongside some of the best in the world before being recruited as executive chef at the Water Grill, downtown Los Angeles’ iconic seafood restaurant. Six years later, he went solo with the contemporary, rustic Manhattan Beach Post, followed shortly afterwards by seafood joint Fishing with Dynamite. He recently launched his third restaurant, the stylish steakhouse The Arthur J, also located in Manhattan Beach, inside a classic mid-century modern building.


It’s soulful food, not intellectual food; we

TIPS AND TRICKS

want people to eat it and have an emotional reaction where you walk away, and you’re still

WITH POULTRY

thinking about that dish the next day.

with Chef David LeFevre

Ultimately, what it comes down to is food that can be enjoyed around the table with other people. I don’t want people to have to quieten down when the food comes to the table and feel uptight, I want them to be relaxed and enjoy the food for its great flavours and soul. WHAT ARE THE MAIN THINGS TO LOOK OUT FOR WHILE YOU’RE CHOOSING A CHICKEN?

WHAT HAS MOST SHAPED YOUR APPROACH TO FOOD AND COOKING THE MOST OVER THE COURSE OF YOUR CAREER?

Probably the ten years I spent with Charlie Trotter in Chicago. When I was there it was ranked top in the United States, and it was one of the top 20 restaurants in the world in the late ‘90s and early 2000s, along with Thomas Keller and Daniel Boulud. It was all about clean flavours, small tasting courses paired with wines and food that really pops. That experience was challenging but rewarding, and taught me about product and approach to food, and your approach to your guests: mostly importantly, exceeding their expectations. A N D T H AT WA S A B I G I N S P I R AT I O N F O R YO U

It’s great if you can get a free-range, organically fed chicken, that’s really important. The way chicken is raised can be brutal in some aspects so the first thing you want to do is buy one where it’s fed naturally and has room to grow. Obviously, you want to look for freshness, and you want a good fat content in your chicken. That’s important with any meat when you’re grilling. Also, quite often chickens are soaked in water during processing, and will absorb a lot of it. So what you want is an air-chilled chicken — that’s what chefs look for, anyway. WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE WAY TO GRILL CHICKEN?

I like to brine it for at least 12 hours before-

WHEN YOU OPENED YOUR FIRST RESTAURANT?

hand — that imparts a great flavour. I prefer a

Opening my own restaurant was, for me, find-

good salt content of between two and three

ing my own voice and what I liked to do, and

percent salt. I don’t add a lot of sugar to mine,

what I envisioned with a restaurant. The in-

though some people do, because I don’t like

spiration that any chef has to open his or her

it to get overly caramelised.

own restaurant is to satisfy their own creativity. But my time at Trotters really taught me to be

The sugar will brown in cooking and turn your

a chef, and the time I spent at the Water Grill

chicken dark very quickly. I like mine with

taught me how to be an operator.

garlic, thyme, rosemary, sage, lemon zest — I don’t use the juice, just the zest, because I

IF THERE WAS ONE DISH THAT COULD REALLY

don’t want the acidity to break down the meat

SUM UP WHAT YOU DO, WHAT WOULD THAT BE?

too much. But the brine will imbue the entire

We have three restaurants right now, and each of them is very different. I can’t pick one dish that really represents what we’re about but across all the restaurants, the food we make is soulful, artisanal and handcrafted.

chicken with flavour, and it’s like a marinade; it doesn’t add much salt but it penetrates all the way through the meat. eatmbpost.com


TIPS FOR GRILLING POULTRY

1

3

BUY GREAT CHICKEN

ROAST AS WELL AS GRILL

Preferably free range, air chilled (not

The heat of the grill is important. Use

soaked) poultry that is bone-in and

direct heat for smaller cuts like wings

skin-on. You can have your butcher

and for boneless meat. Use indirect

break it down for you as smaller

heat for half and whole birds, as well

pieces cook more quickly

as bone in cuts

2

4

SEASON

TIME IT RIGHT

Season the chicken heavily with

A hot grill is necessary in order to

kosher salt and coarse ground black

form a good crust on the chicken or

pepper. You can also brine the chick-

poultry. Don’t flip the chicken until it

en for 12 hours if you plan in advance.

has formed a nice crust. If the bird is sticking to the grill then it is too early


6 to turn it over. Chicken has enough

TAKE IT OFF THE GRILL

before slicing. Just before serving,

fat in the skin that it should not stick

Let the chicken rest. This carry over

drizzle with olive oil and a squeeze

if it’s ready to turn.

cooking can take the chicken or

of lemon. Finish with a light sprinkle

poultry another 5–10 degrees up in

of Fleur de Sel for a bit more salinity

5

temperature. We account for that by

and crunch.

MEASURE YOUR BIRD

removing the chicken or poultry at a

To take the guesswork out of cook

slightly lower temperature than what

8

times, be sure to use an instant read

our target is.

IN GREAT COMPANY

thermometer. Using a thermometer on the thickest part of the bird

Often times you don’t need a recipe 7

for a chicken dish, just great grilled

(thigh) will give you great results.

THE FINAL TOUCH

meat with a variety of sauces and

165°F is PLENTY of cook for a well

Another benefit to the resting time

grilled citrus can be great. Try serv-

done piece of meat.

is that juices have time to be reab-

ing your perfectly grilled bird with

sorbed into the chicken or poultry

chimichurri, romesco, or garlic aioli.


TOOLS OF THE TRADE

DCS Grill Spatula

DCS Grease Management System Trough Scraper

DCS Grill Tongs

DCS Grill Skewer Set


DCS Grill Cleaning Brush

DCS Grill Gloves

DCS Grill Fork


ANDY GRIGOR IS THE CHIEF ENGINEER FOR DCS ACCESSORIES, CREATING BEAUTIFUL, PROFESSIONAL-GRADE PRODUCTS THAT ENHANCE THE GRILLING EXPERIENCE.

Andy Grigor Chief Engineer — Accessories


was that it could extend past the grill sales to other customers — because this might be the

DCS DESIGN INSIGHTS

first DCS product that someone buys. WHAT ELSE WILL THE NEW RANGE CONTAIN?

After the tool set, the next step was obviously apparel. We used the same approach with

Sam Eichblatt

aprons as we did with the grill cover. They’re made from 100-percent durable cotton duck and hickory stripe fabric from American mills,

“ACCESSORIES” PROBABLY CONJURES UP A BROAD

and we used a manufacturer that has been

RANGE OF PRODUCTS FOR MOST PEOPLE — WHAT

making apparel since the 1800s.

EXACTLY ARE YOU WORKING ON?

Well, I’m essentially a massive team of one, but

There’s a real push for “Made in America” at

I draw on other teams. I’m here to enhance the

the moment, so we wanted to engage with

customer experience of the DCS brand and how

as many traditional manufacturers as we can.

customers use our products, and define what

Our glove manufacturer is American, and also

that might look like.

makes fire-fighting equipment; the gloves are 100-percent leather, with a wool-lined

Something that has been really successful is the

inner and internal aluminised palm liner.

outdoor grill cover. Because DCS is a premium

That kind of quality and material selection

brand, a $29 grill cover is not really going to

reflects on the DCS Grill, which is, of course,

cut it! We went into a high level of detail. The

incredibly powerful.

material is PVC with a 400-denier polyester backing, and it’s waterproof and rated UV Level

HOW HAS YOUR RESEARCH “IN THE FIELD” INFLU-

4, so it has a lifespan greater than anything

ENCE THE NEW PRODUCTS?

you’d find in a standard grill store. We built in

From a design perspective, I like to really get

an inner-flow section to the back of the cover

in and use the product to understand how it

for ventilation, to ensure they remain mildew

works and how a premium range should per-

and fungus-free, and we added stainless steel

form. I’ve travelled around the States a lot, and

eyelets so it can be hung to dry after it’s taken

what I enjoyed most was that everyone I met

off. And lastly, we tailored the cover to the DCS

had a different recipe for grilling and wanted

Grill — so that even with the cover on, you can

to share it with us. One of the reps gave me an

see the unique shape of its curved hood.

old DCS recipe that came with its own spices and rubs, so you could go away and make

YOU MENTIONED THAT THE MARKET IS ALREADY

it yourself.

Q U I T E C R OW D E D W I T H P R O D U C T S — H OW D O YO U D E S I G N D C S - B R A N D E D AC C E S S O R I E S T O

Their passion rubs off on you — and from a

BE UNIQUE?

design perspective, that experience has influ-

We did a full set of outdoor grilling tools, for

enced the newer ranges we’re developing now.

example, and looked at the way we could tailor

For example, the new skewers we’re developing

that, so instead of only offering a five-piece set

were one result of that — we met one guy who

that would cost a lot of money, we developed

was actually making his own, because he saw

a “Cook” set, and also a “Cook and Clean” set.

a gap in the market. Our new skewer set looks

If people already have a cleaning brush, they

the grill and, while it’s not a revolutionary shape,

can buy a three-piece cooking tool set. We also

it’s flat and wide so the meat won’t rotate after

looked at key tools to sell as singles. The idea

it contracts during cooking.

like a miniature sword. They fit perfectly into


What’s Under The Hood Full Surface Searing: All DCS Grills feature

Ceramic Radiant Technology: An entire

Stainless Steel Burners: The precision

full surface searing, rather than uneven

layer of ceramic rods is placed between burners

ported U-shaped stainless steel burners are

hotspots. A combination of precision ported

and grill grate. These provide intense yet even

rated at a massive 25,000BTU/hr each, offering

stainless steel burners, ceramic radiant rods and

heat, meaning you are cooking with controlled

premium quality and performance. Each burner

heavy gauge stainless steel burner box

heat rather than direct fire. On DCS grills there

is ignited by a dedicated cross fire igniter. A

construction ensure precise, even searing

is little variance in temperature zones — the total

heat shield directs heat upwards maximising

temperatures across the entire grilling surface.

grilling surface is consistent.

heating efficiency.


Double-sided Cast Stainless Steel Grilling Grates: The 36" and 48" Grills feature

Grease Management System:

Dedicated Sealed Smoker: The 36" and 48"

This patented Grease Management System™

grills have a dedicated smoker tray with a direct

double-sided cast stainless steel grilling grates.

grease channeling technology reduces flare-ups

3,500 BTU burner offering a clean, convenient

One side has a gentle radius for handling

by directing grease and oils away from the

option for specialised smoking recipes.

delicate foods. The other side is W-shaped for

burner flames during grilling.

Smart Beam Grill Light®: A 40W halogen

perfect sear lines while channeling oil away to an easily removable drip tray.

Rotisserie: DCS Rotisserie Grill models include

light is integrated into the patented weather-

a dedicated infrared rotisserie burner, providing

proof rotisserie motor of DCS Rotisserie Grill

controlled searing heat up to 18,000BTU. The

models. The Smart Beam™ Grill Light is

heavy-duty rotisserie motor powers a stainless

designed to illuminate the entire cooking

steel hexagonal rod and adjustable forks, which

surface for perfect night grilling.

can accommodate a 50lb load.


The DCS Outdoor Grill

30" Professional Grill and 30" Professional Grill with Rotisserie The 30" DCS Grill provides exceptional

remarkable consistency across the total grilling

performance with two U-shaped Stainless

surface giving controlled, even heat for both

Steel Burners rated at 25,000 BTU per burner.

high and low temperature cooking.

Combined with Ceramic Radiant Technology that means you are cooking with controlled heat rather than direct fire. All this provides

36" Professional Grill with Rotisserie Tired of trying to find the hot spot? DCS

rods spread across the entire cooking surface,

allows you to control the power of your grill

and the Grease Management SystemÂŽ that

as precisely as you’ve always dreamed. No

reduces flare-ups, this grill produces constant

matter where you place your food or at what

and controlled heat, giving you true professional

temperature, the combination of the powerful

quality performance.

U-shaped burners, the heat radiating ceramic


48" Professional Grill with Integrated Sealed Side Burners Every chef wants the option of preparing

Steel Burners rated at 25,000 BTU, this gives

delicious side dishes to accompany a culinary

you the ability to prepare an entire meal on one

masterpiece. The 48" grill includes two

grill. A rotisserie unit and a smoker with its own

integrated sideburners rated at 17,000 BTU.

dedicated burner truly allow you the flexibility

Combined with the main grill area, which

to be as creative in your cooking as you wish.

features precision ported, U-shaped Stainless

48" Professional Grill with Rotisserie The ultimate in outdoor cooking: the 48" Grill is fully featured and truly allows the chef room to perform at a professional level. The combination of performance and space delivers professional results for any occasion.


DCS Grill Accessories

DCS Grill Tools DCS Grill tools and accessories are crafted from high grade stainless steel with walnut handles and brass rivet detailing. Generously sized and perfectly weighted, DCS grill tools feel as good in your hand as they look.

DCS Grill Tongs

DCS Grill Spatula

DCS Grill Fork

DCS Grill Tongs are crafted from high grade

The DCS Grill Spatula is crafted from high grade

The DCS Grill Spatula is crafted from high grade

stainless steel with a walnut handle and brass

stainless steel with a walnut handle and brass

stainless steel with a walnut handle and brass

rivet detailing.

rivet detailing.

rivet detailing.

DCS Skewers

DCS Grill Cleaning Brush

DCS Grease Management System

DCS Skewers are an essential for the Grill Chef.

The DCS Grill Cleaning Brush features robust

Available in packs of six, these solid stainless

bristles designed to clean your Grill effortlessly.

Trough Scraper

steel skewers are robust and easy to clean.

The DCS Grease Management System Trough Scraper has been created for the easy cleaning and maintainance of your DCS Grill. Designed for efficiency and built to last, this solid stainless steel scraper is an essential for the serious griller.


DCS Grill Gloves

DCS Apron – Duck Brown

DCS Apron – Hickory Stripe

These DCS leather grill gloves are a necessity

A necessity for any serious griller, this DCS

A necessity for any serious griller, this DCS

for the serious griller. Designed to perform and

apron is generously sized and features a front

apron is generously sized and features a front

built to last – just like the DCS Grill itself.

storage pocket and adjustable neck band.

storage pocket and adjustable neck band.

Made from 100% Vintage Cotton Duck Brown

Made in America from 100% Vintage Cotton

and hand-finished with brass findings.

Hickory Stripe and hand-finished with brass findings.

Bamboo Cutting Board

Brazilian Cherry Cutting Board

Maple Cutting Board

A sturdy cutting board is an essential in the

A sturdy cutting board is an essential in the

A sturdy cutting board is an essential in the

kitchen. DCS cutting boards are crafted from

kitchen. DCS cutting boards are crafted from

kitchen. DCS cutting boards are crafted from

solid Bamboo, chosen for its quality, beauty

solid Brazilian Cherry, chosen for its quality,

solid Maple, chosen for its quality, beauty and

and suitability for food preparation. This cutting

beauty and suitability for food preparation.

suitability for food preparation. This cutting

board also fits the DCS Outdoor Grill CAD Cart

This cutting board also fits the DCS Outdoor

board also fits the DCS Outdoor Grill CAD Cart

Side Shelves.

Grill CAD Cart Side Shelves.

Side Shelves.


For an Outdoor Dealer near you or for more information, please visit dcsappliances.com dcsappliances.ca Look online also for the complete DCS Outdoor product line in our DCS Outdoor Catalog.

Customer Care 24 hours a day 7 days a week Call 888-936-7872

DCSBR0408 FEBRUARY 2015 Copyright Fisher & Paykel 2015 All Rights Reserved


Profile for Fisher & Paykel

DCS Grill Magazine November 2015  

DCS Grill Magazine November 2015